Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

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For your first reflection paper assignment, the draft is due on 9/17 and the final paper is due on 9/24. The length of the paper should be about 1,000 words, typed double-spaced, using 12 pt Times Roman font with 1” margins on every side. (Just keep your default margins.) A reflection essay, also known as a reflective essay , is a work in which the writer will take the opportunity to review and analyze a certain experience in a personal way. In this assignment the “experience” is your reaction to the essays we have read so far in FYS. A reflection essay does not involve research, as many other types of essays do. Instead, authors may reflect on their personal interpretations of an experience; this can be something as simple as reading a book or watching a film, or it may occur after a greater life event. These are just a few of the many examples in which writers may take some time to reflect on what they learned. Your reflective essay assignment is to reflect on the readings so far – • Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave”; • Professor Eve’s, The Cave”, • Ray’s “Resident Alien”, • King’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail”, • Kristof’s Half the Sky , and reflect on what you learned from one or more of those essays. The point of a reflection essay is to analyze the readings in a personal way, and both positive and negative aspects should be touched upon. For instance, students writing a reflection essay on an essay they have read are not going to simply provide a summary of the writing. Instead, they might write • what they learned while reading the essay, • if any of this information altered their existing viewpoints, • if they can relate it to their life in some way. Instructors often assign these types of essays to ensure that students are actually reading and thinking about this information; of course, professional authors have also been known to write and publish such essays as well. While students do not have to do research per se, they should include: • quotes, facts and evidence from the readings to support their reflection points, • especially those parts that made them think about a particular issue in a different way • or made them change their mind about some way they used to think before they read the passage. • In other words, if these readings illuminated you in some way, tell how, and use examples from the texts to demonstrate clearly what you mean. Reflection papers can be personal, are personal and can include your own past experiences or ways of thinking to make a point about what your thinking is now after having read the essays. I am including a rubric in the Canvas files that will help with the organi zation of your reflection paper. The file is called “Rubric for Literacy Narrative or Reflective Writing.”

For your first reflection paper assignment, the draft is due on 9/17 and the final paper is due on 9/24. The length of the paper should be about 1,000 words, typed double-spaced, using 12 pt Times Roman font with 1” margins on every side. (Just keep your default margins.) A reflection essay, also known as a reflective essay , is a work in which the writer will take the opportunity to review and analyze a certain experience in a personal way. In this assignment the “experience” is your reaction to the essays we have read so far in FYS. A reflection essay does not involve research, as many other types of essays do. Instead, authors may reflect on their personal interpretations of an experience; this can be something as simple as reading a book or watching a film, or it may occur after a greater life event. These are just a few of the many examples in which writers may take some time to reflect on what they learned. Your reflective essay assignment is to reflect on the readings so far – • Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave”; • Professor Eve’s, The Cave”, • Ray’s “Resident Alien”, • King’s “Letter From Birmingham Jail”, • Kristof’s Half the Sky , and reflect on what you learned from one or more of those essays. The point of a reflection essay is to analyze the readings in a personal way, and both positive and negative aspects should be touched upon. For instance, students writing a reflection essay on an essay they have read are not going to simply provide a summary of the writing. Instead, they might write • what they learned while reading the essay, • if any of this information altered their existing viewpoints, • if they can relate it to their life in some way. Instructors often assign these types of essays to ensure that students are actually reading and thinking about this information; of course, professional authors have also been known to write and publish such essays as well. While students do not have to do research per se, they should include: • quotes, facts and evidence from the readings to support their reflection points, • especially those parts that made them think about a particular issue in a different way • or made them change their mind about some way they used to think before they read the passage. • In other words, if these readings illuminated you in some way, tell how, and use examples from the texts to demonstrate clearly what you mean. Reflection papers can be personal, are personal and can include your own past experiences or ways of thinking to make a point about what your thinking is now after having read the essays. I am including a rubric in the Canvas files that will help with the organi zation of your reflection paper. The file is called “Rubric for Literacy Narrative or Reflective Writing.”

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Assignment 8 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 4, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 10.3 Part A If a particle’s speed increases by a factor of 5, by what factor does its kinetic energy change? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 10.11 A spring is compressed 1.5 . Part A How far must you compress a spring with twice the spring constant to store the same amount of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct = 25 K2 K1 cm x = 1.1 cm Problem 10.2 The lowest point in Death Valley is below sea level. The summit of nearby Mt. Whitney has an elevation of 4420 . Part A What is the change in potential energy of an energetic 80 hiker who makes it from the floor of Death Valley to the top of Mt.Whitney? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.3 Part A At what speed does a 1800 compact car have the same kinetic energy as a 1.80×104 truck going 21.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.5 A boy reaches out of a window and tosses a ball straight up with a speed of 13 . The ball is 21 above the ground as he releases it. 85m m kg U = 3.5×106 J kg kg km/hr vc = 66.4 km hr m/s m Part A Use energy to find the ball’s maximum height above the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Use energy to find the ball’s speed as it passes the window on its way down. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use energy to find the speed of impact on the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Hmax = 30 m v = 13 ms v = 24 ms Problem 10.8 A 59.0 skateboarder wants to just make it to the upper edge of a “quarter pipe,” a track that is one-quarter of a circle with a radius of 2.30 . Part A What speed does he need at the bottom? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.12 A 1500 car traveling at 12 suddenly runs out of gas while approaching the valley shown in the figure. The alert driver immediately puts the car in neutral so that it will roll. Part A kg m 6.71 ms kg m/s What will be the car’s speed as it coasts into the gas station on the other side of the valley? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Ups and Downs Learning Goal: To apply the law of conservation of energy to an object launched upward in the gravitational field of the earth. In the absence of nonconservative forces such as friction and air resistance, the total mechanical energy in a closed system is conserved. This is one particular case of the law of conservation of energy. In this problem, you will apply the law of conservation of energy to different objects launched from the earth. The energy transformations that take place involve the object’s kinetic energy and its gravitational potential energy . The law of conservation of energy for such cases implies that the sum of the object’s kinetic energy and potential energy does not change with time. This idea can be expressed by the equation , where “i” denotes the “initial” moment and “f” denotes the “final” moment. Since any two moments will work, the choice of the moments to consider is, technically, up to you. That choice, though, is usually suggested by the question posed in the problem. First, let us consider an object launched vertically upward with an initial speed . Neglect air resistance. Part A As the projectile goes upward, what energy changes take place? ANSWER: v = 6.8 ms K = (1/2)mv2 U = mgh Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf v Correct Part B At the top point of the flight, what can be said about the projectile’s kinetic and potential energy? ANSWER: Correct Strictly speaking, it is not the ball that possesses potential energy; rather, it is the system “Earth-ball.” Although we will often talk about “the gravitational potential energy of an elevated object,” it is useful to keep in mind that the energy, in fact, is associated with the interactions between the earth and the elevated object. Part C The potential energy of the object at the moment of launch __________. ANSWER: Both kinetic and potential energy decrease. Both kinetic and potential energy increase. Kinetic energy decreases; potential energy increases. Kinetic energy increases; potential energy decreases. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their maximum values. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their minimum values. Kinetic energy is at a maximum; potential energy is at a minimum. Kinetic energy is at a minimum; potential energy is at a maximum. Correct Usually, the zero level is chosen so as to make the relevant calculations simpler. In this case, it makes good sense to assume that at the ground level–but this is not, by any means, the only choice! Part D Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height to which the object will rise. Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: Correct You may remember this result from kinematics. It is comforting to know that our new approach yields the same answer. Part E At what height above the ground does the projectile have a speed of ? Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: is negative is positive is zero depends on the choice of the “zero level” of potential energy U = 0 hmax v g hmax = v2 2g h 0.5v v g h = 3 v2 8g Correct Part F What is the speed of the object at the height of ? Express your answer in terms of and . Use three significant figures in the numeric coefficient. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You are being asked for the speed at half of the maximum height. You know that at the initial height ( ), the speed is . All of the energy is kinetic energy, and so, the total energy is . At the maximum height, all of the energy is potential energy. Since the gravitational potential energy is proportional to , half of the initial kinetic energy must have been converted to potential energy when the projectile is at . Thus, the kinetic energy must be half of its original value (i.e., when ). You need to determine the speed, as a multiple of , that corresponds to such a kinetic energy. ANSWER: Correct Let us now consider objects launched at an angle. For such situations, using conservation of energy leads to a quicker solution than can be produced by kinematics. Part G A ball is launched as a projectile with initial speed at an angle above the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height of the ball’s flight. Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the final kinetic energy Find the final kinetic energy of the ball. Here, the best choice of “final” moment is the point at which the ball reaches its maximum height, since this is the point we are interested in. u (1/2)hmax v g h = 0 v (1/2)mv2 h (1/2)hmax (1/4)mv2 h = (1/2)hmax v u = 0.707v v hmax v g Kf Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the speed at the maximum height The speed of the ball at the maximum height is __________. ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part H A ball is launched with initial speed from ground level up a frictionless slope. The slope makes an angle with the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of , , and . You may or may not use all of these quantities. v m 0 v v cos v sin v tan Kf = 0.5m(vcos( ))2 hmax = (vsin( ))2 2g v hmax v g ANSWER: Correct Interestingly, the answer does not depend on . The difference between this situation and the projectile case is that the ball moving up a slope has no kinetic energy at the top of its trajectory whereas the projectile launched at an angle does. Part I A ball is launched with initial speed from the ground level up a frictionless hill. The hill becomes steeper as the ball slides up; however, the ball remains in contact with the hill at all times. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Correct The profile of the hill does not matter; the equation would have the same terms regardless of the steepness of the hill. Problem 10.14 A 12- -long spring is attached to the ceiling. When a 2.2 mass is hung from it, the spring stretches to a length of 17 . Part A What is the spring constant ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. hmax = v2 2g v hmax v g hmax = v2 2g Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf cm kg cm k ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the spring when a 3.0 mass is suspended from it? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.17 A 6.2 mass hanging from a spring scale is slowly lowered onto a vertical spring, as shown in . You may want to review ( pages 255 – 257) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations = 430 k Nm kg y = 19 cm kg Part A What does the spring scale read just before the mass touches the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass before it touches the scale. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? ANSWER: Correct Part B The scale reads 22 when the lower spring has been compressed by 2.7 . What is the value of the spring constant for the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? Use these to determine the force on the mass by the spring, taking note of the directions from your picture. How is the spring constant related to the force by the spring and the compression of the spring? Check your units. ANSWER: F = 61 N N cm k = 1400 k Nm Correct Part C At what compression length will the scale read zero? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces on the mass. When the scale reads zero, what is the force on the mass due to the scale? What is the gravitational force on the mass? What is the force on the mass by the spring? How is the compression length related to the force by the spring and the spring constant? Check your units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.18 Part A How far must you stretch a spring with = 800 to store 180 of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: y = 4.2 cm k N/m J Correct Problem 10.22 A 15 runaway grocery cart runs into a spring with spring constant 230 and compresses it by 57 . Part A What was the speed of the cart just before it hit the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Spring Gun A spring-loaded toy gun is used to shoot a ball straight up in the air. The ball reaches a maximum height , measured from the equilibrium position of the spring. s = 0.67 m kg N/m cm v = 2.2 ms H Part A The same ball is shot straight up a second time from the same gun, but this time the spring is compressed only half as far before firing. How far up does the ball go this time? Neglect friction. Assume that the spring is ideal and that the distance by which the spring is compressed is negligible compared to . Hint 1. Potential energy of the spring The potential energy of a spring is proportional to the square of the distance the spring is compressed. The spring was compressed half the distance, so the mass, when launched, has one quarter of the energy as in the first trial. Hint 2. Potential energy of the ball At the highest point in the ball’s trajectory, all of the spring’s potential energy has been converted into gravitational potential energy of the ball. ANSWER: Correct A Bullet Is Fired into a Wooden Block A bullet of mass is fired horizontally with speed at a wooden block of mass resting on a frictionless table. The bullet hits the block and becomes completely embedded within it. After the bullet has come to rest within the block, the block, with the bullet in it, is traveling at speed . H height = H 4 mb vi mw vf Part A Which of the following best describes this collision? Hint 1. Types of collisions An inelastic collision is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved. In a partially inelastic collision, kinetic energy is lost, but the objects colliding do not stick together. From this information, you can infer what completely inelastic and elastic collisions are. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which of the following quantities, if any, are conserved during this collision? Hint 1. When is kinetic energy conserved? Kinetic energy is conserved only in perfectly elastic collisions. ANSWER: perfectly elastic partially inelastic perfectly inelastic Correct Part C What is the speed of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the momentum after the collision What is the total momentum of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Use conservation of momentum The momentum of the block/bullet system is conserved. Therefore, the momentum before the collision is the same as the momentum after the collision. Find a second expression for , this time expressed as the total momentum of the system before the collision. Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum neither momentum nor kinetic energy vi mw mb ptotal vf ptotal = (mw + mb)vf ptotal vi ptotal = mbvi ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.31 Ball 1, with a mass of 150 and traveling at 15.0 , collides head on with ball 2, which has a mass of 340 and is initially at rest. Part A What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly elastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C vf = mb vi mb+mw g m/s g (vfx) = -5.82 1 ms (vfx) = 9.18 2 ms What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly inelastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.43 A package of mass is released from rest at a warehouse loading dock and slides down the = 2.2 – high, frictionless chute to a waiting truck. Unfortunately, the truck driver went on a break without having removed the previous package, of mass , from the bottom of the chute. You may want to review ( pages 265 – 269) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations (vfx) = 4.59 1 ms (vfx) = 4.59 2 ms m h m 2m Part A Suppose the packages stick together. What is their common speed after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are two parts to this problem: the block sliding down the frictionless incline and the collision. What conservation laws are valid in each part? In terms of , what are the kinetic and potential energies of the block at the top of the incline? What is the potential energy of the same block at the bottom just before the collision? What are the kinetic energy and velocity of block just before the collision? What is conserved during the collision? What is the total momentum of the two blocks before the collision? What is the momentum of the two blocks stuck together after the collision? What is the velocity of the two blocks after the collision? ANSWER: Correct Part B Suppose the collision between the packages is perfectly elastic. To what height does the package of mass rebound? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are three parts to this problem: the block sliding down the incline, the collision, and mass going back up the incline. What conservation laws are valid in each part? m m v = 2.2 ms m m What is an elastic collision? For an elastic collision, how are the initial and final velocities related when one of the masses is initially at rest? Using the velocity of just before the collision from Part A, what is the velocity of just after the collision in this case? What are the kinetic and potential energies of mass just after the collision? What is the kinetic energy of mass at its maximum rebound height? Using conservation of energy, what is the potential energy of mass at its maximum height? What is the maximum height? ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.35 A cannon tilted up at a 35.0 angle fires a cannon ball at 79.0 from atop a 21.0 -high fortress wall. Part A What is the ball’s impact speed on the ground below? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.45 A 1000 safe is 2.5 above a heavy-duty spring when the rope holding the safe breaks. The safe hits the spring and compresses it 48 . m m m m m h = 24 cm $ m/s m vf = 81.6 ms kg m cm Part A What is the spring constant of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.49 A 100 block on a frictionless table is firmly attached to one end of a spring with = 21 . The other end of the spring is anchored to the wall. A 30 ball is thrown horizontally toward the block with a speed of 6.0 . Part A If the collision is perfectly elastic, what is the ball’s speed immediately after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the maximum compression of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = 2.5×105 k Nm g k N/m g m/s v = 3.2 ms Correct Part C Repeat part A for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Repeat part B for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.4%. You received 120.28 out of a possible total of 121 points. x = 0.19 m v = 1.4 ms x = 0.11 m

