Capital Punishment For this paper, please read both the Ernest Van den Haag article and the Larry Tifft article. PICK A SIDE, either pro-capital punishment (death penalty) or abolitionist (anti-death penalty). This IS an ARGUMENTATIVE PAPER!!!!!!!!!!!! Using both the articles, your text book, (and a general source if you wish such as the Bible or dictionary), argue for your stance. You may also use the Marx/Durkheim handouts if you so wish, so long as there are SOCIOLOGY TERMS in your paper! You must: 1. Provide three points to back up your argument and include them in your thesis paragraph and explain them in the body of the paper; 2. Give voice to the opposing side. If you’re abolitionist, bring up any validity to Van den Haag, if you’re pro-capital punishment, bring up any validity to Tifft’s argument. 3. Use both a thesis opening paragraph and a solid conclusion paragraph. 4. Use SOCIOLOGY TERMS! 5. NO PERSONAL PRONOUNS! TECH requirements: • 12 point, Arial or Times Roman Numeral font. • 3 page long NOT including cover sheet and references page • Double spaced

Capital Punishment For this paper, please read both the Ernest Van den Haag article and the Larry Tifft article. PICK A SIDE, either pro-capital punishment (death penalty) or abolitionist (anti-death penalty). This IS an ARGUMENTATIVE PAPER!!!!!!!!!!!! Using both the articles, your text book, (and a general source if you wish such as the Bible or dictionary), argue for your stance. You may also use the Marx/Durkheim handouts if you so wish, so long as there are SOCIOLOGY TERMS in your paper! You must: 1. Provide three points to back up your argument and include them in your thesis paragraph and explain them in the body of the paper; 2. Give voice to the opposing side. If you’re abolitionist, bring up any validity to Van den Haag, if you’re pro-capital punishment, bring up any validity to Tifft’s argument. 3. Use both a thesis opening paragraph and a solid conclusion paragraph. 4. Use SOCIOLOGY TERMS! 5. NO PERSONAL PRONOUNS! TECH requirements: • 12 point, Arial or Times Roman Numeral font. • 3 page long NOT including cover sheet and references page • Double spaced

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

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Elastic Collision Write up for TA Jessica Andersen The following pages include what is expected for the PHY 112 Elastic Collision lab. Below each section heading are general tips for lab writing that can be applied to any lab in the future. Point values associated with each section are stated, as well are the points associated for topics within that section. Read through completely before beginning. Introduction ( 20 pts total ) Tips for a good Introduction section: Be thorough but do not write a five paragraph essay! Concisely present the purpose and background material. You don’t need to number equations unless you will be referring back to them. Simply explain what they apply to as you introduce them. A 2pt bullet should not correspond to more than two lines of writing in your report. – Include a statement of purpose for the lab. (5pts) – Define the necessary conditions of an Elastic Collision (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of linear momentum and derive the equation for calculating linear momentum in the x-direction and the y direction. (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of energy and derive the equation for calculating kinetic energy of the system before and after the collision. (5pts) Methods (10 pts total) Tips for a good Methods section: Don’t spend too much time on this section! Be very quick and to the point. Write as if you are giving instructions to someone else. This will sound much more professional and you won’t have to worry about the use of “I” or “we”, which can tend to make a lab report sound very informal. – Briefly describe the setup of the lab and what precautions were taken to ensure something close to an elastic collision (5pts) – What frequency was the “zapper” set to? (5pts) Results (25 pts total) Tips for a good Results section: This is an important section. It should be organized and formatted in a way that makes it very easy to read. Your tables should have borders and bolded headings where you see appropriate. Always include a brief description of each table at the opening of the section. REMEMBER, the Results section is about conveying your data in a readable and easy to understand way. • do not divide tables across pages • do not include more than 3 decimal places unless they are legitimately important – Include a table that summarizes all of the values recorded from the collision path. (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Kinetic Energy before and after the collision (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Linear Momentum in both directions before and after the collision (10pts) – Include a summary table that calculates the percent error between before collision values and after collision values. Use the before collision values as your theoretical value. (5pts) Discussion (40 pts total) Tips for a good Discussion section: This section is worth almost half of your report! I want to see that you put legitimate thought into your data and how it relates to what you learn in lecture. Show me that you understand the things we talked about in class. Be thorough, but remember that long and drawn out does not necessary achieve this. • do not present data as one large paragraph, make them smaller and easier to read • do not refer back to tables, actually state the values when asked for • you may refer back to graphs when necessary • do not use math vocabulary wrong, if you are unsure of a definition, look it up!!! – Present the percent error values for both momentum and energy calculations. (10pts) – Why was the energy and momentum BEFORE collision used as the theoretical value? (hint: It has to do with us assuming we have an Elastic Collision) (10pts) – Present the frequency of the “zapper”. What does this mean about the time that passes between each dot on the collision path? (10pts) – Discuss sources of error in this lab and how they may have affected our final result. (10pts) Appendix (5pts total) – Just staple on whatever notes you took in class.

