Lab Report Name Simple Harmonic motion Date: Objective or purpose: The main objective of this lab is to find the value of the spring constant (k) according to Hooke’s law. This lab also teaches us curve fitting and its application here in this lab.

Lab Report Name Simple Harmonic motion Date: Objective or purpose: The main objective of this lab is to find the value of the spring constant (k) according to Hooke’s law. This lab also teaches us curve fitting and its application here in this lab.

Name Simple Harmonic motion Date:           … Read More...
A small object of mass m starts from rest at the position shown and slide along the frictionless loop-the-loop track of radius R. what is the smallest value of y such that object will slide without losing contact with the track ? (1) R/2, (2) R/4, (3) R, (4) 2R, (5) zero

A small object of mass m starts from rest at the position shown and slide along the frictionless loop-the-loop track of radius R. what is the smallest value of y such that object will slide without losing contact with the track ? (1) R/2, (2) R/4, (3) R, (4) 2R, (5) zero

Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

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Lab Report : The purpose of this experiment is to learn about uncertainty in measurement, and how to perform calculations with those uncertainties. The calculation of the density of a wooden block was used as an example.

Lab Report : The purpose of this experiment is to learn about uncertainty in measurement, and how to perform calculations with those uncertainties. The calculation of the density of a wooden block was used as an example.

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The surfaces of the lens have radii of curvature 37.6 cm (located on the object side of the lens) and 55.4 cm (located on the side opposite the object). What is the index of refraction?

The surfaces of the lens have radii of curvature 37.6 cm (located on the object side of the lens) and 55.4 cm (located on the side opposite the object). What is the index of refraction?

