The human body converts internal chemical energy into work and heat at rates of 60 to 125W (called the basal metabolic rate). This energy comes from food and is usually measured in kilocalories [1 kcal = 4.186 kJ]. (Note that the nutritional ‘Calorie’ listed on packaged food actually equals 1 kilocalorie). How many kilocalories of food energy does a person with a metoblic rate of 103.0 W require per day? Enter the numerical answer without units.

The human body converts internal chemical energy into work and heat at rates of 60 to 125W (called the basal metabolic rate). This energy comes from food and is usually measured in kilocalories [1 kcal = 4.186 kJ]. (Note that the nutritional ‘Calorie’ listed on packaged food actually equals 1 kilocalorie). How many kilocalories of food energy does a person with a metoblic rate of 103.0 W require per day? Enter the numerical answer without units.

The human body converts internal chemical energy into work and … Read More...
ENGR 1120 – PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS (MATLAB) Homework Program #2 Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of data files, vector variables, intrinsic functions, subscript manipulation, for loops, and plotting in MATLAB. You have been given a set of ASCII data files that contain directions for laying out patterns in a field. The data files contain in the first column a distance to travel and in the second column a direction heading. Unfortunately, the person who created the data did not have a good understanding of orienteering and the direction headings are given as referenced to a clock face. The pattern begins at the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system with the person facing 12 o’clock, see the figure below. The figure shows an example of the first step in the pattern being a distance of 1.5 feet in the direction of 7 o’clock. All direction headings are given in terms of this clock orientation. The distance values given are in feet. There are 5 data files provided online for testing of the program. Write a script file that will allow the user to input from the keyboard the filename of the file that they wish to analyze. Load only that ONE data file and plot the resulting pattern. Once each point forming the pattern has been located, find and designate on the plot which of the resulting nodes was the farthest away from the origin. Also find and designate the center of the pattern as defined to occur at the coordinate location corresponding to (average x, average y). When plotting the resulting pattern on the Cartesian coordinate system, set the axes limits to appropriate values. HINT: Correlate the direction headings provided in the data files to a Cartesian coordinate system by using the following vector in your script file. This requires subscript manipulation. angle = [60; 30; 0; 330; 300; 270; 240; 210; 180; 150; 120; 90] -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 you are here

ENGR 1120 – PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS (MATLAB) Homework Program #2 Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of data files, vector variables, intrinsic functions, subscript manipulation, for loops, and plotting in MATLAB. You have been given a set of ASCII data files that contain directions for laying out patterns in a field. The data files contain in the first column a distance to travel and in the second column a direction heading. Unfortunately, the person who created the data did not have a good understanding of orienteering and the direction headings are given as referenced to a clock face. The pattern begins at the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system with the person facing 12 o’clock, see the figure below. The figure shows an example of the first step in the pattern being a distance of 1.5 feet in the direction of 7 o’clock. All direction headings are given in terms of this clock orientation. The distance values given are in feet. There are 5 data files provided online for testing of the program. Write a script file that will allow the user to input from the keyboard the filename of the file that they wish to analyze. Load only that ONE data file and plot the resulting pattern. Once each point forming the pattern has been located, find and designate on the plot which of the resulting nodes was the farthest away from the origin. Also find and designate the center of the pattern as defined to occur at the coordinate location corresponding to (average x, average y). When plotting the resulting pattern on the Cartesian coordinate system, set the axes limits to appropriate values. HINT: Correlate the direction headings provided in the data files to a Cartesian coordinate system by using the following vector in your script file. This requires subscript manipulation. angle = [60; 30; 0; 330; 300; 270; 240; 210; 180; 150; 120; 90] -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 you are here

