Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Current balance Objectives When a steady electric current flows perpendicularly across a uniform magnetic field it experiences a force. This experiment aims to investigate this effect, and to determine the direction of the force relative to the current and magnetic field. You will design and perform a series of experiments to show how the magnitude of the force depends upon the current and the length of the conductor that is in the field. Task You are provided with a current balance apparatus (Figure 1), power supply and a magnet. This current balance consists of five loops of conducting wire supported on a pivoted aluminium frame. Current may be made to flow in one or up to five of the loops at a time in either direction. If the end of the loop is situated in a perpendicular magnetic field, when the current is switched on, the magnetic force on the current will unbalance the apparatus. By moving the sliding weights to rebalance it, the magnitude of this magnetic force may be measured. A scale is etched on one arm of the balance, so that the distance moved by the slider can be measured. The circuitry of the balance cannot cope currents greater than 5 Amps, so please do not exceed this level of current. Figure 1: Schematic diagram of current balance apparatus and circuitry. Start by familiarising yourself with the apparatus. Use the two sliding weights to balance the apparatus, then apply a magnetic field to either end of the loop. Pass a current through just one of the conducting loops and observe the direction of the resulting magnetic force, relative to the direction of the current and the applied field. Change the magnitude and direction of the current, observe qualitatively the effect this has on the magnetic force. Having familiarised yourself with the apparatus, you should design and perform a series of quantitative experiments aiming to: (1) determine how the size of the magnetic force is dependant on the size of the current flowing in the conductor. (2) determine how the size of the force is dependant on the length of the conductor which is in the field. (3) measure the value (in Tesla) of the field of the magnet provided. For each of these, the balance should be set up with the magnet positioned at the end of the arm that has the distance scale, and orientated so that the magnetic force will be directed upwards when a current is passed through the conductor. The sliding weight on this arm should be positioned at the zero-mark. The weight on the opposite arm should be adjusted to balance the apparatus in the absence of a current. When a current is applied, you should re-balance the apparatus by moving the weight on the scaled arm outwards, while keeping the opposite weight fixed in position. The distance moved by the weight is directly proportional to the force applied by the magnetic field to the end of the balance. In your report, make sure you discuss why this is the case. Use the position of the sliding weight to quantify the magnetic force as a function of the current applied to the conductor, and of the number of conducting loops through which the current flows. For tasks (1) and (2) you can use the position of the sliding weight as a measure of the force. Look up the relationship that relates the force to the applied field, current and length of conductor in the field. Is this consistent with your data? To complete task (3) you need to determine the magnitude (in Newtons) of the magnetic force from the measurement of the position of the sliding weight. To do this, what other information do you need to know? When you have determined a value for the field, you can measure the field directly using the laboratory’s Gaussmeter for comparison.

Faculty of Science Technology and Engineering Department of Physics Senior Laboratory Current balance Objectives When a steady electric current flows perpendicularly across a uniform magnetic field it experiences a force. This experiment aims to investigate this effect, and to determine the direction of the force relative to the current and magnetic field. You will design and perform a series of experiments to show how the magnitude of the force depends upon the current and the length of the conductor that is in the field. Task You are provided with a current balance apparatus (Figure 1), power supply and a magnet. This current balance consists of five loops of conducting wire supported on a pivoted aluminium frame. Current may be made to flow in one or up to five of the loops at a time in either direction. If the end of the loop is situated in a perpendicular magnetic field, when the current is switched on, the magnetic force on the current will unbalance the apparatus. By moving the sliding weights to rebalance it, the magnitude of this magnetic force may be measured. A scale is etched on one arm of the balance, so that the distance moved by the slider can be measured. The circuitry of the balance cannot cope currents greater than 5 Amps, so please do not exceed this level of current. Figure 1: Schematic diagram of current balance apparatus and circuitry. Start by familiarising yourself with the apparatus. Use the two sliding weights to balance the apparatus, then apply a magnetic field to either end of the loop. Pass a current through just one of the conducting loops and observe the direction of the resulting magnetic force, relative to the direction of the current and the applied field. Change the magnitude and direction of the current, observe qualitatively the effect this has on the magnetic force. Having familiarised yourself with the apparatus, you should design and perform a series of quantitative experiments aiming to: (1) determine how the size of the magnetic force is dependant on the size of the current flowing in the conductor. (2) determine how the size of the force is dependant on the length of the conductor which is in the field. (3) measure the value (in Tesla) of the field of the magnet provided. For each of these, the balance should be set up with the magnet positioned at the end of the arm that has the distance scale, and orientated so that the magnetic force will be directed upwards when a current is passed through the conductor. The sliding weight on this arm should be positioned at the zero-mark. The weight on the opposite arm should be adjusted to balance the apparatus in the absence of a current. When a current is applied, you should re-balance the apparatus by moving the weight on the scaled arm outwards, while keeping the opposite weight fixed in position. The distance moved by the weight is directly proportional to the force applied by the magnetic field to the end of the balance. In your report, make sure you discuss why this is the case. Use the position of the sliding weight to quantify the magnetic force as a function of the current applied to the conductor, and of the number of conducting loops through which the current flows. For tasks (1) and (2) you can use the position of the sliding weight as a measure of the force. Look up the relationship that relates the force to the applied field, current and length of conductor in the field. Is this consistent with your data? To complete task (3) you need to determine the magnitude (in Newtons) of the magnetic force from the measurement of the position of the sliding weight. To do this, what other information do you need to know? When you have determined a value for the field, you can measure the field directly using the laboratory’s Gaussmeter for comparison.

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Assignment 4 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy ± Two Forces Acting at a Point Two forces, and , act at a point. has a magnitude of 9.80 and is directed at an angle of 56.0 above the negative x axis in the second quadrant. has a magnitude of 5.20 and is directed at an angle of 54.1 below the negative x axis in the third quadrant. Part A What is the x component of the resultant force? Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The resultant force is defined as the vector sum of all forces. Thus, its x component is the sum of the x components of the forces, and its y component is the sum of the y components of the forces. Hint 2. Find the x component of Find the x component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , and if . F 1 F  2 F  1 N  F  2 N  F 1 F  1 A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Ax < 0 Ay < 0  <  < 3 2 Hint 2. Find the direction of is directed at an angle of 56.0 above the x axis in the second quadrant. When you calculate the components of , however, the direction of the force is commonly expressed in terms of the angle that the vector representing the force forms with the positive x axis. What is the angle that forms with the positive x axis? Select an answer from the following list, where 56.0 . ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the x component of Find the x component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , F 1 F 1  F  1 F  1  =   180 −  180 +  90 +  -5.48 N F 2 F  2 A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Typesetting math: 100% and if . Hint 2. Find the direction of is directed at an angle of 54.1 below the x axis in the third quadrant. When you calculate the components of , however, the direction of the force is commonly expressed in terms of the angle that the vector representing the force forms with the positive x axis. What is the angle that forms with the positive x axis? Select an answer from the following list, where 54.1 . ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of the resultant force? Express your answer in newtons. Ax < 0 Ay <  <  < 3 2 F 2 F 2  F 2 F  2  =   180 −   − 180 −90 −  -3.05 N -8.53 N Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem Follow the same procedure that you used in Part A to find the x component of the resultant force, though now calculate the y components of the two forces. Hint 2. Find the y component of Find the y component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , and if . ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the y component of Find the y component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector F 1 F  1 A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Ax < 0 Ay < 0  <  < 3 2 8.12 N F 2 F  2 Typesetting math: 100% Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , and if . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the magnitude of the resultant force? Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Magnitude of a vector Consider a vector , whose components are and . The magnitude of is . A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Ax < 0 Ay < 0  <  < 3 2 -4.21 N 3.91 N A Ax Ay A A = A + 2 x A2 y −−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 5.9 The figure shows acceleration-versus-force graphs for two objects pulled by rubber bands. You may want to review ( pages 127 - 130) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Finding the Slope of a Line from a Graph Part A What is the mass ratio ? Express your answer using two significant figures. 9.38 N m1 m2 Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem How are the acceleration and the force on an object related to its mass? How is the slope of each line in the figure related to each object's mass? For each line, what two points are easy to measure accurately to determine the slope of line? How is the slope determined from the x and y coordinates of the two points you chose for each line? ANSWER: Correct A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude . Part A How much horizontal force must a sprinter of mass 54 exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Hint 1. Newton's 2nd law of motion According to Newton's 2nd law of motion, if a net external force acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass of the body times the acceleration of the body: . ANSWER: = 0.36 m1 m2 15 m/s2 F kg Fnet m a Fnet = ma F = 810 N Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Which body exerts the force that propels the sprinter, the blocks or the sprinter? Hint 1. How to approach the question To start moving forward, sprinters push backward on the starting blocks with their feet. Newton's 3rd law tells you that the blocks exert a force on the sprinter of the same magnitude, but opposite in direction. ANSWER: Correct To start moving forward, sprinters push backward on the starting blocks with their feet. As a reaction, the blocks push forward on their feet with a force of the same magnitude. This external force accelerates the sprinter forward. Problem 5.12 The figure shows an acceleration-versus-force graph for a 600 object. the blocks the sprinter g Typesetting math: 100% Part A What must equal in order for the graph to be correct? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What must equal in order for the graph to be correct? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Free-Body Diagrams Learning Goal: To gain practice drawing free-body diagrams Whenever you face a problem involving forces, always start with a free-body diagram. a1 a1 = 1.67 m s2 a2 a2 = 3.33 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% To draw a free-body diagram use the following steps: Isolate the object of interest. It is customary to represent the object of interest as a point 1. in your diagram. Identify all the forces acting on the object and their directions. Do not include forces acting on other objects in the problem. Also, do not include quantities, such as velocities and accelerations, that are not forces. 2. Draw the vectors for each force acting on your object of interest. When possible, the length of the force vectors you draw should represent the relative magnitudes of the forces acting on the object. 3. In most problems, after you have drawn the free-body diagrams, you will explicitly label your coordinate axes and directions. Always make the object of interest the origin of your coordinate system. Then you will need to divide the forces into x and y components, sum the x and y forces, and apply Newton's first or second law. In this problem you will only draw the free-body diagram. Suppose that you are asked to solve the following problem: Chadwick is pushing a piano across a level floor (see the figure). The piano can slide across the floor without friction. If Chadwick applies a horizontal force to the piano, what is the piano's acceleration? To solve this problem you should start by drawing a free-body diagram. Part A Determine the object of interest for the situation described in the problem introduction. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You should first think about the question you are trying to answer: What is the acceleration of the piano? The object of interest in this situation will be the object whose acceleration you are asked to find. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Identify the forces acting on the object of interest. From the list below, select the forces that act on the piano. Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct Now that you have identified the forces acting on the piano, you should draw the free-body diagram. Draw the length of your vectors to represent the relative magnitudes of the forces, but you don't need to worry about the exact scale. You won't have the exact value of all of the forces until you finish solving the problem. To maximize your learning, you should draw the diagram yourself before looking at the choices in the next part. You are on your honor to do so. Part C For this situation you should draw a free-body diagram for the floor. Chadwick. the piano. acceleration of the piano gravitational force acting on the piano (piano's weight) speed of the piano gravitational force acting on Chadwick (Chadwick's weight) force of the floor on the piano (normal force) force of the piano on the floor force of Chadwick on the piano force of the piano pushing on Chadwick Typesetting math: 100% Select the choice that best matches the free-body diagram you have drawn for the piano. Hint 1. Determine the directions and relative magnitudes of the forces Which of the following statements best describes the correct directions and relative magnitudes of the forces involved? ANSWER: ANSWER: The normal force and weight are both upward and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force and weight are both downward and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force is upward, the weight is downward, and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force has a greater magnitude than the weight. The normal force is upward, the weight is downward, and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force and weight have the same magnitude. The normal force is upward, the weight is downward, and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force has a smaller magnitude than the weight. Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct If you were actually going to solve this problem rather than just draw the free-body diagram, you would need to define the coordinate system. Choose the position of the piano as the origin. In this case it is simplest to let the y axis point vertically upward and the x axis point horizontally to the right, in the direction of the acceleration. Chadwick now needs to push the piano up a ramp and into a moving van. at left. The ramp is frictionless. Is Chadwick strong enough to push the piano up the ramp alone or must he get help? To solve this problem you should start by drawing a free-body diagram. Part D Determine the object of interest for this situation. ANSWER: Correct Now draw the free-body diagram of the piano in this new situation. Follow the same sequence of steps that you followed for the first situation. Again draw your diagram before you look at the choices For this situation, you should draw a free-body diagram for the ramp. Chadwick. the piano. Typesetting math: 100% below. Part E Which diagram accurately represents the free-body diagram for the piano? ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct In working problems like this one that involve an incline, it is most often easiest to select a coordinate system that is not vertical and horizontal. Instead, choose the x axis so that it is parallel to the incline and choose the y axis so that it is perpendicular to the incline. Problem 5.18 The figure shows two of the three forces acting on an object in equilibrium. Part A Redraw the diagram, showing all three forces. Label the third force . Draw the force vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: F  3 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 5.25 An ice hockey puck glides across frictionless ice. Part A Identify all forces acting on the object. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram of the ice hockey puck. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Normal force ; Gravity Normal force ; Gravity ; Kinetic friction Tension ; Weight Thrust ; Gravity n F  G n F  G fk  T  w Fthrust  F  G Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 5.26 Your physics textbook is sliding to the right across the table. Part A Identify all forces acting on the object. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram of the object. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Weight ; Kinetic friction Thrust ; Kinetic friction Normal force ; Weight ; Kinetic friction Normal force ; Weight ; Static friction w fk  Fthrust  fk  n w fk  n w fs  Typesetting math: 100% Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 5.35 A constant force is applied to an object, causing the object to accelerate at 13 . You may want to review ( pages 127 - 130) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Proportions I Proportions II Part A m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% What will the acceleration be if the force is halved? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if the force is halved but the mass remains the same? ANSWER: Correct Part B What will the acceleration be if the object's mass is halved? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if the mass is halved but the force remains the same? ANSWER: Correct Part C a = 6.50 m s2 a = 26.0 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% What will the acceleration be if the force and the object's mass are both halved? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if both the force and mass are reduced by a factor of two? ANSWER: Correct Part D What will the acceleration be if the force is halved and the object's mass is doubled? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if the force is decreased by a factor of two and the mass is increased by a factor of two? Check your answer by choosing numerical values of the force and mass, and then halve the force and double the mass. ANSWER: Correct a = 13.0 m s2 a = 3.25 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 5.44 A rocket is being launched straight up. Air resistance is not negligible. Part A Which of the following is the correct motion diagram for the situation described above? Enter the letter that corresponds with the best answer. ANSWER: Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.7%. You received 63.82 out of a possible total of 64 points. Typesetting math: 100%

