Transportation 1. What would be some major benefits to a city investing in mass transit? • Reduces congestion and fuel usage o 2011 – U.S. public transportation use saved 865 million hours in travel time and 450 million gallons of fuel in 498 urban areas o Decrease the need for road enhancements o Can be quicker to get to work when roads are congested o Incentivizes exercise o Mass transit can have less land use requirements • Provides economic opportunities o revitalization of cities o Provides jobs in transportation o City makes money off of transit revenue o More appealing to tourists • Air quality o Cuts carbon emissions by 37 million metric tons annually o Air quality improvement for the city (less smog) • Safety o Reduce the number of accidents 2. What would be some major benefits to the users of mass transit? • Traffic o Reduces frustration of driving in traffic o Reduces the need for gas in traffic o Reliable and predictable time of arrival o More options to travel o No waiting in DMV lines • Economics o Public transit vs. owning, driving, and parking a car = $803/month average savings (~$10,000 a year) o Connects people who don’t have a car to jobs, healthcare, home o Provides jobs in transportation o No longer have to pay car insurance • Social o Can interact/meet new people every day o Connects communities o Can do other things, like read, on the train or bus o Reduce in stress o • Safety o Reduce risk of accidents

Transportation 1. What would be some major benefits to a city investing in mass transit? • Reduces congestion and fuel usage o 2011 – U.S. public transportation use saved 865 million hours in travel time and 450 million gallons of fuel in 498 urban areas o Decrease the need for road enhancements o Can be quicker to get to work when roads are congested o Incentivizes exercise o Mass transit can have less land use requirements • Provides economic opportunities o revitalization of cities o Provides jobs in transportation o City makes money off of transit revenue o More appealing to tourists • Air quality o Cuts carbon emissions by 37 million metric tons annually o Air quality improvement for the city (less smog) • Safety o Reduce the number of accidents 2. What would be some major benefits to the users of mass transit? • Traffic o Reduces frustration of driving in traffic o Reduces the need for gas in traffic o Reliable and predictable time of arrival o More options to travel o No waiting in DMV lines • Economics o Public transit vs. owning, driving, and parking a car = $803/month average savings (~$10,000 a year) o Connects people who don’t have a car to jobs, healthcare, home o Provides jobs in transportation o No longer have to pay car insurance • Social o Can interact/meet new people every day o Connects communities o Can do other things, like read, on the train or bus o Reduce in stress o • Safety o Reduce risk of accidents

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EGR 140 Scientific Programming Assignment # 7 Spring 2017 Use MATLAB to solve each problem by writing script files; copy and paste the script file AND the results in the Command Window and/or plot in the Figure Window to a WORD document that has your name and section in the headers of each page and the page number in each footer. Edit the output to remove extra lines and empty spaces. The script files SHOULD have comments for easy readability; take a print out of the Word file and staple before submission. Due by 3 PM on April 11, 2017. Write a used-defined function that calculates the average and the standard deviation of a list of numbers. Use the function to calculate the average and the standard deviation of the following list of grades: 80 75 91 60 79 89 65 80 95 50 81 Note: The average x_ave (or mean) of a given set of n number x_1,x_2,…..,x_n is given by: x_ave=(x_1+x_2+x_3+⋯+x_n)/n The standard deviation is given by: σ=√((∑_(i=1)^(i=n)▒(x_i-x_ave )^2 )/(n-1)) DO not use built-in functions to calculate the mean and the standard deviation. Write a user-defined function that arranges the digits of a given (positive) number in a row vector in the same order as they appear in the number; the function should also arrange the digits in the decimal part in a different vector. For example, if the number is 2645.12, the vectors should be [2 6 4 5] and [1 2]. The whole number can be from 0 to 10 digits long and the decimal part 0 to 6. Check the validity of the function using a few numbers of your choice. A fenced enclosure consists of a rectangle of length L and width 2R, and a semicircle of radius R, as shown in Figure. The enclosure is to be built to have an area A of 1600 ft2. The cost of the fence is $40 per foot for the curved portion, and $30 per foot for the straight sides. Determine the values of R and L required to minimize the total cost of the fence and the minimum cost using calculus approach. A water tank consists of a cylindrical part of radius r and height h, and a hemispherical top. The tank is to be constructed to hold 500 meter3 of fluid when filled. The cost to construct the cylindrical part of the tank is $300 per square meter of the surface area; the hemispherical part costs $400 per square meter. Determine the radius that results in the least cost and compute the corresponding height and the cost using graphical approach. Verify your results using the calculus approach. A ceramic tile has the design shown in the figure. The shaded area is painted black and the rest of the tile is white. The border line between the red and the white areas follows the equation: y=Asin(x) Determine A such that the area of the white and black colors will be the same.