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ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

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http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? A. Machiavelli equates clemency with being loved and cruelty with being despised, and suggests that being despised is acceptable. B. Machiavelli suggests that cruelty doesn’t always result in being despised and winning the love of your subjects is the most important thing. C. Machiavelli says that cruelty, when applied in a prudent manner, will be held in more esteem than too much mercy. D. Cruelty and clemency are identical; being merciful to one person means that you must be cruel to another. E. Clemency is equated with happiness, and a happy set of subjects is the ultimate goal of a successful leader. What is the difference between hatred and fear? A. Fear makes people respect you. Hatred makes them work against you. B. Fear and hatred follow one another. If you create fear you will eventually create hatred. All leaders should avoid this. C. Hatred from external powers breeds nationalism within your country, causing people to fear external powers. D. Fear and hatred are opposites. E. Hatred follows love; fear follows clemency. http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince23.htm According to Machiavelli, what is a flatterer? A. Someone who wants to lavish gifts upon you in exchange for power. B. An external power that wants to ally with you. C. Someone who will tell you what you think rather than giving their own opinion. D. Someone who tests your opinions against their own to make a good argument. E. An external power that wants to make strong trade alliances to weaken you over time. According to Machiavelli, what is the best way to seek truth from advisers? A. Advisors should present any complaints to you as a group. B. Advisors should be called upon when the leader has a question, otherwise they are to remain silent. C. An advisor should involve the public, allowing them to call the leader to court to listen to their opinions. D. The leader should listen carefully to one private advisor with whom he always disagrees. E. Machiavelli thinks that advisors are not helpful because they will always try to flatter their leader.

http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? A. Machiavelli equates clemency with being loved and cruelty with being despised, and suggests that being despised is acceptable. B. Machiavelli suggests that cruelty doesn’t always result in being despised and winning the love of your subjects is the most important thing. C. Machiavelli says that cruelty, when applied in a prudent manner, will be held in more esteem than too much mercy. D. Cruelty and clemency are identical; being merciful to one person means that you must be cruel to another. E. Clemency is equated with happiness, and a happy set of subjects is the ultimate goal of a successful leader. What is the difference between hatred and fear? A. Fear makes people respect you. Hatred makes them work against you. B. Fear and hatred follow one another. If you create fear you will eventually create hatred. All leaders should avoid this. C. Hatred from external powers breeds nationalism within your country, causing people to fear external powers. D. Fear and hatred are opposites. E. Hatred follows love; fear follows clemency. http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince23.htm According to Machiavelli, what is a flatterer? A. Someone who wants to lavish gifts upon you in exchange for power. B. An external power that wants to ally with you. C. Someone who will tell you what you think rather than giving their own opinion. D. Someone who tests your opinions against their own to make a good argument. E. An external power that wants to make strong trade alliances to weaken you over time. According to Machiavelli, what is the best way to seek truth from advisers? A. Advisors should present any complaints to you as a group. B. Advisors should be called upon when the leader has a question, otherwise they are to remain silent. C. An advisor should involve the public, allowing them to call the leader to court to listen to their opinions. D. The leader should listen carefully to one private advisor with whom he always disagrees. E. Machiavelli thinks that advisors are not helpful because they will always try to flatter their leader.

http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince17.htm   How does Machiavelli feel about cruelty versus clemency? … Read More...