Assignment 4 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 26, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy ± Two Forces Acting at a Point Two forces, and , act at a point. has a magnitude of 9.80 and is directed at an angle of 56.0 above the negative x axis in the second quadrant. has a magnitude of 5.20 and is directed at an angle of 54.1 below the negative x axis in the third quadrant. Part A What is the x component of the resultant force? Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The resultant force is defined as the vector sum of all forces. Thus, its x component is the sum of the x components of the forces, and its y component is the sum of the y components of the forces. Hint 2. Find the x component of Find the x component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , and if . F 1 F  2 F  1 N  F  2 N  F 1 F  1 A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Ax < 0 Ay < 0  <  < 3 2 Hint 2. Find the direction of is directed at an angle of 56.0 above the x axis in the second quadrant. When you calculate the components of , however, the direction of the force is commonly expressed in terms of the angle that the vector representing the force forms with the positive x axis. What is the angle that forms with the positive x axis? Select an answer from the following list, where 56.0 . ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the x component of Find the x component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , F 1 F 1  F  1 F  1  =   180 −  180 +  90 +  -5.48 N F 2 F  2 A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Typesetting math: 100% and if . Hint 2. Find the direction of is directed at an angle of 54.1 below the x axis in the third quadrant. When you calculate the components of , however, the direction of the force is commonly expressed in terms of the angle that the vector representing the force forms with the positive x axis. What is the angle that forms with the positive x axis? Select an answer from the following list, where 54.1 . ANSWER: ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of the resultant force? Express your answer in newtons. Ax < 0 Ay <  <  < 3 2 F 2 F 2  F 2 F  2  =   180 −   − 180 −90 −  -3.05 N -8.53 N Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem Follow the same procedure that you used in Part A to find the x component of the resultant force, though now calculate the y components of the two forces. Hint 2. Find the y component of Find the y component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , and if . ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the y component of Find the y component of . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Components of a vector F 1 F  1 A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Ax < 0 Ay < 0  <  < 3 2 8.12 N F 2 F  2 Typesetting math: 100% Consider a vector that forms an angle with the positive x axis. The x and y components of are, respectively, and , where is the magnitude of the vector. Note that and if , and if . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the magnitude of the resultant force? Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. Magnitude of a vector Consider a vector , whose components are and . The magnitude of is . A  A Ax = Acos  Ay = Asin  A Ax < 0 Ay > 0  <  <  2 Ax < 0 Ay < 0  <  < 3 2 -4.21 N 3.91 N A Ax Ay A A = A + 2 x A2 y −−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 5.9 The figure shows acceleration-versus-force graphs for two objects pulled by rubber bands. You may want to review ( pages 127 - 130) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Finding the Slope of a Line from a Graph Part A What is the mass ratio ? Express your answer using two significant figures. 9.38 N m1 m2 Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem How are the acceleration and the force on an object related to its mass? How is the slope of each line in the figure related to each object's mass? For each line, what two points are easy to measure accurately to determine the slope of line? How is the slope determined from the x and y coordinates of the two points you chose for each line? ANSWER: Correct A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude . Part A How much horizontal force must a sprinter of mass 54 exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Hint 1. Newton's 2nd law of motion According to Newton's 2nd law of motion, if a net external force acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass of the body times the acceleration of the body: . ANSWER: = 0.36 m1 m2 15 m/s2 F kg Fnet m a Fnet = ma F = 810 N Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Which body exerts the force that propels the sprinter, the blocks or the sprinter? Hint 1. How to approach the question To start moving forward, sprinters push backward on the starting blocks with their feet. Newton's 3rd law tells you that the blocks exert a force on the sprinter of the same magnitude, but opposite in direction. ANSWER: Correct To start moving forward, sprinters push backward on the starting blocks with their feet. As a reaction, the blocks push forward on their feet with a force of the same magnitude. This external force accelerates the sprinter forward. Problem 5.12 The figure shows an acceleration-versus-force graph for a 600 object. the blocks the sprinter g Typesetting math: 100% Part A What must equal in order for the graph to be correct? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What must equal in order for the graph to be correct? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Free-Body Diagrams Learning Goal: To gain practice drawing free-body diagrams Whenever you face a problem involving forces, always start with a free-body diagram. a1 a1 = 1.67 m s2 a2 a2 = 3.33 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% To draw a free-body diagram use the following steps: Isolate the object of interest. It is customary to represent the object of interest as a point 1. in your diagram. Identify all the forces acting on the object and their directions. Do not include forces acting on other objects in the problem. Also, do not include quantities, such as velocities and accelerations, that are not forces. 2. Draw the vectors for each force acting on your object of interest. When possible, the length of the force vectors you draw should represent the relative magnitudes of the forces acting on the object. 3. In most problems, after you have drawn the free-body diagrams, you will explicitly label your coordinate axes and directions. Always make the object of interest the origin of your coordinate system. Then you will need to divide the forces into x and y components, sum the x and y forces, and apply Newton's first or second law. In this problem you will only draw the free-body diagram. Suppose that you are asked to solve the following problem: Chadwick is pushing a piano across a level floor (see the figure). The piano can slide across the floor without friction. If Chadwick applies a horizontal force to the piano, what is the piano's acceleration? To solve this problem you should start by drawing a free-body diagram. Part A Determine the object of interest for the situation described in the problem introduction. Hint 1. How to approach the problem You should first think about the question you are trying to answer: What is the acceleration of the piano? The object of interest in this situation will be the object whose acceleration you are asked to find. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Identify the forces acting on the object of interest. From the list below, select the forces that act on the piano. Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct Now that you have identified the forces acting on the piano, you should draw the free-body diagram. Draw the length of your vectors to represent the relative magnitudes of the forces, but you don't need to worry about the exact scale. You won't have the exact value of all of the forces until you finish solving the problem. To maximize your learning, you should draw the diagram yourself before looking at the choices in the next part. You are on your honor to do so. Part C For this situation you should draw a free-body diagram for the floor. Chadwick. the piano. acceleration of the piano gravitational force acting on the piano (piano's weight) speed of the piano gravitational force acting on Chadwick (Chadwick's weight) force of the floor on the piano (normal force) force of the piano on the floor force of Chadwick on the piano force of the piano pushing on Chadwick Typesetting math: 100% Select the choice that best matches the free-body diagram you have drawn for the piano. Hint 1. Determine the directions and relative magnitudes of the forces Which of the following statements best describes the correct directions and relative magnitudes of the forces involved? ANSWER: ANSWER: The normal force and weight are both upward and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force and weight are both downward and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force is upward, the weight is downward, and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force has a greater magnitude than the weight. The normal force is upward, the weight is downward, and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force and weight have the same magnitude. The normal force is upward, the weight is downward, and the pushing force is horizontal. The normal force has a smaller magnitude than the weight. Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct If you were actually going to solve this problem rather than just draw the free-body diagram, you would need to define the coordinate system. Choose the position of the piano as the origin. In this case it is simplest to let the y axis point vertically upward and the x axis point horizontally to the right, in the direction of the acceleration. Chadwick now needs to push the piano up a ramp and into a moving van. at left. The ramp is frictionless. Is Chadwick strong enough to push the piano up the ramp alone or must he get help? To solve this problem you should start by drawing a free-body diagram. Part D Determine the object of interest for this situation. ANSWER: Correct Now draw the free-body diagram of the piano in this new situation. Follow the same sequence of steps that you followed for the first situation. Again draw your diagram before you look at the choices For this situation, you should draw a free-body diagram for the ramp. Chadwick. the piano. Typesetting math: 100% below. Part E Which diagram accurately represents the free-body diagram for the piano? ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct In working problems like this one that involve an incline, it is most often easiest to select a coordinate system that is not vertical and horizontal. Instead, choose the x axis so that it is parallel to the incline and choose the y axis so that it is perpendicular to the incline. Problem 5.18 The figure shows two of the three forces acting on an object in equilibrium. Part A Redraw the diagram, showing all three forces. Label the third force . Draw the force vector starting at the black dot. The location and orientation of the vector will be graded. The length of the vector will not be graded. ANSWER: F  3 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 5.25 An ice hockey puck glides across frictionless ice. Part A Identify all forces acting on the object. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram of the ice hockey puck. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Normal force ; Gravity Normal force ; Gravity ; Kinetic friction Tension ; Weight Thrust ; Gravity n F  G n F  G fk  T  w Fthrust  F  G Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 5.26 Your physics textbook is sliding to the right across the table. Part A Identify all forces acting on the object. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram of the object. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Weight ; Kinetic friction Thrust ; Kinetic friction Normal force ; Weight ; Kinetic friction Normal force ; Weight ; Static friction w fk  Fthrust  fk  n w fk  n w fs  Typesetting math: 100% Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 5.35 A constant force is applied to an object, causing the object to accelerate at 13 . You may want to review ( pages 127 - 130) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Proportions I Proportions II Part A m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% What will the acceleration be if the force is halved? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if the force is halved but the mass remains the same? ANSWER: Correct Part B What will the acceleration be if the object's mass is halved? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if the mass is halved but the force remains the same? ANSWER: Correct Part C a = 6.50 m s2 a = 26.0 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% What will the acceleration be if the force and the object's mass are both halved? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if both the force and mass are reduced by a factor of two? ANSWER: Correct Part D What will the acceleration be if the force is halved and the object's mass is doubled? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the acceleration of an object related to its mass and the force applied? Expressing the acceleration in terms of the force and mass, what happens to the acceleration if the force is decreased by a factor of two and the mass is increased by a factor of two? Check your answer by choosing numerical values of the force and mass, and then halve the force and double the mass. ANSWER: Correct a = 13.0 m s2 a = 3.25 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Problem 5.44 A rocket is being launched straight up. Air resistance is not negligible. Part A Which of the following is the correct motion diagram for the situation described above? Enter the letter that corresponds with the best answer. ANSWER: Correct Part B Draw a free-body diagram. Draw the force vectors with their tails at the dot. The orientation of your vectors will be graded. The exact length of your vectors will not be graded but the relative length of one to the other will be graded. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 99.7%. You received 63.82 out of a possible total of 64 points. Typesetting math: 100%

