You have had the unique opportunity to develop a career plan in this academic program. By determining career goals and objectives, you should have become insightful and capable of assessing your current skills and abilities and their respective usefulness in attaining that ideal position. According to your plan, what training and education may be required before advancement is possible with respect to your future plans? What is the biggest obstacle you face in search of success?

You have had the unique opportunity to develop a career plan in this academic program. By determining career goals and objectives, you should have become insightful and capable of assessing your current skills and abilities and their respective usefulness in attaining that ideal position. According to your plan, what training and education may be required before advancement is possible with respect to your future plans? What is the biggest obstacle you face in search of success?

We can’t escape from the reality that if we wish … Read More...
What is a décimas? Using the article in the reader on the décima as a reference, provide an explanation of what this is, and make mention of some of its structural characteristics

What is a décimas? Using the article in the reader on the décima as a reference, provide an explanation of what this is, and make mention of some of its structural characteristics

The term décimas is a term indication to a lone … Read More...
MECH 203. Engineering Design. Gears design. 1. Assignment should not be hand-written and must be typed. Untidy assignments (subjected to the marker) will not be marked. The design report should include appropriate headings (e.g. Introduction, Design calculations, Discussion). The layout of the report is worth 20%. 2. You are only limited to a maximum of 6 one-sided pages for your design report including the manufacturing drawings. Only the first 6 one-sided pages will be marked. 3. A proper cover sheet must be used for the Assignment. Reports not in pdf format will not be marked. 4. References must be provided whenever appropriate. Two simple gear train systems that consist of three gears each are used as part of a paper feeding mechanism in a printer. The gears are mounted on a plastic panel as shown. The horizontal distance between the first (gear 1) and final gear (gear 3 or gear 4) is restricted by a max length of 100mm. There are also 2 speed ratio requirements and only the drive from gear 3 and gear 4 will be used at any one time. The speed ratio for gear 1 to gear 3 is 1:3 and from gear 1 to gear 4 is 1:4. There is also a force of 5N pressing against gear 1 as shown in the figure. a) Design the gears required by specifying the pitch diameter and number of teeth for each gear. (10 marks) b) Design the plastic panel to hold the gears by performing the following tasks, i. Sketch and provide explanations for design features that you think are important to include in the panel design. Take into consideration how you would like the gears to be mounted on the panel. (30 marks) ii. Analyse the maximum stress in the shaft for gear 1 and specify the appropriate material for your design. (10 marks) iii. Present a detail manufacturing drawing of your panel design only. (30 marks) Gear 1 Gear 2 Gear 3 Gear 4 5 N

MECH 203. Engineering Design. Gears design. 1. Assignment should not be hand-written and must be typed. Untidy assignments (subjected to the marker) will not be marked. The design report should include appropriate headings (e.g. Introduction, Design calculations, Discussion). The layout of the report is worth 20%. 2. You are only limited to a maximum of 6 one-sided pages for your design report including the manufacturing drawings. Only the first 6 one-sided pages will be marked. 3. A proper cover sheet must be used for the Assignment. Reports not in pdf format will not be marked. 4. References must be provided whenever appropriate. Two simple gear train systems that consist of three gears each are used as part of a paper feeding mechanism in a printer. The gears are mounted on a plastic panel as shown. The horizontal distance between the first (gear 1) and final gear (gear 3 or gear 4) is restricted by a max length of 100mm. There are also 2 speed ratio requirements and only the drive from gear 3 and gear 4 will be used at any one time. The speed ratio for gear 1 to gear 3 is 1:3 and from gear 1 to gear 4 is 1:4. There is also a force of 5N pressing against gear 1 as shown in the figure. a) Design the gears required by specifying the pitch diameter and number of teeth for each gear. (10 marks) b) Design the plastic panel to hold the gears by performing the following tasks, i. Sketch and provide explanations for design features that you think are important to include in the panel design. Take into consideration how you would like the gears to be mounted on the panel. (30 marks) ii. Analyse the maximum stress in the shaft for gear 1 and specify the appropriate material for your design. (10 marks) iii. Present a detail manufacturing drawing of your panel design only. (30 marks) Gear 1 Gear 2 Gear 3 Gear 4 5 N

