Questions: 1. Using our text or other reference, in Figure A: a. What is the melting points (in °C) for copper? 1085°C b. What is the melting points (in °C) for nickel? 1455°C c. At any temperature in the “L+SS” region, which phase (L or SS) has the highest composition of copper? The L-phase 2. The Aluminum-Silicon (Al-Si) phase diagram (Figure 9.13 in the text) is a fair approximation of the Eutectic Phase diagram shown in Figure B. a. What is the eutectic temperature for the Al-Si system? 577°C b. What is the eutectic composition for the Al-Si system? 12.6 wt % c. In general, below the eutectic temperature, what two solid phases exist? Pure silicon (β phase) and >95% pure aluminum (α phase). 3. Figure C shows a general Stress-Strain curve for a yielding material. a. What is slope 1? The elastic (or Young’s) modulus b. What is point 2? The yield strength c. What is point 3? The tensile strength d. What is point 4 compared to the strain value at failure? See notes on Figure C on following page. e. What is the physical significance of area 5? The area 5 is the “toughness”, the energy required for fracture

Questions: 1. Using our text or other reference, in Figure A: a. What is the melting points (in °C) for copper? 1085°C b. What is the melting points (in °C) for nickel? 1455°C c. At any temperature in the “L+SS” region, which phase (L or SS) has the highest composition of copper? The L-phase 2. The Aluminum-Silicon (Al-Si) phase diagram (Figure 9.13 in the text) is a fair approximation of the Eutectic Phase diagram shown in Figure B. a. What is the eutectic temperature for the Al-Si system? 577°C b. What is the eutectic composition for the Al-Si system? 12.6 wt % c. In general, below the eutectic temperature, what two solid phases exist? Pure silicon (β phase) and >95% pure aluminum (α phase). 3. Figure C shows a general Stress-Strain curve for a yielding material. a. What is slope 1? The elastic (or Young’s) modulus b. What is point 2? The yield strength c. What is point 3? The tensile strength d. What is point 4 compared to the strain value at failure? See notes on Figure C on following page. e. What is the physical significance of area 5? The area 5 is the “toughness”, the energy required for fracture

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Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

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Chapter 9 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Momentum and Internal Forces Learning Goal: To understand the concept of total momentum for a system of objects and the effect of the internal forces on the total momentum. We begin by introducing the following terms: System: Any collection of objects, either pointlike or extended. In many momentum-related problems, you have a certain freedom in choosing the objects to be considered as your system. Making a wise choice is often a crucial step in solving the problem. Internal force: Any force interaction between two objects belonging to the chosen system. Let us stress that both interacting objects must belong to the system. External force: Any force interaction between objects at least one of which does not belong to the chosen system; in other words, at least one of the objects is external to the system. Closed system: a system that is not subject to any external forces. Total momentum: The vector sum of the individual momenta of all objects constituting the system. In this problem, you will analyze a system composed of two blocks, 1 and 2, of respective masses and . To simplify the analysis, we will make several assumptions: The blocks can move in only one dimension, namely, 1. along the x axis. 2. The masses of the blocks remain constant. 3. The system is closed. At time , the x components of the velocity and the acceleration of block 1 are denoted by and . Similarly, the x components of the velocity and acceleration of block 2 are denoted by and . In this problem, you will show that the total momentum of the system is not changed by the presence of internal forces. m1 m2 t v1(t) a1 (t) v2 (t) a2 (t) Part A Find , the x component of the total momentum of the system at time . Express your answer in terms of , , , and . ANSWER: Part B Find the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum. Express your answer in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Why did we bother with all this math? The expression for the derivative of momentum that we just obtained will be useful in reaching our desired conclusion, if only for this very special case. Part C The quantity (mass times acceleration) is dimensionally equivalent to which of the following? ANSWER: p(t) t m1 m2 v1 (t) v2 (t) p(t) = dp(t)/dt a1 (t) a2 (t) m1 m2 dp(t)/dt = ma Part D Acceleration is due to which of the following physical quantities? ANSWER: Part E Since we have assumed that the system composed of blocks 1 and 2 is closed, what could be the reason for the acceleration of block 1? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: momentum energy force acceleration inertia velocity speed energy momentum force Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Let us denote the x component of the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the x component of the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . Which of the following pairs equalities is a direct consequence of Newton’s second law? ANSWER: Part H Let us recall that we have denoted the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . If we suppose that is greater than , which of the following statements about forces is true? You did not open hints for this part. the large mass of block 1 air resistance Earth’s gravitational attraction a force exerted by block 2 on block 1 a force exerted by block 1 on block 2 F12 F21 and and and and F12 = m2a2 F21 = m1a1 F12 = m1a1 F21 = m2a2 F12 = m1a2 F21 = m2a1 F12 = m2a1 F21 = m1a2 F12 F21 m1 m2 ANSWER: Part I Now recall the expression for the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum: . Considering the information that you now have, choose the best alternative for an equivalent expression to . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Impulse and Momentum Ranking Task Six automobiles are initially traveling at the indicated velocities. The automobiles have different masses and velocities. The drivers step on the brakes and all automobiles are brought to rest. Part A Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of their momentum before the brakes are applied, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. ANSWER: Both forces have equal magnitudes. |F12 | > |F21| |F21 | > |F12| dpx(t)/dt = Fx dpx(t)/dt 0 nonzero constant kt kt2 Part B Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of the impulse needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Rank the automobiles based on the magnitude of the force needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Game of Frictionless Catch Chuck and Jackie stand on separate carts, both of which can slide without friction. The combined mass of Chuck and his cart, , is identical to the combined mass of Jackie and her cart. Initially, Chuck and Jackie and their carts are at rest. Chuck then picks up a ball of mass and throws it to Jackie, who catches it. Assume that the ball travels in a straight line parallel to the ground (ignore the effect of gravity). After Chuck throws the ball, his speed relative to the ground is . The speed of the thrown ball relative to the ground is . Jackie catches the ball when it reaches her, and she and her cart begin to move. Jackie’s speed relative to the ground after she catches the ball is . When answering the questions in this problem, keep the following in mind: The original mass of Chuck and his cart does not include the 1. mass of the ball. 2. The speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity. An object’s speed will always be a nonnegative quantity. mcart mball vc vb vj mcart Part A Find the relative speed between Chuck and the ball after Chuck has thrown the ball. Express the speed in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of the ball (relative to the ground) while it is in the air? Express your answer in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is Chuck’s speed (relative to the ground) after he throws the ball? Express your answer in terms of , , and . u vc vb u = vb mball mcart u vb = vc mball mcart u You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vc = vj vb vj mball mcart vb vj = vj u vj mball mcart u Momentum in an Explosion A giant “egg” explodes as part of a fireworks display. The egg is at rest before the explosion, and after the explosion, it breaks into two pieces, with the masses indicated in the diagram, traveling in opposite directions. Part A What is the momentum of piece A before the explosion? Express your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vj = pA,i Part B During the explosion, is the force of piece A on piece B greater than, less than, or equal to the force of piece B on piece A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The momentum of piece B is measured to be 500 after the explosion. Find the momentum of piece A after the explosion. Enter your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pA,i = kg  m/s greater than less than equal to cannot be determined kg  m/s pA,f pA,f = kg  m/s ± PSS 9.1 Conservation of Momentum Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 9.1 for conservation of momentum problems. An 80- quarterback jumps straight up in the air right before throwing a 0.43- football horizontally at 15 . How fast will he be moving backward just after releasing the ball? PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 9.1 Conservation of momentum MODEL: Clearly define the system. If possible, choose a system that is isolated ( ) or within which the interactions are sufficiently short and intense that you can ignore external forces for the duration of the interaction (the impulse approximation). Momentum is conserved. If it is not possible to choose an isolated system, try to divide the problem into parts such that momentum is conserved during one segment of the motion. Other segments