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Doppler Shift 73 Because of the Doppler Effect, light emitted by an object can appear to change wavelength due to its motion toward or away from an observer. When the observer and the source of light are moving toward each other, the light is shifted to shorter wavelengths (blueshifted). When the observer and the source of light are moving away from each other, the light is shifted to longer wavelengths (redshifted). Part I: Motion of Source Star is not . rnovrng r ABCD 1) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? 2) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to longer wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? . 74 Doppler Shift 3) In which of the srtuations shown (A—D) will theobserver receive light that Is not Doppler Shifted at all? Explain your reasoning. – 4) Imagine our solar system Is moving In the Milky Way toward a group of three stars. Star A is a blue star that is slightly closer to us than the other two. Star B is a red star that is farthest away from us. Star C is a yellow star that is halfway between Stars A end B. a) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. . / b) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be redshifted? Explain your reasoning. c) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to have no shift? Explain your reasoning. — 5) You overhear two students discussing the topic of Doppler Shift. Student 1: Since Betelgeuse is a red star, it must be going away from us, and since Rigel is a blue star it must be coming toward us. Student 2: 1 disagree, the color of the star does not tell you if it is moving. You have to look at the shift in wavelength of the lines in the star’s absorption spectrum to determine whether it’s moving toward or away from you. Do you agree or disagree with either or both of the students? Explain your reasoning. 5 Part II: Shift in Absorption Spectra When we study an astronomical object like a star or galaxy, we examine the spectrum of light it gives off. Since the lines of a spectrum occur at specific wavelengths we can determine that an object is moving when we see that the lines have been shifted to either longer or shorter wavelengths. For the absorption line spectra shown on the next page, short-wavelength light (the blue end of the spectrum) is shown on the left-hand side and long-wavelength light (the red end of the spectrum) is shown on the right-hand side. Doppler Shift 75 For the three absorption line spectra shown below (A, B, and C), one of the spectra corresponds to a star that is not moving relative to you, one of the spectra is from a star that is moving toward you, and one of the spectra is from a star that is moving away from you. A B Blue J___ ..‘ C 6) Which of the three spectra above corresponds with the star moving toward you? Explain your reasoning. If two sources of llght are moving relative to an observer, the light from the star that is moving faster will appear to undergo a greater Doppler Consider the four spectra at the right. The spectrum labeled F is an absorption line spectrum from a star that is at rest. Again, note that short-wavelength (blue) light is shown on the left-hand side of each spectrum and long-wavelength (red) light is shown on the right-hand side of each spectrum. 7) Which of the three spectra corresponds with the star moving away from you? Explain your reasoning. Part 111: Size of Shift and Speed Blue Red . – 76 Doppler Shift 8) Which of the four spectra would be from the star that is moving the fastest? Would this star be moving toward or away from the observer? 9) Of the stars that are moving, which spectra would be from the star that is moving the slowest? Describe the motion of this star, – (fJ 1O)An Important line In the absorption spectrum of stars occurs at a wavelength of 656 nm for stars at rest. Irna me that you observe five stars (H—L) from Earth and discover that this Important absorption line Is measured at the wavelength shown in the table below for each of the five stars, Star Wavelength of Absorption Line H 649nm I 660 nm J 656nrn K 658nrn L 647nm a) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears redshifted? Explain your reasoning. d) Which star is moving the fastest? Is it moving toward or away from the observer? Explain your reasoning. , . . c) Which star is giving off light that appears shifted by the greatest amount? Is this light shifted to longer or shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a) Which planets will receive a radio signal that Is redshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which planets wfll receive a radio signal that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a a . ii) The figure at right shows a spaceprobe and five planets. The motion of the spaceprobe is indicated by the arrow. The spaceprobe is continuously broadcasting a radio signal in all directions. 4 C E not to scale c) Will all the planets receive radio signals from the spaceprobe that are Doppler shifted? Explain your reasoning. d) How will the size of the Doppler Shift in the radio signals detected at Planets A and B compare? Explain your reasoning. Cats r , ‘, e) How Will the slz of 1h Dupler Shift in the radio signals deteed °lane E and B compare? Explain your reasoning. ‘

Doppler Shift 73 Because of the Doppler Effect, light emitted by an object can appear to change wavelength due to its motion toward or away from an observer. When the observer and the source of light are moving toward each other, the light is shifted to shorter wavelengths (blueshifted). When the observer and the source of light are moving away from each other, the light is shifted to longer wavelengths (redshifted). Part I: Motion of Source Star is not . rnovrng r ABCD 1) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? 2) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to longer wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? . 74 Doppler Shift 3) In which of the srtuations shown (A—D) will theobserver receive light that Is not Doppler Shifted at all? Explain your reasoning. – 4) Imagine our solar system Is moving In the Milky Way toward a group of three stars. Star A is a blue star that is slightly closer to us than the other two. Star B is a red star that is farthest away from us. Star C is a yellow star that is halfway between Stars A end B. a) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. . / b) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be redshifted? Explain your reasoning. c) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to have no shift? Explain your reasoning. — 5) You overhear two students discussing the topic of Doppler Shift. Student 1: Since Betelgeuse is a red star, it must be going away from us, and since Rigel is a blue star it must be coming toward us. Student 2: 1 disagree, the color of the star does not tell you if it is moving. You have to look at the shift in wavelength of the lines in the star’s absorption spectrum to determine whether it’s moving toward or away from you. Do you agree or disagree with either or both of the students? Explain your reasoning. 5 Part II: Shift in Absorption Spectra When we study an astronomical object like a star or galaxy, we examine the spectrum of light it gives off. Since the lines of a spectrum occur at specific wavelengths we can determine that an object is moving when we see that the lines have been shifted to either longer or shorter wavelengths. For the absorption line spectra shown on the next page, short-wavelength light (the blue end of the spectrum) is shown on the left-hand side and long-wavelength light (the red end of the spectrum) is shown on the right-hand side. Doppler Shift 75 For the three absorption line spectra shown below (A, B, and C), one of the spectra corresponds to a star that is not moving relative to you, one of the spectra is from a star that is moving toward you, and one of the spectra is from a star that is moving away from you. A B Blue J___ ..‘ C 6) Which of the three spectra above corresponds with the star moving toward you? Explain your reasoning. If two sources of llght are moving relative to an observer, the light from the star that is moving faster will appear to undergo a greater Doppler Consider the four spectra at the right. The spectrum labeled F is an absorption line spectrum from a star that is at rest. Again, note that short-wavelength (blue) light is shown on the left-hand side of each spectrum and long-wavelength (red) light is shown on the right-hand side of each spectrum. 7) Which of the three spectra corresponds with the star moving away from you? Explain your reasoning. Part 111: Size of Shift and Speed Blue Red . – 76 Doppler Shift 8) Which of the four spectra would be from the star that is moving the fastest? Would this star be moving toward or away from the observer? 9) Of the stars that are moving, which spectra would be from the star that is moving the slowest? Describe the motion of this star, – (fJ 1O)An Important line In the absorption spectrum of stars occurs at a wavelength of 656 nm for stars at rest. Irna me that you observe five stars (H—L) from Earth and discover that this Important absorption line Is measured at the wavelength shown in the table below for each of the five stars, Star Wavelength of Absorption Line H 649nm I 660 nm J 656nrn K 658nrn L 647nm a) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears redshifted? Explain your reasoning. d) Which star is moving the fastest? Is it moving toward or away from the observer? Explain your reasoning. , . . c) Which star is giving off light that appears shifted by the greatest amount? Is this light shifted to longer or shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a) Which planets will receive a radio signal that Is redshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which planets wfll receive a radio signal that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a a . ii) The figure at right shows a spaceprobe and five planets. The motion of the spaceprobe is indicated by the arrow. The spaceprobe is continuously broadcasting a radio signal in all directions. 4 C E not to scale c) Will all the planets receive radio signals from the spaceprobe that are Doppler shifted? Explain your reasoning. d) How will the size of the Doppler Shift in the radio signals detected at Planets A and B compare? Explain your reasoning. Cats r , ‘, e) How Will the slz of 1h Dupler Shift in the radio signals deteed °lane E and B compare? Explain your reasoning. ‘