Which of the following does not impact an organism’s biotic potential? Select one: usual number of offspring per reproduction chances of survival until age of reproduction age at which reproduction begins how often each individual reproduces the rate of immigration into an area

Which of the following does not impact an organism’s biotic potential? Select one: usual number of offspring per reproduction chances of survival until age of reproduction age at which reproduction begins how often each individual reproduces the rate of immigration into an area

Which of the following does not impact an organism’s biotic … Read More...
Problem 5: Physical Fitness versus Weight. You may have noticed from your analysis in Problem 4 that height does not explain 100% of the variation that we have observed in students’ heights. Is it possible that the amount of time students devote to physical fitness each week may help us to better understand their weights? a. Question 12 of the survey asked students, “About how much time per week (on average) do you devote to physical fitness?” We have named this variable FITNESS. Create a suitable graph to display the distribution of FITNESS and insert it here. b. What is the mode of this distribution? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours c. Create side-by-side boxplots to display students’ weights for the different levels of FITNESS. (Go to Graph > Boxplot > One Y with Groups > OK. Select WEIGHT for the “Graph variables” slot and FITNESS for the “Categorical variables for grouping” slot.) Insert your graph here. d. Use Minitab to calculate the basic statistics of WEIGHT for each level of FITNESS. Copy and paste the output here. e. With regard to FITNESS levels, which group of students has the lowest mean weight? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours f. Discuss the results: Describe the distributions of WEIGHT for the different levels of FITNESS as well as draw comparisons (i.e., What do they have in common?) and contrasts (i.e., How are they different?) between these distributions. Are there any surprises in the results? Explain why you think so, or why not. Problem 6 (Even): If your E number ends in an even number (0, 2, 4, 6, or 8) then do this question. (Omit this page/problem if your E# ends with an odd number.) Gender and Nuclear Safety. Question 5 in the survey asked students “How safe would you feel if a nuclear energy plant were built near where you live?” (Students could choose one of these options: Extremely safe, Very Safe, Moderately safe, Slightly safe, or Not at all safe.) Is there a relationship between gender and students’ opinions about nuclear safety? a. Create an appropriate graph to display the relationship between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY. You don’t want to display information for students that didn’t answer both of these questions on the survey, so click on Data Options > Group Options and remove the checks in the boxes beside “Include missing as a group” and “Include empty cells.” Insert your graph here. b. Create an appropriate two-way table to summarize the data. Click on Options > Display missing values for… and put a dot in the circle beside “No variables.” Insert your table here. c. SUPPOSE WE SELECT ONE STUDENT AT RANDOM: (Calculate the following probabilities and show your work.) i. What is the probability that this student is a female and feels “very safe”? P = ii. What is the probability that this student is either a male or that he/she feels “very safe”? P = iii. What is the probability that this student feels “not at all safe” given that the student selected is a female? P = iv. What is the probability that this student is a male given that the student selected feels “not at all safe”? P = d. Do you think there may be an association between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY? Why or why not? Explain your reasoning based on what you see in your graph.