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Assignment 1 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 1.6 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Positive Negative Negative Positive Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 1.7 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Positive Negative Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 1.18 The figure shows the motion diagram of a drag racer. The camera took one frame every 2 . Positive Negative Positive Negative Negative Positive s You may want to review ( pages 16 – 19) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Plotting Points on a Graph Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the drag racer. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Based on Table 1.1 in the book/e-text, what two observables are associated with each point? Which position or point of the drag racer occurs first? Which position occurs last? If you label the first point as happening at , at what time does the next point occur? At what time does the last position point occur? What is the position of a point halfway in between and ? Can you think of a way to estimate the positions of the points using a ruler? ANSWER: t = 0 s x = 0 m x = 200 m Correct Motion of Two Rockets Learning Goal: To learn to use images of an object in motion to determine velocity and acceleration. Two toy rockets are traveling in the same direction (taken to be the x axis). A diagram is shown of a time-exposure image where a stroboscope has illuminated the rockets at the uniform time intervals indicated. Part A At what time(s) do the rockets have the same velocity? Hint 1. How to determine the velocity The diagram shows position, not velocity. You can’t find instantaneous velocity from this diagram, but you can determine the average velocity between two times and : . Note that no position values are given in the diagram; you will need to estimate these based on the distance between successive positions of the rockets. ANSWER: Correct t1 t2 vavg[t1, t2] = x(t2)−x(t1) t2−t1 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Part B At what time(s) do the rockets have the same x position? ANSWER: Correct Part C At what time(s) do the two rockets have the same acceleration? Hint 1. How to determine the acceleration The velocity is related to the spacing between images in a stroboscopic diagram. Since acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes, the acceleration is related to the how much this spacing changes from one interval to the next. ANSWER: at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct Part D The motion of the rocket labeled A is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part E The motion of the rocket labeled B is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part F At what time(s) is rocket A ahead of rocket B? and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time Hint 1. Use the diagram You can answer this question by looking at the diagram and identifying the time(s) when rocket A is to the right of rocket B. ANSWER: Correct Dimensions of Physical Quantities Learning Goal: To introduce the idea of physical dimensions and to learn how to find them. Physical quantities are generally not purely numerical: They have a particular dimension or combination of dimensions associated with them. Thus, your height is not 74, but rather 74 inches, often expressed as 6 feet 2 inches. Although feet and inches are different units they have the same dimension–length. Part A In classical mechanics there are three base dimensions. Length is one of them. What are the other two? Hint 1. MKS system The current system of units is called the International System (abbreviated SI from the French Système International). In the past this system was called the mks system for its base units: meter, kilogram, and second. What are the dimensions of these quantities? ANSWER: before only after only before and after between and at no time(s) shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct There are three dimensions used in mechanics: length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). A combination of these three dimensions suffices to express any physical quantity, because when a new physical quantity is needed (e.g., velocity), it always obeys an equation that permits it to be expressed in terms of the units used for these three dimensions. One then derives a unit to measure the new physical quantity from that equation, and often its unit is given a special name. Such new dimensions are called derived dimensions and the units they are measured in are called derived units. For example, area has derived dimensions . (Note that “dimensions of variable ” is symbolized as .) You can find these dimensions by looking at the formula for the area of a square , where is the length of a side of the square. Clearly . Plugging this into the equation gives . Part B Find the dimensions of volume. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for volume You have likely learned many formulas for the volume of various shapes in geometry. Any of these equations will give you the dimensions for volume. You can find the dimensions most easily from the volume of a cube , where is the length of the edge of the cube. ANSWER: acceleration and mass acceleration and time acceleration and charge mass and time mass and charge time and charge l m t A [A] = l2 x [x] A = s2 s [s] = l [A] = [s] = 2 l2 [V ] l m t V = e3 e [V ] = l3 Correct Part C Find the dimensions of speed. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for speed Speed is defined in terms of distance and time as . Therefore, . Hint 2. Familiar units for speed You are probably accustomed to hearing speeds in miles per hour (or possibly kilometers per hour). Think about the dimensions for miles and hours. If you divide the dimensions for miles by the dimensions for hours, you will have the dimensions for speed. ANSWER: Correct The dimensions of a quantity are not changed by addition or subtraction of another quantity with the same dimensions. This means that , which comes from subtracting two speeds, has the same dimensions as speed. It does not make physical sense to add or subtract two quanitites that have different dimensions, like length plus time. You can add quantities that have different units, like miles per hour and kilometers per hour, as long as you convert both quantities to the same set of units before you actually compute the sum. You can use this rule to check your answers to any physics problem you work. If the answer involves the sum or difference of two quantities with different dimensions, then it must be incorrect. This rule also ensures that the dimensions of any physical quantity will never involve sums or differences of the base dimensions. (As in the preceeding example, is not a valid dimension for a [v] l m t v d t v = d t [v] = [d]/[t] [v] = lt−1 v l + t physical quantitiy.) A valid dimension will only involve the product or ratio of powers of the base dimensions (e.g. ). Part D Find the dimensions of acceleration. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for acceleration In physics, acceleration is defined as the change in velocity in a certain time. This is shown by the equation . The is a symbol that means “the change in.” ANSWER: Correct Consistency of Units In physics, every physical quantity is measured with respect to a unit. Time is measured in seconds, length is measured in meters, and mass is measured in kilograms. Knowing the units of physical quantities will help you solve problems in physics. Part A Gravity causes objects to be attracted to one another. This attraction keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground and causes the moon to orbit the earth. The force of gravitational attraction is represented by the equation , where is the magnitude of the gravitational attraction on either body, and are the masses of the bodies, is the distance between them, and is the gravitational constant. In SI units, the units of force are , the units of mass are , and the units of distance are . For this equation to have consistent units, the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation m2/3 l2 t−2 [a] l m t a a = v/t  [a] = lt−2 F = Gm1m2 r2 F m1 m2 r G kg  m/s2 kg m G . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: Correct Part B One consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that mass is a form of energy. This mass-energy relationship is perhaps the most famous of all physics equations: , where is mass, is the speed of the light, and is the energy. In SI units, the units of speed are . For the preceding equation to have consistent units (the same units on both sides of the equation), the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: F = Gm1m2 r2 m1 kg G kg3 ms2 kgs2 m3 m3 kgs2 m kgs2 E = mc2 m c E m/s E E = mc2 m kg E Correct To solve the types of problems typified by these examples, we start with the given equation. For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for the units of the unknown variable. Problem 1.24 Convert the following to SI units: Part A 5.0 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B 54 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. kgm s kgm2 s2 kgs2 m2 kgm2 s m kg in 0.13 m ft/s ANSWER: Correct Part C 72 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D 17 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 1.55 The figure shows a motion diagram of a car traveling down a street. The camera took one frame every 10 . A distance scale is provided. 16 ms mph 32 ms in2 1.1×10−2 m2 s Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the car. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again ± Moving at the Speed of Light Part A How many nanoseconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 in vacuum? Express your answer numerically in nanoseconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Light travels at a constant speed; therefore, you can use the formula for the distance traveled in a certain amount of time by an object moving at constant speed. Before performing any calculations, it is often recommended, although it is not strictly necessary, to convert all quantities to their fundamental units rather than to multiples of the fundamental unit. km Hint 2. Find how many seconds it takes light to travel the given distance Given that the speed of light in vacuum is , how many seconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 ? Express your answer numerically in seconds. Hint 1. Find the time it takes light to travel a certain distance How long does it take light to travel a distance ? Let be the speed of light. Hint 1. The speed of an object The equation that relates the distance traveled by an object with constant speed in a time is . ANSWER: Correct Hint 2. Convert the given distance to meters Convert = 4.40 to meters. Express your answer numerically in meters. Hint 1. Conversion of kilometers to meters Recall that . 3.00 × 108 m/s km r c s v t s = vt r  c r c c r d km 1 km = 103 m ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Correct Now convert the time into nanoseconds. Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.7%. You received 50.84 out of a possible total of 60 points. 4.40km = 4400 m 1.47×10−5 s 1 ns = 10−9 s 1.47×104 ns