of the motion can be analyzed using Newton’s laws or, as you will learn later, conservation of energy. VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of momentum: . In component form, this is ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The interaction at study in this problem is the action of throwing the ball, performed by the quarterback while being off the ground. To apply conservation of momentum to this interaction, you will need to clearly define a system that is isolated or within which the impulse approximation can be applied. Part A Sort the following objects as part of the system or not. Drag the appropriate objects to their respective bins. ANSWER: kg kg m/s F = net 0 P = f P  i (pfx + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfx)2 pfx)3 pix)1 pix)2 pix)3 (pfy + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfy)2 pfy)3 piy)1 piy)2 piy)3 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Visualize Solve Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Assess Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conservation of Momentum in Inelastic Collisions Learning Goal: To understand the vector nature of momentum in the case in which two objects collide and stick together. In this problem we will consider a collision of two moving objects such that after the collision, the objects stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. You have probably learned that “momentum is conserved” in an inelastic collision. But how does this fact help you to solve collision problems? The following questions should help you to clarify the meaning and implications of the statement “momentum is conserved.” Part A What physical quantities are conserved in this collision? ANSWER: Part B Two cars of equal mass collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their speeds are and . What is the speed of the two-car system after the collision? the magnitude of the momentum only the net momentum (considered as a vector) only the momentum of each object considered individually v1 v2 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, what is the magnitude of their combined momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. v1 + v2 v1 − v2 v2 − v1 v1v2 −−−− ” v1+v2 2 v1 + 2 v2 2 −−−−−−−  p1 p2 Part D Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their momenta are and . After the collision, their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, the magnitude of their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. p1 + p2 p1 − p2 p2 − p1 p1p2 −−−− ” p1+p2 2 p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  p 1 p 2 p p = p1 + # p2 # p = p1 − # p2 # p = p2 − # p1 # p1 p2 p You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Colliding Cars In this problem we will consider the collision of two cars initially moving at right angles. We assume that after the collision the cars stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. Two cars of masses and collide at an intersection. Before the collision, car 1 was traveling eastward at a speed of , and car 2 was traveling northward at a speed of . After the collision, the two cars stick together and travel off in the direction shown. Part A p1 + p2 $ p $ p1p2 −−−− ” p1 +p2 $ p $ p1+p2 2 p1 + p2 $ p $ |p1 − p2 | p1 + p2 $ p $ p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  m1 m2 v1 v2 First, find the magnitude of , that is, the speed of the two-car unit after the collision. Express in terms of , , and the cars’ initial speeds and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the tangent of the angle . Express your answer in terms of the momenta of the two cars, and . ANSWER: Part C Suppose that after the collision, ; in other words, is . This means that before the collision: ANSWER: v v v m1 m2 v1 v2 v = p1 p2 tan( ) = tan = 1 45′ The magnitudes of the momenta of the cars were equal. The masses of the cars were equal. The velocities of the cars were equal. ± Catching a Ball on Ice Olaf is standing on a sheet of ice that covers the football stadium parking lot in Buffalo, New York; there is negligible friction between his feet and the ice. A friend throws Olaf a ball of mass 0.400 that is traveling horizontally at 11.2 . Olaf’s mass is 67.1 . Part A If Olaf catches the ball, with what speed do Olaf and the ball move afterward? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B kg m/s kg vf vf = m/s If the ball hits Olaf and bounces off his chest horizontally at 8.00 in the opposite direction, what is his speed after the collision? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 2.90 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 25.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 17.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. m/s vf vf = m/s m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. pi = kg  m/s vf vf = m/s

