The Literary Analysis Essay is essentially an argument that proves what you see in a piece of literature by using evidence from the text to support you. You will have a thesis (your point/what you see) and support (evidence from the text) to persuade readers that you are making a reasonable point. To make things more interesting and meaningful, you will add in a personal reflection that ties your thesis to your own life in some way. Read at least two of the three stories listed below, and choose one of them to analyze: (click on the title to download and/or print a .pdf) “The Things They Carried,” by Tim O’Brien “Everyday Use,” by Alice Walker “The Yellow Wallpaper,” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman To make your argument, you will select a thesis that makes a persuasive case. You are asked to use MLA format and find a personal connection to the thesis that you select. The essay should be: 4 pages in length (minimum 1,000 words) 12-point font in Times New Roman or Arial double-spaced with a centered title and your name, the class, my name and the date in the upper left-hand side of the first page All of the papers you write for this class should be entirely your own work. The penalty for taking part or all of your ideas or words from someone else’s work is a zero for the assignment — and possibly, depending on the seriousness of the plagiarism, an “F” for the course. Your academic honesty is necessary for this course to be fair, effective, and worthwhile.

The Literary Analysis Essay is essentially an argument that proves what you see in a piece of literature by using evidence from the text to support you. You will have a thesis (your point/what you see) and support (evidence from the text) to persuade readers that you are making a reasonable point. To make things more interesting and meaningful, you will add in a personal reflection that ties your thesis to your own life in some way. Read at least two of the three stories listed below, and choose one of them to analyze: (click on the title to download and/or print a .pdf) “The Things They Carried,” by Tim O’Brien “Everyday Use,” by Alice Walker “The Yellow Wallpaper,” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman To make your argument, you will select a thesis that makes a persuasive case. You are asked to use MLA format and find a personal connection to the thesis that you select. The essay should be: 4 pages in length (minimum 1,000 words) 12-point font in Times New Roman or Arial double-spaced with a centered title and your name, the class, my name and the date in the upper left-hand side of the first page All of the papers you write for this class should be entirely your own work. The penalty for taking part or all of your ideas or words from someone else’s work is a zero for the assignment — and possibly, depending on the seriousness of the plagiarism, an “F” for the course. Your academic honesty is necessary for this course to be fair, effective, and worthwhile.

The realistic portrayal of a soldier’s life: “The Things They … Read More...
Initial Data Collection After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.) After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Module 2 – Data Collection, Part 2 Module 2 continues to examine the data you are collecting with respect to issues of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and sufficiency. Please continue to collect data relevant to your inquiry and begin to think about how you will code this data into meaningful organizing principles. Be sure to continuously write memos about your process as a sort of idea journal that you can continually draw from when writing your assignments. Required Readings: Dana, N. F. & Yendol-Hoppey, D. – Revisit Chapter 6 Assignments: For assignment details refer to the “Assignments for the Course” section in this syllabus or the submission link within Blackboard. Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.)

Initial Data Collection After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.) After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Module 2 – Data Collection, Part 2 Module 2 continues to examine the data you are collecting with respect to issues of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and sufficiency. Please continue to collect data relevant to your inquiry and begin to think about how you will code this data into meaningful organizing principles. Be sure to continuously write memos about your process as a sort of idea journal that you can continually draw from when writing your assignments. Required Readings: Dana, N. F. & Yendol-Hoppey, D. – Revisit Chapter 6 Assignments: For assignment details refer to the “Assignments for the Course” section in this syllabus or the submission link within Blackboard. Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.)

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_____ is the set of values, norms, attitudes, and other meaningful symbols that shape human behavior and the artifacts, or products, of that behavior as they are transmitted from one generation to the next.

_____ is the set of values, norms, attitudes, and other meaningful symbols that shape human behavior and the artifacts, or products, of that behavior as they are transmitted from one generation to the next.

