Stage1.2 Telescope Activity (due at Stage 1) Brief Overview of Activity: Research a major astronomical observatory. Required Items: the internet, your textbook, pencil & paper. ________________________________________ Procedure: Research one of the observatories mentioned in our textbook and answer the questions below. What is the name and location of the Observatory?What type of telescope is used?What is the size of its mirror or radio dish?What specific wavelengths of light can be studied by this device?Why would these wavelengths of light be useful to astronomers?

Stage1.2 Telescope Activity (due at Stage 1) Brief Overview of Activity: Research a major astronomical observatory. Required Items: the internet, your textbook, pencil & paper. ________________________________________ Procedure: Research one of the observatories mentioned in our textbook and answer the questions below. What is the name and location of the Observatory?What type of telescope is used?What is the size of its mirror or radio dish?What specific wavelengths of light can be studied by this device?Why would these wavelengths of light be useful to astronomers?

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Microbial Homework 13 points Must be turned in through blackboard, typed, using a word process, and preferably using Microsoft Word. 1. (3pts) Are viruses alive? Justify your answer by indicating whether they meet the criteria of the each of the defining properties of life discussed in chapter 1. 2. (2pts)Explain why Kingdom Protista is considered an artificial grouping. 3. (3pts) Are fungi plants? How are fungi similar to and different from plants? 4.(5pts) Research a product (e.g. food or medicine) made using bacteria or fungus, and describe how the bacteria or fungus is involved in the process. (No more than three paragraphs long, get to the point). The products mentioned in the text (e.g. penicillin and cheese) and edible mushrooms do not count. CITE YOUR SOURCES!! Format doesn’t matter as long as all the necessary information is there.

Microbial Homework 13 points Must be turned in through blackboard, typed, using a word process, and preferably using Microsoft Word. 1. (3pts) Are viruses alive? Justify your answer by indicating whether they meet the criteria of the each of the defining properties of life discussed in chapter 1. 2. (2pts)Explain why Kingdom Protista is considered an artificial grouping. 3. (3pts) Are fungi plants? How are fungi similar to and different from plants? 4.(5pts) Research a product (e.g. food or medicine) made using bacteria or fungus, and describe how the bacteria or fungus is involved in the process. (No more than three paragraphs long, get to the point). The products mentioned in the text (e.g. penicillin and cheese) and edible mushrooms do not count. CITE YOUR SOURCES!! Format doesn’t matter as long as all the necessary information is there.

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The book Gatsby by Fitzgerald chapter 1 only questions 1. Who is the narrator, and how is he related to the principal characters? Why is this effective as a narrative strategy? 2. Describe Daisy’s strategy of exaggerating everything she says. What effect on her characterization does this habit have? List some of her character traits gleaned from your reading of Chapter 1. 3. What is the significance of the book Tom is reading? What character traits are revealed to the reader through his comments abut the book? 4. What matters most to Daisy about her child? What does this tell you? 5. Name 3 colors that are mentioned in chapter 1. Do they have significance to yo as a reader at this point? 6. Why does Gatsby reach out to the water?

The book Gatsby by Fitzgerald chapter 1 only questions 1. Who is the narrator, and how is he related to the principal characters? Why is this effective as a narrative strategy? 2. Describe Daisy’s strategy of exaggerating everything she says. What effect on her characterization does this habit have? List some of her character traits gleaned from your reading of Chapter 1. 3. What is the significance of the book Tom is reading? What character traits are revealed to the reader through his comments abut the book? 4. What matters most to Daisy about her child? What does this tell you? 5. Name 3 colors that are mentioned in chapter 1. Do they have significance to yo as a reader at this point? 6. Why does Gatsby reach out to the water?