  ANSWERS Part 1 1 C is the answer because … Read More...
Name ____________________________________ Motion in 2D Simulation Go to http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Motion_in_2D and click on Run Now. 1) Once the simulation opens, click on ‘Show Both’ for Velocity and Acceleration at the top of the page. Now click and drag the red ball around the screen. Make 3 observations about the blue and green arrows (also called vectors) as you drag the ball around. 2) Which color vector (arrow) represents velocity and which one represents acceleration? How can you tell? 3) Try dragging the ball around and around in a circular path. What do you notice about the lengths and directions of the blue and green vectors? Describe their behavior in detail below. 4) Now move the ball at a slow constant speed across the screen. What do you notice now about the vectors? Explain why this happens. 5) What happens to the vectors when you jerk the ball rapidly back and forth across the screen? Explain why this happens. 6) Now click on ‘Circular’ on the bottom. Describe the motion of the ball and the behavior of the two vectors. Is there a force on the ball? How can you tell? Be detailed in your explanations. 7) Click on ‘Simple Harmonic’ on the bottom. Based on the behavior of the ball and the vectors, write a definition of Simple Harmonic Motion.

Name ____________________________________ Motion in 2D Simulation Go to http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Motion_in_2D and click on Run Now. 1) Once the simulation opens, click on ‘Show Both’ for Velocity and Acceleration at the top of the page. Now click and drag the red ball around the screen. Make 3 observations about the blue and green arrows (also called vectors) as you drag the ball around. 2) Which color vector (arrow) represents velocity and which one represents acceleration? How can you tell? 3) Try dragging the ball around and around in a circular path. What do you notice about the lengths and directions of the blue and green vectors? Describe their behavior in detail below. 4) Now move the ball at a slow constant speed across the screen. What do you notice now about the vectors? Explain why this happens. 5) What happens to the vectors when you jerk the ball rapidly back and forth across the screen? Explain why this happens. 6) Now click on ‘Circular’ on the bottom. Describe the motion of the ball and the behavior of the two vectors. Is there a force on the ball? How can you tell? Be detailed in your explanations. 7) Click on ‘Simple Harmonic’ on the bottom. Based on the behavior of the ball and the vectors, write a definition of Simple Harmonic Motion.

Name ____________________________________                                      Motion in 2D Simulation   Go to http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=Motion_in_2D … Read More...
NAME: ARTIFACT: Describe your artifact. Why do you think it would work well for this project? _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ASSIGNMENT CRITERIA Please answer “yes” or “no” to the following questions. Is your artifact something that was made by people? ___yes ___no Is your artifact specific? (i.e., not a broad concept) ___yes ___no Can you point to your artifact? (i.e., not an abstract idea) ___yes ___no Does your artifact contain enough material to analyze? ___yes ___no Does your artifact relate to the course theme? ___yes ___no Did you bring your artifact to class today? ___yes ___no If you answered no, why not? _________________________________________ REVIEW Take a moment to quickly review the fundamental moves of analysis with your artifact. Do you notice patterns of frequency? ___yes ___no Do you notice patterns of contrast? ___yes ___no Do you notice anomalies? ___yes ___no Do you notice intensity or specific moments of intensity? ___yes ___no Record notes from this exercise in the space provided. What patterns, anomalies, and moments of intensity have you identified that you’d like to keep in mind moving forward? _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ WILL IT WORK? Talk over your responses with a partner before recording an answer to this question. If you or your partner answered “no” to half or more than half of these questions, you may want to reconsider the artifact you have chosen to analyze. Will your artifact work for this project? ___yes ___no FINAL STEPS If you have determined—yes—your artifact will work for this project, record any notes you’d like to save from this exercise in your class notebook and hand this checklist in to your instructor. If you have determined—no—your artifact will not work for this project, take a few minutes to brainstorm other potential artifacts that better fit the assignment criteria and lend themselves to analysis (at least 3). Record your ideas in the space provided and in your class notebook, and hand this checklist in to your instructor. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ If you have determined—I don’t know—or if you’re not sure if your artifact will work for this project, take a few minutes to write down concerns and questions this exercised has raised. Record them in the space provided and in your class notebook, and hand this checklist in to your instructor. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ That’s it, you’re done! Expect an email in response to this exercise before the next class period.

NAME: ARTIFACT: Describe your artifact. Why do you think it would work well for this project? _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ ASSIGNMENT CRITERIA Please answer “yes” or “no” to the following questions. Is your artifact something that was made by people? ___yes ___no Is your artifact specific? (i.e., not a broad concept) ___yes ___no Can you point to your artifact? (i.e., not an abstract idea) ___yes ___no Does your artifact contain enough material to analyze? ___yes ___no Does your artifact relate to the course theme? ___yes ___no Did you bring your artifact to class today? ___yes ___no If you answered no, why not? _________________________________________ REVIEW Take a moment to quickly review the fundamental moves of analysis with your artifact. Do you notice patterns of frequency? ___yes ___no Do you notice patterns of contrast? ___yes ___no Do you notice anomalies? ___yes ___no Do you notice intensity or specific moments of intensity? ___yes ___no Record notes from this exercise in the space provided. What patterns, anomalies, and moments of intensity have you identified that you’d like to keep in mind moving forward? _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ WILL IT WORK? Talk over your responses with a partner before recording an answer to this question. If you or your partner answered “no” to half or more than half of these questions, you may want to reconsider the artifact you have chosen to analyze. Will your artifact work for this project? ___yes ___no FINAL STEPS If you have determined—yes—your artifact will work for this project, record any notes you’d like to save from this exercise in your class notebook and hand this checklist in to your instructor. If you have determined—no—your artifact will not work for this project, take a few minutes to brainstorm other potential artifacts that better fit the assignment criteria and lend themselves to analysis (at least 3). Record your ideas in the space provided and in your class notebook, and hand this checklist in to your instructor. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ If you have determined—I don’t know—or if you’re not sure if your artifact will work for this project, take a few minutes to write down concerns and questions this exercised has raised. Record them in the space provided and in your class notebook, and hand this checklist in to your instructor. _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ That’s it, you’re done! Expect an email in response to this exercise before the next class period.

