Individual case study Due date: 1:00pm AEST, Thursday, Week 11 All students are to submit electronically – max file size is 2Mb. ASSESSMENT Weighting: 35% Length: No set length 2 I…Assignment 2 SPECIFICATIONS CIS8011_Digital Innovation Assignment 2 (30%) (1500 words maximum) This assignment continues from the first assignment and your task is to write a report on the following a…1 CSE2DES/CSE5DES – Assignment 1 Due Date: 10 am Monday 22nd September 2014 Assessment: This assignment 1 is worth 15% of the final mark for CSE2DES/CSE5DES. This is an individual assignment. Copying,…All questions are from the textbook: Fatseas, Victor & Williams, John, Cost Management (2013) 3rd edition, McGraw HillMLC 703: PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX LAW INSTRUCTIONS Please note that the following will not form part of the word count: ? References, including statute and cases; ? Diagrams; ? Tables; ? Calculations….WRITTEN ESSAY Outline This assessment has been written to develop your understanding of Human Resource Management, assessing learning outcomes a, b, c, h and i: “The external environmental (e.g. econo…Subject: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING B01ITMK208 Assessment item 2: International Marketing Analysis Weighting: 30% Due: Week 10. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are a …B01ITMK208 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS KEY INFORMATION Maximum Length: 2500 words Due: Week 8. Note that late submission will attract a penalty. Weighting: 30% Instructions: Read …Subject: Advertising Management BO1ADMG207 Assessment item 2: IMC Report Weighting: 30% Due: Week 8. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are the Australian-based Marke…Attached are two Memos, please have a lookgetEconomics topic Assignment 2 Value: 40% Due date: 01-Sep-2014 Return date: 22-Sep-2014 Length: about 1500-2000 words each Submission method options Alternative submission method Task Analytical essays…Accounting for Business Decisions –HI5001 Trimester 2 2014 The assignment allows students to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of Accounting. The students will use the sk…HOLMES INSTITUTE FACULTY OF HIGHER EDUCATION HI6007 SPSS Assignment 02 Due Friday 4pm week 11 WORTH 30% The data set you need to do the assignment can be found on Blackboard in the folder “Assignments…Assignmnet of Economic Assignment (Written report): 25% 1. Organize yourselves into groups. Each group is to have Four or Five members. 2. Groups need to choose a topic from the list of topics provide…2. Rio Tinto Annual Report Financial Analysis [10 marks] Consider the sources below and answer the following questions. Source 1: Rio Tinto Annual Report 2012 (see report uploaded on the portal) Sourc…Quantitative Methods for Business Business Statistics Assignment – Semester, 2 2014 Total Marks: 60, Worth: 20% of final assessment This assignment requires a considerable amount of computer work and …BUACC 2613 Management Accounting 1 Semester 2, 2014 Assignment Contribution to overall assessment: 25% Due date: 26/09/2014 • This assignment has two parts: o Part 1

Individual case study Due date: 1:00pm AEST, Thursday, Week 11 All students are to submit electronically – max file size is 2Mb. ASSESSMENT Weighting: 35% Length: No set length 2 I…Assignment 2 SPECIFICATIONS CIS8011_Digital Innovation Assignment 2 (30%) (1500 words maximum) This assignment continues from the first assignment and your task is to write a report on the following a…1 CSE2DES/CSE5DES – Assignment 1 Due Date: 10 am Monday 22nd September 2014 Assessment: This assignment 1 is worth 15% of the final mark for CSE2DES/CSE5DES. This is an individual assignment. Copying,…All questions are from the textbook: Fatseas, Victor & Williams, John, Cost Management (2013) 3rd edition, McGraw HillMLC 703: PRINCIPLES OF INCOME TAX LAW INSTRUCTIONS Please note that the following will not form part of the word count: ? References, including statute and cases; ? Diagrams; ? Tables; ? Calculations….WRITTEN ESSAY Outline This assessment has been written to develop your understanding of Human Resource Management, assessing learning outcomes a, b, c, h and i: “The external environmental (e.g. econo…Subject: INTERNATIONAL MARKETING B01ITMK208 Assessment item 2: International Marketing Analysis Weighting: 30% Due: Week 10. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are a …B01ITMK208 INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS KEY INFORMATION Maximum Length: 2500 words Due: Week 8. Note that late submission will attract a penalty. Weighting: 30% Instructions: Read …Subject: Advertising Management BO1ADMG207 Assessment item 2: IMC Report Weighting: 30% Due: Week 8. A daily penalty of 5% will be applied to late assignments. Task: You are the Australian-based Marke…Attached are two Memos, please have a lookgetEconomics topic Assignment 2 Value: 40% Due date: 01-Sep-2014 Return date: 22-Sep-2014 Length: about 1500-2000 words each Submission method options Alternative submission method Task Analytical essays…Accounting for Business Decisions –HI5001 Trimester 2 2014 The assignment allows students to exhibit their knowledge and understanding of the subject matter of Accounting. The students will use the sk…HOLMES INSTITUTE FACULTY OF HIGHER EDUCATION HI6007 SPSS Assignment 02 Due Friday 4pm week 11 WORTH 30% The data set you need to do the assignment can be found on Blackboard in the folder “Assignments…Assignmnet of Economic Assignment (Written report): 25% 1. Organize yourselves into groups. Each group is to have Four or Five members. 2. Groups need to choose a topic from the list of topics provide…2. Rio Tinto Annual Report Financial Analysis [10 marks] Consider the sources below and answer the following questions. Source 1: Rio Tinto Annual Report 2012 (see report uploaded on the portal) Sourc…Quantitative Methods for Business Business Statistics Assignment – Semester, 2 2014 Total Marks: 60, Worth: 20% of final assessment This assignment requires a considerable amount of computer work and …BUACC 2613 Management Accounting 1 Semester 2, 2014 Assignment Contribution to overall assessment: 25% Due date: 26/09/2014 • This assignment has two parts: o Part 1