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1181 Assignment #8 Parallel Arrays For this application, you will use parallel arrays to compare grades of a list of students. 1. Rename the form to frmGrades and give the form an appropriate title. 2. Add the following variables as global (class level) variables. String namesString = “Aaron Ben Carmelina Dorthey Erinn Karin ” + “Lester Mitsue Nichol Ria Sherie Zachary”; String assignmentsString = “44 92 100 100 100 97 100 95 100 0 100 100|” + “95 95 97 90 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 75|” + “98 100 65 0 100 100 100 100 100 100 95 75|” + “85 100 0 50 100 95 90 0 80 100 100 100”; 3. Create three global (class level) arrays. a. One will hold all of the names of your students. b. One will be a 2D array to hold each of the grades for each assignment. c. One will hold the calculated grade for each student for all of their assignments. 4. Add a ListBox to the form to display all of the student names and assignment grades in your arrays. 5. Add a button to do the following: a. Fill the name and assignment grades 2D global arrays from these two strings. The arrays will be ran in parallel. i. Remember Split(). b. DataTypes on the arrays must be appropriate. c. After filling the arrays, call a method to fill the ListBox with student names and grades. i. Remember to use a mono-spaced font. 6. Add a button that will calculate the grade of each student: a. A method to calculate the grade for each student will be called from this event to fill the grades array. 7. Add 3 Labels to display the Name, Grade, and Letter grade of a selected student. 8. Add a Button that will fill the three previously mentioned Labels from the name and grade arrays. a. You will need to make sure the code cannot run until all appropriate arrays have been filled. b. You will need to use the arrays to fill the Labels. c. A method to calculate and return the appropriate letter grade for the student will need to be called from this event method. i. Hint: there is a .SelectedIndex property on a ListBox to get which item in a ListBox is selected. 9. Add a four Labels for the average grade of each assignment. 10. Add a button to display the average of each assignment in the four Labels. a. This event method will need to call a method that calculates the average grade of an assignment from a given index relating to the assignment in the assignment array. 11. You will need a method for each of the following: a. Fill the arrays from the strings provided. i. Hint: the .Split() method is on a string. However, you will not be able to use this directly to fill the assignment array. b. Display the names and assignment grades of each students in the ListBox i. Hint: the .PadLeft() and .PadRight() methods are on a string. c. Get an array of student average across all assignments. i. This is calculated by iterating across the appropriate index of the 2D assignment array for each student and calculating the average of the four assignment grades. This array will be ran in parallel with the student names array. d. Display the name, grade, and letter grade for a given index in the labels. e. Letter grade is returned for a given grade (use +/- system) f. Get the average grade of an assignment using the index of that assignment in the assignments array. Structure Chart Scoring 1. 5% – Form contains controls necessary for assignment. 2. 10% – Validation as needed as described in the assignment. a. This can be either pre-checking or hiding of controls. 3. 5% – Proper datatypes used for each array to include 2D and parallel arrays. 4. 10% – Method used that correctly fills arrays from strings provided. 5. 10% – Method used that displays all students and grades in ListBox. 6. 10% – Method used to return grades for each student based on assignment grades. 7. 10% – Method used to correctly fill name, grade and letter grade to the form using parallel arrays. 8. 5% – Method used that returns the correct letter grade using +/- system. 9. 10% – Method used that returns the correct average of the grades from a given assignment index. 10. 5% – Parallel arrays use indexes correctly. 11. 15% – Meaningful comments; Correct formatting (indentation, braces, whitespace, etc). This should be done automatically if you set up your preferences correctly as described at the beginning of this document. a. Form, TextBoxes, and Buttons are named properly. b. Form and controls have proper titles and labels. 12. 5% – Wow Factor: do something more to the assignment that shows creativity. (Make sure to document it and that it works.) ButtonAverages_Click getAssgnAverageGrade fillArrays displayNames ButtonShow_Click assgnIndex showStudentDetails ButtonSelected_Click selectedIndex getLetterGrade gradeAvg letterGrade Letter Grade Range A 93 – 100 A – 90 – 92.9 B + 87 – 89.9 B 83 – 86.9 B – 80 – 82.9 C + 77 – 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C – 70 – 72.9 D + 67 – 69.9 D 63 – 66.9 D – 60 – 62.9 F < 60 avgGrade ButtonGrades_Click getStudentGrades studGrades

