Attached Files: File Operational Definitions for 670.doc (25.5 KB) Amply armed with all the information you have learned throughout these last 7 weeks (paying special attention to Chapters 11-14), complete a “mini public relations proposal.” Following is a checklist of what is expected in this proposal: 1. Name of the organization and a brief explanation/description (Example: it is a boutique that specializes in selling high-end bridal gowns; it is a nonprofit organization that raises money for children whose parents are wounded veterans, etc.) PLEASE NOTE: No fictitious organizations, please! 2. ONE Overaching Goal (to persuade, inform, educate, etc.) 3. ONE suggestion for the research you plan to conduct. Explain the method (survey, phone interviews, etc.), who you are researching, and why you think this method is most conducive for this communication campaign. 4. ONE behavioral objective (see handouts a) RECALL PLOT: public, level of obtainment, timeframe) b). RECALL that the objective is what you want your target public to do 5. ONE action strategy (RECALL that the strategy is what you are planning to do meet your objective – your gameplan) 6. ONE message strategy (what your message will say) 7. TWO communication tactics 8. ONE technique for measuring whether the objective was met IMPORTANT NOTES: > USE the prsa operational definitions (SEE ATTACHED HANDOUT) > USE subheads for each part of the proposal OR you can just number the components (1-8) > The rubric for this last report is very simple: points will be deducted for each component you do not include or if it is written incorrectly or does not meet all the critiera mapped out in the attached handout.

Attached Files: File Operational Definitions for 670.doc (25.5 KB) Amply armed with all the information you have learned throughout these last 7 weeks (paying special attention to Chapters 11-14), complete a “mini public relations proposal.” Following is a checklist of what is expected in this proposal: 1. Name of the organization and a brief explanation/description (Example: it is a boutique that specializes in selling high-end bridal gowns; it is a nonprofit organization that raises money for children whose parents are wounded veterans, etc.) PLEASE NOTE: No fictitious organizations, please! 2. ONE Overaching Goal (to persuade, inform, educate, etc.) 3. ONE suggestion for the research you plan to conduct. Explain the method (survey, phone interviews, etc.), who you are researching, and why you think this method is most conducive for this communication campaign. 4. ONE behavioral objective (see handouts a) RECALL PLOT: public, level of obtainment, timeframe) b). RECALL that the objective is what you want your target public to do 5. ONE action strategy (RECALL that the strategy is what you are planning to do meet your objective – your gameplan) 6. ONE message strategy (what your message will say) 7. TWO communication tactics 8. ONE technique for measuring whether the objective was met IMPORTANT NOTES: > USE the prsa operational definitions (SEE ATTACHED HANDOUT) > USE subheads for each part of the proposal OR you can just number the components (1-8) > The rubric for this last report is very simple: points will be deducted for each component you do not include or if it is written incorrectly or does not meet all the critiera mapped out in the attached handout.

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1 Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3.1 Laboratory Objective The objective of this laboratory is to understand the basic properties of sinusoids and sinusoid measurements. 3.2 Educational Objectives After performing this experiment, students should be able to: 1. Understand the properties of sinusoids. 2. Understand sinusoidal manipulation 3. Use a function generator 4. Obtain measurements using an oscilloscope 3.3 Background Sinusoids are sine or cosine waveforms that can describe many engineering phenomena. Any oscillatory motion can be described using sinusoids. Many types of electrical signals such as square, triangle, and sawtooth waves are modeled using sinusoids. Their manipulation incurs the understanding of certain quantities that describe sinusoidal behavior. These quantities are described below. 3.3.1 Sinusoid Characteristics Amplitude The amplitude A of a sine wave describes the height of the hills and valleys of a sinusoid. It carries the physical units of what the sinusoid is describing (volts, amps, meters, etc.). Frequency There are two types of frequencies that can describe a sinusoid. The normal frequency f is how many times the sinusoid repeats per unit time. It has units of cycles per second (s-1) or Hertz (Hz). The angular frequency ω is how many radians pass per second. Consequently, ω has units of radians per second. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 2 Period The period T is how long a sinusoid takes to repeat one complete cycle. The period is measured in seconds. Phase The phase φ of a sinusoid causes a horizontal shift along the t-axis. The phase has units of radians. TimeShift The time shift ts of a sinusoid is a horizontal shift along the t-axis and is a time measurement of the phase. The time shift has units of seconds. NOTE: A sine wave and a cosine wave only differ by a phase shift of 90° or ?2 radians. In reality, they are the same waveform but with a different φ value. 