Chapter 9 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Momentum and Internal Forces Learning Goal: To understand the concept of total momentum for a system of objects and the effect of the internal forces on the total momentum. We begin by introducing the following terms: System: Any collection of objects, either pointlike or extended. In many momentum-related problems, you have a certain freedom in choosing the objects to be considered as your system. Making a wise choice is often a crucial step in solving the problem. Internal force: Any force interaction between two objects belonging to the chosen system. Let us stress that both interacting objects must belong to the system. External force: Any force interaction between objects at least one of which does not belong to the chosen system; in other words, at least one of the objects is external to the system. Closed system: a system that is not subject to any external forces. Total momentum: The vector sum of the individual momenta of all objects constituting the system. In this problem, you will analyze a system composed of two blocks, 1 and 2, of respective masses and . To simplify the analysis, we will make several assumptions: The blocks can move in only one dimension, namely, 1. along the x axis. 2. The masses of the blocks remain constant. 3. The system is closed. At time , the x components of the velocity and the acceleration of block 1 are denoted by and . Similarly, the x components of the velocity and acceleration of block 2 are denoted by and . In this problem, you will show that the total momentum of the system is not changed by the presence of internal forces. m1 m2 t v1(t) a1 (t) v2 (t) a2 (t) Part A Find , the x component of the total momentum of the system at time . Express your answer in terms of , , , and . ANSWER: Part B Find the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum. Express your answer in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Why did we bother with all this math? The expression for the derivative of momentum that we just obtained will be useful in reaching our desired conclusion, if only for this very special case. Part C The quantity (mass times acceleration) is dimensionally equivalent to which of the following? ANSWER: p(t) t m1 m2 v1 (t) v2 (t) p(t) = dp(t)/dt a1 (t) a2 (t) m1 m2 dp(t)/dt = ma Part D Acceleration is due to which of the following physical quantities? ANSWER: Part E Since we have assumed that the system composed of blocks 1 and 2 is closed, what could be the reason for the acceleration of block 1? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: momentum energy force acceleration inertia velocity speed energy momentum force Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Let us denote the x component of the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the x component of the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . Which of the following pairs equalities is a direct consequence of Newton’s second law? ANSWER: Part H Let us recall that we have denoted the force exerted by block 1 on block 2 by , and the force exerted by block 2 on block 1 by . If we suppose that is greater than , which of the following statements about forces is true? You did not open hints for this part. the large mass of block 1 air resistance Earth’s gravitational attraction a force exerted by block 2 on block 1 a force exerted by block 1 on block 2 F12 F21 and and and and F12 = m2a2 F21 = m1a1 F12 = m1a1 F21 = m2a2 F12 = m1a2 F21 = m2a1 F12 = m2a1 F21 = m1a2 F12 F21 m1 m2 ANSWER: Part I Now recall the expression for the time derivative of the x component of the system’s total momentum: . Considering the information that you now have, choose the best alternative for an equivalent expression to . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Impulse and Momentum Ranking Task Six automobiles are initially traveling at the indicated velocities. The automobiles have different masses and velocities. The drivers step on the brakes and all automobiles are brought to rest. Part A Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of their momentum before the brakes are applied, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. ANSWER: Both forces have equal magnitudes. |F12 | > |F21| |F21 | > |F12| dpx(t)/dt = Fx dpx(t)/dt 0 nonzero constant kt kt2 Part B Rank these automobiles based on the magnitude of the impulse needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Rank the automobiles based on the magnitude of the force needed to stop them, from largest to smallest. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. If the ranking cannot be determined, check the box below. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A Game of Frictionless Catch Chuck and Jackie stand on separate carts, both of which can slide without friction. The combined mass of Chuck and his cart, , is identical to the combined mass of Jackie and her cart. Initially, Chuck and Jackie and their carts are at rest. Chuck then picks up a ball of mass and throws it to Jackie, who catches it. Assume that the ball travels in a straight line parallel to the ground (ignore the effect of gravity). After Chuck throws the ball, his speed relative to the ground is . The speed of the thrown ball relative to the ground is . Jackie catches the ball when it reaches her, and she and her cart begin to move. Jackie’s speed relative to the ground after she catches the ball is . When answering the questions in this problem, keep the following in mind: The original mass of Chuck and his cart does not include the 1. mass of the ball. 2. The speed of an object is the magnitude of its velocity. An object’s speed will always be a nonnegative quantity. mcart mball vc vb vj mcart Part A Find the relative speed between Chuck and the ball after Chuck has thrown the ball. Express the speed in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of the ball (relative to the ground) while it is in the air? Express your answer in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C What is Chuck’s speed (relative to the ground) after he throws the ball? Express your answer in terms of , , and . u vc vb u = vb mball mcart u vb = vc mball mcart u You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Find Jackie’s speed (relative to the ground) after she catches the ball, in terms of . Express in terms of , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vc = vj vb vj mball mcart vb vj = vj u vj mball mcart u Momentum in an Explosion A giant “egg” explodes as part of a fireworks display. The egg is at rest before the explosion, and after the explosion, it breaks into two pieces, with the masses indicated in the diagram, traveling in opposite directions. Part A What is the momentum of piece A before the explosion? Express your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: vj = pA,i Part B During the explosion, is the force of piece A on piece B greater than, less than, or equal to the force of piece B on piece A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C The momentum of piece B is measured to be 500 after the explosion. Find the momentum of piece A after the explosion. Enter your answer numerically in kilogram meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: pA,i = kg  m/s greater than less than equal to cannot be determined kg  m/s pA,f pA,f = kg  m/s ± PSS 9.1 Conservation of Momentum Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 9.1 for conservation of momentum problems. An 80- quarterback jumps straight up in the air right before throwing a 0.43- football horizontally at 15 . How fast will he be moving backward just after releasing the ball? PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 9.1 Conservation of momentum MODEL: Clearly define the system. If possible, choose a system that is isolated ( ) or within which the interactions are sufficiently short and intense that you can ignore external forces for the duration of the interaction (the impulse approximation). Momentum is conserved. If it is not possible to choose an isolated system, try to divide the problem into parts such that momentum is conserved during one segment of the motion. Other segments of the motion can be analyzed using Newton’s laws or, as you will learn later, conservation of energy. VISUALIZE: Draw a before-and-after pictorial representation. Define symbols that will be used in the problem, list known values, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The mathematical representation is based on the law of conservation of momentum: . In component form, this is ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model The interaction at study in this problem is the action of throwing the ball, performed by the quarterback while being off the ground. To apply conservation of momentum to this interaction, you will need to clearly define a system that is isolated or within which the impulse approximation can be applied. Part A Sort the following objects as part of the system or not. Drag the appropriate objects to their respective bins. ANSWER: kg kg m/s F = net 0 P = f P  i (pfx + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfx)2 pfx)3 pix)1 pix)2 pix)3 (pfy + ( + ( += ( + ( + ( + )1 pfy)2 pfy)3 piy)1 piy)2 piy)3 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Visualize Solve Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Assess Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Conservation of Momentum in Inelastic Collisions Learning Goal: To understand the vector nature of momentum in the case in which two objects collide and stick together. In this problem we will consider a collision of two moving objects such that after the collision, the objects stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. You have probably learned that “momentum is conserved” in an inelastic collision. But how does this fact help you to solve collision problems? The following questions should help you to clarify the meaning and implications of the statement “momentum is conserved.” Part A What physical quantities are conserved in this collision? ANSWER: Part B Two cars of equal mass collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their speeds are and . What is the speed of the two-car system after the collision? the magnitude of the momentum only the net momentum (considered as a vector) only the momentum of each object considered individually v1 v2 You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, what is the magnitude of their combined momentum? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. v1 + v2 v1 − v2 v2 − v1 v1v2 −−−− ” v1+v2 2 v1 + 2 v2 2 −−−−−−−  p1 p2 Part D Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, their momenta are and . After the collision, their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part E Two cars collide inelastically and stick together after the collision. Before the collision, the magnitudes of their momenta are and . After the collision, the magnitude of their combined momentum is . Of what can one be certain? The answer depends on the directions in which the cars were moving before the collision. p1 + p2 p1 − p2 p2 − p1 p1p2 −−−− ” p1+p2 2 p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  p 1 p 2 p p = p1 + # p2 # p = p1 − # p2 # p = p2 − # p1 # p1 p2 p You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Colliding Cars In this problem we will consider the collision of two cars initially moving at right angles. We assume that after the collision the cars stick together and travel off as a single unit. The collision is therefore completely inelastic. Two cars of masses and collide at an intersection. Before the collision, car 1 was traveling eastward at a speed of , and car 2 was traveling northward at a speed of . After the collision, the two cars stick together and travel off in the direction shown. Part A p1 + p2 $ p $ p1p2 −−−− ” p1 +p2 $ p $ p1+p2 2 p1 + p2 $ p $ |p1 − p2 | p1 + p2 $ p $ p1 + 2 p2 2 −−−−−−−  m1 m2 v1 v2 First, find the magnitude of , that is, the speed of the two-car unit after the collision. Express in terms of , , and the cars’ initial speeds and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the tangent of the angle . Express your answer in terms of the momenta of the two cars, and . ANSWER: Part C Suppose that after the collision, ; in other words, is . This means that before the collision: ANSWER: v v v m1 m2 v1 v2 v = p1 p2 tan( ) = tan = 1 45′ The magnitudes of the momenta of the cars were equal. The masses of the cars were equal. The velocities of the cars were equal. ± Catching a Ball on Ice Olaf is standing on a sheet of ice that covers the football stadium parking lot in Buffalo, New York; there is negligible friction between his feet and the ice. A friend throws Olaf a ball of mass 0.400 that is traveling horizontally at 11.2 . Olaf’s mass is 67.1 . Part A If Olaf catches the ball, with what speed do Olaf and the ball move afterward? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B kg m/s kg vf vf = m/s If the ball hits Olaf and bounces off his chest horizontally at 8.00 in the opposite direction, what is his speed after the collision? Express your answer numerically in meters per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: A One-Dimensional Inelastic Collision Block 1, of mass = 2.90 , moves along a frictionless air track with speed = 25.0 . It collides with block 2, of mass = 17.0 , which was initially at rest. The blocks stick together after the collision. Part A Find the magnitude of the total initial momentum of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. m/s vf vf = m/s m1 kg v1 m/s m2 kg pi You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find , the magnitude of the final velocity of the two-block system. Express your answer numerically. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. pi = kg  m/s vf vf = m/s

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Q1) The 2010 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland caused enormous disruption to air travel across western and northern Europe and created an ash plume that rose to a height of approximately 9 kilometres . a) Use Stokes’ Law Derive an expression for the rate of descent (terminal velocity) of a spherical particle in a fluid medium *Explain your reasoning *Describe your assumptions b) Based on the expression you derived above, calculate how long the smallest of the dust cloud particles will take to settle to the ground from the maximum height of the plume *Use open source material and your text to find the requisite physical characteristics of the components *Include citations for your sources Q2) Calculate the drag coefficient of the 2001 Porsche 986 Boxster *Use performance information and frontal profile above *Assume that top speed is drag force limited

Q1) The 2010 eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland caused enormous disruption to air travel across western and northern Europe and created an ash plume that rose to a height of approximately 9 kilometres . a) Use Stokes’ Law Derive an expression for the rate of descent (terminal velocity) of a spherical particle in a fluid medium *Explain your reasoning *Describe your assumptions b) Based on the expression you derived above, calculate how long the smallest of the dust cloud particles will take to settle to the ground from the maximum height of the plume *Use open source material and your text to find the requisite physical characteristics of the components *Include citations for your sources Q2) Calculate the drag coefficient of the 2001 Porsche 986 Boxster *Use performance information and frontal profile above *Assume that top speed is drag force limited