1181 Assignment #8 Parallel Arrays For this application, you will use parallel arrays to compare grades of a list of students. 1. Rename the form to frmGrades and give the form an appropriate title. 2. Add the following variables as global (class level) variables. String namesString = “Aaron Ben Carmelina Dorthey Erinn Karin ” + “Lester Mitsue Nichol Ria Sherie Zachary”; String assignmentsString = “44 92 100 100 100 97 100 95 100 0 100 100|” + “95 95 97 90 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 75|” + “98 100 65 0 100 100 100 100 100 100 95 75|” + “85 100 0 50 100 95 90 0 80 100 100 100”; 3. Create three global (class level) arrays. a. One will hold all of the names of your students. b. One will be a 2D array to hold each of the grades for each assignment. c. One will hold the calculated grade for each student for all of their assignments. 4. Add a ListBox to the form to display all of the student names and assignment grades in your arrays. 5. Add a button to do the following: a. Fill the name and assignment grades 2D global arrays from these two strings. The arrays will be ran in parallel. i. Remember Split(). b. DataTypes on the arrays must be appropriate. c. After filling the arrays, call a method to fill the ListBox with student names and grades. i. Remember to use a mono-spaced font. 6. Add a button that will calculate the grade of each student: a. A method to calculate the grade for each student will be called from this event to fill the grades array. 7. Add 3 Labels to display the Name, Grade, and Letter grade of a selected student. 8. Add a Button that will fill the three previously mentioned Labels from the name and grade arrays. a. You will need to make sure the code cannot run until all appropriate arrays have been filled. b. You will need to use the arrays to fill the Labels. c. A method to calculate and return the appropriate letter grade for the student will need to be called from this event method. i. Hint: there is a .SelectedIndex property on a ListBox to get which item in a ListBox is selected. 9. Add a four Labels for the average grade of each assignment. 10. Add a button to display the average of each assignment in the four Labels. a. This event method will need to call a method that calculates the average grade of an assignment from a given index relating to the assignment in the assignment array. 11. You will need a method for each of the following: a. Fill the arrays from the strings provided. i. Hint: the .Split() method is on a string. However, you will not be able to use this directly to fill the assignment array. b. Display the names and assignment grades of each students in the ListBox i. Hint: the .PadLeft() and .PadRight() methods are on a string. c. Get an array of student average across all assignments. i. This is calculated by iterating across the appropriate index of the 2D assignment array for each student and calculating the average of the four assignment grades. This array will be ran in parallel with the student names array. d. Display the name, grade, and letter grade for a given index in the labels. e. Letter grade is returned for a given grade (use +/- system) f. Get the average grade of an assignment using the index of that assignment in the assignments array. Structure Chart Scoring 1. 5% – Form contains controls necessary for assignment. 2. 10% – Validation as needed as described in the assignment. a. This can be either pre-checking or hiding of controls. 3. 5% – Proper datatypes used for each array to include 2D and parallel arrays. 4. 10% – Method used that correctly fills arrays from strings provided. 5. 10% – Method used that displays all students and grades in ListBox. 6. 10% – Method used to return grades for each student based on assignment grades. 7. 10% – Method used to correctly fill name, grade and letter grade to the form using parallel arrays. 8. 5% – Method used that returns the correct letter grade using +/- system. 9. 10% – Method used that returns the correct average of the grades from a given assignment index. 10. 5% – Parallel arrays use indexes correctly. 11. 15% – Meaningful comments; Correct formatting (indentation, braces, whitespace, etc). This should be done automatically if you set up your preferences correctly as described at the beginning of this document. a. Form, TextBoxes, and Buttons are named properly. b. Form and controls have proper titles and labels. 12. 5% – Wow Factor: do something more to the assignment that shows creativity. (Make sure to document it and that it works.) ButtonAverages_Click getAssgnAverageGrade fillArrays displayNames ButtonShow_Click assgnIndex showStudentDetails ButtonSelected_Click selectedIndex getLetterGrade gradeAvg letterGrade Letter Grade Range A 93 – 100 A – 90 – 92.9 B + 87 – 89.9 B 83 – 86.9 B – 80 – 82.9 C + 77 – 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C – 70 – 72.9 D + 67 – 69.9 D 63 – 66.9 D – 60 – 62.9 F < 60 avgGrade ButtonGrades_Click getStudentGrades studGrades

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Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

Researchers recently investigated whether or not coffee prevented the development of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) in laboratory mice. The mice used in this experiment have a mutation that makes them become diabetic. Read about this research study in this article published on the Science Daily web-site New Evidence That Drinking Coffee May Reduce the Risk of Diabetes as well as the following summary: A group of 11 mice was given water, and another group of 10 mice was supplied with diluted black coffee (coffee:water 1:1) as drinking fluids for five weeks. The composition of the diets and living conditions were similar for both groups of mice. Blood glucose was monitored weekly for all mice. After five weeks, there was no change in average body weight between groups. Results indicated that blood glucose concentrations increased significantly in the mice that drank water compared with those that were supplied with coffee. Finally, blood glucose concentration in the coffee group exhibited a 30 percent decrease compared with that in the water group. In the original paper, the investigators acknowledged that the coffee for the experiment was supplied as a gift from a corporation. Then answer the following questions in your own words: 1. Identify and describe the steps of the scientific method. Which observations do you think the scientists made leading up to this research study? Given your understanding of the experimental design, formulate a specific hypothesis that is being tested in this experiment. Describe the experimental design including control and treatment group(s), and dependent and independent variables. Summarize the results and the conclusion (50 points) 2. Criticize the research described. Things to consider: Were the test subjects and treatments relevant and appropriate? Was the sample size large enough? Were the methods used appropriate? Can you think of a potential bias in a research study like this? What are the limitations of the conclusions made in this research study? Address at least two of these questions in your critique of the research study (20 points). 3. Discuss the relevance of this type of research, both for the world in general and for you personally (20 points). 4. Write answers in your own words with proper grammar and spelling (10 points)

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

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4. Using your knowledge of the Stevenson’s career management model identify and briefly describe one activity that should be included in an organization’s career management program. Identify which element of the model the activity you identified fits within.

4. Using your knowledge of the Stevenson’s career management model identify and briefly describe one activity that should be included in an organization’s career management program. Identify which element of the model the activity you identified fits within.

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2. Career development process is complex and rapidly evolving and new theories are continually developing presenting challenges to traditional understandings. Discuss why an understanding of career development processes is critical to management, employee and organizational success.

2. Career development process is complex and rapidly evolving and new theories are continually developing presenting challenges to traditional understandings. Discuss why an understanding of career development processes is critical to management, employee and organizational success.

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This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

MEMO       To: Ms. Sara From: Ethics Monitoring … Read More...