Question 1 When using NTFS as a file system, what can be used to control the amount of hard disk space each user on the machine can have as a maximum? Answer Logical drives Extended partitions Disk quotas Security Center Question 2 Pin 1 of the floppy cable connects to pin 34 of the controller. Answer True False Question 3 What is the primary cause of hard drive failures? Answer Heat Dust Dirty laser lens Moving parts Question 4 The DBR contains the system files. Answer True False Question 5 A spanned volume requires a minimum of three hard drives. Answer True False Question 6 Which situation would not be appropriate for the use of SSDs? Answer A military operation where fast access to data is critical A medical imaging office that needs high-capacity storage A manufacturing plant with heat-sensitive equipment A research facility where noise must be kept to a minimum Question 7 Why are SSDs more susceptible than mechanical hard drives to electrostatic discharge? Answer The internal battery of the SSD provides additional current. SSDs are memory. The voltage level of the SSD is lower than a mechanical hard drive. The SSD is a more fragile component. Question 8 A motherboard has two PATA IDE connectors, A and B. A is nearer the edge than B. The IDE cable from A connects to a 500GB hard drive and then to a 200GB hard drive. The IDE cable from B connects to an R/W optical drive and then to a Blu-ray optical drive. Assuming the setup is optimal, which of the following describes the 500GB hard drive? Answer Primary slave Secondary slave Primary master Secondary master Question 9 The primary IDE motherboard connection normally uses I/O address 1F0 -1F7h and IRQ 15. Answer True False Question 10 A cable with a twist is used when installing two floppy drives. Answer True False Question 11 What does partitioning the hard drive mean? Answer Dividing the hard drive up into three different sections: one for each type of file system Preparing the drive to be mounted Giving the hard drive a drive letter and/or allowing the hard drive to be seen as more than one drive Preparing the drive for an operating system Question 12 The Network Engineering Technology departmental secretary is getting a new computer funded by a grant. The old computer is being moved by the PC technicians to give to the new program facilitator in another department. Which one of the following is most likely to be used before the program facilitator uses the computer? Answer Check Now Tool Backup Tool Disk Management Tool BitLocker Question 13 What is CHKDSK? Answer A command used to scan the disk for viruses during off hours A program used to defragment the hard drive A program used to locate and identify lost clusters A command used to verify the validity of the drive surface before installing a file system or an operating system Question 14 When a disk has been prepared to store data, it has been Answer Cleaned Tracked Enabled Formatted Question 15 Where would you go to enable a SATA port? Answer CMOS BIOS Disk Management Tool Task Manager Question 16 The Windows boot partition is the partition that must contain the majority of the operating system. Answer True False Question 17 Two considerations when adding or installing a floppy drive are an available drive bay and an available power connector. Answer True False Question 18 What is the difference between a SATA 2 and a SATA 3 hard drive? Answer The SATA 3 has a different power connector. The SATA 3 device transmits more simultaneous bits than SATA 2. The SATA 3 device transmits data faster. SATA 3 will always be a larger capacity drive. The SATA 3 device will be physically smaller. Question 19 What command would be used in Windows 7 to repair a partition table? Answer FDISK FORMAT FIXBOOT bootrec /FixMbr FIXMBR Question 20 What file system is optimized for optical media? Answer exFAT FAT32 CDFS NTFS Question 21 One of the most effective ways of increasing computer performance is to increase the size of virtual memory. Answer True False Question 22 Older PATA IDE cables and the Ultra ATA/66 cable differ by Answer Where the twist occurs The number of conductors The number of pins The number of devices they can connect to Question 23 Which of the following is NOT important in assigning SCSI IDs? Answer The hard drive that the system boots to may have a preset ID. ID priority must match the order of appearance on the SCSI chain. All devices must have unique IDs. Slower devices should have higher priority IDs. Question 24 The ATA standard is associated with the SCSI interface. Answer True False Question 25 A striped volume requires a minimum of two hard drives. Answer True False

Question 1 When using NTFS as a file system, what can be used to control the amount of hard disk space each user on the machine can have as a maximum? Answer Logical drives Extended partitions Disk quotas Security Center Question 2 Pin 1 of the floppy cable connects to pin 34 of the controller. Answer True False Question 3 What is the primary cause of hard drive failures? Answer Heat Dust Dirty laser lens Moving parts Question 4 The DBR contains the system files. Answer True False Question 5 A spanned volume requires a minimum of three hard drives. Answer True False Question 6 Which situation would not be appropriate for the use of SSDs? Answer A military operation where fast access to data is critical A medical imaging office that needs high-capacity storage A manufacturing plant with heat-sensitive equipment A research facility where noise must be kept to a minimum Question 7 Why are SSDs more susceptible than mechanical hard drives to electrostatic discharge? Answer The internal battery of the SSD provides additional current. SSDs are memory. The voltage level of the SSD is lower than a mechanical hard drive. The SSD is a more fragile component. Question 8 A motherboard has two PATA IDE connectors, A and B. A is nearer the edge than B. The IDE cable from A connects to a 500GB hard drive and then to a 200GB hard drive. The IDE cable from B connects to an R/W optical drive and then to a Blu-ray optical drive. Assuming the setup is optimal, which of the following describes the 500GB hard drive? Answer Primary slave Secondary slave Primary master Secondary master Question 9 The primary IDE motherboard connection normally uses I/O address 1F0 -1F7h and IRQ 15. Answer True False Question 10 A cable with a twist is used when installing two floppy drives. Answer True False Question 11 What does partitioning the hard drive mean? Answer Dividing the hard drive up into three different sections: one for each type of file system Preparing the drive to be mounted Giving the hard drive a drive letter and/or allowing the hard drive to be seen as more than one drive Preparing the drive for an operating system Question 12 The Network Engineering Technology departmental secretary is getting a new computer funded by a grant. The old computer is being moved by the PC technicians to give to the new program facilitator in another department. Which one of the following is most likely to be used before the program facilitator uses the computer? Answer Check Now Tool Backup Tool Disk Management Tool BitLocker Question 13 What is CHKDSK? Answer A command used to scan the disk for viruses during off hours A program used to defragment the hard drive A program used to locate and identify lost