Assignment 8 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 4, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 10.3 Part A If a particle’s speed increases by a factor of 5, by what factor does its kinetic energy change? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 10.11 A spring is compressed 1.5 . Part A How far must you compress a spring with twice the spring constant to store the same amount of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct = 25 K2 K1 cm x = 1.1 cm Problem 10.2 The lowest point in Death Valley is below sea level. The summit of nearby Mt. Whitney has an elevation of 4420 . Part A What is the change in potential energy of an energetic 80 hiker who makes it from the floor of Death Valley to the top of Mt.Whitney? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.3 Part A At what speed does a 1800 compact car have the same kinetic energy as a 1.80×104 truck going 21.0 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.5 A boy reaches out of a window and tosses a ball straight up with a speed of 13 . The ball is 21 above the ground as he releases it. 85m m kg U = 3.5×106 J kg kg km/hr vc = 66.4 km hr m/s m Part A Use energy to find the ball’s maximum height above the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Use energy to find the ball’s speed as it passes the window on its way down. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Use energy to find the speed of impact on the ground. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Hmax = 30 m v = 13 ms v = 24 ms Problem 10.8 A 59.0 skateboarder wants to just make it to the upper edge of a “quarter pipe,” a track that is one-quarter of a circle with a radius of 2.30 . Part A What speed does he need at the bottom? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.12 A 1500 car traveling at 12 suddenly runs out of gas while approaching the valley shown in the figure. The alert driver immediately puts the car in neutral so that it will roll. Part A kg m 6.71 ms kg m/s What will be the car’s speed as it coasts into the gas station on the other side of the valley? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Ups and Downs Learning Goal: To apply the law of conservation of energy to an object launched upward in the gravitational field of the earth. In the absence of nonconservative forces such as friction and air resistance, the total mechanical energy in a closed system is conserved. This is one particular case of the law of conservation of energy. In this problem, you will apply the law of conservation of energy to different objects launched from the earth. The energy transformations that take place involve the object’s kinetic energy and its gravitational potential energy . The law of conservation of energy for such cases implies that the sum of the object’s kinetic energy and potential energy does not change with time. This idea can be expressed by the equation , where “i” denotes the “initial” moment and “f” denotes the “final” moment. Since any two moments will work, the choice of the moments to consider is, technically, up to you. That choice, though, is usually suggested by the question posed in the problem. First, let us consider an object launched vertically upward with an initial speed . Neglect air resistance. Part A As the projectile goes upward, what energy changes take place? ANSWER: v = 6.8 ms K = (1/2)mv2 U = mgh Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf v Correct Part B At the top point of the flight, what can be said about the projectile’s kinetic and potential energy? ANSWER: Correct Strictly speaking, it is not the ball that possesses potential energy; rather, it is the system “Earth-ball.” Although we will often talk about “the gravitational potential energy of an elevated object,” it is useful to keep in mind that the energy, in fact, is associated with the interactions between the earth and the elevated object. Part C The potential energy of the object at the moment of launch __________. ANSWER: Both kinetic and potential energy decrease. Both kinetic and potential energy increase. Kinetic energy decreases; potential energy increases. Kinetic energy increases; potential energy decreases. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their maximum values. Both kinetic and potential energy are at their minimum values. Kinetic energy is at a maximum; potential energy is at a minimum. Kinetic energy is at a minimum; potential energy is at a maximum. Correct Usually, the zero level is chosen so as to make the relevant calculations simpler. In this case, it makes good sense to assume that at the ground level–but this is not, by any means, the only choice! Part D Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height to which the object will rise. Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: Correct You may remember this result from kinematics. It is comforting to know that our new approach yields the same answer. Part E At what height above the ground does the projectile have a speed of ? Express your answer in terms of and the magnitude of the acceleration of gravity . ANSWER: is negative is positive is zero depends on the choice of the “zero level” of potential energy U = 0 hmax v g hmax = v2 2g h 0.5v v g h = 3 v2 8g Correct Part F What is the speed of the object at the height of ? Express your answer in terms of and . Use three significant figures in the numeric coefficient. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You are being asked for the speed at half of the maximum height. You know that at the initial height ( ), the speed is . All of the energy is kinetic energy, and so, the total energy is . At the maximum height, all of the energy is potential energy. Since the gravitational potential energy is proportional to , half of the initial kinetic energy must have been converted to potential energy when the projectile is at . Thus, the kinetic energy must be half of its original value (i.e., when ). You need to determine the speed, as a multiple of , that corresponds to such a kinetic energy. ANSWER: Correct Let us now consider objects launched at an angle. For such situations, using conservation of energy leads to a quicker solution than can be produced by kinematics. Part G A ball is launched as a projectile with initial speed at an angle above the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum height of the ball’s flight. Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the final kinetic energy Find the final kinetic energy of the ball. Here, the best choice of “final” moment is the point at which the ball reaches its maximum height, since this is the point we are interested in. u (1/2)hmax v g h = 0 v (1/2)mv2 h (1/2)hmax (1/4)mv2 h = (1/2)hmax v u = 0.707v v hmax v g Kf Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the speed at the maximum height The speed of the ball at the maximum height is __________. ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part H A ball is launched with initial speed from ground level up a frictionless slope. The slope makes an angle with the horizontal. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of , , and . You may or may not use all of these quantities. v m 0 v v cos v sin v tan Kf = 0.5m(vcos( ))2 hmax = (vsin( ))2 2g v hmax v g ANSWER: Correct Interestingly, the answer does not depend on . The difference between this situation and the projectile case is that the ball moving up a slope has no kinetic energy at the top of its trajectory whereas the projectile launched at an angle does. Part I A ball is launched with initial speed from the ground level up a frictionless hill. The hill becomes steeper as the ball slides up; however, the ball remains in contact with the hill at all times. Using conservation of energy, find the maximum vertical height to which the ball will climb. Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Correct The profile of the hill does not matter; the equation would have the same terms regardless of the steepness of the hill. Problem 10.14 A 12- -long spring is attached to the ceiling. When a 2.2 mass is hung from it, the spring stretches to a length of 17 . Part A What is the spring constant ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. hmax = v2 2g v hmax v g hmax = v2 2g Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf cm kg cm k ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the spring when a 3.0 mass is suspended from it? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.17 A 6.2 mass hanging from a spring scale is slowly lowered onto a vertical spring, as shown in . You may want to review ( pages 255 – 257) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations = 430 k Nm kg y = 19 cm kg Part A What does the spring scale read just before the mass touches the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass before it touches the scale. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? ANSWER: Correct Part B The scale reads 22 when the lower spring has been compressed by 2.7 . What is the value of the spring constant for the lower spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces acting on the mass. What is the net force on the mass? What is the force on the mass due to gravity? What is the force on the mass due to the scale? Use these to determine the force on the mass by the spring, taking note of the directions from your picture. How is the spring constant related to the force by the spring and the compression of the spring? Check your units. ANSWER: F = 61 N N cm k = 1400 k Nm Correct Part C At what compression length will the scale read zero? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture showing the forces on the mass. When the scale reads zero, what is the force on the mass due to the scale? What is the gravitational force on the mass? What is the force on the mass by the spring? How is the compression length related to the force by the spring and the spring constant? Check your units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.18 Part A How far must you stretch a spring with = 800 to store 180 of energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: y = 4.2 cm k N/m J Correct Problem 10.22 A 15 runaway grocery cart runs into a spring with spring constant 230 and compresses it by 57 . Part A What was the speed of the cart just before it hit the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Spring Gun A spring-loaded toy gun is used to shoot a ball straight up in the air. The ball reaches a maximum height , measured from the equilibrium position of the spring. s = 0.67 m kg N/m cm v = 2.2 ms H Part A The same ball is shot straight up a second time from the same gun, but this time the spring is compressed only half as far before firing. How far up does the ball go this time? Neglect friction. Assume that the spring is ideal and that the distance by which the spring is compressed is negligible compared to . Hint 1. Potential energy of the spring The potential energy of a spring is proportional to the square of the distance the spring is compressed. The spring was compressed half the distance, so the mass, when launched, has one quarter of the energy as in the first trial. Hint 2. Potential energy of the ball At the highest point in the ball’s trajectory, all of the spring’s potential energy has been converted into gravitational potential energy of the ball. ANSWER: Correct A Bullet Is Fired into a Wooden Block A bullet of mass is fired horizontally with speed at a wooden block of mass resting on a frictionless table. The bullet hits the block and becomes completely embedded within it. After the bullet has come to rest within the block, the block, with the bullet in it, is traveling at speed . H height = H 4 mb vi mw vf Part A Which of the following best describes this collision? Hint 1. Types of collisions An inelastic collision is a collision in which kinetic energy is not conserved. In a partially inelastic collision, kinetic energy is lost, but the objects colliding do not stick together. From this information, you can infer what completely inelastic and elastic collisions are. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which of the following quantities, if any, are conserved during this collision? Hint 1. When is kinetic energy conserved? Kinetic energy is conserved only in perfectly elastic collisions. ANSWER: perfectly elastic partially inelastic perfectly inelastic Correct Part C What is the speed of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Find the momentum after the collision What is the total momentum of the block/bullet system after the collision? Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Use conservation of momentum The momentum of the block/bullet system is conserved. Therefore, the momentum before the collision is the same as the momentum after the collision. Find a second expression for , this time expressed as the total momentum of the system before the collision. Express your answer in terms of and other given quantities. ANSWER: kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum neither momentum nor kinetic energy vi mw mb ptotal vf ptotal = (mw + mb)vf ptotal vi ptotal = mbvi ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.31 Ball 1, with a mass of 150 and traveling at 15.0 , collides head on with ball 2, which has a mass of 340 and is initially at rest. Part A What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly elastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C vf = mb vi mb+mw g m/s g (vfx) = -5.82 1 ms (vfx) = 9.18 2 ms What are the final velocities of each ball if the collision is perfectly inelastic? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 10.43 A package of mass is released from rest at a warehouse loading dock and slides down the = 2.2 – high, frictionless chute to a waiting truck. Unfortunately, the truck driver went on a break without having removed the previous package, of mass , from the bottom of the chute. You may want to review ( pages 265 – 269) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Solving Algebraic Equations (vfx) = 4.59 1 ms (vfx) = 4.59 2 ms m h m 2m Part A Suppose the packages stick together. What is their common speed after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are two parts to this problem: the block sliding down the frictionless incline and the collision. What conservation laws are valid in each part? In terms of , what are the kinetic and potential energies of the block at the top of the incline? What is the potential energy of the same block at the bottom just before the collision? What are the kinetic energy and velocity of block just before the collision? What is conserved during the collision? What is the total momentum of the two blocks before the collision? What is the momentum of the two blocks stuck together after the collision? What is the velocity of the two blocks after the collision? ANSWER: Correct Part B Suppose the collision between the packages is perfectly elastic. To what height does the package of mass rebound? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem There are three parts to this problem: the block sliding down the incline, the collision, and mass going back up the incline. What conservation laws are valid in each part? m m v = 2.2 ms m m What is an elastic collision? For an elastic collision, how are the initial and final velocities related when one of the masses is initially at rest? Using the velocity of just before the collision from Part A, what is the velocity of just after the collision in this case? What are the kinetic and potential energies of mass just after the collision? What is the kinetic energy of mass at its maximum rebound height? Using conservation of energy, what is the potential energy of mass at its maximum height? What is the maximum height? ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.35 A cannon tilted up at a 35.0 angle fires a cannon ball at 79.0 from atop a 21.0 -high fortress wall. Part A What is the ball’s impact speed on the ground below? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.45 A 1000 safe is 2.5 above a heavy-duty spring when the rope holding the safe breaks. The safe hits the spring and compresses it 48 . m m m m m h = 24 cm $ m/s m vf = 81.6 ms kg m cm Part A What is the spring constant of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 10.49 A 100 block on a frictionless table is firmly attached to one end of a spring with = 21 . The other end of the spring is anchored to the wall. A 30 ball is thrown horizontally toward the block with a speed of 6.0 . Part A If the collision is perfectly elastic, what is the ball’s speed immediately after the collision? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the maximum compression of the spring? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = 2.5×105 k Nm g k N/m g m/s v = 3.2 ms Correct Part C Repeat part A for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D Repeat part B for the case of a perfectly inelastic collision. Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.4%. You received 120.28 out of a possible total of 121 points. x = 0.19 m v = 1.4 ms x = 0.11 m

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Chapter 4 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Advice for the Quarterback A quarterback is set up to throw the football to a receiver who is running with a constant velocity directly away from the quarterback and is now a distance away from the quarterback. The quarterback figures that the ball must be thrown at an angle to the horizontal and he estimates that the receiver must catch the ball a time interval after it is thrown to avoid having opposition players prevent the receiver from making the catch. In the following you may assume that the ball is thrown and caught at the same height above the level playing field. Assume that the y coordinate of the ball at the instant it is thrown or caught is and that the horizontal position of the quaterback is . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and use the pictured inertial coordinate system when solving the problem. Part A Find , the vertical component of the velocity of the ball when the quarterback releases it. Express in terms of and . Hint 1. Equation of motion in y direction What is the expression for , the height of the ball as a function of time? Answer in terms of , , and . v r D  tc y = 0 x = 0 g v0y v0y tc g y(t) t g v0y ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Hint 2. Height at which the ball is caught, Remember that after time the ball was caught at the same height as it had been released. That is, . ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B Find , the initial horizontal component of velocity of the ball. Express your answer for in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Receiver’s position Find , the receiver’s position before he catches the ball. Answer in terms of , , and . ANSWER: Football’s position y(t) = v0yt− g 1 2 t2 y(tc) tc y(tc) = y0 = 0 v0y = gtc 2 v0x v0x D tc vr xr D vr tc xr = D + vrtc Typesetting math: 100% Find , the horizontal distance that the ball travels before reaching the receiver. Answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Part C Find the speed with which the quarterback must throw the ball. Answer in terms of , , , and . Hint 1. How to approach the problem Remember that velocity is a vector; from solving Parts A and B you have the two components, from which you can find the magnitude of this vector. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part D xc v0x tc xc = v0xtc v0x = + D tc vr v0 D tc vr g v0 = ( + ) + D tc vr 2 ( ) gtc 2 2 −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% Assuming that the quarterback throws the ball with speed , find the angle above the horizontal at which he should throw it. Your solution should contain an inverse trig function (entered as asin, acos, or atan). Give your answer in terms of already known quantities, , , and . Hint 1. Find angle from and Think of velocity as a vector with Cartesian coordinates and . Find the angle that this vector would make with the x axis using the results of Parts A and B. ANSWER: Answer Requested Direction of Velocity at Various Times in Flight for Projectile Motion Conceptual Question For each of the motions described below, determine the algebraic sign (positive, negative, or zero) of the x component and y component of velocity of the object at the time specified. For all of the motions, the positive x axis points to the right and the positive y axis points upward. Alex, a mountaineer, must leap across a wide crevasse. The other side of the crevasse is below the point from which he leaps, as shown in the figure. Alex leaps horizontally and successfully makes the jump. v0  v0x v0y v0  v0x v0y v0xx^ v0yy^   = atan( ) v0y v0x Typesetting math: 100% Part A Determine the algebraic sign of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity at the instant he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Algebraic sign of velocity The algebraic sign of the velocity is determined solely by comparing the direction in which the object is moving with the direction that is defined to be positive. In this example, to the right is defined to be the positive x direction and upward the positive y direction. Therefore, any object moving to the right, whether speeding up, slowing down, or even simultaneously moving upward or downward, has a positive x velocity. Similarly, if the object is moving downward, regardless of any other aspect of its motion, its y velocity is negative. Hint 2. Sketch Alex’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant after he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. ANSWER: ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Part B Determine the algebraic signs of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity the instant before he lands at the end of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Sketch Alex’s final velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant before he safely lands on the other side of the crevasse. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: Answer Requested Typesetting math: 100% At the buzzer, a basketball player shoots a desperation shot. The ball goes in! Part C Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part D Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity at the ball’s maximum height. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s velocity at maximum height Typesetting math: 100% On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant it reaches its maximum height. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested PSS 4.1 Projectile Motion Problems Learning Goal: Typesetting math: 100% To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 4.1 for projectile motion problems. A rock thrown with speed 9.00 and launch angle 30.0 (above the horizontal) travels a horizontal distance of = 17.0 before hitting the ground. From what height was the rock thrown? Use the value = 9.810 for the free-fall acceleration. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 4.1 Projectile motion problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions, such as treating the object as a particle. Is it reasonable to ignore air resistance? VISUALIZE: Use a pictorial representation. Establish a coordinate system with the x axis horizontal and the y axis vertical. Show important points in the motion on a sketch. Define symbols, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The acceleration is known: and . Thus, the problem becomes one of two-dimensional kinematics. The kinematic equations are , . is the same for the horizontal and vertical components of the motion. Find from one component, and then use that value for the other component. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model Start by making simplifying assumptions: Model the rock as a particle in free fall. You can ignore air resistance because the rock is a relatively heavy object moving relatively slowly. Visualize Part A Which diagram represents an accurate sketch of the rock’s trajectory? Hint 1. The launch angle In a projectile’s motion, the angle of the initial velocity above the horizontal is called the launch angle. ANSWER: m/s  d m g m/s2 ax = 0 ay = −g xf = xi +vixt, yf = yi +viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfx = vix = constant, and vfy = viy − gt t t v i Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B As stated in the strategy, choose a coordinate system where the x axis is horizontal and the y axis is vertical. Note that in the strategy, the y component of the projectile’s acceleration, , is taken to be negative. This implies that the positive y axis is upward. Use the same convention for your y axis, and take the positive x axis to be to the right. Where you choose your origin doesn’t change the answer to the question, but choosing an origin can make a problem easier to solve (even if only a bit). Usually it is nice if the majority of the quantities you are given and the quantity you are trying to solve for take positive values relative to your chosen origin. Given this goal, what location for the origin of the coordinate system would make this problem easiest? ANSWER: ay At ground level below the point where the rock is launched At the point where the rock strikes the ground At the peak of the trajectory At the point where the rock is released At ground level below the peak of the trajectory Typesetting math: 100% Correct It’s best to place the origin of the coordinate system at ground level below the launching point because in this way all the points of interest (the launching point and the landing point) will have positive coordinates. (Based on your experience, you know that it’s generally easier to work with positive coordinates.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an arbitrary choice. The correct solution of the problem will not depend on the location of the origin of your coordinate system. Now, define symbols representing initial and final position, velocity, and time. Your target variable is , the initial y coordinate of the rock. Your pictorial representation should be complete now, and similar to the picture below: Solve Part C Find the height from which the rock was launched. Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. yi yi Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem The time needed to move horizontally to the final position = 17.0 is the same time needed for the rock to rise from the initial position to the peak of its trajectory and then fall to the ground. Use the information you have about motion in the horizontal direction to solve for . Knowing this time will allow you to use the equations of motion for the vertical direction to solve for . Hint 2. Find the time spent in the air How long ( ) is the rock in the air? Express your answer in seconds to three significant figures. Hint 1. Determine which equation to use Which of the equations given in the strategy and shown below is the most appropriate to calculate the time the rock spent in the air? ANSWER: Hint 2. Find the x component of the initial velocity What is the x component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: t xf = d m yi t yi t t xf = xi + vixt yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt vix = 7.79 m/s Typesetting math: 100% Hint 3. Find the y component of the initial velocity What is the y component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Assess Part D A second rock is thrown straight upward with a speed 4.500 . If this rock takes 2.181 to fall to the ground, from what height was it released? Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. Hint 1. Identify the known variables What are the values of , , , and for the second rock? Take the positive y axis to be upward and the origin to be located on the ground where the rock lands. Express your answers to four significant figures in the units shown to the right, separated by commas. ANSWER: t = 2.18 s viy = 4.50 m/s yi = 13.5 m m/s s H yf viy t a Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Hint 2. Determine which equation to use to find the height Which equation should you use to find ? Keep in mind that if the positive y axis is upward and the origin is located on the ground, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Projectile motion is made up of two independent motions: uniform motion at constant velocity in the horizontal direction and free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Because both rocks were thrown with the same initial vertical velocity, 4.500 , and fell the same vertical distance of 13.5 , they were in the air for the same amount of time. This result was expected and helps to confirm that you did the calculation in Part C correctly. ± Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A , , , = 0,4.500,2.181,-yf viy t a 9.810 m, m/s, s, m/s2 H yi = H yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt = − 2g( − ) v2f y v2i y yf yi H = 13.5 m viy = m/s m  = 45 D = 220 m g = 9.8 m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Find , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Introduce the (unknown) variables and for the initial components of velocity. Then use kinematics to relate them and solve for . What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Find Find the horizontal component of the initial velocity. Express your answer symbolically in terms of and given symbolic quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Find What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of . ANSWER: ANSWER: ta vy0 vx0 ta vy0 ta D vx0 vx0 ta vx0 = D ta vy0 vy0 vx0 vy0 = vx0 vy0 = D ta Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. From the change in the vertical component of velocity, you should be able to find in terms of and . Give your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Find When applied to the y-component of velocity, in this problem the formula for with constant acceleration is What is , the vertical component of velocity when the arrow hits the tree? Answer symbolically in terms of only. ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Put the algebra together to find symbolically. If you have an expression for the initial vertical velocity component in terms in terms of and , and another in terms of and , you should be able to eliminate this initial component to find an expression for Express your answer symbolically in terms of given variables. ANSWER: ta vy0 g vy0 g vy(ta) v(t) −g vy(t) = vy0 − g t vy(ta ) vy0 vy(ta) = −vy0 ta = 2vy0 g ta D ta g ta ta2 t2 = a 2D g Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Answer Requested Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. When should the apple be dropped The apple should be dropped at the time equal to the total time it takes the arrow to reach the tree minus the time it takes the apple to fall 6.0 meters. Hint 2. Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters How long does it take an apple to fall 6.0 meters? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: ta = 6.7 s tf = 1.1 s td = 5.6 s Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Accelerating Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. Part A Consider the video you just watched. Suppose we replace the original launcher with one that fires the ball upward at twice the speed. We make no other changes. How far behind the cart will the ball land, compared to the distance in the original experiment? Hint 1. Determine how long the ball is in the air How will doubling the initial upward speed of the ball change the time the ball spends in the air? A kinematic equation may be helpful here. The time in the air will ANSWER: be cut in half. stay the same. double. quadruple. Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Determine the appropriate kinematic expression Which of the following kinematic equations correctly describes the horizontal distance between the ball and the cart at the moment the ball lands? The cart’s initial horizontal velocity is , its horizontal acceleration is , and is the time elapsed between launch and impact. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct The ball will spend twice as much time in the air ( , where is the ball’s initial upward velocity), so it will land four times farther behind the cart: (where is the cart’s horizontal acceleration). Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Moving Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. d v0x ax t d = v0x t d = 1 2 axv0x t2 d = v0x t+ 1 2 axt2 d = 1 2 axt2 the same distance twice as far half as far four times as far by a factor not listed above t = 2v0y/g v0y d = 1 2 axt2 ax Typesetting math: 100% Part A The crew of a cargo plane wishes to drop a crate of supplies on a target below. To hit the target, when should the crew drop the crate? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. How to approach the problem While the crate is on the plane, it shares the plane’s velocity. What is the crate’s velocity immediately after it is released? Hint 2. What affects the motion of the crate? Gravity will accelerate the crate downward. What, if anything, affects the crate’s horizontal motion? (Keep in mind that we are told to ignore air resistance, even though that’s not very realistic in this situation.) ANSWER: Correct At the moment it is released, the crate shares the plane’s horizontal velocity. In the absence of air resistance, the crate would remain directly below the plane as it fell. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. Before the plane is directly over the target After the plane has flown over the target When the plane is directly over the target Typesetting math: 100% You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Typesetting math: 100%

Chapter 4 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Advice for the Quarterback A quarterback is set up to throw the football to a receiver who is running with a constant velocity directly away from the quarterback and is now a distance away from the quarterback. The quarterback figures that the ball must be thrown at an angle to the horizontal and he estimates that the receiver must catch the ball a time interval after it is thrown to avoid having opposition players prevent the receiver from making the catch. In the following you may assume that the ball is thrown and caught at the same height above the level playing field. Assume that the y coordinate of the ball at the instant it is thrown or caught is and that the horizontal position of the quaterback is . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and use the pictured inertial coordinate system when solving the problem. Part A Find , the vertical component of the velocity of the ball when the quarterback releases it. Express in terms of and . Hint 1. Equation of motion in y direction What is the expression for , the height of the ball as a function of time? Answer in terms of , , and . v r D  tc y = 0 x = 0 g v0y v0y tc g y(t) t g v0y ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Hint 2. Height at which the ball is caught, Remember that after time the ball was caught at the same height as it had been released. That is, . ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B Find , the initial horizontal component of velocity of the ball. Express your answer for in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Receiver’s position Find , the receiver’s position before he catches the ball. Answer in terms of , , and . ANSWER: Football’s position y(t) = v0yt− g 1 2 t2 y(tc) tc y(tc) = y0 = 0 v0y = gtc 2 v0x v0x D tc vr xr D vr tc xr = D + vrtc Typesetting math: 100% Find , the horizontal distance that the ball travels before reaching the receiver. Answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Part C Find the speed with which the quarterback must throw the ball. Answer in terms of , , , and . Hint 1. How to approach the problem Remember that velocity is a vector; from solving Parts A and B you have the two components, from which you can find the magnitude of this vector. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part D xc v0x tc xc = v0xtc v0x = + D tc vr v0 D tc vr g v0 = ( + ) + D tc vr 2 ( ) gtc 2 2 −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% Assuming that the quarterback throws the ball with speed , find the angle above the horizontal at which he should throw it. Your solution should contain an inverse trig function (entered as asin, acos, or atan). Give your answer in terms of already known quantities, , , and . Hint 1. Find angle from and Think of velocity as a vector with Cartesian coordinates and . Find the angle that this vector would make with the x axis using the results of Parts A and B. ANSWER: Answer Requested Direction of Velocity at Various Times in Flight for Projectile Motion Conceptual Question For each of the motions described below, determine the algebraic sign (positive, negative, or zero) of the x component and y component of velocity of the object at the time specified. For all of the motions, the positive x axis points to the right and the positive y axis points upward. Alex, a mountaineer, must leap across a wide crevasse. The other side of the crevasse is below the point from which he leaps, as shown in the figure. Alex leaps horizontally and successfully makes the jump. v0  v0x v0y v0  v0x v0y v0xx^ v0yy^   = atan( ) v0y v0x Typesetting math: 100% Part A Determine the algebraic sign of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity at the instant he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Algebraic sign of velocity The algebraic sign of the velocity is determined solely by comparing the direction in which the object is moving with the direction that is defined to be positive. In this example, to the right is defined to be the positive x direction and upward the positive y direction. Therefore, any object moving to the right, whether speeding up, slowing down, or even simultaneously moving upward or downward, has a positive x velocity. Similarly, if the object is moving downward, regardless of any other aspect of its motion, its y velocity is negative. Hint 2. Sketch Alex’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant after he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. ANSWER: ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Part B Determine the algebraic signs of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity the instant before he lands at the end of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Sketch Alex’s final velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant before he safely lands on the other side of the crevasse. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: Answer Requested Typesetting math: 100% At the buzzer, a basketball player shoots a desperation shot. The ball goes in! Part C Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part D Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity at the ball’s maximum height. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s velocity at maximum height Typesetting math: 100% On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant it reaches its maximum height. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested PSS 4.1 Projectile Motion Problems Learning Goal: Typesetting math: 100% To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 4.1 for projectile motion problems. A rock thrown with speed 9.00 and launch angle 30.0 (above the horizontal) travels a horizontal distance of = 17.0 before hitting the ground. From what height was the rock thrown? Use the value = 9.810 for the free-fall acceleration. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 4.1 Projectile motion problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions, such as treating the object as a particle. Is it reasonable to ignore air resistance? VISUALIZE: Use a pictorial representation. Establish a coordinate system with the x axis horizontal and the y axis vertical. Show important points in the motion on a sketch. Define symbols, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The acceleration is known: and . Thus, the problem becomes one of two-dimensional kinematics. The kinematic equations are , . is the same for the horizontal and vertical components of the motion. Find from one component, and then use that value for the other component. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model Start by making simplifying assumptions: Model the rock as a particle in free fall. You can ignore air resistance because the rock is a relatively heavy object moving relatively slowly. Visualize Part A Which diagram represents an accurate sketch of the rock’s trajectory? Hint 1. The launch angle In a projectile’s motion, the angle of the initial velocity above the horizontal is called the launch angle. ANSWER: m/s  d m g m/s2 ax = 0 ay = −g xf = xi +vixt, yf = yi +viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfx = vix = constant, and vfy = viy − gt t t v i Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B As stated in the strategy, choose a coordinate system where the x axis is horizontal and the y axis is vertical. Note that in the strategy, the y component of the projectile’s acceleration, , is taken to be negative. This implies that the positive y axis is upward. Use the same convention for your y axis, and take the positive x axis to be to the right. Where you choose your origin doesn’t change the answer to the question, but choosing an origin can make a problem easier to solve (even if only a bit). Usually it is nice if the majority of the quantities you are given and the quantity you are trying to solve for take positive values relative to your chosen origin. Given this goal, what location for the origin of the coordinate system would make this problem easiest? ANSWER: ay At ground level below the point where the rock is launched At the point where the rock strikes the ground At the peak of the trajectory At the point where the rock is released At ground level below the peak of the trajectory Typesetting math: 100% Correct It’s best to place the origin of the coordinate system at ground level below the launching point because in this way all the points of interest (the launching point and the landing point) will have positive coordinates. (Based on your experience, you know that it’s generally easier to work with positive coordinates.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an arbitrary choice. The correct solution of the problem will not depend on the location of the origin of your coordinate system. Now, define symbols representing initial and final position, velocity, and time. Your target variable is , the initial y coordinate of the rock. Your pictorial representation should be complete now, and similar to the picture below: Solve Part C Find the height from which the rock was launched. Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. yi yi Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem The time needed to move horizontally to the final position = 17.0 is the same time needed for the rock to rise from the initial position to the peak of its trajectory and then fall to the ground. Use the information you have about motion in the horizontal direction to solve for . Knowing this time will allow you to use the equations of motion for the vertical direction to solve for . Hint 2. Find the time spent in the air How long ( ) is the rock in the air? Express your answer in seconds to three significant figures. Hint 1. Determine which equation to use Which of the equations given in the strategy and shown below is the most appropriate to calculate the time the rock spent in the air? ANSWER: Hint 2. Find the x component of the initial velocity What is the x component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: t xf = d m yi t yi t t xf = xi + vixt yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt vix = 7.79 m/s Typesetting math: 100% Hint 3. Find the y component of the initial velocity What is the y component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Assess Part D A second rock is thrown straight upward with a speed 4.500 . If this rock takes 2.181 to fall to the ground, from what height was it released? Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. Hint 1. Identify the known variables What are the values of , , , and for the second rock? Take the positive y axis to be upward and the origin to be located on the ground where the rock lands. Express your answers to four significant figures in the units shown to the right, separated by commas. ANSWER: t = 2.18 s viy = 4.50 m/s yi = 13.5 m m/s s H yf viy t a Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Hint 2. Determine which equation to use to find the height Which equation should you use to find ? Keep in mind that if the positive y axis is upward and the origin is located on the ground, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Projectile motion is made up of two independent motions: uniform motion at constant velocity in the horizontal direction and free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Because both rocks were thrown with the same initial vertical velocity, 4.500 , and fell the same vertical distance of 13.5 , they were in the air for the same amount of time. This result was expected and helps to confirm that you did the calculation in Part C correctly. ± Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A , , , = 0,4.500,2.181,-yf viy t a 9.810 m, m/s, s, m/s2 H yi = H yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt = − 2g( − ) v2f y v2i y yf yi H = 13.5 m viy = m/s m  = 45 D = 220 m g = 9.8 m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Find , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Introduce the (unknown) variables and for the initial components of velocity. Then use kinematics to relate them and solve for . What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Find Find the horizontal component of the initial velocity. Express your answer symbolically in terms of and given symbolic quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Find What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of . ANSWER: ANSWER: ta vy0 vx0 ta vy0 ta D vx0 vx0 ta vx0 = D ta vy0 vy0 vx0 vy0 = vx0 vy0 = D ta Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. From the change in the vertical component of velocity, you should be able to find in terms of and . Give your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Find When applied to the y-component of velocity, in this problem the formula for with constant acceleration is What is , the vertical component of velocity when the arrow hits the tree? Answer symbolically in terms of only. ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Put the algebra together to find symbolically. If you have an expression for the initial vertical velocity component in terms in terms of and , and another in terms of and , you should be able to eliminate this initial component to find an expression for Express your answer symbolically in terms of given variables. ANSWER: ta vy0 g vy0 g vy(ta) v(t) −g vy(t) = vy0 − g t vy(ta ) vy0 vy(ta) = −vy0 ta = 2vy0 g ta D ta g ta ta2 t2 = a 2D g Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Answer Requested Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. When should the apple be dropped The apple should be dropped at the time equal to the total time it takes the arrow to reach the tree minus the time it takes the apple to fall 6.0 meters. Hint 2. Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters How long does it take an apple to fall 6.0 meters? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: ta = 6.7 s tf = 1.1 s td = 5.6 s Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Accelerating Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. Part A Consider the video you just watched. Suppose we replace the original launcher with one that fires the ball upward at twice the speed. We make no other changes. How far behind the cart will the ball land, compared to the distance in the original experiment? Hint 1. Determine how long the ball is in the air How will doubling the initial upward speed of the ball change the time the ball spends in the air? A kinematic equation may be helpful here. The time in the air will ANSWER: be cut in half. stay the same. double. quadruple. Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Determine the appropriate kinematic expression Which of the following kinematic equations correctly describes the horizontal distance between the ball and the cart at the moment the ball lands? The cart’s initial horizontal velocity is , its horizontal acceleration is , and is the time elapsed between launch and impact. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct The ball will spend twice as much time in the air ( , where is the ball’s initial upward velocity), so it will land four times farther behind the cart: (where is the cart’s horizontal acceleration). Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Moving Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. d v0x ax t d = v0x t d = 1 2 axv0x t2 d = v0x t+ 1 2 axt2 d = 1 2 axt2 the same distance twice as far half as far four times as far by a factor not listed above t = 2v0y/g v0y d = 1 2 axt2 ax Typesetting math: 100% Part A The crew of a cargo plane wishes to drop a crate of supplies on a target below. To hit the target, when should the crew drop the crate? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. How to approach the problem While the crate is on the plane, it shares the plane’s velocity. What is the crate’s velocity immediately after it is released? Hint 2. What affects the motion of the crate? Gravity will accelerate the crate downward. What, if anything, affects the crate’s horizontal motion? (Keep in mind that we are told to ignore air resistance, even though that’s not very realistic in this situation.) ANSWER: Correct At the moment it is released, the crate shares the plane’s horizontal velocity. In the absence of air resistance, the crate would remain directly below the plane as it fell. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. Before the plane is directly over the target After the plane has flown over the target When the plane is directly over the target Typesetting math: 100% You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Typesetting math: 100%

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Critical Reflection Assignment (Essay 5) Goals: • As the name implies, the hope is you will reflect on your writing choices, which may in turn get you to rethink some of them and perhaps give you ideas for further revision. • Reflecting also gives you opportunity to reinforce good choices you made and hence remember them to do again when you write future papers. • This further provides you the opportunity to take credit for some good choices and hopefully bolster your confidence. • It allows you to point out why your paper demonstrates your competency in writing academic essays to justify a passing grade in English 111. • It also is a last ditch effort to show your thinking!!! If you explain why you made the choices you did in your synthesis essay, and you truly share your thinking, it helps you meet top box expectations yet again. Directions: 1. Choose either essay 3 or 4 to write about. 2. Take some time to reflect on how your idea for that essay came about, why you picked that idea to go with, what questions came to mind, and what pre-writing strategies you went through to get started. 3. Get out one of your copies of the English 111 Rubric. Go over it. Make sure you know what each box is looking for. 4. Plan an essay that helps you show that you have met the expectations of each box. Stress your thinking and reasoning. For any idea you include – explain why you did those things. Emphasize what you believed the job was, why you chose to approach it the way you did, the options you considered, and what you ended up doing after revising. 5. Be sure to include a discussion of effective thinking, complexity, source selection, source use, synthesis, and revision. 6. As you have teachers in your audience, it would likely be a good choice to include what you learned and how you’ll use that in your future writing. Rough Draft should be completed Tuesday Week 14. Final (REVISED) Copy due at your meeting week 14/15.

Critical Reflection Assignment (Essay 5) Goals: • As the name implies, the hope is you will reflect on your writing choices, which may in turn get you to rethink some of them and perhaps give you ideas for further revision. • Reflecting also gives you opportunity to reinforce good choices you made and hence remember them to do again when you write future papers. • This further provides you the opportunity to take credit for some good choices and hopefully bolster your confidence. • It allows you to point out why your paper demonstrates your competency in writing academic essays to justify a passing grade in English 111. • It also is a last ditch effort to show your thinking!!! If you explain why you made the choices you did in your synthesis essay, and you truly share your thinking, it helps you meet top box expectations yet again. Directions: 1. Choose either essay 3 or 4 to write about. 2. Take some time to reflect on how your idea for that essay came about, why you picked that idea to go with, what questions came to mind, and what pre-writing strategies you went through to get started. 3. Get out one of your copies of the English 111 Rubric. Go over it. Make sure you know what each box is looking for. 4. Plan an essay that helps you show that you have met the expectations of each box. Stress your thinking and reasoning. For any idea you include – explain why you did those things. Emphasize what you believed the job was, why you chose to approach it the way you did, the options you considered, and what you ended up doing after revising. 5. Be sure to include a discussion of effective thinking, complexity, source selection, source use, synthesis, and revision. 6. As you have teachers in your audience, it would likely be a good choice to include what you learned and how you’ll use that in your future writing. Rough Draft should be completed Tuesday Week 14. Final (REVISED) Copy due at your meeting week 14/15.

ENG 111 M05 14 Apr. 15   Forest Gump and … Read More...
Chapter 1 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Curved Motion Diagram The motion diagram shown in the figure represents a pendulum released from rest at an angle of 45 from the vertical. The dots in the motion diagram represent the positions of the pendulum bob at eleven moments separated by equal time intervals. The green arrows represent the average velocity between adjacent dots. Also given is a “compass rose” in which directions are labeled with the letters of the alphabet.  Part A What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moment 5? Enter the letter of the arrow with this direction from the compass rose in the figure. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part B What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moments 0 and 10? Enter the letters corresponding to the arrows with these directions from the compass rose in the figure, separated by commas. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again PSS 1.1 Motion Diagrams Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 1.1 for motion diagram problems. A car is traveling with constant velocity along a highway. The driver notices he is late for work, so he stomps down on the gas pedal and the car begins to speed up. The car has just achieved double its directions at time step 0, time step 10 = initial velocity when the driver spots a police officer behind him and applies the brakes. The car then slows down, coming to rest at a stoplight ahead. Draw a complete motion diagram for this situation. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 1.1 Motion diagrams MODEL: Represent the moving object as a particle. Make simplifying assumptions when interpreting the problem statement. VISUALIZE: A complete motion diagram consists of: The position of the object in each frame of the film, shown as a dot. Use five or six dots to make the motion clear but without overcrowding the picture. More complex motions may need more dots. The average velocity vectors, found by connecting each dot in the motion diagram to the next with a vector arrow. There is one velocity vector linking each set of two position dots. Label the row of velocity vectors . The average acceleration vectors, found using Tactics Box 1.3. There is one acceleration vector linking each set of two velocity vectors. Each acceleration vector is drawn at the dot between the two velocity vectors it links. Use to indicate a point at which the acceleration is zero. Label the row of acceleration vectors . Model It is appropriate to use the particle model for the car. You should also make some simplifying assumptions. v 0 a Part A The car’s motion can be divided into three different stages: its motion before the driver realizes he’s late, its motion after the driver hits the gas (but before he sees the police car), and its motion after the driver sees the police car. Which of the following simplifying assumptions is it reasonable to make in this problem? During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant A. acceleration. B. During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant velocity. C. The highway is straight (i.e., there are no curves). D. The highway is level (i.e., there are no hills or valleys). Enter all the correct answers in alphabetical order without commas. For example, if statements C and D are correct, enter CD. ANSWER: Correct In addition to the assumptions listed above, in the rest of this problem assume that the car is moving in a straight line to the right. Visualize Part B In the three diagrams shown to the left, the position of the car at five subsequent instants of time is represented by black dots, and the car’s average velocity is represented by green arrows. Which of these diagrams best describes the position and the velocity of the car before the driver notices he is late? ANSWER: Correct Part C Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver hits the gas, but before he notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct A B C A B C Part D Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the diagrams shown below most accurately depicts the average acceleration vectors of the car during the events described in the problem introduction? ANSWER: A B C Correct You can now draw a complete motion diagram for the situation described in this problem. Your diagram should