3.3.2 Sinusoidal Relationships Figure 3.1: Sinusoid The general equation of a sinusoid is given below and refers to Figure 3.1. ?(?) = ????(?? +?) (3.1) The angular frequency is related to the normal frequency by Equation 3.2. ?= 2?? (3.2) The angular frequency is also related to the period by Equation 3.3. ?=2?? (3.3) By inspection, the normal frequency is related to the period by Equation 3.4. ? =1? (3.4) ?? Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3 The time shift is related to the phase (radians) and the frequency by Equation 3.5. ??= ∅2?? (3.5) 3.3.3 Equipment 3.3.3.1 Inductors Inductors are electrical components that resist a change in the flow of current passing through them. They are essentially coils of wire. Inductors are electromagnets too. They are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment (with or without exposed wire): Figure 3.2: Symbol and Physical Example for Inductors 3.3.3.2 Capacitors Capacitors are electrical components that store energy. This enables engineers to store electrical energy from an input source such as a battery. Some capacitors are polarized and therefore have a negative and positive plate. One plate is straight, representing the positive terminal on the device, and the other is curved, representing the negative one. Polarized capacitors are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment: Figure 3.3: Symbol and Physical Example for Capacitors 3.3.3.3 Function Generator A function generator is used to create different types of electrical waveforms over a wide range of frequencies. It generates standard sine, square, and triangle waveforms and uses the analog output channel. 3.3.3.5 Oscilloscope An oscilloscope is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying voltages, usually as a two-dimensional plot of one or more signals as a function of time. It displays voltage data over time for the analysis of one or two voltage measurements taken from the analog input channels of the Oscilloscope. The observed waveform can be analyzed for amplitude, frequency, time interval and more. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 4 3.4 Procedure Follow the steps outlined below after the instructor has explained how to use the laboratory equipment 3.4.1 Sinusoidal Measurements 1. Connect the output channel of the Function Generator to the channel one of the Oscilloscope. 2. Complete Table 3.1 using the given values for voltage and frequency. Table 3.1: Sinusoid Measurements Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Voltage Amplitude, A (V ) Frequency (Hz) 2*A (Vp−p ) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) T (sec) 2.5 1000 3 5000 3.4.2 Circuit Measurements 1. Connect the circuit in figure 3.4 below with the given resistor and capacitor NOTE: Vs from the circuit comes from the Function Generator using a BNC connector. Figure 3.4: RC Circuit Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 5 2. Using the alligator to BNC cables, connect channel one of the Oscilloscope across the capacitor and complete Table 3.2 Table 3.2: Capacitor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) Vc (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 3. Disconnect channel one and connect channel two of the oscilloscope across the resistor and complete table 3.3. Table 3.3: Resistor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) VR (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 4. Leaving channel two connected across the resistor, clip the positive lead to the positive side of the capacitor and complete table 3.4 Table 3.4: Phase Difference Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (volts) Frequency (Hz) Divisions Time/Div (sec) ts (sec) ɸ (rad) ɸ (degrees) 2.5 100 5. Using the data from Tables 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, plot the capacitor sinusoidal equation and the resistor sinusoidal equation on the same graph using MATLAB. HINT: Plot over one period. 6. Kirchoff’s Voltage Law states that ??(?)=??(?)+??(?). Calculate Vs by hand using the following equation and Tables 3.2 and 3.3 ??(?)=√??2+??2???(??−???−1(????)) Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 6 3.5 New MATLAB Commands hold on  This command allows multiple graphs to be placed on the same XY axis and is placed after the first plot statement. legend (’string 1’, ’string2’, ‘string3’)  This command adds a legend to the plot. Strings must be placed in the order as the plots were generated. plot (x, y, ‘line specifiers’)  This command plots the data and uses line specifiers to differentiate between different plots on the same XY axis. In this lab, only use different line styles from the table below. Table 3.5: Line specifiers for the plot() command sqrt(X)  This command produces the square root of the elements of X. NOTE: The “help” command in MATLAB can be used to find a description and example for functions such as input.  