clusters A command used to verify the validity of the drive surface before installing a file system or an operating system Question 14 When a disk has been prepared to store data, it has been Answer Cleaned Tracked Enabled Formatted Question 15 Where would you go to enable a SATA port? Answer CMOS BIOS Disk Management Tool Task Manager Question 16 The Windows boot partition is the partition that must contain the majority of the operating system. Answer True False Question 17 Two considerations when adding or installing a floppy drive are an available drive bay and an available power connector. Answer True False Question 18 What is the difference between a SATA 2 and a SATA 3 hard drive? Answer The SATA 3 has a different power connector. The SATA 3 device transmits more simultaneous bits than SATA 2. The SATA 3 device transmits data faster. SATA 3 will always be a larger capacity drive. The SATA 3 device will be physically smaller. Question 19 What command would be used in Windows 7 to repair a partition table? Answer FDISK FORMAT FIXBOOT bootrec /FixMbr FIXMBR Question 20 What file system is optimized for optical media? Answer exFAT FAT32 CDFS NTFS Question 21 One of the most effective ways of increasing computer performance is to increase the size of virtual memory. Answer True False Question 22 Older PATA IDE cables and the Ultra ATA/66 cable differ by Answer Where the twist occurs The number of conductors The number of pins The number of devices they can connect to Question 23 Which of the following is NOT important in assigning SCSI IDs? Answer The hard drive that the system boots to may have a preset ID. ID priority must match the order of appearance on the SCSI chain. All devices must have unique IDs. Slower devices should have higher priority IDs. Question 24 The ATA standard is associated with the SCSI interface. Answer True False Question 25 A striped volume requires a minimum of two hard drives. Answer True False

Question 1   When using NTFS as a file system, … Read More...
Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

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A moving 4.7 kg block collides with a horizontal spring whose spring constant is 210 N/m. The block compresses the spring a maximum distance of 9.5 cm from its rest postion. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the horizontal surface is 0.38. What is the work done by the spring in bringing the block to rest?

A moving 4.7 kg block collides with a horizontal spring whose spring constant is 210 N/m. The block compresses the spring a maximum distance of 9.5 cm from its rest postion. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the block and the horizontal surface is 0.38. What is the work done by the spring in bringing the block to rest?

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Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER:

Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER:

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Assignment 1 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 1.6 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Positive Negative Negative Positive Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 1.7 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Positive Negative Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 1.18 The figure shows the motion diagram of a drag racer. The camera took one frame every 2 . Positive Negative Positive Negative Negative Positive s You may want to review ( pages 16 – 19) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Plotting Points on a Graph Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the drag racer. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Based on Table 1.1 in the book/e-text, what two observables are associated with each point? Which position or point of the drag racer occurs first? Which position occurs last? If you label the first point as happening at , at what time does the next point occur? At what time does the last position point occur? What is the position of a point halfway in between and ? Can you think of a way to estimate the positions of the points using a ruler? ANSWER: t = 0 s x = 0 m x = 200 m Correct Motion of Two Rockets Learning Goal: To learn to use images of an object in motion to determine velocity and acceleration. Two toy rockets are traveling in the same direction (taken to be the x axis). A diagram is shown of a time-exposure image where a stroboscope has illuminated the rockets at the uniform time intervals indicated. Part A At what time(s) do the rockets have the same velocity? Hint 1. How to determine the velocity The diagram shows position, not velocity. You can’t find instantaneous velocity from this diagram, but you can determine the average velocity between two times and : . Note that no position values are given in the diagram; you will need to estimate these based on the distance between successive positions of the rockets. ANSWER: Correct t1 t2 vavg[t1, t2] = x(t2)−x(t1) t2−t1 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Part B At what time(s) do the rockets have the same x position? ANSWER: Correct Part C At what time(s) do the two rockets have the same acceleration? Hint 1. How to determine the acceleration The velocity is related to the spacing between images in a stroboscopic diagram. Since acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes, the acceleration is related to the how much this spacing changes from one interval to the next. ANSWER: at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct Part D The motion of the rocket labeled A is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part E The motion of the rocket labeled B is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part F At what time(s) is rocket A ahead of rocket B? and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time Hint 1. Use the diagram You can answer this question by looking at the diagram and identifying the time(s) when rocket A is to the right of rocket B. ANSWER: Correct Dimensions of Physical Quantities Learning Goal: To introduce the idea of physical dimensions and to learn how to find them. Physical quantities are generally not purely numerical: They have a particular dimension or combination of dimensions associated with them. Thus, your height is not 74, but rather 74 inches, often expressed as 6 feet 2 inches. Although feet and inches are different units they have the same dimension–length. Part A In classical mechanics there are three base dimensions. Length is one of them. What are the other two? Hint 1. MKS system The current system of units is called the International System (abbreviated SI from the French Système International). In the past this system was called the mks system for its base units: meter, kilogram, and second. What are the dimensions of these quantities? ANSWER: before only after only before and after between and at no time(s) shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct There are three dimensions used in mechanics: length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). A combination of these three dimensions suffices to express any physical quantity, because when a new physical quantity is needed (e.g., velocity), it always obeys an equation that permits it to be expressed in terms of the units used for these three dimensions. One then derives a unit to measure the new physical quantity from that equation, and often its unit is given a special name. Such new dimensions are called derived dimensions and the units they are measured in are called derived units. For example, area has derived dimensions . (Note that “dimensions of variable ” is symbolized as .) You can find these dimensions by looking at the formula for the area of a square , where is the length of a side of the square. Clearly . Plugging this into the equation gives . Part B Find the dimensions of volume. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for volume You have likely learned many formulas for the volume of various shapes in geometry. Any of these equations will give you the dimensions for volume. You can find the dimensions most easily from the volume of a cube , where is the length of the edge of the cube. ANSWER: acceleration and mass acceleration and time acceleration and charge mass and time mass and charge time and charge l m t A [A] = l2 x [x] A = s2 s [s] = l [A] = [s] = 2 l2 [V ] l m t V = e3 e [V ] = l3 Correct Part C Find the dimensions of speed. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for speed Speed is defined in terms of distance and time as . Therefore, . Hint 2. Familiar units for speed You are probably accustomed to hearing speeds in miles per hour (or possibly kilometers per hour). Think about the dimensions for miles and hours. If you divide the dimensions for miles by the dimensions for hours, you will have the dimensions for speed. ANSWER: Correct The dimensions of a quantity are not changed by addition or subtraction of another quantity with the same dimensions. This means that , which comes from subtracting two speeds, has the same dimensions as speed. It does not make physical sense to add or subtract two quanitites that have different dimensions, like length plus time. You can add quantities that have different units, like miles per hour and kilometers per hour, as long as you convert both quantities to the same set of units before you actually compute the sum. You can use this rule to check your answers to any physics problem you work. If the answer involves the sum or difference of two quantities with different dimensions, then it must be incorrect. This rule also ensures that the dimensions of any physical quantity will never involve sums or differences of the base dimensions. (As in the preceeding example, is not a valid dimension for a [v] l m t v d t v = d t [v] = [d]/[t] [v] = lt−1 v l + t physical quantitiy.) A valid dimension will only involve the product or ratio of powers of the base dimensions (e.g. ). Part D Find the dimensions of acceleration. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for acceleration In physics, acceleration is defined as the change in velocity in a certain time. This is shown by the equation . The is a symbol that means “the change in.” ANSWER: Correct Consistency of Units In physics, every physical quantity is measured with respect to a unit. Time is measured in seconds, length is measured in meters, and mass is measured in kilograms. Knowing the units of physical quantities will help you solve problems in physics. Part A Gravity causes objects to be attracted to one another. This attraction keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground and causes the moon to orbit the earth. The force of gravitational attraction is represented by the equation , where is the magnitude of the gravitational attraction on either body, and are the masses of the bodies, is the distance between them, and is the gravitational constant. In SI units, the units of force are , the units of mass are , and the units of distance are . For this equation to have consistent units, the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation m2/3 l2 t−2 [a] l m t a a = v/t  [a] = lt−2 F = Gm1m2 r2 F m1 m2 r G kg  m/s2 kg m G . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: Correct Part B One consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that mass is a form of energy. This mass-energy relationship is perhaps the most famous of all physics equations: , where is mass, is the speed of the light, and is the energy. In SI units, the units of speed are . For the preceding equation to have consistent units (the same units on both sides of the equation), the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: F = Gm1m2 r2 m1 kg G kg3 ms2 kgs2 m3 m3 kgs2 m kgs2 E = mc2 m c E m/s E E = mc2 m kg E Correct To solve the types of problems typified by these examples, we start with the given equation. For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for the units of the unknown variable. Problem 1.24 Convert the following to SI units: Part A 5.0 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B 54 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. kgm s kgm2 s2 kgs2 m2 kgm2 s m kg in 0.13 m ft/s ANSWER: Correct Part C 72 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D 17 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 1.55 The figure shows a motion diagram of a car traveling down a street. The camera took one frame every 10 . A distance scale is provided. 16 ms mph 32 ms in2 1.1×10−2 m2 s Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the car. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again ± Moving at the Speed of Light Part A How many nanoseconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 in vacuum? Express your answer numerically in nanoseconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Light travels at a constant speed; therefore, you can use the formula for the distance traveled in a certain amount of time by an object moving at constant speed. Before performing any calculations, it is often recommended, although it is not strictly necessary, to convert all quantities to their fundamental units rather than to multiples of the fundamental unit. km Hint 2. Find how many seconds it takes light to travel the given distance Given that the speed of light in vacuum is , how many seconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 ? Express your answer numerically in seconds. Hint 1. Find the time it takes light to travel a certain distance How long does it take light to travel a distance ? Let be the speed of light. Hint 1. The speed of an object The equation that relates the distance traveled by an object with constant speed in a time is . ANSWER: Correct Hint 2. Convert the given distance to meters Convert = 4.40 to meters. Express your answer numerically in meters. Hint 1. Conversion of kilometers to meters Recall that . 3.00 × 108 m/s km r c s v t s = vt r  c r c c r d km 1 km = 103 m ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Correct Now convert the time into nanoseconds. Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.7%. You received 50.84 out of a possible total of 60 points. 4.40km = 4400 m 1.47×10−5 s 1 ns = 10−9 s 1.47×104 ns