Chapter 10 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 3.70 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 15.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 19.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the two-block system’s kinetic energy due to the collision? Express your answer numerically in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pi = kg m/s vf vf = m/s K = Kfinal − Kinitial K = J Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Six pendulums of various masses are released from various heights above a tabletop, as shown in the figures below. All the pendulums have the same length and are mounted such that at the vertical position their lowest points are the height of the tabletop and just do not strike the tabletop when released. Assume that the size of each bob is negligible. Part A Rank each pendulum on the basis of its initial gravitational potential energy (before being released) relative to the tabletop. Rank from largest to smallest To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m h Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Momentum and Kinetic Energy Consider two objects (Object 1 and Object 2) moving in the same direction on a frictionless surface. Object 1 moves with speed and has mass . Object 2 moves with speed and has mass . Part A Which object has the larger magnitude of its momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which object has the larger kinetic energy? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v1 = v m1 = 2m v2 = 2v m2 = m Object 1 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Object 2 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Both objects have the same magnitude of their momenta. Object 1 has the greater kinetic energy. Object 2 has the greater kinetic energy. The objects have the same kinetic energy. Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Part A Six baseball throws are shown below. In each case the baseball is thrown at the same initial speed and from the same height above the ground. Assume that the effects of air resistance are negligible. Rank these throws according to the speed of the baseball the instant before it hits the ground. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: H PSS 10.1 Conservation of Mechanical Energy Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 10.1 for conservation of mechanical energy problems. Tarzan, in one tree, sights Jane in another tree. He grabs the end of a vine with length 20 that makes an angle of 45 with the vertical, steps off his tree limb, and swings down and then up to Jane’s open arms. When he arrives, his vine makes an angle of 30 with the vertical. Determine whether he gives her a tender embrace or knocks her off her limb by calculating Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane. You can ignore air resistance and the mass of the vine. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 10.1 Conservation of mechanical energy MODEL: Choose a system without friction or other losses of mechanical energy. m   VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you’re trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of mechanical energy: . ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The problem does not involve friction, nor are there losses of mechanical energy, so conservation of mechanical energy applies. Model Tarzan and the vine as a pendulum. Visualize Part A Which of the following sketches can be used in drawing a before-and-after pictorial representation? ANSWER: Kf + Uf = Ki + Ui Solve Part B What is Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane? Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Assess Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Bungee Jumping Diagram A Diagram B Diagram C Diagram D vf vf = m/s Kate, a bungee jumper, wants to jump off the edge of a bridge that spans a river below. Kate has a mass , and the surface of the bridge is a height above the water. The bungee cord, which has length when unstretched, will first straighten and then stretch as Kate falls. Assume the following: The bungee cord behaves as an ideal spring once it begins to stretch, with spring constant . Kate doesn’t actually jump but simply steps off the edge of the bridge and falls straight downward. Kate’s height is negligible compared to the length of the bungee cord. Hence, she can be treated as a point particle. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A How far below the bridge will Kate eventually be hanging, once she stops oscillating and comes finally to rest? Assume that she doesn’t touch the water. Express the distance in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Spinning Mass on a Spring An object of mass is attached to a spring with spring constant whose unstretched length is , and whose far end is fixed to a shaft that is rotating with angular speed . Neglect gravity and assume that the mass rotates with angular speed as shown. When solving this problem use an inertial coordinate system, as drawn here. m h L k g d = M k L Part A Given the angular speed , find the radius at which the mass rotates without moving toward or away from the origin. Express the radius in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C R( ) k L M R( ) = This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Baby Bounce with a Hooke One of the pioneers of modern science, Sir Robert Hooke (1635-1703), studied the elastic properties of springs and formulated the law that bears his name. Hooke found the relationship among the force a spring exerts, , the distance from equilibrium the end of the spring is displaced, , and a number called the spring constant (or, sometimes, the force constant of the spring). According to Hooke, the force of the spring is directly proportional to its displacement from equilibrium, or . In its scalar form, this equation is simply . The negative sign indicates that the force that the spring exerts and its displacement have opposite directions. The value of depends on the geometry and the material of the spring; it can be easily determined experimentally using this scalar equation. Toy makers have always been interested in springs for the entertainment value of the motion they produce. One well-known application is a baby bouncer,which consists of a harness seat for a toddler, attached to a spring. The entire contraption hooks onto the top of a doorway. The idea is for the baby to hang in the seat with his or her feet just touching the ground so that a good push up will get the baby bouncing, providing potentially hours of entertainment. F  x k F = −kx F = −kx k Part A The following chart and accompanying graph depict an experiment to determine the spring constant for a baby bouncer. Displacement from equilibrium, ( ) Force exerted on the spring, ( ) 0 0 0.005 2.5 0.010 5.0 0.015 7.5 0.020 10 What is the spring constant of the spring being tested for the baby bouncer? Express your answer to two significant figures in newtons per meter. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Shooting a ball into a box Two children are trying to shoot a marble of mass into a small box using a spring-loaded gun that is fixed on a table and shoots horizontally from the edge of the table. The edge of the table is a height above the top of the box (the height of which is negligibly small), and the center of the box is a distance from the edge of the table. x m F N k k = N/m m H d The spring has a spring constant . The first child compresses the spring a distance and finds that the marble falls short of its target by a horizontal distance . Part A By what distance, , should the second child compress the spring so that the marble lands in the middle of the box? (Assume that height of the box is negligible, so that there is no chance that the marble will hit the side of the box before it lands in the bottom.) Express the distance in terms of , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). k x1 d12 x2 m k g H d x2 = Elastic Collision in One Dimension Block 1, of mass , moves across a frictionless surface with speed . It collides elastically with block 2, of mass , which is at rest ( ). After the collision, block 1 moves with speed , while block 2 moves with speed . Assume that , so that after the collision, the two objects move off in the direction of the first object before the collision. Part A This collision is elastic. What quantities, if any, are conserved in this collision? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the final speed of block 1? m1 ui m2 vi = 0 uf vf m1 > m2 kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum uf Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the final speed of block 2? Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Ballistic Pendulum In a ballistic pendulum an object of mass is fired with an initial speed at a pendulum bob. The bob has a mass , which is suspended by a rod of length and negligible mass. After the collision, the pendulum and object stick together and swing to a maximum angular displacement as shown . uf m1 m2 ui uf = vf vf m1 m2 ui vf = m v0 M L  Part A Find an expression for , the initial speed of the fired object. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and and the acceleration due to gravity, . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B An experiment is done to compare the initial speed of bullets fired from different handguns: a 9.0 and a .44 caliber. The guns are fired into a 10- pendulum bob of length . Assume that the 9.0- bullet has a mass of 6.0 and the .44-caliber bullet has a mass of 12 . If the 9.0- bullet causes the pendulum to swing to a maximum angular displacement of 4.3 and the .44-caliber bullet causes a displacement of 10.1 , find the ratio of the initial speed of the 9.0- bullet to the speed of the .44-caliber bullet, . Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v0 m M L  g v0 = mm kg L mm g g mm   mm (v /( 0 )9.0 v0)44 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. (v0 )9.0/(v0 )44 =

Chapter 10 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 3.70 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 15.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 19.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the two-block system’s kinetic energy due to the collision? Express your answer numerically in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pi = kg m/s vf vf = m/s K = Kfinal − Kinitial K = J Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Six pendulums of various masses are released from various heights above a tabletop, as shown in the figures below. All the pendulums have the same length and are mounted such that at the vertical position their lowest points are the height of the tabletop and just do not strike the tabletop when released. Assume that the size of each bob is negligible. Part A Rank each pendulum on the basis of its initial gravitational potential energy (before being released) relative to the tabletop. Rank from largest to smallest To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: m h Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Momentum and Kinetic Energy Consider two objects (Object 1 and Object 2) moving in the same direction on a frictionless surface. Object 1 moves with speed and has mass . Object 2 moves with speed and has mass . Part A Which object has the larger magnitude of its momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which object has the larger kinetic energy? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v1 = v m1 = 2m v2 = 2v m2 = m Object 1 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Object 2 has the greater magnitude of its momentum. Both objects have the same magnitude of their momenta. Object 1 has the greater kinetic energy. Object 2 has the greater kinetic energy. The objects have the same kinetic energy. Projectile Motion and Conservation of Energy Ranking Task Part A Six baseball throws are shown below. In each case the baseball is thrown at the same initial speed and from the same height above the ground. Assume that the effects of air resistance are negligible. Rank these throws according to the speed of the baseball the instant before it hits the ground. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: H PSS 10.1 Conservation of Mechanical Energy Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 10.1 for conservation of mechanical energy problems. Tarzan, in one tree, sights Jane in another tree. He grabs the end of a vine with length 20 that makes an angle of 45 with the vertical, steps off his tree limb, and swings down and then up to Jane’s open arms. When he arrives, his vine makes an angle of 30 with the vertical. Determine whether he gives her a tender embrace or knocks her off her limb by calculating Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane. You can ignore air resistance and the mass of the vine. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 10.1 Conservation of mechanical energy MODEL: Choose a system without friction or other losses of mechanical energy. m   VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you’re trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of mechanical energy: . ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The problem does not involve friction, nor are there losses of mechanical energy, so conservation of mechanical energy applies. Model Tarzan and the vine as a pendulum. Visualize Part A Which of the following sketches can be used in drawing a before-and-after pictorial representation? ANSWER: Kf + Uf = Ki + Ui Solve Part B What is Tarzan’s speed just before he reaches Jane? Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Assess Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Bungee Jumping Diagram A Diagram B Diagram C Diagram D vf vf = m/s Kate, a bungee jumper, wants to jump off the edge of a bridge that spans a river below. Kate has a mass , and the surface of the bridge is a height above the water. The bungee cord, which has length when unstretched, will first straighten and then stretch as Kate falls. Assume the following: The bungee cord behaves as an ideal spring once it begins to stretch, with spring constant . Kate doesn’t actually jump but simply steps off the edge of the bridge and falls straight downward. Kate’s height is negligible compared to the length of the bungee cord. Hence, she can be treated as a point particle. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A How far below the bridge will Kate eventually be hanging, once she stops oscillating and comes finally to rest? Assume that she doesn’t touch the water. Express the distance in terms of quantities given in the problem introduction. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Spinning Mass on a Spring An object of mass is attached to a spring with spring constant whose unstretched length is , and whose far end is fixed to a shaft that is rotating with angular speed . Neglect gravity and assume that the mass rotates with angular speed as shown. When solving this problem use an inertial coordinate system, as drawn here. m h L k g d = M k L Part A Given the angular speed , find the radius at which the mass rotates without moving toward or away from the origin. Express the radius in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C R( ) k L M R( ) = This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± Baby Bounce with a Hooke One of the pioneers of modern science, Sir Robert Hooke (1635-1703), studied the elastic properties of springs and formulated the law that bears his name. Hooke found the relationship among the force a spring exerts, , the distance from equilibrium the end of the spring is displaced, , and a number called the spring constant (or, sometimes, the force constant of the spring). According to Hooke, the force of the spring is directly proportional to its displacement from equilibrium, or . In its scalar form, this equation is simply . The negative sign indicates that the force that the spring exerts and its displacement have opposite directions. The value of depends on the geometry and the material of the spring; it can be easily determined experimentally using this scalar equation. Toy makers have always been interested in springs for the entertainment value of the motion they produce. One well-known application is a baby bouncer,which consists of a harness seat for a toddler, attached to a spring. The entire contraption hooks onto the top of a doorway. The idea is for the baby to hang in the seat with his or her feet just touching the ground so that a good push up will get the baby bouncing, providing potentially hours of entertainment. F  x k F = −kx F = −kx k Part A The following chart and accompanying graph depict an experiment to determine the spring constant for a baby bouncer. Displacement from equilibrium, ( ) Force exerted on the spring, ( ) 0 0 0.005 2.5 0.010 5.0 0.015 7.5 0.020 10 What is the spring constant of the spring being tested for the baby bouncer? Express your answer to two significant figures in newtons per meter. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Shooting a ball into a box Two children are trying to shoot a marble of mass into a small box using a spring-loaded gun that is fixed on a table and shoots horizontally from the edge of the table. The edge of the table is a height above the top of the box (the height of which is negligibly small), and the center of the box is a distance from the edge of the table. x m F N k k = N/m m H d The spring has a spring constant . The first child compresses the spring a distance and finds that the marble falls short of its target by a horizontal distance . Part A By what distance, , should the second child compress the spring so that the marble lands in the middle of the box? (Assume that height of the box is negligible, so that there is no chance that the marble will hit the side of the box before it lands in the bottom.) Express the distance in terms of , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). k x1 d12 x2 m k g H d x2 = Elastic Collision in One Dimension Block 1, of mass , moves across a frictionless surface with speed . It collides elastically with block 2, of mass , which is at rest ( ). After the collision, block 1 moves with speed , while block 2 moves with speed . Assume that , so that after the collision, the two objects move off in the direction of the first object before the collision. Part A This collision is elastic. What quantities, if any, are conserved in this collision? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the final speed of block 1? m1 ui m2 vi = 0 uf vf m1 > m2 kinetic energy only momentum only kinetic energy and momentum uf Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is the final speed of block 2? Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Ballistic Pendulum In a ballistic pendulum an object of mass is fired with an initial speed at a pendulum bob. The bob has a mass , which is suspended by a rod of length and negligible mass. After the collision, the pendulum and object stick together and swing to a maximum angular displacement as shown . uf m1 m2 ui uf = vf vf m1 m2 ui vf = m v0 M L  Part A Find an expression for , the initial speed of the fired object. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and and the acceleration due to gravity, . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B An experiment is done to compare the initial speed of bullets fired from different handguns: a 9.0 and a .44 caliber. The guns are fired into a 10- pendulum bob of length . Assume that the 9.0- bullet has a mass of 6.0 and the .44-caliber bullet has a mass of 12 . If the 9.0- bullet causes the pendulum to swing to a maximum angular displacement of 4.3 and the .44-caliber bullet causes a displacement of 10.1 , find the ratio of the initial speed of the 9.0- bullet to the speed of the .44-caliber bullet, . Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: v0 m M L  g v0 = mm kg L mm g g mm   mm (v /( 0 )9.0 v0)44 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. (v0 )9.0/(v0 )44 =