Physics 220 – HW #1 (Homework) halsalem::app-6@purdue Summer-2013-PHYS-22000-01-XLST, Summer 1 2013 Instructor: Shawn Slavin Current Score : 2 / 20 Due : Wednesday, May 22 2013 11:59 PM EDT 1. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.006. Kinetic energy KE has dimensions kg · m 2 /s 2 . It can be written in terms of the momentum p and mass m as (a) Determine the proper units for momentum using dimensional analysis. (b) Force has the SI units kg · m/s2. Given the units of force, write a simple equation relating a constant force F exerted on an object, an interval of time t during which the force is applied, and the resulting momentum of the object, p. (Do this on paper. Your instructor may ask you to turn in this work.) Show My Work (Optional) 2. 2/2 points | Previous Answers SerCP9 1.P.502.XP. You can obtain a rough estimate of the size of a molecule by the following simple experiment. Let a droplet of oil spread out on a smooth surface of water. The resulting oil slick will be approximately one molecule thick. Given an oil droplet of mass 8.0 10 -7 kg and density 914 kg/m 3 that spreads out into a circle of radius 41.8 cm on the water surface, what is the order of magnitude of the diameter of an oil molecule? Show My Work (Optional) 3. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.016. A small turtle moves at a speed of 163 furlongs per fortnight. Find the speed of the turtle in centimeters per second. Note that 1 furlong = 220 yards and 1 fortnight = 14 days. cm/s Show My Work (Optional) 4. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.035.MI.FB. A point is located in a polar coordinate system by the coordinates r = 4.6 m and θ = 24°. Find the x- and y-coordinates of this point, assuming that the two coordinate systems have the same origin. x = m y = m Show My Work (Optional) WebAssign KE = P . 2 2m kg · m/s2 kg · m/s kg · m2/s kg2 · m/s 10−5 10−7 10−9 10−11 10−14 Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 1 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 5. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.045. In the figure below, find each of the following. (a) the side opposite θ (b) the side adjacent to (c) cos θ (d) sin (e) tan Show My Work (Optional) 6. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.028.WI. In 1865, Jules Verne proposed sending men to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with final speed of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during their launch? (A human can stand an acceleration of 15g for a short time.) m/s2 Compare your answer with the free-fall acceleration, 9.80 m/s 2 (i.e. how many times stronger than gravity is this force?). g Show My Work (Optional) 7. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.045. A ball is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 10.0 m/s. (a) How high does it rise? m (b) How long does it take to reach its highest point? s (c) How long does the ball take to hit the ground after it reaches its highest point? s (d) What is its velocity when it returns to the level from which it started? m/s Show My Work (Optional) Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 2 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 8. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.001. Vector has a magnitude of 28 units and points in the positive y-direction. When vector is added to the resultant vector points in the negative y-direction with a magnitude of 13 units. Find the magnitude and direction of magnitude unit(s) direction Show My Work (Optional) 9. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.010. A person walks 24.0° north of east for 2.30 km. How far due north and how far due east would she have to walk to arrive at the same location? north km east km Show My Work (Optional) 10.–/2 points SerCP9 3.P.025.WI. The best leaper in the animal kingdom is the puma, which can jump to a height of 3.7 m when leaving the ground at an angle of 45°. With what speed must the animal leave the ground to reach that height? m/s Show My Work (Optional) A B A, A + B B? Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 3 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35