Assignment 1 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 1.6 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Positive Negative Negative Positive Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 1.7 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Positive Negative Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 1.18 The figure shows the motion diagram of a drag racer. The camera took one frame every 2 . Positive Negative Positive Negative Negative Positive s You may want to review ( pages 16 – 19) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Plotting Points on a Graph Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the drag racer. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Based on Table 1.1 in the book/e-text, what two observables are associated with each point? Which position or point of the drag racer occurs first? Which position occurs last? If you label the first point as happening at , at what time does the next point occur? At what time does the last position point occur? What is the position of a point halfway in between and ? Can you think of a way to estimate the positions of the points using a ruler? ANSWER: t = 0 s x = 0 m x = 200 m Correct Motion of Two Rockets Learning Goal: To learn to use images of an object in motion to determine velocity and acceleration. Two toy rockets are traveling in the same direction (taken to be the x axis). A diagram is shown of a time-exposure image where a stroboscope has illuminated the rockets at the uniform time intervals indicated. Part A At what time(s) do the rockets have the same velocity? Hint 1. How to determine the velocity The diagram shows position, not velocity. You can’t find instantaneous velocity from this diagram, but you can determine the average velocity between two times and : . Note that no position values are given in the diagram; you will need to estimate these based on the distance between successive positions of the rockets. ANSWER: Correct t1 t2 vavg[t1, t2] = x(t2)−x(t1) t2−t1 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Part B At what time(s) do the rockets have the same x position? ANSWER: Correct Part C At what time(s) do the two rockets have the same acceleration? Hint 1. How to determine the acceleration The velocity is related to the spacing between images in a stroboscopic diagram. Since acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes, the acceleration is related to the how much this spacing changes from one interval to the next. ANSWER: at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct Part D The motion of the rocket labeled A is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part E The motion of the rocket labeled B is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part F At what time(s) is rocket A ahead of rocket B? and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time Hint 1. Use the diagram You can answer this question by looking at the diagram and identifying the time(s) when rocket A is to the right of rocket B. ANSWER: Correct Dimensions of Physical Quantities Learning Goal: To introduce the idea of physical dimensions and to learn how to find them. Physical quantities are generally not purely numerical: They have a particular dimension or combination of dimensions associated with them. Thus, your height is not 74, but rather 74 inches, often expressed as 6 feet 2 inches. Although feet and inches are different units they have the same dimension–length. Part A In classical mechanics there are three base dimensions. Length is one of them. What are the other two? Hint 1. MKS system The current system of units is called the International System (abbreviated SI from the French Système International). In the past this system was called the mks system for its base units: meter, kilogram, and second. What are the dimensions of these quantities? ANSWER: before only after only before and after between and at no time(s) shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct There are three dimensions used in mechanics: length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). A combination of these three dimensions suffices to express any physical quantity, because when a new physical quantity is needed (e.g., velocity), it always obeys an equation that permits it to be expressed in terms of the units used for these three dimensions. One then derives a unit to measure the new physical quantity from that equation, and often its unit is given a special name. Such new dimensions are called derived dimensions and the units they are measured in are called derived units. For example, area has derived dimensions . (Note that “dimensions of variable ” is symbolized as .) You can find these dimensions by looking at the formula for the area of a square , where is the length of a side of the square. Clearly . Plugging this into the equation gives . Part B Find the dimensions of volume. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for volume You have likely learned many formulas for the volume of various shapes in geometry. Any of these equations will give you the dimensions for volume. You can find the dimensions most easily from the volume of a cube , where is the length of the edge of the cube. ANSWER: acceleration and mass acceleration and time acceleration and charge mass and time mass and charge time and charge l m t A [A] = l2 x [x] A = s2 s [s] = l [A] = [s] = 2 l2 [V ] l m t V = e3 e [V ] = l3 Correct Part C Find the dimensions of speed. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for speed Speed is defined in terms of distance and time as . Therefore, . Hint 2. Familiar units for speed You are probably accustomed to hearing speeds in miles per hour (or possibly kilometers per hour). Think about the dimensions for miles and hours. If you divide the dimensions for miles by the dimensions for hours, you will have the dimensions for speed. ANSWER: Correct The dimensions of a quantity are not changed by addition or subtraction of another quantity with the same dimensions. This means that , which comes from subtracting two speeds, has the same dimensions as speed. It does not make physical sense to add or subtract two quanitites that have different dimensions, like length plus time. You can add quantities that have different units, like miles per hour and kilometers per hour, as long as you convert both quantities to the same set of units before you actually compute the sum. You can use this rule to check your answers to any physics problem you work. If the answer involves the sum or difference of two quantities with different dimensions, then it must be incorrect. This rule also ensures that the dimensions of any physical quantity will never involve sums or differences of the base dimensions. (As in the preceeding example, is not a valid dimension for a [v] l m t v d t v = d t [v] = [d]/[t] [v] = lt−1 v l + t physical quantitiy.) A valid dimension will only involve the product or ratio of powers of the base dimensions (e.g. ). Part D Find the dimensions of acceleration. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for acceleration In physics, acceleration is defined as the change in velocity in a certain time. This is shown by the equation . The is a symbol that means “the change in.” ANSWER: Correct Consistency of Units In physics, every physical quantity is measured with respect to a unit. Time is measured in seconds, length is measured in meters, and mass is measured in kilograms. Knowing the units of physical quantities will help you solve problems in physics. Part A Gravity causes objects to be attracted to one another. This attraction keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground and causes the moon to orbit the earth. The force of gravitational attraction is represented by the equation , where is the magnitude of the gravitational attraction on either body, and are the masses of the bodies, is the distance between them, and is the gravitational constant. In SI units, the units of force are , the units of mass are , and the units of distance are . For this equation to have consistent units, the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation m2/3 l2 t−2 [a] l m t a a = v/t  [a] = lt−2 F = Gm1m2 r2 F m1 m2 r G kg  m/s2 kg m G . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: Correct Part B One consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that mass is a form of energy. This mass-energy relationship is perhaps the most famous of all physics equations: , where is mass, is the speed of the light, and is the energy. In SI units, the units of speed are . For the preceding equation to have consistent units (the same units on both sides of the equation), the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: F = Gm1m2 r2 m1 kg G kg3 ms2 kgs2 m3 m3 kgs2 m kgs2 E = mc2 m c E m/s E E = mc2 m kg E Correct To solve the types of problems typified by these examples, we start with the given equation. For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for the units of the unknown variable. Problem 1.24 Convert the following to SI units: Part A 5.0 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B 54 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. kgm s kgm2 s2 kgs2 m2 kgm2 s m kg in 0.13 m ft/s ANSWER: Correct Part C 72 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D 17 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 1.55 The figure shows a motion diagram of a car traveling down a street. The camera took one frame every 10 . A distance scale is provided. 16 ms mph 32 ms in2 1.1×10−2 m2 s Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the car. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again ± Moving at the Speed of Light Part A How many nanoseconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 in vacuum? Express your answer numerically in nanoseconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Light travels at a constant speed; therefore, you can use the formula for the distance traveled in a certain amount of time by an object moving at constant speed. Before performing any calculations, it is often recommended, although it is not strictly necessary, to convert all quantities to their fundamental units rather than to multiples of the fundamental unit. km Hint 2. Find how many seconds it takes light to travel the given distance Given that the speed of light in vacuum is , how many seconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 ? Express your answer numerically in seconds. Hint 1. Find the time it takes light to travel a certain distance How long does it take light to travel a distance ? Let be the speed of light. Hint 1. The speed of an object The equation that relates the distance traveled by an object with constant speed in a time is . ANSWER: Correct Hint 2. Convert the given distance to meters Convert = 4.40 to meters. Express your answer numerically in meters. Hint 1. Conversion of kilometers to meters Recall that . 3.00 × 108 m/s km r c s v t s = vt r  c r c c r d km 1 km = 103 m ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Correct Now convert the time into nanoseconds. Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.7%. You received 50.84 out of a possible total of 60 points. 4.40km = 4400 m 1.47×10−5 s 1 ns = 10−9 s 1.47×104 ns

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Think about a game of tug-of-war with your friends. If both sides are pulling and neither side is moving, then the forces are balanced. How would you describe the forces if one person is taken away from the game?

Think about a game of tug-of-war with your friends. If both sides are pulling and neither side is moving, then the forces are balanced. How would you describe the forces if one person is taken away from the game?

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Chapter 9 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Momentum and Internal Forces Learning Goal: To understand the concept of total momentum for a system of objects and the effect of the internal forces on the total momentum. We begin by introducing the following terms: System: Any collection of objects, either pointlike or extended. In many momentum-related problems, you have a certain freedom in choosing the objects to be considered as your system. Making a wise choice is often a crucial step in solving the problem. Internal force: Any force interaction between two objects belonging to the chosen system. Let us stress that both interacting objects must belong to the system. External force: Any force interaction between objects at least one of which does not belong to the chosen system; in other words, at least one of the objects is external to the system. Closed system: a system that is not subject to any external forces. Total momentum: The vector sum of the individual momenta of all objects constituting the system. In this problem, you will analyze a system composed of two blocks, 1 and 2, of respective masses and . To simplify the analysis, we will make several assumptions: The blocks can move in only one dimension, namely, 1. along the x axis. 2. The masses of the blocks remain constant. 3. The system is closed. At time , the x components of the velocity and the acceleration of block 1 are denoted by and . Similarly, the x components of the velocity and acceleration of block 2 are denoted by and . In this problem, you will show that the total momentum of the system is not changed by the presence of internal forces. m1 m2 t v1(t) a1 (t) v2 (t) a2 (t) Part A Find , the x component of the total momentum of the system at time . Express your answer in terms of , , , and . ANSWER: Part B Find the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum. Express your answer in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Why did we bother with all this math? The expression for the derivative of momentum that we just obtained will be useful in reaching our desired conclusion, if only for this very special case. Part C The quantity (mass times acceleration) is dimensionally equivalent to which of the following? ANSWER: p(t) t m1 m2 v1 (t) v2 (t) p(t) = dp(t)/dt a1 (t) a2 (t) m1 m2 dp(t)/dt = ma Part D Acceleration is due to which of the following physical quantities? ANSWER: Part E Since we have assumed that the system composed of blocks 1 and 2 is closed, what could be the reason for the acceleration of block 1? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: momentum energy force acceleration inertia velocity speed energy momentum force Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Let us denote the x component of the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the x component of the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . Which of the following pairs equalities is a direct consequence of Newton’s second law? ANSWER: Part H Let us recall that we have denoted the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . If we suppose that is greater than , which of the following statements about forces is true? You did not open hints for this part. the large mass of block 1 air resistance Earth’s gravitational attraction a force exerted by block 2 on block 1 a force exerted by block 1 on block 2 F12 F21 and and and and F12 = m2a2 F21 = m1a1 F12 = m1a1 F21 = m2a2 F12 = m1a2 F21 = m2a1 F12 = m2a1 F21 = m1a2 F12 F21 m1 m2 ANSWER: Part I Now recall the expression for the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum: . Considering the information that you now have, choose the best alternative for an equivalent expression to . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Impulse and Momentum Ranking Task Six automobiles are initially traveling at the indicated velocities. The automobiles have different masses and velocities. The drivers step on the brakes and all automobiles are brought to rest. Part A Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of their momentum before the brakes are applied, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. ANSWER: Both forces have equal magnitudes. |F12 | > |F21| |F21 | > |F12| dpx(t)/dt = Fx dpx(t)/dt 0 nonzero constant kt kt2 Part B Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of the impulse needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Rank the automobiles based on the magnitude of the force needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Game of Frictionless Catch Chuck and Jackie stand on separate carts, both of which can slide without friction. The combined mass of Chuck and his cart, , is identical to the combined mass of Jackie and her cart. Initially, Chuck and Jackie and their carts are at rest. Chuck then picks up a ball of mass and throws it to Jackie, who catches it. Assume that the ball travels in a straight line parallel to the ground (ignore the effect of gravity). After Chuck throws the ball, his speed relative to the ground is . The speed of the thrown ball relative to the ground is . Jackie catches the ball when it reaches her, and she and her cart begin to move. Jackie’s speed relative to the ground after she catches the ball is . When answering the questions in this problem, keep the following in mind: The original mass of Chuck and his cart does not include the 1. mass of the ball. 2. The speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity. An object’s speed will always be a nonnegative quantity. mcart mball vc vb vj mcart Part A Find the relative speed between Chuck and the ball after Chuck has thrown the ball. Express the speed in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of the ball (relative to the ground) while it is in the air? Express your answer in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is Chuck’s speed (relative to the ground) after he throws the ball? Express your answer in terms of , , and . u vc vb u = vb mball mcart u vb = vc mball mcart u You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vc = vj vb vj mball mcart vb vj = vj u vj mball mcart u Momentum in an Explosion A giant “egg” explodes as part of a fireworks display. The egg is at rest before the explosion, and after the explosion, it breaks into two pieces, with the masses indicated in the diagram, traveling in opposite directions. Part A What is the momentum of piece A before the explosion? Express your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vj = pA,i Part B During the explosion, is the force of piece A on piece B greater than, less than, or equal to the force of piece B on piece A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The momentum of piece B is measured to be 500 after the explosion. Find the momentum of piece A after the explosion. Enter your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pA,i = kg  m/s greater than less than equal to cannot be determined kg  m/s pA,f pA,f = kg  m/s ± PSS 9.1 Conservation of Momentum Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 9.1 for conservation of momentum problems. An 80- quarterback jumps straight up in the air right before throwing a 0.43- football horizontally at 15 . How fast will he be moving backward just after releasing the ball? PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 9.1 Conservation of momentum MODEL: Clearly define the system. If possible, choose a system that is isolated ( ) or within which the interactions are sufficiently short and intense that you can ignore external forces for the duration of the interaction (the impulse approximation). Momentum is conserved. If it is not possible to choose an isolated system, try to divide the problem into parts such that momentum is conserved during one segment of the motion. Other segments of the motion can be analyzed using Newton’s laws or, as you will learn later, conservation of energy. VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of momentum: . In component form, this is ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The interaction at study in this problem is the action of throwing the ball, performed by the quarterback while being off the ground. To apply conservation of momentum to this interaction, you will need to clearly define a system that is isolated or within which the impulse approximation can be applied. Part A Sort the following objects as part of the system or not. Drag the appropriate objects to their respective bins. ANSWER: kg kg m/s F = net 0 P = f P  i (pfx + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfx)2 pfx)3 pix)1 pix)2 pix)3 (pfy + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfy)2 pfy)3 piy)1 piy)2 piy)3 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Visualize Solve Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Assess Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conservation of Momentum in Inelastic Collisions Learning Goal: To understand the vector nature of momentum in the case in which two objects collide and stick together. In this problem we will consider a collision of two moving objects such that after the collision, the objects stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. You have probably learned that “momentum is conserved” in an inelastic collision. But how does this fact help you to solve collision problems? The following questions should help you to clarify the meaning and implications of the statement “momentum is conserved.” Part A What physical quantities are conserved in this collision? ANSWER: Part B Two cars of equal mass collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their speeds are and . What is the speed of the two-car system after the collision? the magnitude of the momentum only the net momentum (considered as a vector) only the momentum of each object considered individually v1 v2 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, what is the magnitude of their combined momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. v1 + v2 v1 − v2 v2 − v1 v1v2 −−−− ” v1+v2 2 v1 + 2 v2 2 −−−−−−−  p1 p2 Part D Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their momenta are and . After the collision, their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, the magnitude of their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. p1 + p2 p1 − p2 p2 − p1 p1p2 −−−− ” p1+p2 2 p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  p 1 p 2 p p = p1 + # p2 # p = p1 − # p2 # p = p2 − # p1 # p1 p2 p You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Colliding Cars In this problem we will consider the collision of two cars initially moving at right angles. We