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2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 1/22 Assignment 2 Due: 6:43pm on Saturday, February 28, 2015 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 2/22 Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from 5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. Part A C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F _._ _._ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 3/22 What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _._ _4 = _._ _5 = _._ _5 = 4 _._ _4 = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 4/22 The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. ANSWER: Finding the Cross Product The figure shows two vectors and separated by an angle . You are given that , , and . _._ _._ _4, _5 = _._ _4 , _5 = _._ _._ They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. _ ._ _._ J56 _ .__ _ _ _ _.__ _ _ _ _ ._g_.__ _ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 5/22 Part A Express as an ordered triplet of values, separated by commas. ANSWER: Part B Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Part C Find the sine of the angle between and . ANSWER: Significant Figures Conceptual Question In the parts that follow select whether the number presented in statement A is greater than, less than, or equal to the number presented in statement B. Be sure to follow all of the rules concerning significant figures. _ ._ _ ._= _ ._ ]_ ]._ = _ ._ _._ TJO J__ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 6/22 Part A Statement A: 2.567 , to two significant figures. Statement B: 2.567 , to three significant figures. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Statement A: (2.567 + 3.146 ), to two significant figures. Statement B: (2.567 , to two significant figures) + (3.146 , to two significant figures). Determine the correct relationship between the statements. ANSWER: Part C Statement A: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.4 . Statement B: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.41 . Since you are not told specific numbers of significant figures to round to, you must use the rules for multiplying numbers while respecting significant figures. If you need a reminder, consult the hint. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. LN LN LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. N N N N 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 7/22 ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. _.__ _ _Ã_ _.__ Ã_ _ _ _.__ Ã_Ã_ _ _._ø _._ = J”# _._ _._ J”# = SBEJBOT __._ø __._ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 8/22 Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _ _._ø __._ = _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _.___._ _ ø _._ _ .__ _ .__ __ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ = ø _ .__ _ .__ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 9/22 Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Resolving Vector Components with Trigonometry Often a vector is specified by a magnitude and a direction; for example, a rope with tension exerts a force of magnitude in a direction 35 north of east. This is a good way to think of vectors; however, to calculate results with vectors, it is best to select a coordinate system and manipulate the components of the vectors in that coordinate system. Part A Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B _ .__ _ .__ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ ._ _ È _._ _ C È _._ = ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 10/22 Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle 30.0 as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 1.28 Part A How many dollar bills would you have to stack to reach the moon? (Depending on age, dollar bills can be stacked with about 23 per millimeter.) Express your answer using one significant figure. ANSWER: Problem 1.80 A boulder of weight rests on a hillside that rises at a constant angle above the horizontal, as shown in the figure . Its weight is a force on the boulder that has direction vertically downward. _._ _ D È _._ = _._ _ ] _ È _._ = dollar bills 3 C 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 11/22 Part A In terms of and , what is the component of the weight of the boulder in the direction parallel to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part B What is the component of the weight in the direction perpendicular to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part C An air conditioner unit is fastened to a roof that slopes upward at an angle of . In order that the unit not slide down the roof, the component of the unit’s weight parallel to the roof cannot exceed 550 N. What is the maximum allowed weight of the unit? ANSWER: Problem 1.84 You are camping with two friends, Joe and Karl. Since all three of you like your privacy, you don’t pitch your tents close together. Joe’s tent is 23.5 from yours, in the direction 19.0 north of east. Karl’s tent is 40.0 from yours, in the direction 36.0 south of east. C 3 C 3 ]3,_. ] = C 3 ]3,!., ] = ____È 3 = / N È N È 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 12/22 Part A What is the distance between Karl’s tent and Joe’s tent? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 1.8 Part A The components of vectors and are given as follows: Ax = +5.7 Bx = 9.8 Ay = 3.6 By = 6.5 The magnitude of the vector difference , is closest to: ANSWER: OneDimensional Kinematics with Constant Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand the meaning of the variables that appear in the equations for onedimensional kinematics with constant acceleration. Motion with a constant, nonzero acceleration is not uncommon in the world around us. Falling (or thrown) objects and cars starting and stopping approximate this type of motion. It is also the type of motion most frequently involved in introductory kinematics problems. The kinematic equations for such motion can be written as , , where the symbols are defined as follows: is the position of the particle; _ = N _ ¥ _ ¥ à _ ¥ _ ¥ 5.0 11 5.0 16 250 4 0_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 0 _ 2J __0 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 13/22 is the initial position of the particle; is the velocity of the particle; is the initial velocity of the particle; is the acceleration of the particle. In anwering the following questions, assume that the acceleration is constant and nonzero: . Part A The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part B The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part C The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part D The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: 4J 2 0 2J _ _ Ü _ 4 true false 4J true false 2J true false 2 true false 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 14/22 Part E Which of the given equations is not an explicit function of and is therefore useful when you don’t know or don’t need the time? ANSWER: Part F A particle moves with constant acceleration . The expression represents the particle’s velocity at what instant in time? ANSWER: More generally, the equations of motion can be written as and . Here is the time that has elapsed since the beginning of the particle’s motion, that is, , where is the current time and is the time at which we start measuring the particle’s motion. The terms and are, respectively, the position and velocity at . As you can now see, the equations given at the beginning of this problem correspond to the case , which is a convenient choice if there is only one particle of interest. To illustrate the use of these more general equations, consider the motion of two particles, A and B. The position of particle A depends on time as . That is, particle A starts moving at time with velocity , from . At time , particle B has twice the acceleration, half the velocity, and the same position that particle A had at time . Part G What is the equation describing the position of particle B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 0 4_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 _ 2J __0 _ ___ 4à 2_ 2_J 4J _ 2J __0 only at time only at the “initial” time when a time has passed since the particle’s velocity was 0 _ _ 0 2J 4 0_ 4J_2J 0_ _ 0 __ _ 2 0 _ 2J __ 0 0 0 _ 0Ã0J 0 0J 4J 2J 0 _ 0J 0J _ _ 4″ 0 _ 4J _2J0_ ____0_ 0 _ 0J” _ _ 2J” _ 2J 4J” _ 4J 0 _ 0_ 0 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 15/22 Part H At what time does the velocity of particle B equal that of particle A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Given Positions, Find Velocity and Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand how to graph position, velocity, and acceleration of an object starting with a table of positions vs. time. The table shows the x coordinate of a moving object. The position is tabulated at 1s intervals. The x coordinate is indicated below each time. You should make the simplification that the acceleration of the object is bounded and contains no spikes. time (s) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 x (m) 0 1 4 9 16 24 32 40 46 48 Part A Which graph best represents the function , describing the object’s position vs. time? 4# 0_ 4J__2J0_ _ __ 0_ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J0__0_ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0_0__ _ 0_ __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0_0_ __ 0_0_ _ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0Ã0__ _ 0à __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0Ã0_ __ 0Ã0_ _ The two particles never have the same velocity. 0_ 0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 16/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the object’s velocity as a function of time? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 1 2 3 4 2 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 17/22 Part C Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the acceleration of this object? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. 1 2 3 4 _ 0 1 2 3 4 _ 0 _ _ _ _ 4 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 18/22 Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . You did not open hints for this part. 4NBO 0 _ _ 0 4NBO 0 = 4CVT 0 _ 0 4CVT = 0DBUDI 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 19/22 ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Stopping on Snow Light, dry snow is called powder. Skiing on a powder day is different than skiing on a day when the snow is wet and heavy. When you slow down on dry snow the maximum (negative) acceleration caused by the snow acting on your skis is about twofifths as much as that of stopping on wet snow. Part A For a given initial velocity, how does the time it takes to stop on dry snow differ from the time it takes to stop on wet snow? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B For a given initial velocity, how does the stopping distance on dry snow differ from the stopping distance on wet snow? 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI _ _ _ Ç 0DBUDI 0E 0X 0E _ ___0X 0E _ 0X 0E _ ___0X 4E 4X 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 20/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 2.34 A subway train starts from rest at a station and accelerates at a rate of for 14.0 . It runs at constant speed for 70.0 and slows down at a rate of until it stops at the next station. Part A Find the total distance covered. ANSWER: Problem 2.57 Dan gets on Interstate Highway I280 at Seward, Nebraska, and drives due west in a straight line and at an average velocity of magnitude 88.0 . After traveling 76 km, he reaches the Aurora exit . Realizing he has gone too far, he turns around and drives due east 34 back to the York exit at an average velocity of magnitude 75.0 . Part A For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is his average speed? 4E _ ___4X 4E _ 4X 4E _ ___4X ____ N_T_ T T ____ N_T_ = LN LN_I LN LN_I 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 21/22 ANSWER: Part B For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is the magnitude of his average velocity? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.1 Part A A train starts from rest and accelerates uniformly, until it has traveled 5.9 km and acquired a velocity of 35 m/s. The train then moves at a constant velocity of 35 m/s for 400 s. The train then decelerates uniformly at 0.065 m/s2, until it is brought to a halt. The acceleration during the first 5.9 km of travel is closest to: ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.8 Part A A racquetball strikes a wall with a speed of 30 m/s and rebounds with a speed of 26 m/s. The collision takes 20 ms. What is the average acceleration of the ball during collision? ANSWER: 2 = LN_I 2 = LN_I 0.13 m/s2 0.11 m/s2 0.12 m/s2 0.10 m/s2 0.093 m/s2 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 18 points. zero 200 m/s2 1500 m/s2 1300 m/s2 2800 m/s2