Problem 5: Physical Fitness versus Weight. You may have noticed from your analysis in Problem 4 that height does not explain 100% of the variation that we have observed in students’ heights. Is it possible that the amount of time students devote to physical fitness each week may help us to better understand their weights? a. Question 12 of the survey asked students, “About how much time per week (on average) do you devote to physical fitness?” We have named this variable FITNESS. Create a suitable graph to display the distribution of FITNESS and insert it here. b. What is the mode of this distribution? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours c. Create side-by-side boxplots to display students’ weights for the different levels of FITNESS. (Go to Graph > Boxplot > One Y with Groups > OK. Select WEIGHT for the “Graph variables” slot and FITNESS for the “Categorical variables for grouping” slot.) Insert your graph here. d. Use Minitab to calculate the basic statistics of WEIGHT for each level of FITNESS. Copy and paste the output here. e. With regard to FITNESS levels, which group of students has the lowest mean weight? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours f. Discuss the results: Describe the distributions of WEIGHT for the different levels of FITNESS as well as draw comparisons (i.e., What do they have in common?) and contrasts (i.e., How are they different?) between these distributions. Are there any surprises in the results? Explain why you think so, or why not. Problem 6 (Even): If your E number ends in an even number (0, 2, 4, 6, or 8) then do this question. (Omit this page/problem if your E# ends with an odd number.) Gender and Nuclear Safety. Question 5 in the survey asked students “How safe would you feel if a nuclear energy plant were built near where you live?” (Students could choose one of these options: Extremely safe, Very Safe, Moderately safe, Slightly safe, or Not at all safe.) Is there a relationship between gender and students’ opinions about nuclear safety? a. Create an appropriate graph to display the relationship between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY. You don’t want to display information for students that didn’t answer both of these questions on the survey, so click on Data Options > Group Options and remove the checks in the boxes beside “Include missing as a group” and “Include empty cells.” Insert your graph here. b. Create an appropriate two-way table to summarize the data. Click on Options > Display missing values for… and put a dot in the circle beside “No variables.” Insert your table here. c. SUPPOSE WE SELECT ONE STUDENT AT RANDOM: (Calculate the following probabilities and show your work.) i. What is the probability that this student is a female and feels “very safe”? P = ii. What is the probability that this student is either a male or that he/she feels “very safe”? P = iii. What is the probability that this student feels “not at all safe” given that the student selected is a female? P = iv. What is the probability that this student is a male given that the student selected feels “not at all safe”? P = d. Do you think there may be an association between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY? Why or why not? Explain your reasoning based on what you see in your graph.

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Please write clearly, show all work in an organized fashion, and circle answers. 1) Using the data shown in Figures 6.14 (at 25oC) and 6.21, combine both curves onto one plot, being careful to correctly plot the modulus, yield strength, tensile (ultimate) strength, and ductility. Discuss how the modulus, yield strength, and ductility compare for pure iron (figure 6.14) vs. the alloy steel. 2) The equation for the effect of grain size on yield strength is given by: y = I +kD-0.5 where y is the yield stress, I is the intrinsic resistance of the lattice to dislocation motion, k is the “blocking parameter” which measures the effectiveness of grain boundaries in blocking dislocation motion, and D is the grain diameter. Use this equation to determine the change in yield strength of a typical steel when the grain size is increased from 10micron to 50 micron (1 micron = 10-6 m), due to grain growth. . I = 150 MN/m2 and k = 0.70 MN/m1.5 . 3) Using the data shown in Callister Figure 7.19, draw an approximate stress-strain curve for the 1040 steel at 0% cold work and at 30% cold work, clearly indicating the yield strength, ductility, and tensile strength of the steel before and after cold-working (Young’s modulus of steel E = 250 MPa). 4) A fatigue test is carried out on a steel having an ultimate strength of 289 MPa. The number of cycles required to break the specimen at different stresses are given below: Stress Amplitude Fatigue Life (MPa) (cycles) 223 4.5 x 104 209 2.4 x 105 192 8.0 x 105 178 1.5 x 106 175 2.7 x 106 168 7.8 x 106 168 >1.0 x 107 (did not break) 165 >2.6 x 107 162 >2.2 x 107 a) Plot the data on linear-log scale, preferably with a computerized figure-plotting program. b) Determine the average fatigue strength at 106 cycles (hint: use curve-fitting software to fit the line). c) What is the ratio of the fatigue strength at 106 cycles to the ultimate strength? e) If you plan to use this material for 108 cycles, what is the maximum fatigue strength you would recommend (assuming 20% fluctuations in stress amplitude). Callister Homework Problems: 7.22, 8.4, 8.12 (see next page)