assume that after the collision the cars stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. Two cars of masses and collide at an intersection. Before the collision, car 1 was traveling eastward at a speed of , and car 2 was traveling northward at a speed of . After the collision, the two cars stick together and travel off in the direction shown. Part A p1 + p2 $ p $ p1p2 −−−− ” p1 +p2 $ p $ p1+p2 2 p1 + p2 $ p $ |p1 − p2 | p1 + p2 $ p $ p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  m1 m2 v1 v2 First, find the magnitude of , that is, the speed of the two-car unit after the collision. Express in terms of , , and the cars’ initial speeds and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the tangent of the angle . Express your answer in terms of the momenta of the two cars, and . ANSWER: Part C Suppose that after the collision, ; in other words, is . This means that before the collision: ANSWER: v v v m1 m2 v1 v2 v = p1 p2 tan( ) = tan = 1 45′ The magnitudes of the momenta of the cars were equal. The masses of the cars were equal. The velocities of the cars were equal. ± Catching a Ball on Ice Olaf is standing on a sheet of ice that covers the football stadium parking lot in Buffalo, New York; there is negligible friction between his feet and the ice. A friend throws Olaf a ball of mass 0.400 that is traveling horizontally at 11.2 . Olaf’s mass is 67.1 . Part A If Olaf catches the ball, with what speed do Olaf and the ball move afterward? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B kg m/s kg vf vf = m/s If the ball hits Olaf and bounces off his chest horizontally at 8.00 in the opposite direction, what is his speed after the collision? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 2.90 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 25.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 17.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. m/s vf vf = m/s m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. pi = kg  m/s vf vf = m/s

Chapter 9 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Momentum and Internal Forces Learning Goal: To understand the concept of total momentum for a system of objects and the effect of the internal forces on the total momentum. We begin by introducing the following terms: System: Any collection of objects, either pointlike or extended. In many momentum-related problems, you have a certain freedom in choosing the objects to be considered as your system. Making a wise choice is often a crucial step in solving the problem. Internal force: Any force interaction between two objects belonging to the chosen system. Let us stress that both interacting objects must belong to the system. External force: Any force interaction between objects at least one of which does not belong to the chosen system; in other words, at least one of the objects is external to the system. Closed system: a system that is not subject to any external forces. Total momentum: The vector sum of the individual momenta of all objects constituting the system. In this problem, you will analyze a system composed of two blocks, 1 and 2, of respective masses and . To simplify the analysis, we will make several assumptions: The blocks can move in only one dimension, namely, 1. along the x axis. 2. The masses of the blocks remain constant. 3. The system is closed. At time , the x components of the velocity and the acceleration of block 1 are denoted by and . Similarly, the x components of the velocity and acceleration of block 2 are denoted by and . In this problem, you will show that the total momentum of the system is not changed by the presence of internal forces. m1 m2 t v1(t) a1 (t) v2 (t) a2 (t) Part A Find , the x component of the total momentum of the system at time . Express your answer in terms of , , , and . ANSWER: Part B Find the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum. Express your answer in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Why did we bother with all this math? The expression for the derivative of momentum that we just obtained will be useful in reaching our desired conclusion, if only for this very special case. Part C The quantity (mass times acceleration) is dimensionally equivalent to which of the following? ANSWER: p(t) t m1 m2 v1 (t) v2 (t) p(t) = dp(t)/dt a1 (t) a2 (t) m1 m2 dp(t)/dt = ma Part D Acceleration is due to which of the following physical quantities? ANSWER: Part E Since we have assumed that the system composed of blocks 1 and 2 is closed, what could be the reason for the acceleration of block 1? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: momentum energy force acceleration inertia velocity speed energy momentum force Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Let us denote the x component of the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the x component of the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . Which of the following pairs equalities is a direct consequence of Newton’s second law? ANSWER: Part H Let us recall that we have denoted the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . If we suppose that is greater than , which of the following statements about forces is true? You did not open hints for this part. the large mass of block 1 air resistance Earth’s gravitational attraction a force exerted by block 2 on block 1 a force exerted by block 1 on block 2 F12 F21 and and and and F12 = m2a2 F21 = m1a1 F12 = m1a1 F21 = m2a2 F12 = m1a2 F21 = m2a1 F12 = m2a1 F21 = m1a2 F12 F21 m1 m2 ANSWER: Part I Now recall the expression for the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum: . Considering the information that you now have, choose the best alternative for an equivalent expression to . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Impulse and Momentum Ranking Task Six automobiles are initially traveling at the indicated velocities. The automobiles have different masses and velocities. The drivers step on the brakes and all automobiles are brought to rest. Part A Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of their momentum before the brakes are applied, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. ANSWER: Both forces have equal magnitudes. |F12 | > |F21| |F21 | > |F12| dpx(t)/dt = Fx dpx(t)/dt 0 nonzero constant kt kt2 Part B Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of the impulse needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Rank the automobiles based on the magnitude of the force needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Game of Frictionless Catch Chuck and Jackie stand on separate carts, both of which can slide without friction. The combined mass of Chuck and his cart, , is identical to the combined mass of Jackie and her cart. Initially, Chuck and Jackie and their carts are at rest. Chuck then picks up a ball of mass and throws it to Jackie, who catches it. Assume that the ball travels in a straight line parallel to the ground (ignore the effect of gravity). After Chuck throws the ball, his speed relative to the ground is . The speed of the thrown ball relative to the ground is . Jackie catches the ball when it reaches her, and she and her cart begin to move. Jackie’s speed relative to the ground after she catches the ball is . When answering the questions in this problem, keep the following in mind: The original mass of