Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
It was believed that in Greek music, modes, similar to later notes and scales, caused the listeners to experience each of the following emotions and ethical effects EXCEPT ______.

It was believed that in Greek music, modes, similar to later notes and scales, caused the listeners to experience each of the following emotions and ethical effects EXCEPT ______.

info@checkyourstudy.com
What qualifies you to evaluate music in a given language, dialect or style? What guidelines should you follow in learning to evaluate music in a style you are not familiar with? Is it possible, in theory, to say that one style of music is inherently better than another? If so, what is the justification for listening to or performing musical styles which are inherently not as good, from your perspective? Are certain types of music more appropriate than others for specific situations? its music category

What qualifies you to evaluate music in a given language, dialect or style? What guidelines should you follow in learning to evaluate music in a style you are not familiar with? Is it possible, in theory, to say that one style of music is inherently better than another? If so, what is the justification for listening to or performing musical styles which are inherently not as good, from your perspective? Are certain types of music more appropriate than others for specific situations? its music category

Sample to sample: A researcher suspected that students who study with music playing in the background would not retain information as well as students who study under quiet conditions. To test her hypothesis, she randomly assigned 18 participants to either a music or quiet study condition and had them study the same information for the same amount of time. She then administered a 10 item test on the material to all participants. The test scores were interval/ratio data and normally distributed. Assume alpha=.05. Their scores were as follows: Music group: 6, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 8, 5 Quiet group: 10, 9, 8, 7, 9, 6, 8, 6, 9 – – Describe what type of decision maker you are. Talk about a time you had to make a decision that affected others and what was the process in which you reached that decision. Be specific. Write your reaction to a club meeting that you have attended. Discuss how you felt about being at the meeting, how the meeting was run, what leadership characteristics did the officers exhibit, etc.? Was the meeting effective? Solving the water scarcity problem to achieve long-term water availability lake chad

Sample to sample: A researcher suspected that students who study with music playing in the background would not retain information as well as students who study under quiet conditions. To test her hypothesis, she randomly assigned 18 participants to either a music or quiet study condition and had them study the same information for the same amount of time. She then administered a 10 item test on the material to all participants. The test scores were interval/ratio data and normally distributed. Assume alpha=.05. Their scores were as follows: Music group: 6, 5, 6, 5, 6, 6, 7, 8, 5 Quiet group: 10, 9, 8, 7, 9, 6, 8, 6, 9 – – Describe what type of decision maker you are. Talk about a time you had to make a decision that affected others and what was the process in which you reached that decision. Be specific. Write your reaction to a club meeting that you have attended. Discuss how you felt about being at the meeting, how the meeting was run, what leadership characteristics did the officers exhibit, etc.? Was the meeting effective? Solving the water scarcity problem to achieve long-term water availability lake chad

checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919891515290
Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
• Question 1 10 out of 10 points The composition of the Alexander Mosaic is designed to convey: • Question 2 10 out of 10 points What is so revolutionary about Walking Man? • Question 3 10 out of 10 points What does the Justinian mosaic in the Church of San Vitale in Ravenna demonstrate? • Question 4 10 out of 10 points Who is the artist of Brillo Box? • Question 5 10 out of 10 points What is Shiva Nataraja responsible for doing? • Question 6 0 out of 10 points Willard Wigan created a lifesize replica of the Statue of Liberty for the people of France. • Question 7 10 out of 10 points Who is the artist of The Nightmare? • Question 8 10 out of 10 points Astrolabes were used by Muslims to determine the direction of Mecca. • Question 9 10 out of 10 points Who is the artist of the painting Woman Holding a Balance? • Question 10 10 out of 10 points The lyre from the Royal Cemetery of Ur (4.14) cannot be appreciated by viewers today in the same way that it was by the ancient Sumerians who made it. • Question 11 10 out of 10 points Which part of René Magritte’s The Human Condition is painted? • Question 12 10 out of 10 points The sarcophagus lid from the tomb of Lord Pacal shows him ________. • Question 13 10 out of 10 points Which artist created a three-dimensional sculpture of his own face? • Question 14 10 out of 10 points Salvador Dalí’s painting Persistence of Memory shows warped clocks, ants, and a distorted face, all of which are symbols of his mother, who died the month before this was painted. • Question 15 10 out of 10 points Muqarnas are ________. • Question 16 10 out of 10 points Synesthesia is when stimulation of one sense triggers an experience in another, for example visualizing color when one hears music. • Question 17 10 out of 10 points Mary Richardson, the attacker of the Rokeby Venus in 1914, did so because: • Question 18 10 out of 10 points Which of the following is emphasized in Lewis Wickes Hine’s Power House Mechanic Working on Steam Pump? • Question 19 10 out of 10 points Artemisia Gentileschi made ________ paintings of the biblical story of Judith and Holofernes. • Question 20 10 out of 10 points Which artist was investigated by the U.S. Treasury Department for counterfeiting because his painting of a dollar bill looked so incredibly real? • Question 21 10 out of 10 points Ancient Egyptian pyramids were only positioned according to geographical coordinates. • Question 22 10 out of 10 points The form of the goddess’s figure in The Birth of Venus was based on ________. • Question 23 10 out of 10 points Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother shows ________. • Question 24 0 out of 10 points Which of the following artworks does not address social class: • Question 25 10 out of 10 points How are the dual genders of the Hermaphrodite with a Dog made visible? • Question 26 10 out of 10 points The ziggurat at Ur was dedicated to: • Question 27 10 out of 10 points The sculpture of a head, which probably represents a king of Ife (4.134), was made using which medium? • Question 28 10 out of 10 points What is the subject matter of Myron’s Discus Thrower? • Question 29 10 out of 10 points Nick Ut’s photographs of the Vietnam War are brutally truthful, but he was not an impartial photographer. • Question 30 10 out of 10 points J. M. W. Turner’s painting Slave Ship uses pale colors and smooth brushstrokes to depict the serenity of life at sea. • Question 31 0 out of 10 points A lyre is used for what purpose? • Question 32 10 out of 10 points The Hopi of the southwestern United States are responsible for making which of the following sculptures? • Question 33 10 out of 10 points What is the medium of Yves Klein’s Anthropométries de l’époque bleue? • Question 34 10 out of 10 points Artists have often been influenced by scientific discoveries. • Question 35 10 out of 10 points Rituals that connect with ancestors and nature spirits are as important as the tasks of daily life for African peoples like the Kongo. • Question 36 10 out of 10 points As described in the article, Linda Bengalis made headlines when she strapped dead eagle around her waist and posed in Art Forum • Question 37 10 out of 10 points Shepard Fairey sued Barak Obama for using his original image. • Question 38 10 out of 10 points Hennessey Youngman made the Spiral Jetty • Question 39 10 out of 10 points According to the video, Mary Mattingly’s greatest concern coincides with that of the Guerrilla Girls.