Please write clearly, show all work in an organized fashion, and circle answers. 1) Using the data shown in Figures 6.14 (at 25oC) and 6.21, combine both curves onto one plot, being careful to correctly plot the modulus, yield strength, tensile (ultimate) strength, and ductility. Discuss how the modulus, yield strength, and ductility compare for pure iron (figure 6.14) vs. the alloy steel. 2) The equation for the effect of grain size on yield strength is given by: y = I +kD-0.5 where y is the yield stress, I is the intrinsic resistance of the lattice to dislocation motion, k is the “blocking parameter” which measures the effectiveness of grain boundaries in blocking dislocation motion, and D is the grain diameter. Use this equation to determine the change in yield strength of a typical steel when the grain size is increased from 10micron to 50 micron (1 micron = 10-6 m), due to grain growth. . I = 150 MN/m2 and k = 0.70 MN/m1.5 . 3) Using the data shown in Callister Figure 7.19, draw an approximate stress-strain curve for the 1040 steel at 0% cold work and at 30% cold work, clearly indicating the yield strength, ductility, and tensile strength of the steel before and after cold-working (Young’s modulus of steel E = 250 MPa). 4) A fatigue test is carried out on a steel having an ultimate strength of 289 MPa. The number of cycles required to break the specimen at different stresses are given below: Stress Amplitude Fatigue Life (MPa) (cycles) 223 4.5 x 104 209 2.4 x 105 192 8.0 x 105 178 1.5 x 106 175 2.7 x 106 168 7.8 x 106 168 >1.0 x 107 (did not break) 165 >2.6 x 107 162 >2.2 x 107 a) Plot the data on linear-log scale, preferably with a computerized figure-plotting program. b) Determine the average fatigue strength at 106 cycles (hint: use curve-fitting software to fit the line). c) What is the ratio of the fatigue strength at 106 cycles to the ultimate strength? e) If you plan to use this material for 108 cycles, what is the maximum fatigue strength you would recommend (assuming 20% fluctuations in stress amplitude). Callister Homework Problems: 7.22, 8.4, 8.12 (see next page)

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Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Check here if you want your paper returned Chapter 3 – Section 3.1-3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Dr. Bragg Printed Last Name: First Name: WKUID: 1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: a. Hypothesis b. Law c. Theory d. Conservation e. Proportion f. Radioactive g. Atomic Number h. Mass Number i. Isotope j. Spectrum k. Ground State l. Excited State m. Quantum n. Valence o. Shell p. Subshell q. Orbital 2. Briefly describe the main points of Dalton’s Atomic Theory. On Time: Complete: Questions: Total Score: 3. Who experimentally verified the Law of Conservation of Matter? 4. Who experimentally verified the Law of Definite Proportions? 5. What are the three most important subatomic particles, and what is the charge on each? 6. Who discovered natural radioactivity? 7. What are the three main radioactive ‘particles,’ and what is the charge on each? 8. Who was the student that set up the experiments and made the observations that lead to the discovery of the nucleus of the atom? 9. Considering atomic numbers and mass numbers, which is the same among a set of isotopes and which is different? 10. What is the difference between a continuous spectrum and a line spectrum? 11. Who proposed the Shell Model of the hydrogen atom based on small energy steps between adjacent levels for electrons? 12. Which end of the electromagnetic spectrum is higher in ENERGY, ı-rays or radio waves? 13. Who proposed the mathematical wave theory that explained the existence of orbitals? 14. Give the general subshell filling order for electrons in ground state atoms. Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Dr. Bragg Chapter 3 – Sections 3.1 – 3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Page 2

Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Check here if you want your paper returned Chapter 3 – Section 3.1-3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Dr. Bragg Printed Last Name: First Name: WKUID: 1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: a. Hypothesis b. Law c. Theory d. Conservation e. Proportion f. Radioactive g. Atomic Number h. Mass Number i. Isotope j. Spectrum k. Ground State l. Excited State m. Quantum n. Valence o. Shell p. Subshell q. Orbital 2. Briefly describe the main points of Dalton’s Atomic Theory. On Time: Complete: Questions: Total Score: 3. Who experimentally verified the Law of Conservation of Matter? 4. Who experimentally verified the Law of Definite Proportions? 5. What are the three most important subatomic particles, and what is the charge on each? 6. Who discovered natural radioactivity? 7. What are the three main radioactive ‘particles,’ and what is the charge on each? 8. Who was the student that set up the experiments and made the observations that lead to the discovery of the nucleus of the atom? 9. Considering atomic numbers and mass numbers, which is the same among a set of isotopes and which is different? 10. What is the difference between a continuous spectrum and a line spectrum? 11. Who proposed the Shell Model of the hydrogen atom based on small energy steps between adjacent levels for electrons? 12. Which end of the electromagnetic spectrum is higher in ENERGY, ı-rays or radio waves? 13. Who proposed the mathematical wave theory that explained the existence of orbitals? 14. Give the general subshell filling order for electrons in ground state atoms. Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Dr. Bragg Chapter 3 – Sections 3.1 – 3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Page 2

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