look like this: Measurements in SI Units Familiarity with SI units will aid your study of physics and all other sciences. Part A What is the approximate height of the average adult in centimeters? Hint 1. Converting between feet and centimeters The distance from your elbow to your fingertips is typically about 50 . A B C cm ANSWER: Correct If you’re not familiar with metric units of length, you can use your body to develop intuition for them. The average height of an adult is 5 6.4 . The distance from elbow to fingertips on the average adult is about 50 . Ten (1 ) is about the width of this adult’s little finger and 10 is about the width of the average hand. Part B Approximately what is the mass of the average adult in kilograms? Hint 1. Converting between pounds and kilograms Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . ANSWER: Correct Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . This is a useful conversion to keep in mind! ± A Trip to Europe 100 200 300 cm cm cm feet inches cm mm cm cm pound 1 kg 2 80 500 1200 kg kg kg pound (1/2) kg Learning Goal: To understand how to use dimensional analysis to solve problems. Dimensional analysis is a useful tool for solving problems that involve unit conversions. Since unit conversion is not limited to physics problems but is part of our everyday life, correct use of conversion factors is essential to working through problems of practical importance. For example, dimensional analysis could be used in problems involving currency exchange. Say you want to calculate how many euros you get if you exchange 3600 ( ), given the exchange rate , that is, 1 to 1.20 . Begin by writing down the starting value, 3600 . This can also be written as a fraction: . Next, convert dollars to euros. This conversion involves multiplying by a simple conversion factor derived from the exchange rate: . Note that the “dollar” unit, , should appear on the bottom of this conversion factor, since appears on the top of the starting value. Finally, since dollars are divided by dollars, the units can be canceled and the final result is . Currency exchange is only one example of many practical situations where dimensional analysis may help you to work through problems. Remember that dimensional analysis involves multiplying a given value by a conversion factor, resulting in a value in the new units. The conversion factor can be the ratio of any two quantities, as long as the ratio is equal to one. You and your friends are organizing a trip to Europe. Your plan is to rent a car and drive through the major European capitals. By consulting a map you estimate that you will cover a total distance of 5000 . Consider the euro-dollar exchange rate given in the introduction and use dimensional analysis to work through these simple problems. Part A You select a rental package that includes a car with an average consumption of 6.00 of fuel per 100 . Considering that in Europe the average fuel cost is 1.063 , how much (in US dollars) will you spend in fuel on your trip? Express your answer numerically in US dollars to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: US dollars USD 1 EUR = 1.20 USD euro US dollars USD 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD USD USD ( )( ) = 3000 EUR 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD km liters km euros/liter Part B How many gallons of fuel would the rental car consume per mile? Express your answer numerically in gallons per mile to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Cost of fuel = USD gallons/mile

Chapter 1 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Curved Motion Diagram The motion diagram shown in the figure represents a pendulum released from rest at an angle of 45 from the vertical. The dots in the motion diagram represent the positions of the pendulum bob at eleven moments separated by equal time intervals. The green arrows represent the average velocity between adjacent dots. Also given is a “compass rose” in which directions are labeled with the letters of the alphabet.  Part A What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moment 5? Enter the letter of the arrow with this direction from the compass rose in the figure. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part B What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moments 0 and 10? Enter the letters corresponding to the arrows with these directions from the compass rose in the figure, separated by commas. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again PSS 1.1 Motion Diagrams Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 1.1 for motion diagram problems. A car is traveling with constant velocity along a highway. The driver notices he is late for work, so he stomps down on the gas pedal and the car begins to speed up. The car has just achieved double its directions at time step 0, time step 10 = initial velocity when the driver spots a police officer behind him and applies the brakes. The car then slows down, coming to rest at a stoplight ahead. Draw a complete motion diagram for this situation. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 1.1 Motion diagrams MODEL: Represent the moving object as a particle. Make simplifying assumptions when interpreting the problem statement. VISUALIZE: A complete motion diagram consists of: The position of the object in each frame of the film, shown as a dot. Use five or six dots to make the motion clear but without overcrowding the picture. More complex motions may need more dots. The average velocity vectors, found by connecting each dot in the motion diagram to the next with a vector arrow. There is one velocity vector linking each set of two position dots. Label the row of velocity vectors . The average acceleration vectors, found using Tactics Box 1.3. There is one acceleration vector linking each set of two velocity vectors. Each acceleration vector is drawn at the dot between the two velocity vectors it links. Use to indicate a point at which the acceleration is zero. Label the row of acceleration vectors . Model It is appropriate to use the particle model for the car. You should also make some simplifying assumptions. v 0 a Part A The car’s motion can be divided into three different stages: its motion before the driver realizes he’s late, its motion after the driver hits the gas (but before he sees the police car), and its motion after the driver sees the police car. Which of the following simplifying assumptions is it reasonable to make in this problem? During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant A. acceleration. B. During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant velocity. C. The highway is straight (i.e., there are no curves). D. The highway is level (i.e., there are no hills or valleys). Enter all the correct answers in alphabetical order without commas. For example, if statements C and D are correct, enter CD. ANSWER: Correct In addition to the assumptions listed above, in the rest of this problem assume that the car is moving in a straight line to the right. Visualize Part B In the three diagrams shown to the left, the position of the car at five subsequent instants of time is represented by black dots, and the car’s average velocity is represented by green arrows. Which of these diagrams best describes the position and the velocity of the car before the driver notices he is late? ANSWER: Correct Part C Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver hits the gas, but before he notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct A B C A B C Part D Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the diagrams shown below most accurately depicts the average acceleration vectors of the car during the events described in the problem introduction? ANSWER: A B C Correct You can now draw a complete motion diagram for the situation described in this problem. Your diagram should look like this: Measurements in SI Units Familiarity with SI units will aid your study of physics and all other sciences. Part A What is the approximate height of the average adult in centimeters? Hint 1. Converting between feet and centimeters The distance from your elbow to your fingertips is typically about 50 . A B C cm ANSWER: Correct If you’re not familiar with metric units of length, you can use your body to develop intuition for them. The average height of an adult is 5 6.4 . The distance from elbow to fingertips on the average adult is about 50 . Ten (1 ) is about the width of this adult’s little finger and 10 is about the width of the average hand. Part B Approximately what is the mass of the average adult in kilograms? Hint 1. Converting between pounds and kilograms Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . ANSWER: Correct Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . This is a useful conversion to keep in mind! ± A Trip to Europe 100 200 300 cm cm cm feet inches cm mm cm cm pound 1 kg 2 80 500 1200 kg kg kg pound (1/2) kg Learning Goal: To understand how to use dimensional analysis to solve problems. Dimensional analysis is a useful tool for solving problems that involve unit conversions. Since unit conversion is not limited to physics problems but is part of our everyday life, correct use of conversion factors is essential to working through problems of practical importance. For example, dimensional analysis could be used in problems involving currency exchange. Say you want to calculate how many euros you get if you exchange 3600 ( ), given the exchange rate , that is, 1 to 1.20 . Begin by writing down the starting value, 3600 . This can also be written as a fraction: . Next, convert dollars to euros. This conversion involves multiplying by a simple conversion factor derived from the exchange rate: . Note that the “dollar” unit, , should appear on the bottom of this conversion factor, since appears on the top of the starting value. Finally, since dollars are divided by dollars, the units can be canceled and the final result is . Currency exchange is only one example of many practical situations where dimensional analysis may help you to work through problems. Remember that dimensional analysis involves multiplying a given value by a conversion factor, resulting in a value in the new units. The conversion factor can be the ratio of any two quantities, as long as the ratio is equal to one. You and your friends are organizing a trip to Europe. Your plan is to rent a car and drive through the major European capitals. By consulting a map you estimate that you will cover a total distance of 5000 . Consider the euro-dollar exchange rate given in the introduction and use dimensional analysis to work through these simple problems. Part A You select a rental package that includes a car with an average consumption of 6.00 of fuel per 100 . Considering that in Europe the average fuel cost is 1.063 , how much (in US dollars) will you spend in fuel on your trip? Express your answer numerically in US dollars to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: US dollars USD 1 EUR = 1.20 USD euro US dollars USD 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD USD USD ( )( ) = 3000 EUR 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD km liters km euros/liter Part B How many gallons of fuel would the rental car consume per mile? Express your answer numerically in gallons per mile to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Cost of fuel = USD gallons/mile

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CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

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