Assignment 1 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 1.6 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Positive Negative Negative Positive Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 1.7 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Positive Negative Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 1.18 The figure shows the motion diagram of a drag racer. The camera took one frame every 2 . Positive Negative Positive Negative Negative Positive s You may want to review ( pages 16 – 19) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Plotting Points on a Graph Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the drag racer. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Based on Table 1.1 in the book/e-text, what two observables are associated with each point? Which position or point of the drag racer occurs first? Which position occurs last? If you label the first point as happening at , at what time does the next point occur? At what time does the last position point occur? What is the position of a point halfway in between and ? Can you think of a way to estimate the positions of the points using a ruler? ANSWER: t = 0 s x = 0 m x = 200 m Correct Motion of Two Rockets Learning Goal: To learn to use images of an object in motion to determine velocity and acceleration. Two toy rockets are traveling in the same direction (taken to be the x axis). A diagram is shown of a time-exposure image where a stroboscope has illuminated the rockets at the uniform time intervals indicated. Part A At what time(s) do the rockets have the same velocity? Hint 1. How to determine the velocity The diagram shows position, not velocity. You can’t find instantaneous velocity from this diagram, but you can determine the average velocity between two times and : . Note that no position values are given in the diagram; you will need to estimate these based on the distance between successive positions of the rockets. ANSWER: Correct t1 t2 vavg[t1, t2] = x(t2)−x(t1) t2−t1 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Part B At what time(s) do the rockets have the same x position? ANSWER: Correct Part C At what time(s) do the two rockets have the same acceleration? Hint 1. How to determine the acceleration The velocity is related to the spacing between images in a stroboscopic diagram. Since acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes, the acceleration is related to the how much this spacing changes from one interval to the next. ANSWER: at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct Part D The motion of the rocket labeled A is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part E The motion of the rocket labeled B is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part F At what time(s) is rocket A ahead of rocket B? and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time Hint 1. Use the diagram You can answer this question by looking at the diagram and identifying the time(s) when rocket A is to the right of rocket B. ANSWER: Correct Dimensions of Physical Quantities Learning Goal: To introduce the idea of physical dimensions and to learn how to find them. Physical quantities are generally not purely numerical: They have a particular dimension or combination of dimensions associated with them. Thus, your height is not 74, but rather 74 inches, often expressed as 6 feet 2 inches. Although feet and inches are different units they have the same dimension–length. Part A In classical mechanics there are three base dimensions. Length is one of them. What are the other two? Hint 1. MKS system The current system of units is called the International System (abbreviated SI from the French Système International). In the past this system was called the mks system for its base units: meter, kilogram, and second. What are the dimensions of these quantities? ANSWER: before only after only before and after between and at no time(s) shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct There are three dimensions used in mechanics: length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). A combination of these three dimensions suffices to express any physical quantity, because when a new physical quantity is needed (e.g., velocity), it always obeys an equation that permits it to be expressed in terms of the units used for these three dimensions. One then derives a unit to measure the new physical quantity from that equation, and often its unit is given a special name. Such new dimensions are called derived dimensions and the units they are measured in are called derived units. For example, area has derived dimensions . (Note that “dimensions of variable ” is symbolized as .) You can find these dimensions by looking at the formula for the area of a square , where is the length of a side of the square. Clearly . Plugging this into the equation gives . Part B Find the dimensions of volume. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for volume You have likely learned many formulas for the volume of various shapes in geometry. Any of these equations will give you the dimensions for volume. You can find the dimensions most easily from the volume of a cube , where is the length of the edge of the cube. ANSWER: acceleration and mass acceleration and time acceleration and charge mass and time mass and charge time and charge l m t A [A] = l2 x [x] A = s2 s [s] = l [A] = [s] = 2 l2 [V ] l m t V = e3 e [V ] = l3 Correct Part C Find the dimensions of speed. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for speed Speed is defined in terms of distance and time as . Therefore, . Hint 2. Familiar units for speed You are probably accustomed to hearing speeds in miles per hour (or possibly kilometers per hour). Think about the dimensions for miles and hours. If you divide the dimensions for miles by the dimensions for hours, you will have the dimensions for speed. ANSWER: Correct The dimensions of a quantity are not changed by addition or subtraction of another quantity with the same dimensions. This means that , which comes from subtracting two speeds, has the same dimensions as speed. It does not make physical sense to add or subtract two quanitites that have different dimensions, like length plus time. You can add quantities that have different units, like miles per hour and kilometers per hour, as long as you convert both quantities to the same set of units before you actually compute the sum. You can use this rule to check your answers to any physics problem you work. If the answer involves the sum or difference of two quantities with different dimensions, then it must be incorrect. This rule also ensures that the dimensions of any physical quantity will never involve sums or differences of the base dimensions. (As in the preceeding example, is not a valid dimension for a [v] l m t v d t v = d t [v] = [d]/[t] [v] = lt−1 v l + t physical quantitiy.) A valid dimension will only involve the product or ratio of powers of the base dimensions (e.g. ). Part D Find the dimensions of acceleration. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for acceleration In physics, acceleration is defined as the change in velocity in a certain time. This is shown by the equation . The is a symbol that means “the change in.” ANSWER: Correct Consistency of Units In physics, every physical quantity is measured with respect to a unit. Time is measured in seconds, length is measured in meters, and mass is measured in kilograms. Knowing the units of physical quantities will help you solve problems in physics. Part A Gravity causes objects to be attracted to one another. This attraction keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground and causes the moon to orbit the earth. The force of gravitational attraction is represented by the equation , where is the magnitude of the gravitational attraction on either body, and are the masses of the bodies, is the distance between them, and is the gravitational constant. In SI units, the units of force are , the units of mass are , and the units of distance are . For this equation to have consistent units, the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation m2/3 l2 t−2 [a] l m t a a = v/t  [a] = lt−2 F = Gm1m2 r2 F m1 m2 r G kg  m/s2 kg m G . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: Correct Part B One consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that mass is a form of energy. This mass-energy relationship is perhaps the most famous of all physics equations: , where is mass, is the speed of the light, and is the energy. In SI units, the units of speed are . For the preceding equation to have consistent units (the same units on both sides of the equation), the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: F = Gm1m2 r2 m1 kg G kg3 ms2 kgs2 m3 m3 kgs2 m kgs2 E = mc2 m c E m/s E E = mc2 m kg E Correct To solve the types of problems typified by these examples, we start with the given equation. For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for the units of the unknown variable. Problem 1.24 Convert the following to SI units: Part A 5.0 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B 54 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. kgm s kgm2 s2 kgs2 m2 kgm2 s m kg in 0.13 m ft/s ANSWER: Correct Part C 72 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D 17 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 1.55 The figure shows a motion diagram of a car traveling down a street. The camera took one frame every 10 . A distance scale is provided. 16 ms mph 32 ms in2 1.1×10−2 m2 s Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the car. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again ± Moving at the Speed of Light Part A How many nanoseconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 in vacuum? Express your answer numerically in nanoseconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Light travels at a constant speed; therefore, you can use the formula for the distance traveled in a certain amount of time by an object moving at constant speed. Before performing any calculations, it is often recommended, although it is not strictly necessary, to convert all quantities to their fundamental units rather than to multiples of the fundamental unit. km Hint 2. Find how many seconds it takes light to travel the given distance Given that the speed of light in vacuum is , how many seconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 ? Express your answer numerically in seconds. Hint 1. Find the time it takes light to travel a certain distance How long does it take light to travel a distance ? Let be the speed of light. Hint 1. The speed of an object The equation that relates the distance traveled by an object with constant speed in a time is . ANSWER: Correct Hint 2. Convert the given distance to meters Convert = 4.40 to meters. Express your answer numerically in meters. Hint 1. Conversion of kilometers to meters Recall that . 3.00 × 108 m/s km r c s v t s = vt r  c r c c r d km 1 km = 103 m ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Correct Now convert the time into nanoseconds. Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.7%. You received 50.84 out of a possible total of 60 points. 4.40km = 4400 m 1.47×10−5 s 1 ns = 10−9 s 1.47×104 ns