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Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is correct about interpreting the results of statistical tests? Question 2 options: 1) Obtaining a probability value of .05 tells us the difference between groups is definitely not caused by chance fluctuation. 2) If a probability value falls above .05, then the results will have to be replicated before we can have confidence in them. 3) Obtaining a probability value of .05 gives us confidence that the findings are not the result of chance, but does not eliminate this possibility. 4) A .05 probability value means there is a 5 percent chance the finding reflects a real difference. Question 3 (1 point) Which of the following statements is true about theories of personality? Question 3 options: 1) They provide only a part of the picture of human personality. 2) They support the expert’s viewpoint. 3) Theories are predicted from one hypothesis or another. 4) They are directly tested using empirical methods. Question 4 (1 point) Which of the following statements is correct about hypothetical constructs? Question 4 options: 1) They are useful inventions by researchers that have no physical reality. 2) They are easier to measure than personality variables. 3) They cannot be measured with personality tests. 4) They have poor reliability and validity. Question 5 (1 point) According to the “law of parsimony,” Question 5 options: 1) a good theory generates a large number of hypotheses. 2) the best theory is the one that explains a phenomenon with the fewest constructs. 3) hypotheses are generated from theories. 4) theories should require as few studies as possible to support them. ________________________________________ Question 6 (1 point) Which of the following does a correlation coefficient not tell us? Question 6 options: 1) If the difference between two means reflects a real difference or can be attributed tochancefluctuation. 2) The strength of a relationship between two measures. 3) The direction of a relationship between two measures. 4) How well a score on one measure can be predicted by a score on another measure. Question 7 (1 point) A researcher finds that males make fewer errors than females when working in a competitive situation. However, women make fewer errors than men when working in acooperative situation. This is an example of Question 7 options: 1) a confound. 2) two manipulated independent variables. 3) an interaction. 4) a failure to replicate.

Question 2 (1 point) Which of the following is correct about interpreting the results of statistical tests? Question 2 options: 1) Obtaining a probability value of .05 tells us the difference between groups is definitely not caused by chance fluctuation. 2) If a probability value falls above .05, then the results will have to be replicated before we can have confidence in them. 3) Obtaining a probability value of .05 gives us confidence that the findings are not the result of chance, but does not eliminate this possibility. 4) A .05 probability value means there is a 5 percent chance the finding reflects a real difference. Question 3 (1 point) Which of the following statements is true about theories of personality? Question 3 options: 1) They provide only a part of the picture of human personality. 2) They support the expert’s viewpoint. 3) Theories are predicted from one hypothesis or another. 4) They are directly tested using empirical methods. Question 4 (1 point) Which of the following statements is correct about hypothetical constructs? Question 4 options: 1) They are useful inventions by researchers that have no physical reality. 2) They are easier to measure than personality variables. 3) They cannot be measured with personality tests. 4) They have poor reliability and validity. Question 5 (1 point) According to the “law of parsimony,” Question 5 options: 1) a good theory generates a large number of hypotheses. 2) the best theory is the one that explains a phenomenon with the fewest constructs. 3) hypotheses are generated from theories. 4) theories should require as few studies as possible to support them. ________________________________________ Question 6 (1 point) Which of the following does a correlation coefficient not tell us? Question 6 options: 1) If the difference between two means reflects a real difference or can be attributed tochancefluctuation. 2) The strength of a relationship between two measures. 3) The direction of a relationship between two measures. 4) How well a score on one measure can be predicted by a score on another measure. Question 7 (1 point) A researcher finds that males make fewer errors than females when working in a competitive situation. However, women make fewer errors than men when working in acooperative situation. This is an example of Question 7 options: 1) a confound. 2) two manipulated independent variables. 3) an interaction. 4) a failure to replicate.