Culture
1181 Assignment #8 Parallel Arrays For this application, you will use parallel arrays to compare grades of a list of students. 1. Rename the form to frmGrades and give the form an appropriate title. 2. Add the following variables as global (class level) variables. String namesString = “Aaron Ben Carmelina Dorthey Erinn Karin ” + “Lester Mitsue Nichol Ria Sherie Zachary”; String assignmentsString = “44 92 100 100 100 97 100 95 100 0 100 100|” + “95 95 97 90 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 75|” + “98 100 65 0 100 100 100 100 100 100 95 75|” + “85 100 0 50 100 95 90 0 80 100 100 100”; 3. Create three global (class level) arrays. a. One will hold all of the names of your students. b. One will be a 2D array to hold each of the grades for each assignment. c. One will hold the calculated grade for each student for all of their assignments. 4. Add a ListBox to the form to display all of the student names and assignment grades in your arrays. 5. Add a button to do the following: a. Fill the name and assignment grades 2D global arrays from these two strings. The arrays will be ran in parallel. i. Remember Split(). b. DataTypes on the arrays must be appropriate. c. After filling the arrays, call a method to fill the ListBox with student names and grades. i. Remember to use a mono-spaced font. 6. Add a button that will calculate the grade of each student: a. A method to calculate the grade for each student will be called from this event to fill the grades array. 7. Add 3 Labels to display the Name, Grade, and Letter grade of a selected student. 8. Add a Button that will fill the three previously mentioned Labels from the name and grade arrays. a. You will need to make sure the code cannot run until all appropriate arrays have been filled. b. You will need to use the arrays to fill the Labels. c. A method to calculate and return the appropriate letter grade for the student will need to be called from this event method. i. Hint: there is a .SelectedIndex property on a ListBox to get which item in a ListBox is selected. 9. Add a four Labels for the average grade of each assignment. 10. Add a button to display the average of each assignment in the four Labels. a. This event method will need to call a method that calculates the average grade of an assignment from a given index relating to the assignment in the assignment array. 11. You will need a method for each of the following: a. Fill the arrays from the strings provided. i. Hint: the .Split() method is on a string. However, you will not be able to use this directly to fill the assignment array. b. Display the names and assignment grades of each students in the ListBox i. Hint: the .PadLeft() and .PadRight() methods are on a string. c. Get an array of student average across all assignments. i. This is calculated by iterating across the appropriate index of the 2D assignment array for each student and calculating the average of the four assignment grades. This array will be ran in parallel with the student names array. d. Display the name, grade, and letter grade for a given index in the labels. e. Letter grade is returned for a given grade (use +/- system) f. Get the average grade of an assignment using the index of that assignment in the assignments array. Structure Chart Scoring 1. 5% – Form contains controls necessary for assignment. 2. 10% – Validation as needed as described in the assignment. a. This can be either pre-checking or hiding of controls. 3. 5% – Proper datatypes used for each array to include 2D and parallel arrays. 4. 10% – Method used that correctly fills arrays from strings provided. 5. 10% – Method used that displays all students and grades in ListBox. 6. 10% – Method used to return grades for each student based on assignment grades. 7. 10% – Method used to correctly fill name, grade and letter grade to the form using parallel arrays. 8. 5% – Method used that returns the correct letter grade using +/- system. 9. 10% – Method used that returns the correct average of the grades from a given assignment index. 10. 5% – Parallel arrays use indexes correctly. 11. 15% – Meaningful comments; Correct formatting (indentation, braces, whitespace, etc). This should be done automatically if you set up your preferences correctly as described at the beginning of this document. a. Form, TextBoxes, and Buttons are named properly. b. Form and controls have proper titles and labels. 12. 5% – Wow Factor: do something more to the assignment that shows creativity. (Make sure to document it and that it works.) ButtonAverages_Click getAssgnAverageGrade fillArrays displayNames ButtonShow_Click assgnIndex showStudentDetails ButtonSelected_Click selectedIndex getLetterGrade gradeAvg letterGrade Letter Grade Range A 93 – 100 A – 90 – 92.9 B + 87 – 89.9 B 83 – 86.9 B – 80 – 82.9 C + 77 – 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C – 70 – 72.9 D + 67 – 69.9 D 63 – 66.9 D – 60 – 62.9 F < 60 avgGrade ButtonGrades_Click getStudentGrades studGrades