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Economic order quantity (EOQ) questions: 1. An equipment contains 30 parts of the same type. The part has a predicted mean failure frequency of 10,000 hours. The equipment operates 24 hours a day, and spares are provisioned at 90-day intervals. How many spares should be carried in the inventory to ensure a 95% probability of having a spare available when required? 2. Determine the EOQ of an item for spares inventory replenishment, where: a. the cost per unit is $100 b. The cost of preparing for a shipment and sending a truck to the warehouse is $25 c. The estimated cost of holding the inventory, including capital tied up, is 25% of the initial inventory value D. The annual demand is 200 units. Assume that the cost per order and the inventory carrying charge is fixed.

Economic order quantity (EOQ) questions: 1. An equipment contains 30 parts of the same type. The part has a predicted mean failure frequency of 10,000 hours. The equipment operates 24 hours a day, and spares are provisioned at 90-day intervals. How many spares should be carried in the inventory to ensure a 95% probability of having a spare available when required? 2. Determine the EOQ of an item for spares inventory replenishment, where: a. the cost per unit is $100 b. The cost of preparing for a shipment and sending a truck to the warehouse is $25 c. The estimated cost of holding the inventory, including capital tied up, is 25% of the initial inventory value D. The annual demand is 200 units. Assume that the cost per order and the inventory carrying charge is fixed.

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Chapter 4 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Advice for the Quarterback A quarterback is set up to throw the football to a receiver who is running with a constant velocity directly away from the quarterback and is now a distance away from the quarterback. The quarterback figures that the ball must be thrown at an angle to the horizontal and he estimates that the receiver must catch the ball a time interval after it is thrown to avoid having opposition players prevent the receiver from making the catch. In the following you may assume that the ball is thrown and caught at the same height above the level playing field. Assume that the y coordinate of the ball at the instant it is thrown or caught is and that the horizontal position of the quaterback is . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and use the pictured inertial coordinate system when solving the problem. Part A Find , the vertical component of the velocity of the ball when the quarterback releases it. Express in terms of and . Hint 1. Equation of motion in y direction What is the expression for , the height of the ball as a function of time? Answer in terms of , , and . v r D  tc y = 0 x = 0 g v0y v0y tc g y(t) t g v0y ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Hint 2. Height at which the ball is caught, Remember that after time the ball was caught at the same height as it had been released. That is, . ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B Find , the initial horizontal component of velocity of the ball. Express your answer for in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Receiver’s position Find , the receiver’s position before he catches the ball. Answer in terms of , , and . ANSWER: Football’s position y(t) = v0yt− g 1 2 t2 y(tc) tc y(tc) = y0 = 0 v0y = gtc 2 v0x v0x D tc vr xr D vr tc xr = D + vrtc Typesetting math: 100% Find , the horizontal distance that the ball travels before reaching the receiver. Answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Part C Find the speed with which the quarterback must throw the ball. Answer in terms of , , , and . Hint 1. How to approach the problem Remember that velocity is a vector; from solving Parts A and B you have the two components, from which you can find the magnitude of this vector. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part D xc v0x tc xc = v0xtc v0x = + D tc vr v0 D tc vr g v0 = ( + ) + D tc vr 2 ( ) gtc 2 2 −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% Assuming that the quarterback throws the ball with speed , find the angle above the horizontal at which he should throw it. Your solution should contain an inverse trig function (entered as asin, acos, or atan). Give your answer in terms of already known quantities, , , and . Hint 1. Find angle from and Think of velocity as a vector with Cartesian coordinates and . Find the angle that this vector would make with the x axis using the results of Parts A and B. ANSWER: Answer Requested Direction of Velocity at Various Times in Flight for Projectile Motion Conceptual Question For each of the motions described below, determine the algebraic sign (positive, negative, or zero) of the x component and y component of velocity of the object at the time specified. For all of the motions, the positive x axis points to the right and the positive y axis points upward. Alex, a mountaineer, must leap across a wide crevasse. The other side of the crevasse is below the point from which he leaps, as shown in the figure. Alex leaps horizontally and successfully makes the jump. v0  v0x v0y v0  v0x v0y v0xx^ v0yy^   = atan( ) v0y v0x Typesetting math: 100% Part A Determine the algebraic sign of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity at the instant he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Algebraic sign of velocity The algebraic sign of the velocity is determined solely by comparing the direction in which the object is moving with the direction that is defined to be positive. In this example, to the right is defined to be the positive x direction and upward the positive y direction. Therefore, any object moving to the right, whether speeding up, slowing down, or even simultaneously moving upward or downward, has a positive x velocity. Similarly, if the object is moving downward, regardless of any other aspect of its motion, its y velocity is negative. Hint 2. Sketch Alex’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant after he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. ANSWER: ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Part B Determine the algebraic signs of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity the instant before he lands at the end of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Sketch Alex’s final velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant before he safely lands on the other side of the crevasse. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: Answer Requested Typesetting math: 100% At the buzzer, a basketball player shoots a desperation shot. The ball goes in! Part C Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part D Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity at the ball’s maximum height. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s velocity at maximum height Typesetting math: 100% On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant it reaches its maximum height. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested PSS 4.1 Projectile Motion Problems Learning Goal: Typesetting math: 100% To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 4.1 for projectile motion problems. A rock thrown with speed 9.00 and launch angle 30.0 (above the horizontal) travels a horizontal distance of = 17.0 before hitting the ground. From what height was the rock thrown? Use the value = 9.810 for the free-fall acceleration. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 4.1 Projectile motion problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions, such as treating the object as a particle. Is it reasonable to ignore air resistance? VISUALIZE: Use a pictorial representation. Establish a coordinate system with the x axis horizontal and the y axis vertical. Show important points in the motion on a sketch. Define symbols, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The acceleration is known: and . Thus, the problem becomes one of two-dimensional kinematics. The kinematic equations are , . is the same for the horizontal and vertical components of the motion. Find from one component, and then use that value for the other component. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model Start by making simplifying assumptions: Model the rock as a particle in free fall. You can ignore air resistance because the rock is a relatively heavy object moving relatively slowly. Visualize Part A Which diagram represents an accurate sketch of the rock’s trajectory? Hint 1. The launch angle In a projectile’s motion, the angle of the initial velocity above the horizontal is called the launch angle. ANSWER: m/s  d m g m/s2 ax = 0 ay = −g xf = xi +vixt, yf = yi +viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfx = vix = constant, and vfy = viy − gt t t v i Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B As stated in the strategy, choose a coordinate system where the x axis is horizontal and the y axis is vertical. Note that in the strategy, the y component of the projectile’s acceleration, , is taken to be negative. This implies that the positive y axis is upward. Use the same convention for your y axis, and take the positive x axis to be to the right. Where you choose your origin doesn’t change the answer to the question, but choosing an origin can make a problem easier to solve (even if only a bit). Usually it is nice if the majority of the quantities you are given and the quantity you are trying to solve for take positive values relative to your chosen origin. Given this goal, what location for the origin of the coordinate system would make this problem easiest? ANSWER: ay At ground level below the point where the rock is launched At the point where the rock strikes the ground At the peak of the trajectory At the point where the rock is released At ground level below the peak of the trajectory Typesetting math: 100% Correct It’s best to place the origin of the coordinate system at ground level below the launching point because in this way all the points of interest (the launching point and the landing point) will have positive coordinates. (Based on your experience, you know that it’s generally easier to work with positive coordinates.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an arbitrary choice. The correct solution of the problem will not depend on the location of the origin of your coordinate system. Now, define symbols representing initial and final position, velocity, and time. Your target variable is , the initial y coordinate of the rock. Your pictorial representation should be complete now, and similar to the picture below: Solve Part C Find the height from which the rock was launched. Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. yi yi Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem The time needed to move horizontally to the final position = 17.0 is the same time needed for the rock to rise from the initial position to the peak of its trajectory and then fall to the ground. Use the information you have about motion in the horizontal direction to solve for . Knowing this time will allow you to use the equations of motion for the vertical direction to solve for . Hint 2. Find the time spent in the air How long ( ) is the rock in the air? Express your answer in seconds to three significant figures. Hint 1. Determine which equation to use Which of the equations given in the strategy and shown below is the most appropriate to calculate the time the rock spent in the air? ANSWER: Hint 2. Find the x component of the initial velocity What is the x component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: t xf = d m yi t yi t t xf = xi + vixt yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt vix = 7.79 m/s Typesetting math: 100% Hint 3. Find the y component of the initial velocity What is the y component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Assess Part D A second rock is thrown straight upward with a speed 4.500 . If this rock takes 2.181 to fall to the ground, from what height was it released? Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. Hint 1. Identify the known variables What are the values of , , , and for the second rock? Take the positive y axis to be upward and the origin to be located on the ground where the rock lands. Express your answers to four significant figures in the units shown to the right, separated by commas. ANSWER: t = 2.18 s viy = 4.50 m/s yi = 13.5 m m/s s H yf viy t a Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Hint 2. Determine which equation to use to find the height Which equation should you use to find ? Keep in mind that if the positive y axis is upward and the origin is located on the ground, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Projectile motion is made up of two independent motions: uniform motion at constant velocity in the horizontal direction and free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Because both rocks were thrown with the same initial vertical velocity, 4.500 , and fell the same vertical distance of 13.5 , they were in the air for the same amount of time. This result was expected and helps to confirm that you did the calculation in Part C correctly. ± Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A , , , = 0,4.500,2.181,-yf viy t a 9.810 m, m/s, s, m/s2 H yi = H yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt = − 2g( − ) v2f y v2i y yf yi H = 13.5 m viy = m/s m  = 45 D = 220 m g = 9.8 m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Find , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Introduce the (unknown) variables and for the initial components of velocity. Then use kinematics to relate them and solve for . What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Find Find the horizontal component of the initial velocity. Express your answer symbolically in terms of and given symbolic quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Find What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of . ANSWER: ANSWER: ta vy0 vx0 ta vy0 ta D vx0 vx0 ta vx0 = D ta vy0 vy0 vx0 vy0 = vx0 vy0 = D ta Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. From the change in the vertical component of velocity, you should be able to find in terms of and . Give your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Find When applied to the y-component of velocity, in this problem the formula for with constant acceleration is What is , the vertical component of velocity when the arrow hits the tree? Answer symbolically in terms of only. ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Put the algebra together to find symbolically. If you have an expression for the initial vertical velocity component in terms in terms of and , and another in terms of and , you should be able to eliminate this initial component to find an expression for Express your answer symbolically in terms of given variables. ANSWER: ta vy0 g vy0 g vy(ta) v(t) −g vy(t) = vy0 − g t vy(ta ) vy0 vy(ta) = −vy0 ta = 2vy0 g ta D ta g ta ta2 t2 = a 2D g Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Answer Requested Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. When should the apple be dropped The apple should be dropped at the time equal to the total time it takes the arrow to reach the tree minus the time it takes the apple to fall 6.0 meters. Hint 2. Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters How long does it take an apple to fall 6.0 meters? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: ta = 6.7 s tf = 1.1 s td = 5.6 s Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Accelerating Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. Part A Consider the video you just watched. Suppose we replace the original launcher with one that fires the ball upward at twice the speed. We make no other changes. How far behind the cart will the ball land, compared to the distance in the original experiment? Hint 1. Determine how long the ball is in the air How will doubling the initial upward speed of the ball change the time the ball spends in the air? A kinematic equation may be helpful here. The time in the air will ANSWER: be cut in half. stay the same. double. quadruple. Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Determine the appropriate kinematic expression Which of the following kinematic equations correctly describes the horizontal distance between the ball and the cart at the moment the ball lands? The cart’s initial horizontal velocity is , its horizontal acceleration is , and is the time elapsed between launch and impact. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct The ball will spend twice as much time in the air ( , where is the ball’s initial upward velocity), so it will land four times farther behind the cart: (where is the cart’s horizontal acceleration). Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Moving Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. d v0x ax t d = v0x t d = 1 2 axv0x t2 d = v0x t+ 1 2 axt2 d = 1 2 axt2 the same distance twice as far half as far four times as far by a factor not listed above t = 2v0y/g v0y d = 1 2 axt2 ax Typesetting math: 100% Part A The crew of a cargo plane wishes to drop a crate of supplies on a target below. To hit the target, when should the crew drop the crate? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. How to approach the problem While the crate is on the plane, it shares the plane’s velocity. What is the crate’s velocity immediately after it is released? Hint 2. What affects the motion of the crate? Gravity will accelerate the crate downward. What, if anything, affects the crate’s horizontal motion? (Keep in mind that we are told to ignore air resistance, even though that’s not very realistic in this situation.) ANSWER: Correct At the moment it is released, the crate shares the plane’s horizontal velocity. In the absence of air resistance, the crate would remain directly below the plane as it fell. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. Before the plane is directly over the target After the plane has flown over the target When the plane is directly over the target Typesetting math: 100% You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Typesetting math: 100%

Chapter 4 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Advice for the Quarterback A quarterback is set up to throw the football to a receiver who is running with a constant velocity directly away from the quarterback and is now a distance away from the quarterback. The quarterback figures that the ball must be thrown at an angle to the horizontal and he estimates that the receiver must catch the ball a time interval after it is thrown to avoid having opposition players prevent the receiver from making the catch. In the following you may assume that the ball is thrown and caught at the same height above the level playing field. Assume that the y coordinate of the ball at the instant it is thrown or caught is and that the horizontal position of the quaterback is . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and use the pictured inertial coordinate system when solving the problem. Part A Find , the vertical component of the velocity of the ball when the quarterback releases it. Express in terms of and . Hint 1. Equation of motion in y direction What is the expression for , the height of the ball as a function of time? Answer in terms of , , and . v r D  tc y = 0 x = 0 g v0y v0y tc g y(t) t g v0y ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Hint 2. Height at which the ball is caught, Remember that after time the ball was caught at the same height as it had been released. That is, . ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B Find , the initial horizontal component of velocity of the ball. Express your answer for in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Receiver’s position Find , the receiver’s position before he catches the ball. Answer in terms of , , and . ANSWER: Football’s position y(t) = v0yt− g 1 2 t2 y(tc) tc y(tc) = y0 = 0 v0y = gtc 2 v0x v0x D tc vr xr D vr tc xr = D + vrtc Typesetting math: 100% Find , the horizontal distance that the ball travels before reaching the receiver. Answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Part C Find the speed with which the quarterback must throw the ball. Answer in terms of , , , and . Hint 1. How to approach the problem Remember that velocity is a vector; from solving Parts A and B you have the two components, from which you can find the magnitude of this vector. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part D xc v0x tc xc = v0xtc v0x = + D tc vr v0 D tc vr g v0 = ( + ) + D tc vr 2 ( ) gtc 2 2 −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% Assuming that the quarterback throws the ball with speed , find the angle above the horizontal at which he should throw it. Your solution should contain an inverse trig function (entered as asin, acos, or atan). Give your answer in terms of already known quantities, , , and . Hint 1. Find angle from and Think of velocity as a vector with Cartesian coordinates and . Find the angle that this vector would make with the x axis using the results of Parts A and B. ANSWER: Answer Requested Direction of Velocity at Various Times in Flight for Projectile Motion Conceptual Question For each of the motions described below, determine the algebraic sign (positive, negative, or zero) of the x component and y component of velocity of the object at the time specified. For all of the motions, the positive x axis points to the right and the positive y axis points upward. Alex, a mountaineer, must leap across a wide crevasse. The other side of the crevasse is below the point from which he leaps, as shown in the figure. Alex leaps horizontally and successfully makes the jump. v0  v0x v0y v0  v0x v0y v0xx^ v0yy^   = atan( ) v0y v0x Typesetting math: 100% Part A Determine the algebraic sign of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity at the instant he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Algebraic sign of velocity The algebraic sign of the velocity is determined solely by comparing the direction in which the object is moving with the direction that is defined to be positive. In this example, to the right is defined to be the positive x direction and upward the positive y direction. Therefore, any object moving to the right, whether speeding up, slowing down, or even simultaneously moving upward or downward, has a positive x velocity. Similarly, if the object is moving downward, regardless of any other aspect of its motion, its y velocity is negative. Hint 2. Sketch Alex’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant after he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. ANSWER: ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Part B Determine the algebraic signs of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity the instant before he lands at the end of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Sketch Alex’s final velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant before he safely lands on the other side of the crevasse. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: Answer Requested Typesetting math: 100% At the buzzer, a basketball player shoots a desperation shot. The ball goes in! Part C Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part D Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity at the ball’s maximum height. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s velocity at maximum height Typesetting math: 100% On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant it reaches its maximum height. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested PSS 4.1 Projectile Motion Problems Learning Goal: Typesetting math: 100% To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 4.1 for projectile motion problems. A rock thrown with speed 9.00 and launch angle 30.0 (above the horizontal) travels a horizontal distance of = 17.0 before hitting the ground. From what height was the rock thrown? Use the value = 9.810 for the free-fall acceleration. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 4.1 Projectile motion problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions, such as treating the object as a particle. Is it reasonable to ignore air resistance? VISUALIZE: Use a pictorial representation. Establish a coordinate system with the x axis horizontal and the y axis vertical. Show important points in the motion on a sketch. Define symbols, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The acceleration is known: and . Thus, the problem becomes one of two-dimensional kinematics. The kinematic equations are , . is the same for the horizontal and vertical components of the motion. Find from one component, and then use that value for the other component. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model Start by making simplifying assumptions: Model the rock as a particle in free fall. You can ignore air resistance because the rock is a relatively heavy object moving relatively slowly. Visualize Part A Which diagram represents an accurate sketch of the rock’s trajectory? Hint 1. The launch angle In a projectile’s motion, the angle of the initial velocity above the horizontal is called the launch angle. ANSWER: m/s  d m g m/s2 ax = 0 ay = −g xf = xi +vixt, yf = yi +viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfx = vix = constant, and vfy = viy − gt t t v i Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B As stated in the strategy, choose a coordinate system where the x axis is horizontal and the y axis is vertical. Note that in the strategy, the y component of the projectile’s acceleration, , is taken to be negative. This implies that the positive y axis is upward. Use the same convention for your y axis, and take the positive x axis to be to the right. Where you choose your origin doesn’t change the answer to the question, but choosing an origin can make a problem easier to solve (even if only a bit). Usually it is nice if the majority of the quantities you are given and the quantity you are trying to solve for take positive values relative to your chosen origin. Given this goal, what location for the origin of the coordinate system would make this problem easiest? ANSWER: ay At ground level below the point where the rock is launched At the point where the rock strikes the ground At the peak of the trajectory At the point where the rock is released At ground level below the peak of the trajectory Typesetting math: 100% Correct It’s best to place the origin of the coordinate system at ground level below the launching point because in this way all the points of interest (the launching point and the landing point) will have positive coordinates. (Based on your experience, you know that it’s generally easier to work with positive coordinates.