EGR 140 Scientific Programming Assignment # 7 Spring 2017 Use MATLAB to solve each problem by writing script files; copy and paste the script file AND the results in the Command Window and/or plot in the Figure Window to a WORD document that has your name and section in the headers of each page and the page number in each footer. Edit the output to remove extra lines and empty spaces. The script files SHOULD have comments for easy readability; take a print out of the Word file and staple before submission. Due by 3 PM on April 11, 2017. Write a used-defined function that calculates the average and the standard deviation of a list of numbers. Use the function to calculate the average and the standard deviation of the following list of grades: 80 75 91 60 79 89 65 80 95 50 81 Note: The average x_ave (or mean) of a given set of n number x_1,x_2,…..,x_n is given by: x_ave=(x_1+x_2+x_3+⋯+x_n)/n The standard deviation is given by: σ=√((∑_(i=1)^(i=n)▒(x_i-x_ave )^2 )/(n-1)) DO not use built-in functions to calculate the mean and the standard deviation. Write a user-defined function that arranges the digits of a given (positive) number in a row vector in the same order as they appear in the number; the function should also arrange the digits in the decimal part in a different vector. For example, if the number is 2645.12, the vectors should be [2 6 4 5] and [1 2]. The whole number can be from 0 to 10 digits long and the decimal part 0 to 6. Check the validity of the function using a few numbers of your choice. A fenced enclosure consists of a rectangle of length L and width 2R, and a semicircle of radius R, as shown in Figure. The enclosure is to be built to have an area A of 1600 ft2. The cost of the fence is $40 per foot for the curved portion, and $30 per foot for the straight sides. Determine the values of R and L required to minimize the total cost of the fence and the minimum cost using calculus approach. A water tank consists of a cylindrical part of radius r and height h, and a hemispherical top. The tank is to be constructed to hold 500 meter3 of fluid when filled. The cost to construct the cylindrical part of the tank is $300 per square meter of the surface area; the hemispherical part costs $400 per square meter. Determine the radius that results in the least cost and compute the corresponding height and the cost using graphical approach. Verify your results using the calculus approach. A ceramic tile has the design shown in the figure. The shaded area is painted black and the rest of the tile is white. The border line between the red and the white areas follows the equation: y=Asin(x) Determine A such that the area of the white and black colors will be the same.

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You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation

You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/ http://www.usa.gov/ 1.                  Starting Point a.       Composition Matches Site Purpose … Read More...
A crush of popular social-media toys – Facebook, Twitter, Google, Yahoo, Yelp, social games, Skype, YouTube and Quora, to name a few – has opened the lines of communication between millions of people as never before. But the glut of tools and their features – chat, messages, instant messages, texting and tweets – has led to multiple conversations that can be head-spinning. People are drowning in a deluge of data. Corporate users received about 110 messages a day in 2010, says market researcher Radicati Group. There are 110 million tweets a day, Twitter says. Researcher Basex has pegged business productivity losses due to the “cost of unnecessary interruptions” at $650 billion in 2007. What can you do to manage social media? Is there a way to use social media in a positive way in the workplace?

A crush of popular social-media toys – Facebook, Twitter, Google, Yahoo, Yelp, social games, Skype, YouTube and Quora, to name a few – has opened the lines of communication between millions of people as never before. But the glut of tools and their features – chat, messages, instant messages, texting and tweets – has led to multiple conversations that can be head-spinning. People are drowning in a deluge of data. Corporate users received about 110 messages a day in 2010, says market researcher Radicati Group. There are 110 million tweets a day, Twitter says. Researcher Basex has pegged business productivity losses due to the “cost of unnecessary interruptions” at $650 billion in 2007. What can you do to manage social media? Is there a way to use social media in a positive way in the workplace?

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1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

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Human Computer Interaction You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation a. Included b. Searchable c. Links to difficult concepts/words 16. Multimedia a. Animation/Audio/Video/Still images b. Load time given c. Add-in required d. Quality e. Appropriateness of use 17. Scrolling and Paging a. Usage b. Appropriate? 18. Amount of Information Presented Appropriate 19. Other factors to note?

Human Computer Interaction You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation a. Included b. Searchable c. Links to difficult concepts/words 16. Multimedia a. Animation/Audio/Video/Still images b. Load time given c. Add-in required d. Quality e. Appropriateness of use 17. Scrolling and Paging a. Usage b. Appropriate? 18. Amount of Information Presented Appropriate 19. Other factors to note?