Elastic Collision Write up for TA Jessica Andersen The following pages include what is expected for the PHY 112 Elastic Collision lab. Below each section heading are general tips for lab writing that can be applied to any lab in the future. Point values associated with each section are stated, as well are the points associated for topics within that section. Read through completely before beginning. Introduction ( 20 pts total ) Tips for a good Introduction section: Be thorough but do not write a five paragraph essay! Concisely present the purpose and background material. You don’t need to number equations unless you will be referring back to them. Simply explain what they apply to as you introduce them. A 2pt bullet should not correspond to more than two lines of writing in your report. – Include a statement of purpose for the lab. (5pts) – Define the necessary conditions of an Elastic Collision (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of linear momentum and derive the equation for calculating linear momentum in the x-direction and the y direction. (5pts) – Introduce the concept of conservation of energy and derive the equation for calculating kinetic energy of the system before and after the collision. (5pts) Methods (10 pts total) Tips for a good Methods section: Don’t spend too much time on this section! Be very quick and to the point. Write as if you are giving instructions to someone else. This will sound much more professional and you won’t have to worry about the use of “I” or “we”, which can tend to make a lab report sound very informal. – Briefly describe the setup of the lab and what precautions were taken to ensure something close to an elastic collision (5pts) – What frequency was the “zapper” set to? (5pts) Results (25 pts total) Tips for a good Results section: This is an important section. It should be organized and formatted in a way that makes it very easy to read. Your tables should have borders and bolded headings where you see appropriate. Always include a brief description of each table at the opening of the section. REMEMBER, the Results section is about conveying your data in a readable and easy to understand way. • do not divide tables across pages • do not include more than 3 decimal places unless they are legitimately important – Include a table that summarizes all of the values recorded from the collision path. (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Kinetic Energy before and after the collision (5pts) – Include a table that displays the Linear Momentum in both directions before and after the collision (10pts) – Include a summary table that calculates the percent error between before collision values and after collision values. Use the before collision values as your theoretical value. (5pts) Discussion (40 pts total) Tips for a good Discussion section: This section is worth almost half of your report! I want to see that you put legitimate thought into your data and how it relates to what you learn in lecture. Show me that you understand the things we talked about in class. Be thorough, but remember that long and drawn out does not necessary achieve this. • do not present data as one large paragraph, make them smaller and easier to read • do not refer back to tables, actually state the values when asked for • you may refer back to graphs when necessary • do not use math vocabulary wrong, if you are unsure of a definition, look it up!!! – Present the percent error values for both momentum and energy calculations. (10pts) – Why was the energy and momentum BEFORE collision used as the theoretical value? (hint: It has to do with us assuming we have an Elastic Collision) (10pts) – Present the frequency of the “zapper”. What does this mean about the time that passes between each dot on the collision path? (10pts) – Discuss sources of error in this lab and how they may have affected our final result. (10pts) Appendix (5pts total) – Just staple on whatever notes you took in class.

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“How to Date a Black girl, Brown girl, Halfie or White girl” written by Junot Diaz

“How to Date a Black girl, Brown girl, Halfie or White girl” written by Junot Diaz

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Lab 1: Introduction to Motion  You must make the following changes to your lab manual before coming to lab, not during lab!  Do not plan to consult this sheet during lab. There is not enough time.  The required changes must be in your lab manual in the proper sequence to complete the lab in a smooth and timely manner.  You should bring this paper to lab but only for reference to the images printed below. You have been warned! A note about vector addition: Adding Vectors: To add these two vectors: means to place them head-to-tail like so: and therefore they equal: Subtracting Vectors: Subtracting these two vectors: is the same as the sum of one vector and the negative of the other: which is the same as: which means to place them head-to-tail like so: and therefore they equal: Pg. 7 Activity 1-3 Cross off Step 1 Cross off Step 2 Pg. 7 Step 3) Replace “Try to make each of the graphs …” with “Try to make one of the graphs…” Pg. 7 Step 4) Replace this step with: “Describe how you must move to produce the graph you selected. Note if you selected graph C your description is at the top of page 8. Pg. 8 Activity 2-1 Step 2) Replace: “(Just draw smooth patterns; leave out…” with “(Quickly draw smooth patterns; leave out…” Then highlight this entire sentence. + − + (− ) + Pg. 10 Step 3) Where it states “(Be sure to adjust the time scale to 15 s.)” The way to do this is to click this clock icon And change the “Duration:” value Pg. 11 Question 2-3) At the end of the question add the following: “See the top of page 12 for the rest of the question.” Pg. 13 Step 2) Highlight the part that states: “Get the times right. Get the velocities right. Each person should take a turn.” At the end of the paragraph add: “But do not spend too much time getting things perfect.” Pg. 15 Step 1) Where is states: “Use the analysis feature of the software to read values of velocity…” Do this: Click here and then move the mouse over the graph. You can now quickly read data from the graph.