• Question 1 10 out of 10 points The composition of the Alexander Mosaic is designed to convey: • Question 2 10 out of 10 points What is so revolutionary about Walking Man? • Question 3 10 out of 10 points What does the Justinian mosaic in the Church of San Vitale in Ravenna demonstrate? • Question 4 10 out of 10 points Who is the artist of Brillo Box? • Question 5 10 out of 10 points What is Shiva Nataraja responsible for doing? • Question 6 0 out of 10 points Willard Wigan created a lifesize replica of the Statue of Liberty for the people of France. • Question 7 10 out of 10 points Who is the artist of The Nightmare? • Question 8 10 out of 10 points Astrolabes were used by Muslims to determine the direction of Mecca. • Question 9 10 out of 10 points Who is the artist of the painting Woman Holding a Balance? • Question 10 10 out of 10 points The lyre from the Royal Cemetery of Ur (4.14) cannot be appreciated by viewers today in the same way that it was by the ancient Sumerians who made it. • Question 11 10 out of 10 points Which part of René Magritte’s The Human Condition is painted? • Question 12 10 out of 10 points The sarcophagus lid from the tomb of Lord Pacal shows him ________. • Question 13 10 out of 10 points Which artist created a three-dimensional sculpture of his own face? • Question 14 10 out of 10 points Salvador Dalí’s painting Persistence of Memory shows warped clocks, ants, and a distorted face, all of which are symbols of his mother, who died the month before this was painted. • Question 15 10 out of 10 points Muqarnas are ________. • Question 16 10 out of 10 points Synesthesia is when stimulation of one sense triggers an experience in another, for example visualizing color when one hears music. • Question 17 10 out of 10 points Mary Richardson, the attacker of the Rokeby Venus in 1914, did so because: • Question 18 10 out of 10 points Which of the following is emphasized in Lewis Wickes Hine’s Power House Mechanic Working on Steam Pump? • Question 19 10 out of 10 points Artemisia Gentileschi made ________ paintings of the biblical story of Judith and Holofernes. • Question 20 10 out of 10 points Which artist was investigated by the U.S. Treasury Department for counterfeiting because his painting of a dollar bill looked so incredibly real? • Question 21 10 out of 10 points Ancient Egyptian pyramids were only positioned according to geographical coordinates. • Question 22 10 out of 10 points The form of the goddess’s figure in The Birth of Venus was based on ________. • Question 23 10 out of 10 points Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother shows ________. • Question 24 0 out of 10 points Which of the following artworks does not address social class: • Question 25 10 out of 10 points How are the dual genders of the Hermaphrodite with a Dog made visible? • Question 26 10 out of 10 points The ziggurat at Ur was dedicated to: • Question 27 10 out of 10 points The sculpture of a head, which probably represents a king of Ife (4.134), was made using which medium? • Question 28 10 out of 10 points What is the subject matter of Myron’s Discus Thrower? • Question 29 10 out of 10 points Nick Ut’s photographs of the Vietnam War are brutally truthful, but he was not an impartial photographer. • Question 30 10 out of 10 points J. M. W. Turner’s painting Slave Ship uses pale colors and smooth brushstrokes to depict the serenity of life at sea. • Question 31 0 out of 10 points A lyre is used for what purpose? • Question 32 10 out of 10 points The Hopi of the southwestern United States are responsible for making which of the following sculptures? • Question 33 10 out of 10 points What is the medium of Yves Klein’s Anthropométries de l’époque bleue? • Question 34 10 out of 10 points Artists have often been influenced by scientific discoveries. • Question 35 10 out of 10 points Rituals that connect with ancestors and nature spirits are as important as the tasks of daily life for African peoples like the Kongo. • Question 36 10 out of 10 points As described in the article, Linda Bengalis made headlines when she strapped dead eagle around her waist and posed in Art Forum • Question 37 10 out of 10 points Shepard Fairey sued Barak Obama for using his original image. • Question 38 10 out of 10 points Hennessey Youngman made the Spiral Jetty • Question 39 10 out of 10 points According to the video, Mary Mattingly’s greatest concern coincides with that of the Guerrilla Girls.

checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277