Physics 220 – HW #1 (Homework) halsalem::app-6@purdue Summer-2013-PHYS-22000-01-XLST, Summer 1 2013 Instructor: Shawn Slavin Current Score : 2 / 20 Due : Wednesday, May 22 2013 11:59 PM EDT 1. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.006. Kinetic energy KE has dimensions kg · m 2 /s 2 . It can be written in terms of the momentum p and mass m as (a) Determine the proper units for momentum using dimensional analysis. (b) Force has the SI units kg · m/s2. Given the units of force, write a simple equation relating a constant force F exerted on an object, an interval of time t during which the force is applied, and the resulting momentum of the object, p. (Do this on paper. Your instructor may ask you to turn in this work.) Show My Work (Optional) 2. 2/2 points | Previous Answers SerCP9 1.P.502.XP. You can obtain a rough estimate of the size of a molecule by the following simple experiment. Let a droplet of oil spread out on a smooth surface of water. The resulting oil slick will be approximately one molecule thick. Given an oil droplet of mass 8.0 10 -7 kg and density 914 kg/m 3 that spreads out into a circle of radius 41.8 cm on the water surface, what is the order of magnitude of the diameter of an oil molecule? Show My Work (Optional) 3. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.016. A small turtle moves at a speed of 163 furlongs per fortnight. Find the speed of the turtle in centimeters per second. Note that 1 furlong = 220 yards and 1 fortnight = 14 days. cm/s Show My Work (Optional) 4. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.035.MI.FB. A point is located in a polar coordinate system by the coordinates r = 4.6 m and θ = 24°. Find the x- and y-coordinates of this point, assuming that the two coordinate systems have the same origin. x = m y = m Show My Work (Optional) WebAssign KE = P . 2 2m kg · m/s2 kg · m/s kg · m2/s kg2 · m/s 10−5 10−7 10−9 10−11 10−14 Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 1 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 5. –/2 points SerCP9 1.P.045. In the figure below, find each of the following. (a) the side opposite θ (b) the side adjacent to (c) cos θ (d) sin (e) tan Show My Work (Optional) 6. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.028.WI. In 1865, Jules Verne proposed sending men to the Moon by firing a space capsule from a 220-m-long cannon with final speed of 10.97 km/s. What would have been the unrealistically large acceleration experienced by the space travelers during their launch? (A human can stand an acceleration of 15g for a short time.) m/s2 Compare your answer with the free-fall acceleration, 9.80 m/s 2 (i.e. how many times stronger than gravity is this force?). g Show My Work (Optional) 7. –/2 points SerCP9 2.P.045. A ball is thrown vertically upward with a speed of 10.0 m/s. (a) How high does it rise? m (b) How long does it take to reach its highest point? s (c) How long does the ball take to hit the ground after it reaches its highest point? s (d) What is its velocity when it returns to the level from which it started? m/s Show My Work (Optional) Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 2 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35 8. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.001. Vector has a magnitude of 28 units and points in the positive y-direction. When vector is added to the resultant vector points in the negative y-direction with a magnitude of 13 units. Find the magnitude and direction of magnitude unit(s) direction Show My Work (Optional) 9. –/2 points SerCP9 3.P.010. A person walks 24.0° north of east for 2.30 km. How far due north and how far due east would she have to walk to arrive at the same location? north km east km Show My Work (Optional) 10.–/2 points SerCP9 3.P.025.WI. The best leaper in the animal kingdom is the puma, which can jump to a height of 3.7 m when leaving the ground at an angle of 45°. With what speed must the animal leave the ground to reach that height? m/s Show My Work (Optional) A B A, A + B B? Physics 220 – HW #1 http://www.webassign.net/web/Student/Assignment-Responses/last?d… 3 of 3 19-05-2013 13:35

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The second task : Tutorial Topic 7 – MIS (to be completed over 2 weeks) Describe a decision support system whose purpose is to help you decide which accommodation would be best for you whilst at college next year. Hints: You will need to decide on the factors that will influence your decision, and decide on any weightings that may apply to these factors. You will also need to supply a formula to derive ‘the best solution’, making sure it can support ‘what if’ features. Factors you might consider – affordable rent values, flat or house, sharing (how many others), location, personal circumstances etc.

The second task : Tutorial Topic 7 – MIS (to be completed over 2 weeks) Describe a decision support system whose purpose is to help you decide which accommodation would be best for you whilst at college next year. Hints: You will need to decide on the factors that will influence your decision, and decide on any weightings that may apply to these factors. You will also need to supply a formula to derive ‘the best solution’, making sure it can support ‘what if’ features. Factors you might consider – affordable rent values, flat or house, sharing (how many others), location, personal circumstances etc.

As any DSS system, my DSS system will have the … Read More...