2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 1/22 Assignment 2 Due: 6:43pm on Saturday, February 28, 2015 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 2/22 Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from 5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. Part A C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F _._ _._ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 3/22 What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _._ _4 = _._ _5 = _._ _5 = 4 _._ _4 = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 4/22 The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. ANSWER: Finding the Cross Product The figure shows two vectors and separated by an angle . You are given that , , and . _._ _._ _4, _5 = _._ _4 , _5 = _._ _._ They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. _ ._ _._ J56 _ .__ _ _ _ _.__ _ _ _ _ ._g_.__ _ ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 5/22 Part A Express as an ordered triplet of values, separated by commas. ANSWER: Part B Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Part C Find the sine of the angle between and . ANSWER: Significant Figures Conceptual Question In the parts that follow select whether the number presented in statement A is greater than, less than, or equal to the number presented in statement B. Be sure to follow all of the rules concerning significant figures. _ ._ _ ._= _ ._ ]_ ]._ = _ ._ _._ TJO J__ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 6/22 Part A Statement A: 2.567 , to two significant figures. Statement B: 2.567 , to three significant figures. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Statement A: (2.567 + 3.146 ), to two significant figures. Statement B: (2.567 , to two significant figures) + (3.146 , to two significant figures). Determine the correct relationship between the statements. ANSWER: Part C Statement A: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.4 . Statement B: Area of a rectangle with measured length = 2.536 and width = 1.41 . Since you are not told specific numbers of significant figures to round to, you must use the rules for multiplying numbers while respecting significant figures. If you need a reminder, consult the hint. Determine the correct relationship between the statements. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. LN LN LN LN Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. N N N N 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 7/22 ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: Statement A is greater than less than equal to Statement B. _.__ _ _Ã_ _.__ Ã_ _ _ _.__ Ã_Ã_ _ _._ø _._ = J”# _._ _._ J”# = SBEJBOT __._ø __._ = 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 8/22 Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: _ _._ø __._ = _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _._ø _._ _._ø _.___._ _ ø _._ _ .__ _ .__ __ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ _ .__ = ø _ .__ _ .__ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 9/22 Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Resolving Vector Components with Trigonometry Often a vector is specified by a magnitude and a direction; for example, a rope with tension exerts a force of magnitude in a direction 35 north of east. This is a good way to think of vectors; however, to calculate results with vectors, it is best to select a coordinate system and manipulate the components of the vectors in that coordinate system. Part A Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B _ .__ _ .__ __ __ = ø _ .__ _ .__ _ ._ _ È _._ _ C È _._ = ._ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 10/22 Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle =20.0 with respect to the x axis as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Find the components of the vector with length = 1.00 and angle 30.0 as shown. Enter the x component followed by the y component, separated by a comma. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 1.28 Part A How many dollar bills would you have to stack to reach the moon? (Depending on age, dollar bills can be stacked with about 23 per millimeter.) Express your answer using one significant figure. ANSWER: Problem 1.80 A boulder of weight rests on a hillside that rises at a constant angle above the horizontal, as shown in the figure . Its weight is a force on the boulder that has direction vertically downward. _._ _ D È _._ = _._ _ ] _ È _._ = dollar bills 3 C 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 11/22 Part A In terms of and , what is the component of the weight of the boulder in the direction parallel to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part B What is the component of the weight in the direction perpendicular to the surface of the hill? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: Part C An air conditioner unit is fastened to a roof that slopes upward at an angle of . In order that the unit not slide down the roof, the component of the unit’s weight parallel to the roof cannot exceed 550 N. What is the maximum allowed weight of the unit? ANSWER: Problem 1.84 You are camping with two friends, Joe and Karl. Since all three of you like your privacy, you don’t pitch your tents close together. Joe’s tent is 23.5 from yours, in the direction 19.0 north of east. Karl’s tent is 40.0 from yours, in the direction 36.0 south of east. C 3 C 3 ]3,_. ] = C 3 ]3,!., ] = ____È 3 = / N È N È 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 12/22 Part A What is the distance between Karl’s tent and Joe’s tent? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 1.8 Part A The components of vectors and are given as follows: Ax = +5.7 Bx = 9.8 Ay = 3.6 By = 6.5 The magnitude of the vector difference , is closest to: ANSWER: OneDimensional Kinematics with Constant Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand the meaning of the variables that appear in the equations for onedimensional kinematics with constant acceleration. Motion with a constant, nonzero acceleration is not uncommon in the world around us. Falling (or thrown) objects and cars starting and stopping approximate this type of motion. It is also the type of motion most frequently involved in introductory kinematics problems. The kinematic equations for such motion can be written as , , where the symbols are defined as follows: is the position of the particle; _ = N _ ¥ _ ¥ à _ ¥ _ ¥ 5.0 11 5.0 16 250 4 0_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 0 _ 2J __0 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 13/22 is the initial position of the particle; is the velocity of the particle; is the initial velocity of the particle; is the acceleration of the particle. In anwering the following questions, assume that the acceleration is constant and nonzero: . Part A The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part B The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part C The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: Part D The quantity represented by is a function of time (i.e., is not constant). ANSWER: 4J 2 0 2J _ _ Ü _ 4 true false 4J true false 2J true false 2 true false 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 14/22 Part E Which of the given equations is not an explicit function of and is therefore useful when you don’t know or don’t need the time? ANSWER: Part F A particle moves with constant acceleration . The expression represents the particle’s velocity at what instant in time? ANSWER: More generally, the equations of motion can be written as and . Here is the time that has elapsed since the beginning of the particle’s motion, that is, , where is the current time and is the time at which we start measuring the particle’s motion. The terms and are, respectively, the position and velocity at . As you can now see, the equations given at the beginning of this problem correspond to the case , which is a convenient choice if there is only one particle of interest. To illustrate the use of these more general equations, consider the motion of two particles, A and B. The position of particle A depends on time as . That is, particle A starts moving at time with velocity , from . At time , particle B has twice the acceleration, half the velocity, and the same position that particle A had at time . Part G What is the equation describing the position of particle B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 0 4_ 4J_2J0_ _ __ 0_ 2 _ 2J __0 _ ___ 4à 2_ 2_J 4J _ 2J __0 only at time only at the “initial” time when a time has passed since the particle’s velocity was 0 _ _ 0 2J 4 0_ 4J_2J 0_ _ 0 __ _ 2 0 _ 2J __ 0 0 0 _ 0Ã0J 0 0J 4J 2J 0 _ 0J 0J _ _ 4″ 0 _ 4J _2J0_ ____0_ 0 _ 0J” _ _ 2J” _ 2J 4J” _ 4J 0 _ 0_ 0 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 15/22 Part H At what time does the velocity of particle B equal that of particle A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Given Positions, Find Velocity and Acceleration Learning Goal: To understand how to graph position, velocity, and acceleration of an object starting with a table of positions vs. time. The table shows the x coordinate of a moving object. The position is tabulated at 1s intervals. The x coordinate is indicated below each time. You should make the simplification that the acceleration of the object is bounded and contains no spikes. time (s) 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 x (m) 0 1 4 9 16 24 32 40 46 48 Part A Which graph best represents the function , describing the object’s position vs. time? 4# 0_ 4J__2J0_ _ __ 0_ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J0__0_ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0_0__ _ 0_ __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0_0_ __ 0_0_ _ 4# 0_ 4J__2J 0Ã0__ _ 0à __ 0__ 4# 0 _ 4J ____2J 0Ã0_ __ 0Ã0_ _ The two particles never have the same velocity. 0_ 0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 0__0__ 2J __ 4 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 16/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the object’s velocity as a function of time? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 1 2 3 4 2 0 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 17/22 Part C Which of the following graphs best represents the function , describing the acceleration of this object? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. 1 2 3 4 _ 0 1 2 3 4 _ 0 _ _ _ _ 4 _ _ 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 18/22 Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . You did not open hints for this part. 4NBO 0 _ _ 0 4NBO 0 = 4CVT 0 _ 0 4CVT = 0DBUDI 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 19/22 ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Stopping on Snow Light, dry snow is called powder. Skiing on a powder day is different than skiing on a day when the snow is wet and heavy. When you slow down on dry snow the maximum (negative) acceleration caused by the snow acting on your skis is about twofifths as much as that of stopping on wet snow. Part A For a given initial velocity, how does the time it takes to stop on dry snow differ from the time it takes to stop on wet snow? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B For a given initial velocity, how does the stopping distance on dry snow differ from the stopping distance on wet snow? 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI 4NBO 0DBUDI _ 4CVT 0DBUDI _ _ _ Ç 0DBUDI 0E 0X 0E _ ___0X 0E _ 0X 0E _ ___0X 4E 4X 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 20/22 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Exercise 2.34 A subway train starts from rest at a station and accelerates at a rate of for 14.0 . It runs at constant speed for 70.0 and slows down at a rate of until it stops at the next station. Part A Find the total distance covered. ANSWER: Problem 2.57 Dan gets on Interstate Highway I280 at Seward, Nebraska, and drives due west in a straight line and at an average velocity of magnitude 88.0 . After traveling 76 km, he reaches the Aurora exit . Realizing he has gone too far, he turns around and drives due east 34 back to the York exit at an average velocity of magnitude 75.0 . Part A For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is his average speed? 4E _ ___4X 4E _ 4X 4E _ ___4X ____ N_T_ T T ____ N_T_ = LN LN_I LN LN_I 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 21/22 ANSWER: Part B For his whole trip from Seward to the York exit, what is the magnitude of his average velocity? ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.1 Part A A train starts from rest and accelerates uniformly, until it has traveled 5.9 km and acquired a velocity of 35 m/s. The train then moves at a constant velocity of 35 m/s for 400 s. The train then decelerates uniformly at 0.065 m/s2, until it is brought to a halt. The acceleration during the first 5.9 km of travel is closest to: ANSWER: Multiple Choice Question 2.8 Part A A racquetball strikes a wall with a speed of 30 m/s and rebounds with a speed of 26 m/s. The collision takes 20 ms. What is the average acceleration of the ball during collision? ANSWER: 2 = LN_I 2 = LN_I 0.13 m/s2 0.11 m/s2 0.12 m/s2 0.10 m/s2 0.093 m/s2 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 18 points. zero 200 m/s2 1500 m/s2 1300 m/s2 2800 m/s2