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– 1 – Laboratory 1 Introduction: In this lab you will look at two problems that are at the heart of calculus. Each of these experiments illustrates a core calculus concept. You should perform each experiment taking notes and pictures. You will use these to write up your results. You are expected to use a word processor to produce the laboratory. Graphing software should be used to draw your graphs and illustrations. You can also include pictures you have taken. Equations should be written using “equation editor” software. In short, the laboratory should have a professional look and feel to it. It should be of publishable quality. You report should be printed on 8.5 x 11 inch paper and include a title page (format will be discussed in class). Each page should be numbered. You can work in groups of 3 on this laboratory. If you do this, you must include a page right after the title page and before the report that includes a list of the contributions of each member of the group has made. Question 1 Suppose you start 10 feet away from a wall and walk 5 feet toward the wall and stop. Now walk 2.5 feet toward the wall and stop. Keep going each time walking half the distance of your previous walk toward the wall. 1. Where are you after three walks? 2. Where are you after 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 walks? 3. Create a function where n is the number of the walk and f(n) is the distance from the wall. 4. Graph this function. 5. Using your modeling skills find a model for this function. 6. If you walk forever, were will you end up? For this one write a paragraph defending your location. 7. If instead of walking one half as far as the previous walk, walk one third. That is start 9 feet away from the wall and walk 3 feet, then 1 foot, then 1/3 of a foot, etc. Where do you end up this time? Again write a paragraph. 8. Discuss you experiment in relation Zeno’s Paradox called Achilles and Tortoise. – 2 – Question 2 Here you are going to find the circumference and area of a circle by approximating it with polygons. 1. Start by drawing a circle with radius 3” on a sheet of paper. (You should include your drawings in laboratory report. You should be able to get two per page.) 2. Divide the circle into 3 equal parts. 3. Now connect adjacent points on the circumference to form 3 triangles as shown below. You need to find the area of these isosceles triangles and the length of the bases (red lines). 4. In a table keep track of the following: a. The number of triangles. b. The sum of the lengths of the bases. This is your approximation for the circumference. Label this column, C. c. The sum of the areas of the triangles. This is your approximation for the area of the circle. Label this column , A. d. In a column divide your approximation for the circumference by 2*r. This value should be 6 since r is the radius of your circle is 3. Label this column P1 e. In a column divide your approximation for the area by r2 or 9. Label this column P2. – 3 – 5. Repeat this process for n = 4 … 15 recording your results in the correct columns. 6. Create the two functions described below. You should the graph for each of these functions separately. a. C(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the circumference. b. A(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the area. 7. For the two functions created in step 6 find a model for each function. 8. If we were to continue this experiment — let n grow larger without bound then what values do C and A will approach. Write a paragraph for each variable explaining your reasoning. 9. Then examine the P1 and P2 columns of your table. Write a paragraph on what you if n is allowed to grow larger without bound.

– 1 – Laboratory 1 Introduction: In this lab you will look at two problems that are at the heart of calculus. Each of these experiments illustrates a core calculus concept. You should perform each experiment taking notes and pictures. You will use these to write up your results. You are expected to use a word processor to produce the laboratory. Graphing software should be used to draw your graphs and illustrations. You can also include pictures you have taken. Equations should be written using “equation editor” software. In short, the laboratory should have a professional look and feel to it. It should be of publishable quality. You report should be printed on 8.5 x 11 inch paper and include a title page (format will be discussed in class). Each page should be numbered. You can work in groups of 3 on this laboratory. If you do this, you must include a page right after the title page and before the report that includes a list of the contributions of each member of the group has made. Question 1 Suppose you start 10 feet away from a wall and walk 5 feet toward the wall and stop. Now walk 2.5 feet toward the wall and stop. Keep going each time walking half the distance of your previous walk toward the wall. 1. Where are you after three walks? 2. Where are you after 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 walks? 3. Create a function where n is the number of the walk and f(n) is the distance from the wall. 4. Graph this function. 5. Using your modeling skills find a model for this function. 6. If you walk forever, were will you end up? For this one write a paragraph defending your location. 7. If instead of walking one half as far as the previous walk, walk one third. That is start 9 feet away from the wall and walk 3 feet, then 1 foot, then 1/3 of a foot, etc. Where do you end up this time? Again write a paragraph. 8. Discuss you experiment in relation Zeno’s Paradox called Achilles and Tortoise. – 2 – Question 2 Here you are going to find the circumference and area of a circle by approximating it with polygons. 1. Start by drawing a circle with radius 3” on a sheet of paper. (You should include your drawings in laboratory report. You should be able to get two per page.) 2. Divide the circle into 3 equal parts. 3. Now connect adjacent points on the circumference to form 3 triangles as shown below. You need to find the area of these isosceles triangles and the length of the bases (red lines). 4. In a table keep track of the following: a. The number of triangles. b. The sum of the lengths of the bases. This is your approximation for the circumference. Label this column, C. c. The sum of the areas of the triangles. This is your approximation for the area of the circle. Label this column , A. d. In a column divide your approximation for the circumference by 2*r. This value should be 6 since r is the radius of your circle is 3. Label this column P1 e. In a column divide your approximation for the area by r2 or 9. Label this column P2. – 3 – 5. Repeat this process for n = 4 … 15 recording your results in the correct columns. 6. Create the two functions described below. You should the graph for each of these functions separately. a. C(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the circumference. b. A(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the area. 7. For the two functions created in step 6 find a model for each function. 8. If we were to continue this experiment — let n grow larger without bound then what values do C and A will approach. Write a paragraph for each variable explaining your reasoning. 9. Then examine the P1 and P2 columns of your table. Write a paragraph on what you if n is allowed to grow larger without bound.

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