1 | P a g e Lecture #2: Abortion (Warren) While studying this topic, we will ask whether it is morally permissible to intentionally terminate a pregnancy and, if so, whether certain restrictions should be placed upon such practices. Even though we will most often be speaking of terminating a fetus, biologists make further classifications: the zygote is the single cell resulting from the fusion of the egg and the sperm; the morula is the cluster of cells that travels through the fallopian tubes; the blastocyte exists once an outer shell of cells has formed around an inner group of cells; the embryo exists once the cells begin to take on specific functions (around the 15th day); the fetus comes into existence in the 8th week when the embryo gains a basic structural resemblance to the adult. Given these distinctions, there are certain kinds of non-fetal abortion—such as usage of RU-486 (the morning-after “abortion pill”)—though most of the writers we will study refer to fetal abortions. So now let us consider the “Classical Argument against Abortion”, which has been very influential: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is an innocent person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. (Note that this argument has received various formulations, including those from Warren and Thomson which differ from the above. For this course, we will refer to the above formulation as the “Classical Argument”.) Before evaluating this argument, we should talk about terminology: A person is a member of the moral community; i.e., someone who has rights and/or duties. ‘Persons’ is the plural of ‘person’. ‘Person’ can be contrasted with ‘human being’; a human being is anyone who is genetically human (i.e., a member of Homo sapiens). ‘People’ (or ‘human beings’) is the plural of ‘human being’. Why does this matter? First, not all persons are human beings. For example, consider an alien from another planet who mentally resembled us. If he were to visit Earth, it would be morally reprehensible to kick him or to set him on fire because of the pain and suffering that these acts would cause. And, similarly, the alien would be morally condemnable if he were to propagate such acts on us; he has a moral duty not to act in those ways (again, assuming a certain mental resemblance to us). So, even though this alien is not a human being, he is nevertheless a person with the associative rights and/or duties. 2 | P a g e And, more controversially, maybe not all human beings are persons. For example, anencephalic infants—i.e., ones born without cerebral cortexes and therefore with severely limited cognitive abilities—certainly do not have duties since they are not capable of rational thought and autonomous action. Some philosophers have even argued that they do not have rights. Now let us return to the Classical Argument. It is valid insofar as, if the premises are true, then the conclusion has to be true. But maybe it commits equivocation, which is to say that it uses the same word in multiple senses; equivocation is an informal fallacy (i.e., attaches to arguments that are formally valid but otherwise fallacious). Consider the following: P1) I put my money in the bank. P2) The bank borders the river. C) I put my money somewhere that borders the river. This argument equivocates since ‘bank’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used to represent a financial institution and, in P2, it is used to represent a geological feature. Returning to the classical argument, it could be argued that ‘person’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used in its appropriate moral sense and, in P2, it is inappropriately used instead of ‘human being’. The critic might suggest that a more accurate way to represent the argument would be as follows: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a human being. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. This argument is obviously invalid. So one way to criticize the Classical Argument is to say that it conflates two different concepts—viz., ‘person’ and ‘human being’—and therefore commits equivocation. However, the more straightforward way to attack the Classical Argument is just to deny its second premise and thus contend that the argument is unsound. This is the approach that Mary Anne Warren takes in “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”. Why does Warren think that the second premise is false? Remember that we defined a person as “a member of the moral community.” And we said that an alien, for example, could be afforded moral status even though it is not a human being. Why do we think that this alien should not be tortured or set on fire? Warren thinks that, intuitively, we think that membership in the moral community is based upon possession of the following traits: 3 | P a g e 1. Consciousness of objects and events external and/or internal to the being and especially the capacity to feel pain; 2. Reasoning or rationality (i.e., the developed capacity to solve new and relatively complex problems); 3. Self-motivated activity (i.e., activity which is relatively independent of either genetic or direct external control); 4. Capacity to communicate (not necessarily verbal or linguistic); and 5. Possession of self-concepts and self-awareness. Warren then admits that, though all of the items on this list look promising, we need not require that a person have all of the items on this list. (4) is perhaps the most expendable: imagine someone who is fully paralyzed as well as deaf, these incapacities, which preclude communication, are not sufficient to justify torture. Similarly, we might be able to imagine certain psychological afflictions that negate (5) without compromising personhood. Warren suspects that (1) and (2) are might be sufficient to confer personhood, and thinks that (1)-(3) “quite probably” are sufficient. Note that, if she is right, we would not be able to torture chimps, let us say, but we could set plants on fire (and most likely ants as well). However, given Warren’s aims, she does not need to specify which of these traits are necessary or sufficient for personhood; all that she wants to observe is that the fetus has none of them! Therefore, regardless of which traits we want to require, Warren thinks that the fetus is not a person. Therefore she thinks that the Classical Argument is unsound and should be rejected. Even if we accept Warren’s refutation of the second premise, we might be inclined to say that, while the fetus is not (now) a person, it is a potential person: the fetus will hopefully mature into a being that possesses all five of the traits on Warren’s list. We might then propose the following adjustment to the Classical Argument: P1) It is wrong to kill all innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. However, this argument is invalid. Warren grants that potentiality might serve as a prima facie reason (i.e., a reason that has some moral weight but which might be outweighed by other considerations) not to abort a fetus, but potentiality alone is insufficient to grant the fetus a moral right against being terminated. By analogy, consider the following argument: 4 | P a g e P1) The President has the right to declare war. P2) Mary is a potential President. C) Mary has the right to declare war. This argument is invalid since the premises are both true and the conclusion is false. By parity, the following argument is also invalid: P1) A person has a right to life. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) A fetus has a right to life. Thus Warren thinks that considerations of potentiality are insufficient to undermine her argument that fetuses—which are potential persons but, she thinks, not persons—do not have a right to life.

1 | P a g e Lecture #2: Abortion (Warren) While studying this topic, we will ask whether it is morally permissible to intentionally terminate a pregnancy and, if so, whether certain restrictions should be placed upon such practices. Even though we will most often be speaking of terminating a fetus, biologists make further classifications: the zygote is the single cell resulting from the fusion of the egg and the sperm; the morula is the cluster of cells that travels through the fallopian tubes; the blastocyte exists once an outer shell of cells has formed around an inner group of cells; the embryo exists once the cells begin to take on specific functions (around the 15th day); the fetus comes into existence in the 8th week when the embryo gains a basic structural resemblance to the adult. Given these distinctions, there are certain kinds of non-fetal abortion—such as usage of RU-486 (the morning-after “abortion pill”)—though most of the writers we will study refer to fetal abortions. So now let us consider the “Classical Argument against Abortion”, which has been very influential: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is an innocent person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. (Note that this argument has received various formulations, including those from Warren and Thomson which differ from the above. For this course, we will refer to the above formulation as the “Classical Argument”.) Before evaluating this argument, we should talk about terminology: A person is a member of the moral community; i.e., someone who has rights and/or duties. ‘Persons’ is the plural of ‘person’. ‘Person’ can be contrasted with ‘human being’; a human being is anyone who is genetically human (i.e., a member of Homo sapiens). ‘People’ (or ‘human beings’) is the plural of ‘human being’. Why does this matter? First, not all persons are human beings. For example, consider an alien from another planet who mentally resembled us. If he were to visit Earth, it would be morally reprehensible to kick him or to set him on fire because of the pain and suffering that these acts would cause. And, similarly, the alien would be morally condemnable if he were to propagate such acts on us; he has a moral duty not to act in those ways (again, assuming a certain mental resemblance to us). So, even though this alien is not a human being, he is nevertheless a person with the associative rights and/or duties. 