Lab 1: Introduction to Motion  You must make the following changes to your lab manual before coming to lab, not during lab!  Do not plan to consult this sheet during lab. There is not enough time.  The required changes must be in your lab manual in the proper sequence to complete the lab in a smooth and timely manner.  You should bring this paper to lab but only for reference to the images printed below. You have been warned! A note about vector addition: Adding Vectors: To add these two vectors: means to place them head-to-tail like so: and therefore they equal: Subtracting Vectors: Subtracting these two vectors: is the same as the sum of one vector and the negative of the other: which is the same as: which means to place them head-to-tail like so: and therefore they equal: Pg. 7 Activity 1-3 Cross off Step 1 Cross off Step 2 Pg. 7 Step 3) Replace “Try to make each of the graphs …” with “Try to make one of the graphs…” Pg. 7 Step 4) Replace this step with: “Describe how you must move to produce the graph you selected. Note if you selected graph C your description is at the top of page 8. Pg. 8 Activity 2-1 Step 2) Replace: “(Just draw smooth patterns; leave out…” with “(Quickly draw smooth patterns; leave out…” Then highlight this entire sentence. + − + (− ) + Pg. 10 Step 3) Where it states “(Be sure to adjust the time scale to 15 s.)” The way to do this is to click this clock icon And change the “Duration:” value Pg. 11 Question 2-3) At the end of the question add the following: “See the top of page 12 for the rest of the question.” Pg. 13 Step 2) Highlight the part that states: “Get the times right. Get the velocities right. Each person should take a turn.” At the end of the paragraph add: “But do not spend too much time getting things perfect.” Pg. 15 Step 1) Where is states: “Use the analysis feature of the software to read values of velocity…” Do this: Click here and then move the mouse over the graph. You can now quickly read data from the graph.

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Homework 3 For Homework 3, answer each of the five questions below from this article Granena, G., & Long, M. (2013). Age of onset, length of residence, language aptitude, and ultimate attainment in three linguistic domains. Second Language Research, 29, 311-343. You will probably need no more than a paragraph for each question. These are very general questions about the main points of the article. As I am interested in how you understand the article, do not use quotes for your answers, but rather your own words. 1. What was the purpose of the study? 2. Who did they investigate? 3. What was the procedure? 4. What were the results? 5. What are the implications of the study for our understanding of language development in general and the Critical Period Hypothesis in particular?

Homework 3 For Homework 3, answer each of the five questions below from this article Granena, G., & Long, M. (2013). Age of onset, length of residence, language aptitude, and ultimate attainment in three linguistic domains. Second Language Research, 29, 311-343. You will probably need no more than a paragraph for each question. These are very general questions about the main points of the article. As I am interested in how you understand the article, do not use quotes for your answers, but rather your own words. 1. What was the purpose of the study? 2. Who did they investigate? 3. What was the procedure? 4. What were the results? 5. What are the implications of the study for our understanding of language development in general and the Critical Period Hypothesis in particular?

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essay agreement about weigh in motion technology. I need it around 1500 words I need 5 paragraphs introduction paragraph has thesis statement 3 body each body has support your idea and example . The Conclusion The purpose of a conclusion is to refresh in the mind of the readers what your argument is. It is the part where you leave a footprint in their minds. Rounding off your writing is very important here. You wrap it up what you said in the introduction.

essay agreement about weigh in motion technology. I need it around 1500 words I need 5 paragraphs introduction paragraph has thesis statement 3 body each body has support your idea and example . The Conclusion The purpose of a conclusion is to refresh in the mind of the readers what your argument is. It is the part where you leave a footprint in their minds. Rounding off your writing is very important here. You wrap it up what you said in the introduction.

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