info@checkyourstudy.com 2/24/2015 Assignment 2 =3484333 1/22 Assignment 2 Due: 6:43pm … Read More...
SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AT BOSE CORPORATION Bose Corporation, headquartered in Framingham, Massachusetts, offers an excellent example of integrated supply chain management. Bose, a producer of audio premium speakers used in automobiles, high-fidelity systems, and consumer and commercial broadcasting systems, was founded in 1964 by Dr. Bose of MIT. Bose currently maintains plants in Massachusetts and Michigan as well as Canada, Mexico, and Ireland. Its purchasing organization, while decentralized, has some overlap that requires coordination between sites. It manages this coordination by using conference calls between managers, electronic communication, and joint problem solving. The company is moving toward single sourcing many of its 800 to 1,000 parts, which include corrugated paper, particle board and wood, plastic injected molded parts, fasteners, glues, woofers, and fabric. Some product components, such as woofers, are sourced overseas. For example, at the Hillsdale, Michigan, plant, foreign sourcing accounts for 20% of purchases, with the remainder of suppliers located immediately within the state of Michigan. About 35% of the parts purchased at this site are single sourced, with approximately half of the components arriving with no incoming inspection performed. In turn, Bose ships finished products directly to Delco, Honda, and Nissan and has a record of no missed deliveries. Normal lead time to customers is 60 working days, but Bose can expedite shipments in one week and airfreight them if necessary. The company has developed a detailed supplier performance system that measures on-time delivery, quality performance, technical improvements, and supplier suggestions. A report is generated twice a month from this system and sent to the supplier providing feedback about supplier performance. If there is a three-week trend of poor performance, Bose will usually establish a specific goal for improvement that the supplier must attain. Examples include 10% delivery improvement every month until 100% conformance is achieved, or 5% quality improvement until a 1% defect level is reached over a four-month period. In one case, a supplier sent a rejected shipment back to Bose without explanation and with no corrective action taken. When no significant improvement occurred, another supplier replaced the delinquent supplier. Bose has few written contracts with suppliers. After six months of deliveries without rejects, Bose encourages suppliers to apply for a certificate of achievement form, signifying that they are qualified suppliers. One of the primary criteria for gaining certification involves how well the supplier responds to corrective action requests. One of the biggest problems observed is that suppliers often correct problems on individual parts covered by a corrective action form without extending these corrective actions to other part families and applicable parts. Bose has adopted a unique system of marrying just-in-time (JIT) purchasing with global sourcing. Approximately half of the dollar value of Bose’s total purchases are made overseas, with the majority of the sourcing done in Asia. Because foreign sourcing does not support just-in-time deliveries, Bose “had to find a way to blend low inventory with buying from distant sources,” says the director of purchasing and logistics for Bose. Visualizing itself as a customer-driven organization, Bose now uses a sophisticated transportation system—what Bose’s manager of logistics calls “the best EDI system in the country.” Working closely with a national less-than-truckload carrier for the bulk of its domestic freight movements, including shipments arriving at a U.S. port from oversees, Bose implemented an electronic data interchange (EDI) system that does much more than simple tracking. The system operates close to real time and allows two-way communication between every one of the freight handler’s 230 terminals and Bose. Information is updated several times daily and is downloaded automatically, enabling Bose to perform shipping analysis and distribution channel modeling to achieve reliable lowest total cost scenarios. The company can also request removal from a terminal of any shipment that it must expedite with an air shipment. This state-of-the-art system provides a snapshot of what is happening on a daily basis and keeps Bose’s managers on top of everyday occurrences and decisions. Management proactively manages logistics time elements in pursuit of better customer service. The next step is to implement this system with all major suppliers rather than just with transportation suppliers. In the future, Bose plans to automate its entire materials system. Perhaps one of the most unique features of Bose’s procurement and logistics system is the development of JIT II. The basic premise of JIT II is simple: The person who can do the best job of ordering and managing inventory of a particular item is the supplier himself. Bose negotiated with each supplier to provide a full-time employee at the Bose plant who was responsible for ordering, shipping, and receiving materials from that plant, as well as managing on-site inventories of the items. This was done through an EDI connection between Bose’s plant and the supplier’s facility. Collocating suppliers and buyers was so successful that Bose is now implementing it at all plant locations. In fact, many other companies have also begun to implement collocation of suppliers. Assignment Questions The following assignment questions relate to ideas and concepts presented throughout this text. Answer some or all of the questions as directed by your instructor. 1. Discuss how the strategy development process might work at a company like Bose. 2. What should be the relationship between Bose’s supply management strategy and the development of its performance measurement system? 3. Why is purchased quality so important to Bose? 4. Can a just-in-time purchase system operate without total quality from suppliers? 5. Why can some components arrive at the Hillsdale, Michigan, plant with no incoming inspection required? 6. Discuss the reasons why Bose has a certificate of achievement program for identifying qualified suppliers. 7. Bose is moving toward single sourcing many of its purchased part requirements. Discuss why the company might want to do this. Are there any risks to that approach? 8. Discuss some of the difficulties a company like Bose might experience when trying to implement just-in-time purchasing with international suppliers. 9. Why does Bose have to source so much of its purchase requirements from offshore suppliers? 10. What makes the JIT II system at Bose unique? Why would a company pursue this type of system? 11. Why is it necessary to enter into a longer-term contractual arrangement when pursuing arrangements like the one Bose has with its domestic transportation carrier? 12. Why is it important to manage logistics time elements proactively when pursuing higher levels of customer service? 13. What role does information technology play at Bose? 14. What advantages do information technology systems provide to Bose that might not be available to a company that does not have these systems? 15. Why has Bose developed its supplier performance measurement system? 16. Do you think the performance measurement systems at Bose are computerized or manual? Why?

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AT BOSE CORPORATION Bose Corporation, headquartered in Framingham, Massachusetts, offers an excellent example of integrated supply chain management. Bose, a producer of audio premium speakers used in automobiles, high-fidelity systems, and consumer and commercial broadcasting systems, was founded in 1964 by Dr. Bose of MIT. Bose currently maintains plants in Massachusetts and Michigan as well as Canada, Mexico, and Ireland. Its purchasing organization, while decentralized, has some overlap that requires coordination between sites. It manages this coordination by using conference calls between managers, electronic communication, and joint problem solving. The company is moving toward single sourcing many of its 800 to 1,000 parts, which include corrugated paper, particle board and wood, plastic injected molded parts, fasteners, glues, woofers, and fabric. Some product components, such as woofers, are sourced overseas. For example, at the Hillsdale, Michigan, plant, foreign sourcing accounts for 20% of purchases, with the remainder of suppliers located immediately within the state of Michigan. About 35% of the parts purchased at this site are single sourced, with approximately half of the components arriving with no incoming inspection performed. In turn, Bose ships finished products directly to Delco, Honda, and Nissan and has a record of no missed deliveries. Normal lead time to customers is 60 working days, but Bose can expedite shipments in one week and airfreight them if necessary. The company has developed a detailed supplier performance system that measures on-time delivery, quality performance, technical improvements, and supplier suggestions. A report is generated twice a month from this system and sent to the supplier providing feedback about supplier performance. If there is a three-week trend of poor performance, Bose will usually establish a specific goal for improvement that the supplier must attain. Examples include 10% delivery improvement every month until 100% conformance is achieved, or 5% quality improvement until a 1% defect level is reached over a four-month period. In one case, a supplier sent a rejected shipment back to Bose without explanation and with no corrective action taken. When no significant improvement occurred, another supplier replaced the delinquent supplier. Bose has few written contracts with suppliers. After six months of deliveries without rejects, Bose encourages suppliers to apply for a certificate of achievement form, signifying that they are qualified suppliers. One of the primary criteria for gaining certification involves how well the supplier responds to corrective action requests. One of the biggest problems observed is that suppliers often correct problems on individual parts covered by a corrective action form without extending these corrective actions to other part families and applicable parts. Bose has adopted a unique system of marrying just-in-time (JIT) purchasing with global sourcing. Approximately half of the dollar value of Bose’s total purchases are made overseas, with the majority of the sourcing done in Asia. Because foreign sourcing does not support just-in-time deliveries, Bose “had to find a way to blend low inventory with buying from distant sources,” says the director of purchasing and logistics for Bose. Visualizing itself as a customer-driven organization, Bose now uses a sophisticated transportation system—what Bose’s manager of logistics calls “the best EDI system in the country.” Working closely with a national less-than-truckload carrier for the bulk of its domestic freight movements, including shipments arriving at a U.S. port from oversees, Bose implemented an electronic data interchange (EDI) system that does much more than simple tracking. The system operates close to real time and allows two-way communication between every one of the freight handler’s 230 terminals and Bose. Information is updated several times daily and is downloaded automatically, enabling Bose to perform shipping analysis and distribution channel modeling to achieve reliable lowest total cost scenarios. The company can also request removal from a terminal of any shipment that it must expedite with an air shipment. This state-of-the-art system provides a snapshot of what is happening on a daily basis and keeps Bose’s managers on top of everyday occurrences and decisions. Management proactively manages logistics time elements in pursuit of better customer service. The next step is to implement this system with all major suppliers rather than just with transportation suppliers. In the future, Bose plans to automate its entire materials system. Perhaps one of the most unique features of Bose’s procurement and logistics system is the development of JIT II. The basic premise of JIT II is simple: The person who can do the best job of ordering and managing inventory of a particular item is the supplier himself. Bose negotiated with each supplier to provide a full-time employee at the Bose plant who was responsible for ordering, shipping, and receiving materials from that plant, as well as managing on-site inventories of the items. This was done through an EDI connection between Bose’s plant and the supplier’s facility. Collocating suppliers and buyers was so successful that Bose is now implementing it at all plant locations. In fact, many other companies have also begun to implement collocation of suppliers. Assignment Questions The following assignment questions relate to ideas and concepts presented throughout this text. Answer some or all of the questions as directed by your instructor. 1. Discuss how the strategy development process might work at a company like Bose. 2. What should be the relationship between Bose’s supply management strategy and the development of its performance measurement system? 3. Why is purchased quality so important to Bose? 4. Can a just-in-time purchase system operate without total quality from suppliers? 5. Why can some components arrive at the Hillsdale, Michigan, plant with no incoming inspection required? 6. Discuss the reasons why Bose has a certificate of achievement program for identifying qualified suppliers. 7. Bose is moving toward single sourcing many of its purchased part requirements. Discuss why the company might want to do this. Are there any risks to that approach? 8. Discuss some of the difficulties a company like Bose might experience when trying to implement just-in-time purchasing with international suppliers. 9. Why does Bose have to source so much of its purchase requirements from offshore suppliers? 10. What makes the JIT II system at Bose unique? Why would a company pursue this type of system? 11. Why is it necessary to enter into a longer-term contractual arrangement when pursuing arrangements like the one Bose has with its domestic transportation carrier? 12. Why is it important to manage logistics time elements proactively when pursuing higher levels of customer service? 13. What role does information technology play at Bose? 14. What advantages do information technology systems provide to Bose that might not be available to a company that does not have these systems? 15. Why has Bose developed its supplier performance measurement system? 16. Do you think the performance measurement systems at Bose are computerized or manual? Why?

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