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an arbitrary choice. The correct solution of the problem will not depend on the location of the origin of your coordinate system. Now, define symbols representing initial and final position, velocity, and time. Your target variable is , the initial y coordinate of the rock. Your pictorial representation should be complete now, and similar to the picture below: Solve Part C Find the height from which the rock was launched. Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. yi yi Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem The time needed to move horizontally to the final position = 17.0 is the same time needed for the rock to rise from the initial position to the peak of its trajectory and then fall to the ground. Use the information you have about motion in the horizontal direction to solve for . Knowing this time will allow you to use the equations of motion for the vertical direction to solve for . Hint 2. Find the time spent in the air How long ( ) is the rock in the air? Express your answer in seconds to three significant figures. Hint 1. Determine which equation to use Which of the equations given in the strategy and shown below is the most appropriate to calculate the time the rock spent in the air? ANSWER: Hint 2. Find the x component of the initial velocity What is the x component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: t xf = d m yi t yi t t xf = xi + vixt yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt vix = 7.79 m/s Typesetting math: 100% Hint 3. Find the y component of the initial velocity What is the y component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Assess Part D A second rock is thrown straight upward with a speed 4.500 . If this rock takes 2.181 to fall to the ground, from what height was it released? Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. Hint 1. Identify the known variables What are the values of , , , and for the second rock? Take the positive y axis to be upward and the origin to be located on the ground where the rock lands. Express your answers to four significant figures in the units shown to the right, separated by commas. ANSWER: t = 2.18 s viy = 4.50 m/s yi = 13.5 m m/s s H yf viy t a Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Hint 2. Determine which equation to use to find the height Which equation should you use to find ? Keep in mind that if the positive y axis is upward and the origin is located on the ground, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Projectile motion is made up of two independent motions: uniform motion at constant velocity in the horizontal direction and free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Because both rocks were thrown with the same initial vertical velocity, 4.500 , and fell the same vertical distance of 13.5 , they were in the air for the same amount of time. This result was expected and helps to confirm that you did the calculation in Part C correctly. ± Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A , , , = 0,4.500,2.181,-yf viy t a 9.810 m, m/s, s, m/s2 H yi = H yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt = − 2g( − ) v2f y v2i y yf yi H = 13.5 m viy = m/s m  = 45 D = 220 m g = 9.8 m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Find , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Introduce the (unknown) variables and for the initial components of velocity. Then use kinematics to relate them and solve for . What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Find Find the horizontal component of the initial velocity. Express your answer symbolically in terms of and given symbolic quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Find What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of . ANSWER: ANSWER: ta vy0 vx0 ta vy0 ta D vx0 vx0 ta vx0 = D ta vy0 vy0 vx0 vy0 = vx0 vy0 = D ta Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. From the change in the vertical component of velocity, you should be able to find in terms of and . Give your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Find When applied to the y-component of velocity, in this problem the formula for with constant acceleration is What is , the vertical component of velocity when the arrow hits the tree? Answer symbolically in terms of only. ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Put the algebra together to find symbolically. If you have an expression for the initial vertical velocity component in terms in terms of and , and another in terms of and , you should be able to eliminate this initial component to find an expression for Express your answer symbolically in terms of given variables. ANSWER: ta vy0 g vy0 g vy(ta) v(t) −g vy(t) = vy0 − g t vy(ta ) vy0 vy(ta) = −vy0 ta = 2vy0 g ta D ta g ta ta2 t2 = a 2D g Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Answer Requested Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. When should the apple be dropped The apple should be dropped at the time equal to the total time it takes the arrow to reach the tree minus the time it takes the apple to fall 6.0 meters. Hint 2. Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters How long does it take an apple to fall 6.0 meters? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: ta = 6.7 s tf = 1.1 s td = 5.6 s Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Accelerating Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. Part A Consider the video you just watched. Suppose we replace the original launcher with one that fires the ball upward at twice the speed. We make no other changes. How far behind the cart will the ball land, compared to the distance in the original experiment? Hint 1. Determine how long the ball is in the air How will doubling the initial upward speed of the ball change the time the ball spends in the air? A kinematic equation may be helpful here. The time in the air will ANSWER: be cut in half. stay the same. double. quadruple. Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Determine the appropriate kinematic expression Which of the following kinematic equations correctly describes the horizontal distance between the ball and the cart at the moment the ball lands? The cart’s initial horizontal velocity is , its horizontal acceleration is , and is the time elapsed between launch and impact. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct The ball will spend twice as much time in the air ( , where is the ball’s initial upward velocity), so it will land four times farther behind the cart: (where is the cart’s horizontal acceleration). Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Moving Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. d v0x ax t d = v0x t d = 1 2 axv0x t2 d = v0x t+ 1 2 axt2 d = 1 2 axt2 the same distance twice as far half as far four times as far by a factor not listed above t = 2v0y/g v0y d = 1 2 axt2 ax Typesetting math: 100% Part A The crew of a cargo plane wishes to drop a crate of supplies on a target below. To hit the target, when should the crew drop the crate? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. How to approach the problem While the crate is on the plane, it shares the plane’s velocity. What is the crate’s velocity immediately after it is released? Hint 2. What affects the motion of the crate? Gravity will accelerate the crate downward. What, if anything, affects the crate’s horizontal motion? (Keep in mind that we are told to ignore air resistance, even though that’s not very realistic in this situation.) ANSWER: Correct At the moment it is released, the crate shares the plane’s horizontal velocity. In the absence of air resistance, the crate would remain directly below the plane as it fell. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. Before the plane is directly over the target After the plane has flown over the target When the plane is directly over the target Typesetting math: 100% You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Typesetting math: 100%

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For Day 3 Homework Cover Sheet Name:_________________________________________________ 1. Read Pages from 34-42, or watch the videos listed below.  Geometry http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4v0CZzC9ec (10 min) 2. Attempt Workbook pages 7-8 Summary of the lectures you watched. List any parts of the video lecture (if there are any) that were unclear or you had trouble understanding. Please be specific and do not just say “All of it”. Questions you had difficulty with or felt stuck on- ALEKS topics to be mastered (21 topics) Acute, obtuse, and right angles Acute, obtuse, and right triangles Area of a triangle Classifying parallelograms Classifying quadrilaterals Classifying solids Corresponding and alternate angles Drawing an angle with the protractor Identifying congruent shapes on a grid Identifying numbers as integers or non-integers Identifying numbers as rational or irrational Identifying parallel and perpendicular lines Identifying parallelograms, rectangles, and squares Interpreting a tally table Introduction to a circle: Diameter, radius, and chord Measuring an angle with the protractor Naming polygons Naming segments, rays, and lines Scalene, isosceles, and equilateral triangles Supplementary and complementary angles Supplementary and vertical angles

For Day 3 Homework Cover Sheet Name:_________________________________________________ 1. Read Pages from 34-42, or watch the videos listed below.  Geometry http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X4v0CZzC9ec (10 min) 2. Attempt Workbook pages 7-8 Summary of the lectures you watched. List any parts of the video lecture (if there are any) that were unclear or you had trouble understanding. Please be specific and do not just say “All of it”. Questions you had difficulty with or felt stuck on- ALEKS topics to be mastered (21 topics) Acute, obtuse, and right angles Acute, obtuse, and right triangles Area of a triangle Classifying parallelograms Classifying quadrilaterals Classifying solids Corresponding and alternate angles Drawing an angle with the protractor Identifying congruent shapes on a grid Identifying numbers as integers or non-integers Identifying numbers as rational or irrational Identifying parallel and perpendicular lines Identifying parallelograms, rectangles, and squares Interpreting a tally table Introduction to a circle: Diameter, radius, and chord Measuring an angle with the protractor Naming polygons Naming segments, rays, and lines Scalene, isosceles, and equilateral triangles Supplementary and complementary angles Supplementary and vertical angles

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A total of 800 students responded to the MATH1530 class survey during the spring semester of 2015. The name of the data file is Sp15Math1530CSTPData.MTW. The Minitab worksheet is set up as follows: C1: ID (an identification number given to each student in the data file) C2: GENDER C3: AGE (yrs) C4: WEIGHT (lbs) C5: HEIGHT (in) C6: NUCLEAR SAFETY C7: TALK POLITICS C8: WASH HANDS C9: L E CAMERAS C10: CLOTHING ARTICLES C11: CLOTHING PURCHASE ($) C12: LOWEST GAS PRICE ($) C13: FITNESS C14: SEXUAL PREDATOR MATH-1530 CAPSTONE TECHNOLOGY PROJECT SPRING SEMESTER 2015 Problem 1: Identify Variable Type. Which of these questions from the class survey measured variables that are categorical and which are quantitative? Use your word processor to underline the best option (or you may highlight in yellow if you are using a color printer). a. AGE Categorical Quantitative Neither b. NUCLEAR SAFETY Categorical Quantitative Neither c. WASH HANDS Categorical Quantitative Neither d. CLOTHING PURCHASE Categorical Quantitative Neither e. FITNESS Categorical Quantitative Neither Problem 2: Sampling. In the survey data, the variable “AGE” is the current age reported by each student. a. Type the first 10 observations from the column representing the variable AGE into the table below, and use this as your sample data for part (a). Then calculate the mean age of these first 10 observations and report the value below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AGE (yrs) The mean age of the first 10 students is years. (Type the value into the space provided) Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: b. Next, select a random sample of size n = 10 (Go to Calc > Random Data > Sample from Columns). Type the number 10 in the “Number of rows to Sample” slot. Enter the variable “ID” and “AGE” into the “From columns” slot. Enter C17-C18 into the “Store samples in” slot. Record the data for your sample in the table below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ID AGE (yrs) Calculate and report the mean age for your random sample of 10 students. The sample mean age is years. Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: c. Let’s treat all the students who responded to the survey as a population for the purposes of this problem. Use Minitab to calculate the mean age for all 800 observations included in the data set and report this value below. The mean age of the population is years. d. Compare the population mean you found in Part (c) to the sample means you found in Parts (a) and (b). Which sample provided a closer estimate of the population mean age in this case?