2 | P a g e And, more controversially, maybe not all human beings are persons. For example, anencephalic infants—i.e., ones born without cerebral cortexes and therefore with severely limited cognitive abilities—certainly do not have duties since they are not capable of rational thought and autonomous action. Some philosophers have even argued that they do not have rights. Now let us return to the Classical Argument. It is valid insofar as, if the premises are true, then the conclusion has to be true. But maybe it commits equivocation, which is to say that it uses the same word in multiple senses; equivocation is an informal fallacy (i.e., attaches to arguments that are formally valid but otherwise fallacious). Consider the following: P1) I put my money in the bank. P2) The bank borders the river. C) I put my money somewhere that borders the river. This argument equivocates since ‘bank’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used to represent a financial institution and, in P2, it is used to represent a geological feature. Returning to the classical argument, it could be argued that ‘person’ is being used in two different senses: in P1 it is used in its appropriate moral sense and, in P2, it is inappropriately used instead of ‘human being’. The critic might suggest that a more accurate way to represent the argument would be as follows: P1) It is wrong to kill innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a human being. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. This argument is obviously invalid. So one way to criticize the Classical Argument is to say that it conflates two different concepts—viz., ‘person’ and ‘human being’—and therefore commits equivocation. However, the more straightforward way to attack the Classical Argument is just to deny its second premise and thus contend that the argument is unsound. This is the approach that Mary Anne Warren takes in “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”. Why does Warren think that the second premise is false? Remember that we defined a person as “a member of the moral community.” And we said that an alien, for example, could be afforded moral status even though it is not a human being. Why do we think that this alien should not be tortured or set on fire? Warren thinks that, intuitively, we think that membership in the moral community is based upon possession of the following traits: 3 | P a g e 1. Consciousness of objects and events external and/or internal to the being and especially the capacity to feel pain; 2. Reasoning or rationality (i.e., the developed capacity to solve new and relatively complex problems); 3. Self-motivated activity (i.e., activity which is relatively independent of either genetic or direct external control); 4. Capacity to communicate (not necessarily verbal or linguistic); and 5. Possession of self-concepts and self-awareness. Warren then admits that, though all of the items on this list look promising, we need not require that a person have all of the items on this list. (4) is perhaps the most expendable: imagine someone who is fully paralyzed as well as deaf, these incapacities, which preclude communication, are not sufficient to justify torture. Similarly, we might be able to imagine certain psychological afflictions that negate (5) without compromising personhood. Warren suspects that (1) and (2) are might be sufficient to confer personhood, and thinks that (1)-(3) “quite probably” are sufficient. Note that, if she is right, we would not be able to torture chimps, let us say, but we could set plants on fire (and most likely ants as well). However, given Warren’s aims, she does not need to specify which of these traits are necessary or sufficient for personhood; all that she wants to observe is that the fetus has none of them! Therefore, regardless of which traits we want to require, Warren thinks that the fetus is not a person. Therefore she thinks that the Classical Argument is unsound and should be rejected. Even if we accept Warren’s refutation of the second premise, we might be inclined to say that, while the fetus is not (now) a person, it is a potential person: the fetus will hopefully mature into a being that possesses all five of the traits on Warren’s list. We might then propose the following adjustment to the Classical Argument: P1) It is wrong to kill all innocent persons. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) It is wrong to kill a fetus. However, this argument is invalid. Warren grants that potentiality might serve as a prima facie reason (i.e., a reason that has some moral weight but which might be outweighed by other considerations) not to abort a fetus, but potentiality alone is insufficient to grant the fetus a moral right against being terminated. By analogy, consider the following argument: 4 | P a g e P1) The President has the right to declare war. P2) Mary is a potential President. C) Mary has the right to declare war. This argument is invalid since the premises are both true and the conclusion is false. By parity, the following argument is also invalid: P1) A person has a right to life. P2) A fetus is a potential person. C) A fetus has a right to life. Thus Warren thinks that considerations of potentiality are insufficient to undermine her argument that fetuses—which are potential persons but, she thinks, not persons—do not have a right to life.