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1. A biological psychologist would be most interested in conducting research on the relationship between A) neurotransmitters and depression. B) bone density and body size. C) self-esteem and popularity. D) genetics and eye color. 2. The function of dendrites is to A) receive incoming signals from other neurons. B) release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons. C) coordinate the activation of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. D) control pain through the release of opiate-like chemicals into the brain. 3. Sensory neurons are located in the A) thalamus. B) reticular formation. C) peripheral nervous system. D) sensory cortex. 4. The part of the brainstem that controls heartbeat and breathing is called the A) cerebellum. B) medulla. C) amygdala. D) thalamus. 5. After flying from California to New York, Arthur experienced a restless, sleepless night. His problem was most likely caused by a disruption of his normal A) change blindness. B) circadian rhythm. C) hypnagogic sensations. D) sleep paralysis. 6. Mr. Oates always sleeps restlessly, snorting and gasping throughout the night. It is most likely that Mr. Oates suffers from A) sleep apnea. B) narcolepsy. C) night terrors. D) insomnia. 7. A condition in which a person can respond to a visual stimulus without consciously experiencing it is known as A) narcolepsy. B) change blindness. C) REM rebound. D) blindsight. 8. Consciousness is to unconsciousness as ________ is to ________. A) tolerance; withdrawal B) sequential processing; parallel processing C) latent content; manifest content D) delta wave; alpha wave 9. Auditory stimulation is first processed in the ________ lobes. A) occipital B) temporal C) frontal D) parietal 10. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that A) causes sleepiness. B) lessens physical pain. C) reduces depressed moods. D) triggers muscle contractions. 11. Which of the following is not one of the phases of the general adaptation syndrome: A) attention B) alarm reaction C) resistance D) exhaustion 12. People with Type B personality A) Are at a greater risk for heart disease B) Tend to be more easy-going than those with Type A personality C) Are at a greater risk for depression D) Tend to be more motivated to do well than those with Type A personality 13. Which is an example of problem-focused coping A) Studying harder for an exam after you got a bad grade on the first one B) Trying not to think about how angry you are C) Distracting yourself by watching a funny movie D) Talking about how upset you are with your friend 14. People with an external locus of think that A) events are largely outside of their control B) too much personal freedom decreases life satisfaction. C) individuals can influence their own outcomes in life. D) self-control gets permanently weaker with age 15. Which of the following is a benefit of social support A) improved immune system functioning B) decreased blood pressure C) improved health D) all of the above

1. A biological psychologist would be most interested in conducting research on the relationship between A) neurotransmitters and depression. B) bone density and body size. C) self-esteem and popularity. D) genetics and eye color. 2. The function of dendrites is to A) receive incoming signals from other neurons. B) release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons. C) coordinate the activation of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. D) control pain through the release of opiate-like chemicals into the brain. 3. Sensory neurons are located in the A) thalamus. B) reticular formation. C) peripheral nervous system. D) sensory cortex. 4. The part of the brainstem that controls heartbeat and breathing is called the A) cerebellum. B) medulla. C) amygdala. D) thalamus. 5. After flying from California to New York, Arthur experienced a restless, sleepless night. His problem was most likely caused by a disruption of his normal A) change blindness. B) circadian rhythm. C) hypnagogic sensations. D) sleep paralysis. 6. Mr. Oates always sleeps restlessly, snorting and gasping throughout the night. It is most likely that Mr. Oates suffers from A) sleep apnea. B) narcolepsy. C) night terrors. D) insomnia. 7. A condition in which a person can respond to a visual stimulus without consciously experiencing it is known as A) narcolepsy. B) change blindness. C) REM rebound. D) blindsight. 8. Consciousness is to unconsciousness as ________ is to ________. A) tolerance; withdrawal B) sequential processing; parallel processing C) latent content; manifest content D) delta wave; alpha wave 9. Auditory stimulation is first processed in the ________ lobes. A) occipital B) temporal C) frontal D) parietal 10. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that A) causes sleepiness. B) lessens physical pain. C) reduces depressed moods. D) triggers muscle contractions. 11. Which of the following is not one of the phases of the general adaptation syndrome: A) attention B) alarm reaction C) resistance D) exhaustion 12. People with Type B personality A) Are at a greater risk for heart disease B) Tend to be more easy-going than those with Type A personality C) Are at a greater risk for depression D) Tend to be more motivated to do well than those with Type A personality 13. Which is an example of problem-focused coping A) Studying harder for an exam after you got a bad grade on the first one B) Trying not to think about how angry you are C) Distracting yourself by watching a funny movie D) Talking about how upset you are with your friend 14. People with an external locus of think that A) events are largely outside of their control B) too much personal freedom decreases life satisfaction. C) individuals can influence their own outcomes in life. D) self-control gets permanently weaker with age 15. Which of the following is a benefit of social support A) improved immune system functioning B) decreased blood pressure C) improved health D) all of the above

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