A total of 800 students responded to the MATH1530 class survey during the spring semester of 2015. The name of the data file is Sp15Math1530CSTPData.MTW. The Minitab worksheet is set up as follows: C1: ID (an identification number given to each student in the data file) C2: GENDER C3: AGE (yrs) C4: WEIGHT (lbs) C5: HEIGHT (in) C6: NUCLEAR SAFETY C7: TALK POLITICS C8: WASH HANDS C9: L E CAMERAS C10: CLOTHING ARTICLES C11: CLOTHING PURCHASE ($) C12: LOWEST GAS PRICE ($) C13: FITNESS C14: SEXUAL PREDATOR MATH-1530 CAPSTONE TECHNOLOGY PROJECT SPRING SEMESTER 2015 Problem 1: Identify Variable Type. Which of these questions from the class survey measured variables that are categorical and which are quantitative? Use your word processor to underline the best option (or you may highlight in yellow if you are using a color printer). a. AGE Categorical Quantitative Neither b. NUCLEAR SAFETY Categorical Quantitative Neither c. WASH HANDS Categorical Quantitative Neither d. CLOTHING PURCHASE Categorical Quantitative Neither e. FITNESS Categorical Quantitative Neither Problem 2: Sampling. In the survey data, the variable “AGE” is the current age reported by each student. a. Type the first 10 observations from the column representing the variable AGE into the table below, and use this as your sample data for part (a). Then calculate the mean age of these first 10 observations and report the value below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AGE (yrs) The mean age of the first 10 students is years. (Type the value into the space provided) Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: b. Next, select a random sample of size n = 10 (Go to Calc > Random Data > Sample from Columns). Type the number 10 in the “Number of rows to Sample” slot. Enter the variable “ID” and “AGE” into the “From columns” slot. Enter C17-C18 into the “Store samples in” slot. Record the data for your sample in the table below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ID AGE (yrs) Calculate and report the mean age for your random sample of 10 students. The sample mean age is years. Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: c. Let’s treat all the students who responded to the survey as a population for the purposes of this problem. Use Minitab to calculate the mean age for all 800 observations included in the data set and report this value below. The mean age of the population is years. d. Compare the population mean you found in Part (c) to the sample means you found in Parts (a) and (b). Which sample provided a closer estimate of the population mean age in this case?

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Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Standard based Curriculum In standard based curriculum, the initial point … Read More...
ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. 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Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = -60 % s t = 0 s cm cm/s 0 = -2.09 rad Correct Part B What is the phase at ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase at ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the phase at ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t = 0.5 s  = 0 rad t = 1.0 s  = 2.09 rad t = 1.5 s  = 4.19 rad Correct Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct g cm s 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 0.628 s 5.00 Nm -0.785 rad Part E The initial coordinate of the mass. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part F The initial velocity. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part G The maximum speed. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 1.41 cm 14.1 cms 20.0 cms Part H The total energy. Express your answer to one decimal place and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part I The velocity at . Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? 1.0 mJ t = 0.40 s 1.46 cms N/m cm s Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. m L T T L T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T ‘2T 2T g/6 ANSWER: Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. T/6 T/’6 ‘6T 6T It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. g % s L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 94.2%. You received 135.71 out of a possible total of 144 points. N amax = 6.6 μm vmax = 41 ms

Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = -60 % s t = 0 s cm cm/s 0 = -2.09 rad Correct Part B What is the phase at ? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase at ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the phase at ? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t = 0.5 s  = 0 rad t = 1.0 s  = 2.09 rad t = 1.5 s  = 4.19 rad Correct Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct g cm s 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 0.628 s 5.00 Nm -0.785 rad Part E The initial coordinate of the mass. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part F The initial velocity. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part G The maximum speed. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 1.41 cm 14.1 cms 20.0 cms Part H The total energy. Express your answer to one decimal place and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part I The velocity at . Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? 1.0 mJ t = 0.40 s 1.46 cms N/m cm s Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. m L T T L T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T ‘2T 2T g/6 ANSWER: Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. T/6 T/’6 ‘6T 6T It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. g % s L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 94.2%. You received 135.71 out of a possible total of 144 points. N amax = 6.6 μm vmax = 41 ms

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