Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
What is a décimas? Using the article in the reader on the décima as a reference, provide an explanation of what this is, and make mention of some of its structural characteristics

What is a décimas? Using the article in the reader on the décima as a reference, provide an explanation of what this is, and make mention of some of its structural characteristics

The term décimas is a term indication to a lone … Read More...
a primary source to prepare a literary paper. A secondary source is any information that other authors/critics have written about the primary piece (poem). Reading Suggestion: You may use any literature books, poems and and secondary sources. You are to prepare a 1-2 page (excluding cover and works cited pages). You are required to use to at least tow (2) references in the paper for (Biography of William Butler Yeats) and 1 Poem

a primary source to prepare a literary paper. A secondary source is any information that other authors/critics have written about the primary piece (poem). Reading Suggestion: You may use any literature books, poems and and secondary sources. You are to prepare a 1-2 page (excluding cover and works cited pages). You are required to use to at least tow (2) references in the paper for (Biography of William Butler Yeats) and 1 Poem

a primary source to prepare a literary paper. A secondary … Read More...
500 words essay responding to a poem needed in 12 hours from now. it is one page poem that I will provide you with. The essay details are below: Essay #1- Poetry Length: 500 words (~2 pages) MLA Format Write a formal academic essay responding to a poem we have discussed in class. Pick ONE poem on the reading schedule and discuss how the poem’s literary devices and formal elements contribute to its larger thematic concerns. Two pages is not a lot of space, so focus on the most important elements, rather than trying to include everything. Some things to think about: Figurative language: Note the images the poem describes. Does the poem seem to be literally describing things, or does the poet employ figurative language? Are there any metaphors or conceits? How does the poet move from one image to the next? Does there seem to be any theme tying the images together? Form: Look at the way the poem appears on the page. Do you notice any patterns? Is the poem written in stanzas? Does the poem employ a specific meter (iambic pentameter)? Is the poem a fixed form (sonnet)? Does the poet employ punctuation? Does the poem appear neat or chaotic? How do any of these elements relate to what the poem describes? Sound: Read the poem out loud. Do the sounds roll off your tongue, or does it feel like a tongue-twister? Is the language clunky or smooth? Does the poem use alliteration, assonance, or repetition? If the poem rhymes, are they perfect rhymes or near rhymes? Do the rhymes appear at the end of the line or in the middle? Does the way the poem sounds bring out the feeling of what it is describing? Speaker: Who is the speaker (age/gender/role)? Who are they speaking to? Is it first person, third-person, written in a persona? Is the tone formal or conversational? Is the diction simple, or does the speaker use words you have to look up in a dictionary? What might this tell us? Theme: Are there any specific ideas the poem seems to be addressing? How do the poem’s formal concerns (how it appears on the page) emphasize, challenge, or undercut these ideas? Some themes we might focus on include: identity, place, defamiliarization, freedom and constraint, violence and language, racial injustice. (You may focus on one of these or come up with your own.) Make sure this is a formal academic essay. Format your page to include page numbers, double-spacing, and 1” margins. Use Times New Roman font. Include a Works Cited page. Using any source that is not the primary text will result in a 25% penalty.

500 words essay responding to a poem needed in 12 hours from now. it is one page poem that I will provide you with. The essay details are below: Essay #1- Poetry Length: 500 words (~2 pages) MLA Format Write a formal academic essay responding to a poem we have discussed in class. Pick ONE poem on the reading schedule and discuss how the poem’s literary devices and formal elements contribute to its larger thematic concerns. Two pages is not a lot of space, so focus on the most important elements, rather than trying to include everything. Some things to think about: Figurative language: Note the images the poem describes. Does the poem seem to be literally describing things, or does the poet employ figurative language? Are there any metaphors or conceits? How does the poet move from one image to the next? Does there seem to be any theme tying the images together? Form: Look at the way the poem appears on the page. Do you notice any patterns? Is the poem written in stanzas? Does the poem employ a specific meter (iambic pentameter)? Is the poem a fixed form (sonnet)? Does the poet employ punctuation? Does the poem appear neat or chaotic? How do any of these elements relate to what the poem describes? Sound: Read the poem out loud. Do the sounds roll off your tongue, or does it feel like a tongue-twister? Is the language clunky or smooth? Does the poem use alliteration, assonance, or repetition? If the poem rhymes, are they perfect rhymes or near rhymes? Do the rhymes appear at the end of the line or in the middle? Does the way the poem sounds bring out the feeling of what it is describing? Speaker: Who is the speaker (age/gender/role)? Who are they speaking to? Is it first person, third-person, written in a persona? Is the tone formal or conversational? Is the diction simple, or does the speaker use words you have to look up in a dictionary? What might this tell us? Theme: Are there any specific ideas the poem seems to be addressing? How do the poem’s formal concerns (how it appears on the page) emphasize, challenge, or undercut these ideas? Some themes we might focus on include: identity, place, defamiliarization, freedom and constraint, violence and language, racial injustice. (You may focus on one of these or come up with your own.) Make sure this is a formal academic essay. Format your page to include page numbers, double-spacing, and 1” margins. Use Times New Roman font. Include a Works Cited page. Using any source that is not the primary text will result in a 25% penalty.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

info@checkyourstudy.com
The Literary Analysis Essay is essentially an argument that proves what you see in a piece of literature by using evidence from the text to support you. You will have a thesis (your point/what you see) and support (evidence from the text) to persuade readers that you are making a reasonable point. To make things more interesting and meaningful, you will add in a personal reflection that ties your thesis to your own life in some way. Read at least two of the three stories listed below, and choose one of them to analyze: (click on the title to download and/or print a .pdf) “The Things They Carried,” by Tim O’Brien “Everyday Use,” by Alice Walker “The Yellow Wallpaper,” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman To make your argument, you will select a thesis that makes a persuasive case. You are asked to use MLA format and find a personal connection to the thesis that you select. The essay should be: 4 pages in length (minimum 1,000 words) 12-point font in Times New Roman or Arial double-spaced with a centered title and your name, the class, my name and the date in the upper left-hand side of the first page All of the papers you write for this class should be entirely your own work. The penalty for taking part or all of your ideas or words from someone else’s work is a zero for the assignment — and possibly, depending on the seriousness of the plagiarism, an “F” for the course. Your academic honesty is necessary for this course to be fair, effective, and worthwhile.

The Literary Analysis Essay is essentially an argument that proves what you see in a piece of literature by using evidence from the text to support you. You will have a thesis (your point/what you see) and support (evidence from the text) to persuade readers that you are making a reasonable point. To make things more interesting and meaningful, you will add in a personal reflection that ties your thesis to your own life in some way. Read at least two of the three stories listed below, and choose one of them to analyze: (click on the title to download and/or print a .pdf) “The Things They Carried,” by Tim O’Brien “Everyday Use,” by Alice Walker “The Yellow Wallpaper,” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman To make your argument, you will select a thesis that makes a persuasive case. You are asked to use MLA format and find a personal connection to the thesis that you select. The essay should be: 4 pages in length (minimum 1,000 words) 12-point font in Times New Roman or Arial double-spaced with a centered title and your name, the class, my name and the date in the upper left-hand side of the first page All of the papers you write for this class should be entirely your own work. The penalty for taking part or all of your ideas or words from someone else’s work is a zero for the assignment — and possibly, depending on the seriousness of the plagiarism, an “F” for the course. Your academic honesty is necessary for this course to be fair, effective, and worthwhile.

The realistic portrayal of a soldier’s life: “The Things They … Read More...