Chuck and his cart does not include the 1. mass of the ball. 2. The speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity. An object’s speed will always be a nonnegative quantity. mcart mball vc vb vj mcart Part A Find the relative speed between Chuck and the ball after Chuck has thrown the ball. Express the speed in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of the ball (relative to the ground) while it is in the air? Express your answer in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is Chuck’s speed (relative to the ground) after he throws the ball? Express your answer in terms of , , and . u vc vb u = vb mball mcart u vb = vc mball mcart u You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vc = vj vb vj mball mcart vb vj = vj u vj mball mcart u Momentum in an Explosion A giant “egg” explodes as part of a fireworks display. The egg is at rest before the explosion, and after the explosion, it breaks into two pieces, with the masses indicated in the diagram, traveling in opposite directions. Part A What is the momentum of piece A before the explosion? Express your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vj = pA,i Part B During the explosion, is the force of piece A on piece B greater than, less than, or equal to the force of piece B on piece A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The momentum of piece B is measured to be 500 after the explosion. Find the momentum of piece A after the explosion. Enter your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pA,i = kg  m/s greater than less than equal to cannot be determined kg  m/s pA,f pA,f = kg  m/s ± PSS 9.1 Conservation of Momentum Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 9.1 for conservation of momentum problems. An 80- quarterback jumps straight up in the air right before throwing a 0.43- football horizontally at 15 . How fast will he be moving backward just after releasing the ball? PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 9.1 Conservation of momentum MODEL: Clearly define the system. If possible, choose a system that is isolated ( ) or within which the interactions are sufficiently short and intense that you can ignore external forces for the duration of the interaction (the impulse approximation). Momentum is conserved. If it is not possible to choose an isolated system, try to divide the problem into parts such that momentum is conserved during one segment of the motion. Other segments of the motion can be analyzed using Newton’s laws or, as you will learn later, conservation of energy. VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of momentum: . In component form, this is ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The interaction at study in this problem is the action of throwing the ball, performed by the quarterback while being off the ground. To apply conservation of momentum to this interaction, you will need to clearly define a system that is isolated or within which the impulse approximation can be applied. Part A Sort the following objects as part of the system or not. Drag the appropriate objects to their respective bins. ANSWER: kg kg m/s F = net 0 P = f P  i (pfx + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfx)2 pfx)3 pix)1 pix)2 pix)3 (pfy + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfy)2 pfy)3 piy)1 piy)2 piy)3 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Visualize Solve Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Assess Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conservation of Momentum in Inelastic Collisions Learning Goal: To understand the vector nature of momentum in the case in which two objects collide and stick together. In this problem we will consider a collision of two moving objects such that after the collision, the objects stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. You have probably learned that “momentum is conserved” in an inelastic collision. But how does this fact help you to solve collision problems? The following questions should help you to clarify the meaning and implications of the statement “momentum is conserved.” Part A What physical quantities are conserved in this collision? ANSWER: Part B Two cars of equal mass collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their speeds are and . What is the speed of the two-car system after the collision? the magnitude of the momentum only the net momentum (considered as a vector) only the momentum of each object considered individually v1 v2 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, what is the magnitude of their combined momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. v1 + v2 v1 − v2 v2 − v1 v1v2 −−−− ” v1+v2 2 v1 + 2 v2 2 −−−−−−−  p1 p2 Part D Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their momenta are and . After the collision, their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, the magnitude of their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. p1 + p2 p1 − p2 p2 − p1 p1p2 −−−− ” p1+p2 2 p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  p 1 p 2 p p = p1 + # p2 # p = p1 − # p2 # p = p2 − # p1 # p1 p2 p You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Colliding Cars In this problem we will consider the collision of two cars initially moving at right angles. We assume that after the collision the cars stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. Two cars of masses and collide at an intersection. Before the collision, car 1 was traveling eastward at a speed of , and car 2 was traveling northward at a speed of . After the collision, the two cars stick together and travel off in the direction shown. Part A p1 + p2 $ p $ p1p2 −−−− ” p1 +p2 $ p $ p1+p2 2 p1 + p2 $ p $ |p1 − p2 | p1 + p2 $ p $ p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  m1 m2 v1 v2 First, find the magnitude of , that is, the speed of the two-car unit after the collision. Express in terms of , , and the cars’ initial speeds and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the tangent of the angle . Express your answer in terms of the momenta of the two cars, and . ANSWER: Part C Suppose that after the collision, ; in other words, is . This means that before the collision: ANSWER: v v v m1 m2 v1 v2 v = p1 p2 tan( ) = tan = 1 45′ The magnitudes of the momenta of the cars were equal. The masses of the cars were equal. The velocities of the cars were equal. ± Catching a Ball on Ice Olaf is standing on a sheet of ice that covers the football stadium parking lot in Buffalo, New York; there is negligible friction between his feet and the ice. A friend throws Olaf a ball of mass 0.400 that is traveling horizontally at 11.2 . Olaf’s mass is 67.1 . Part A If Olaf catches the ball, with what speed do Olaf and the ball move afterward? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B kg m/s kg vf vf = m/s If the ball hits Olaf and bounces off his chest horizontally at 8.00 in the opposite direction, what is his speed after the collision? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 2.90 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 25.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 17.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. m/s vf vf = m/s m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. pi = kg  m/s vf vf = m/s

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