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Comp755 HW 2 – Fall 2015 1. Problem 4.2 (10pts) 2. Problem 4.4 (15pts) 3. Problem 5.25 (10pts) 4. Problem 10.2 (15pts) . Hint: Create three Gantt charts where each square represents 10 time units. a. The first chart should use earliest deadline using the processes that are currently available. Since there is no preemption, some processes will not be scheduled if there start deadline is missed. b. The second chart should schedule strictly by the earliest deadline. The processor will be idle if the process with the earliest deadline has not arrived. c. The third chart should just use FCFS. 5. (Synchronize threads) Write a program that launches 1,000 threads. Each thread adds 1 to a variable sum that initially is 0. You need to pass sum by reference to each thread. In order to pass it by reference, define an Integer wrapper object to hold sum. Run the program with and without synchronization to see its effect (Create a command line argument where passing a 0 means run unsynchronized and passing a 1 means to run synchronized). Submit your entire Netbeans project (50pts).

Comp755 HW 2 – Fall 2015 1. Problem 4.2 (10pts) 2. Problem 4.4 (15pts) 3. Problem 5.25 (10pts) 4. Problem 10.2 (15pts) . Hint: Create three Gantt charts where each square represents 10 time units. a. The first chart should use earliest deadline using the processes that are currently available. Since there is no preemption, some processes will not be scheduled if there start deadline is missed. b. The second chart should schedule strictly by the earliest deadline. The processor will be idle if the process with the earliest deadline has not arrived. c. The third chart should just use FCFS. 5. (Synchronize threads) Write a program that launches 1,000 threads. Each thread adds 1 to a variable sum that initially is 0. You need to pass sum by reference to each thread. In order to pass it by reference, define an Integer wrapper object to hold sum. Run the program with and without synchronization to see its effect (Create a command line argument where passing a 0 means run unsynchronized and passing a 1 means to run synchronized). Submit your entire Netbeans project (50pts).

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