1181 Assignment #8 Parallel Arrays For this application, you will use parallel arrays to compare grades of a list of students. 1. Rename the form to frmGrades and give the form an appropriate title. 2. Add the following variables as global (class level) variables. String namesString = “Aaron Ben Carmelina Dorthey Erinn Karin ” + “Lester Mitsue Nichol Ria Sherie Zachary”; String assignmentsString = “44 92 100 100 100 97 100 95 100 0 100 100|” + “95 95 97 90 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 75|” + “98 100 65 0 100 100 100 100 100 100 95 75|” + “85 100 0 50 100 95 90 0 80 100 100 100”; 3. Create three global (class level) arrays. a. One will hold all of the names of your students. b. One will be a 2D array to hold each of the grades for each assignment. c. One will hold the calculated grade for each student for all of their assignments. 4. Add a ListBox to the form to display all of the student names and assignment grades in your arrays. 5. Add a button to do the following: a. Fill the name and assignment grades 2D global arrays from these two strings. The arrays will be ran in parallel. i. Remember Split(). b. DataTypes on the arrays must be appropriate. c. After filling the arrays, call a method to fill the ListBox with student names and grades. i. Remember to use a mono-spaced font. 6. Add a button that will calculate the grade of each student: a. A method to calculate the grade for each student will be called from this event to fill the grades array. 7. Add 3 Labels to display the Name, Grade, and Letter grade of a selected student. 8. Add a Button that will fill the three previously mentioned Labels from the name and grade arrays. a. You will need to make sure the code cannot run until all appropriate arrays have been filled. b. You will need to use the arrays to fill the Labels. c. A method to calculate and return the appropriate letter grade for the student will need to be called from this event method. i. Hint: there is a .SelectedIndex property on a ListBox to get which item in a ListBox is selected. 9. Add a four Labels for the average grade of each assignment. 10. Add a button to display the average of each assignment in the four Labels. a. This event method will need to call a method that calculates the average grade of an assignment from a given index relating to the assignment in the assignment array. 11. You will need a method for each of the following: a. Fill the arrays from the strings provided. i. Hint: the .Split() method is on a string. However, you will not be able to use this directly to fill the assignment array. b. Display the names and assignment grades of each students in the ListBox i. Hint: the .PadLeft() and .PadRight() methods are on a string. c. Get an array of student average across all assignments. i. This is calculated by iterating across the appropriate index of the 2D assignment array for each student and calculating the average of the four assignment grades. This array will be ran in parallel with the student names array. d. Display the name, grade, and letter grade for a given index in the labels. e. Letter grade is returned for a given grade (use +/- system) f. Get the average grade of an assignment using the index of that assignment in the assignments array. Structure Chart Scoring 1. 5% – Form contains controls necessary for assignment. 2. 10% – Validation as needed as described in the assignment. a. This can be either pre-checking or hiding of controls. 3. 5% – Proper datatypes used for each array to include 2D and parallel arrays. 4. 10% – Method used that correctly fills arrays from strings provided. 5. 10% – Method used that displays all students and grades in ListBox. 6. 10% – Method used to return grades for each student based on assignment grades. 7. 10% – Method used to correctly fill name, grade and letter grade to the form using parallel arrays. 8. 5% – Method used that returns the correct letter grade using +/- system. 9. 10% – Method used that returns the correct average of the grades from a given assignment index. 10. 5% – Parallel arrays use indexes correctly. 11. 15% – Meaningful comments; Correct formatting (indentation, braces, whitespace, etc). This should be done automatically if you set up your preferences correctly as described at the beginning of this document. a. Form, TextBoxes, and Buttons are named properly. b. Form and controls have proper titles and labels. 12. 5% – Wow Factor: do something more to the assignment that shows creativity. (Make sure to document it and that it works.) ButtonAverages_Click getAssgnAverageGrade fillArrays displayNames ButtonShow_Click assgnIndex showStudentDetails ButtonSelected_Click selectedIndex getLetterGrade gradeAvg letterGrade Letter Grade Range A 93 – 100 A – 90 – 92.9 B + 87 – 89.9 B 83 – 86.9 B – 80 – 82.9 C + 77 – 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C – 70 – 72.9 D + 67 – 69.9 D 63 – 66.9 D – 60 – 62.9 F < 60 avgGrade ButtonGrades_Click getStudentGrades studGrades

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Essay list

Essay list

      Some students have a background or story … Read More...
You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation

You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/ http://www.usa.gov/ 1.                  Starting Point a.       Composition Matches Site Purpose … Read More...
Human Computer Interaction You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation a. Included b. Searchable c. Links to difficult concepts/words 16. Multimedia a. Animation/Audio/Video/Still images b. Load time given c. Add-in required d. Quality e. Appropriateness of use 17. Scrolling and Paging a. Usage b. Appropriate? 18. Amount of Information Presented Appropriate 19. Other factors to note?

Human Computer Interaction You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation a. Included b. Searchable c. Links to difficult concepts/words 16. Multimedia a. Animation/Audio/Video/Still images b. Load time given c. Add-in required d. Quality e. Appropriateness of use 17. Scrolling and Paging a. Usage b. Appropriate? 18. Amount of Information Presented Appropriate 19. Other factors to note?

Human Computer Interaction You are to choose 2 websites, with … Read More...
Read: http://xnet.kp.org/permanentejournal/winter03/leader.html This article talks about physicians as leaders. It is written by a physician for physicians, so it provides insight into how doctors think of themselves in leadership. How can you use this understanding of doctors and leadership in managing your own healthcare facility? After all, the organizational chart shows the board of directors and CEO at the top, but physicians are just as important in leading any hospital or clinic. How will you integrate physicians as leaders in your own organization?

Read: http://xnet.kp.org/permanentejournal/winter03/leader.html This article talks about physicians as leaders. It is written by a physician for physicians, so it provides insight into how doctors think of themselves in leadership. How can you use this understanding of doctors and leadership in managing your own healthcare facility? After all, the organizational chart shows the board of directors and CEO at the top, but physicians are just as important in leading any hospital or clinic. How will you integrate physicians as leaders in your own organization?

The physicians always take a lead in creating patient-cantered care. … Read More...