500 words essay responding to a poem needed in 12 hours from now. it is one page poem that I will provide you with. The essay details are below: Essay #1- Poetry Length: 500 words (~2 pages) MLA Format Write a formal academic essay responding to a poem we have discussed in class. Pick ONE poem on the reading schedule and discuss how the poem’s literary devices and formal elements contribute to its larger thematic concerns. Two pages is not a lot of space, so focus on the most important elements, rather than trying to include everything. Some things to think about: Figurative language: Note the images the poem describes. Does the poem seem to be literally describing things, or does the poet employ figurative language? Are there any metaphors or conceits? How does the poet move from one image to the next? Does there seem to be any theme tying the images together? Form: Look at the way the poem appears on the page. Do you notice any patterns? Is the poem written in stanzas? Does the poem employ a specific meter (iambic pentameter)? Is the poem a fixed form (sonnet)? Does the poet employ punctuation? Does the poem appear neat or chaotic? How do any of these elements relate to what the poem describes? Sound: Read the poem out loud. Do the sounds roll off your tongue, or does it feel like a tongue-twister? Is the language clunky or smooth? Does the poem use alliteration, assonance, or repetition? If the poem rhymes, are they perfect rhymes or near rhymes? Do the rhymes appear at the end of the line or in the middle? Does the way the poem sounds bring out the feeling of what it is describing? Speaker: Who is the speaker (age/gender/role)? Who are they speaking to? Is it first person, third-person, written in a persona? Is the tone formal or conversational? Is the diction simple, or does the speaker use words you have to look up in a dictionary? What might this tell us? Theme: Are there any specific ideas the poem seems to be addressing? How do the poem’s formal concerns (how it appears on the page) emphasize, challenge, or undercut these ideas? Some themes we might focus on include: identity, place, defamiliarization, freedom and constraint, violence and language, racial injustice. (You may focus on one of these or come up with your own.) Make sure this is a formal academic essay. Format your page to include page numbers, double-spacing, and 1” margins. Use Times New Roman font. Include a Works Cited page. Using any source that is not the primary text will result in a 25% penalty.

500 words essay responding to a poem needed in 12 hours from now. it is one page poem that I will provide you with. The essay details are below: Essay #1- Poetry Length: 500 words (~2 pages) MLA Format Write a formal academic essay responding to a poem we have discussed in class. Pick ONE poem on the reading schedule and discuss how the poem’s literary devices and formal elements contribute to its larger thematic concerns. Two pages is not a lot of space, so focus on the most important elements, rather than trying to include everything. Some things to think about: Figurative language: Note the images the poem describes. Does the poem seem to be literally describing things, or does the poet employ figurative language? Are there any metaphors or conceits? How does the poet move from one image to the next? Does there seem to be any theme tying the images together? Form: Look at the way the poem appears on the page. Do you notice any patterns? Is the poem written in stanzas? Does the poem employ a specific meter (iambic pentameter)? Is the poem a fixed form (sonnet)? Does the poet employ punctuation? Does the poem appear neat or chaotic? How do any of these elements relate to what the poem describes? Sound: Read the poem out loud. Do the sounds roll off your tongue, or does it feel like a tongue-twister? Is the language clunky or smooth? Does the poem use alliteration, assonance, or repetition? If the poem rhymes, are they perfect rhymes or near rhymes? Do the rhymes appear at the end of the line or in the middle? Does the way the poem sounds bring out the feeling of what it is describing? Speaker: Who is the speaker (age/gender/role)? Who are they speaking to? Is it first person, third-person, written in a persona? Is the tone formal or conversational? Is the diction simple, or does the speaker use words you have to look up in a dictionary? What might this tell us? Theme: Are there any specific ideas the poem seems to be addressing? How do the poem’s formal concerns (how it appears on the page) emphasize, challenge, or undercut these ideas? Some themes we might focus on include: identity, place, defamiliarization, freedom and constraint, violence and language, racial injustice. (You may focus on one of these or come up with your own.) Make sure this is a formal academic essay. Format your page to include page numbers, double-spacing, and 1” margins. Use Times New Roman font. Include a Works Cited page. Using any source that is not the primary text will result in a 25% penalty.