For example, type “help input” in the command window to learn more about the input function. NOTE: Refer to section the “MATLAB Commands” sections from prior labs for previously discussed material that you may also need in order to complete this assignment. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 7 3.6 Lab Report Requirements 1. Complete Tables 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 (5 points each) 2. Show hand calculations for all four tables. Insert after this page (5 points each) 3. Draw the two sinusoids by hand from table 3.1. Label amplitude, period, and phase. Insert after this page. (5 points) 4. Insert MATLAB plot of Vc and VR as obtained from data in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 after this page. (5 points each) 5. Show hand calculations for Vs(t). Insert after this page. (5 points) 6. Using the data from the Tables, write: (10 points) a) Vc(t) = b) VR(t) = 7. Also, ???(?)=2.5???(628?). Write your Vs below and give reasons why they are different. (10 points) a) Vs(t) = b) Reasons: 8. Write an executive summary for this lab describing what you have done, and learned. (20 points)

1 Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3.1 Laboratory Objective The objective of this laboratory is to understand the basic properties of sinusoids and sinusoid measurements. 3.2 Educational Objectives After performing this experiment, students should be able to: 1. Understand the properties of sinusoids. 2. Understand sinusoidal manipulation 3. Use a function generator 4. Obtain measurements using an oscilloscope 3.3 Background Sinusoids are sine or cosine waveforms that can describe many engineering phenomena. Any oscillatory motion can be described using sinusoids. Many types of electrical signals such as square, triangle, and sawtooth waves are modeled using sinusoids. Their manipulation incurs the understanding of certain quantities that describe sinusoidal behavior. These quantities are described below. 3.3.1 Sinusoid Characteristics Amplitude The amplitude A of a sine wave describes the height of the hills and valleys of a sinusoid. It carries the physical units of what the sinusoid is describing (volts, amps, meters, etc.). Frequency There are two types of frequencies that can describe a sinusoid. The normal frequency f is how many times the sinusoid repeats per unit time. It has units of cycles per second (s-1) or Hertz (Hz). The angular frequency ω is how many radians pass per second. Consequently, ω has units of radians per second. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 2 Period The period T is how long a sinusoid takes to repeat one complete cycle. The period is measured in seconds. Phase The phase φ of a sinusoid causes a horizontal shift along the t-axis. The phase has units of radians. TimeShift The time shift ts of a sinusoid is a horizontal shift along the t-axis and is a time measurement of the phase. The time shift has units of seconds. NOTE: A sine wave and a cosine wave only differ by a phase shift of 90° or ?2 radians. In reality, they are the same waveform but with a different φ value. 3.3.2 Sinusoidal Relationships Figure 3.1: Sinusoid The general equation of a sinusoid is given below and refers to Figure 3.1. ?(?) = ????(?? +?) (3.1) The angular frequency is related to the normal frequency by Equation 3.2. ?= 2?? (3.2) The angular frequency is also related to the period by Equation 3.3. ?=2?? (3.3) By inspection, the normal frequency is related to the period by Equation 3.4. ? =1? (3.4) ?? Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3 The time shift is related to the phase (radians) and the frequency by Equation 3.5. ??= ∅2?? (3.5) 3.3.3 Equipment 3.3.3.1 Inductors Inductors are electrical components that resist a change in the flow of current passing through them. They are essentially coils of wire. Inductors are electromagnets too. They are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment (with or without exposed wire): Figure 3.2: Symbol and Physical Example for Inductors 3.3.3.2 Capacitors Capacitors are electrical components that store energy. This enables engineers to store electrical energy from an input source such as a battery. Some capacitors are polarized and therefore have a negative and positive plate. One plate is straight, representing the positive terminal on the device, and the other is curved, representing the negative one. Polarized capacitors are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment: Figure 3.3: Symbol and Physical Example for Capacitors 3.3.3.3 Function Generator A function generator is used to create different types of electrical waveforms over a wide range of frequencies. It generates standard sine, square, and triangle waveforms and uses the analog output channel. 3.3.3.5 Oscilloscope An oscilloscope is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying voltages, usually as a two-dimensional plot of one or more signals as a function of time. It displays voltage data over time for the analysis of one or two voltage measurements taken from the analog input channels of the Oscilloscope. The observed waveform can be analyzed for amplitude, frequency, time interval and more. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 4 3.4 Procedure Follow the steps outlined below after the instructor has explained how to use the laboratory equipment 3.4.1 Sinusoidal Measurements 1. Connect the output channel of the Function Generator to the channel one of the Oscilloscope. 2. Complete Table 3.1 using the given values for voltage and frequency. Table 3.1: Sinusoid Measurements Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Voltage Amplitude, A (V ) Frequency (Hz) 2*A (Vp−p ) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) T (sec) 2.5 1000 3 5000 3.4.2 Circuit Measurements 1. Connect the circuit in figure 3.4 below with the given resistor and capacitor NOTE: Vs from the circuit comes from the Function Generator using a BNC connector. Figure 3.4: RC Circuit Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 5 2. Using the alligator to BNC cables, connect channel one of the Oscilloscope across the capacitor and complete Table 3.2 Table 3.2: Capacitor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) Vc (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 3. Disconnect channel one and connect channel two of the oscilloscope across the resistor and complete table 3.3. Table 3.3: Resistor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) VR (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 4. Leaving channel two connected across the resistor, clip the positive lead to the positive side of the capacitor and complete table 3.4 Table 3.4: Phase Difference Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (volts) Frequency (Hz) Divisions Time/Div (sec) ts (sec) ɸ (rad) ɸ (degrees) 2.5 100 5. Using the data from Tables 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, plot the capacitor sinusoidal equation and the resistor sinusoidal equation on the same graph using MATLAB. HINT: Plot over one period. 6. Kirchoff’s Voltage Law states that ??(?)=??(?)+??(?). Calculate Vs by hand using the following equation and Tables 3.2 and 3.3 ??(?)=√??2+??2???(??−???−1(????)) Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 6 3.5 New MATLAB Commands hold on  This command allows multiple graphs to be placed on the same XY axis and is placed after the first plot statement. legend (’string 1’, ’string2’, ‘string3’)  This command adds a legend to the plot. Strings must be placed in the order as the plots were generated. plot (x, y, ‘line specifiers’)  This command plots the data and uses line specifiers to differentiate between different plots on the same XY axis. In this lab, only use different line styles from the table below. Table 3.5: Line specifiers for the plot() command sqrt(X)  This command produces the square root of the elements of X. NOTE: The “help” command in MATLAB can be used to find a description and example for functions such as input.  For example, type “help input” in the command window to learn more about the input function. NOTE: Refer to section the “MATLAB Commands” sections from prior labs for previously discussed material that you may also need in order to complete this assignment. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 7 3.6 Lab Report Requirements 1. Complete Tables 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 (5 points each) 2. Show hand calculations for all four tables. Insert after this page (5 points each) 3. Draw the two sinusoids by hand from table 3.1. Label amplitude, period, and phase. Insert after this page. (5 points) 4. Insert MATLAB plot of Vc and VR as obtained from data in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 after this page. (5 points each) 5. Show hand calculations for Vs(t). Insert after this page. (5 points) 6. Using the data from the Tables, write: (10 points) a) Vc(t) = b) VR(t) = 7. Also, ???(?)=2.5???(628?). Write your Vs below and give reasons why they are different. (10 points) a) Vs(t) = b) Reasons: 8. Write an executive summary for this lab describing what you have done, and learned. (20 points)

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ENGR 1120 – PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS (MATLAB) Homework Program #2 Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of data files, vector variables, intrinsic functions, subscript manipulation, for loops, and plotting in MATLAB. You have been given a set of ASCII data files that contain directions for laying out patterns in a field. The data files contain in the first column a distance to travel and in the second column a direction heading. Unfortunately, the person who created the data did not have a good understanding of orienteering and the direction headings are given as referenced to a clock face. The pattern begins at the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system with the person facing 12 o’clock, see the figure below. The figure shows an example of the first step in the pattern being a distance of 1.5 feet in the direction of 7 o’clock. All direction headings are given in terms of this clock orientation. The distance values given are in feet. There are 5 data files provided online for testing of the program. Write a script file that will allow the user to input from the keyboard the filename of the file that they wish to analyze. Load only that ONE data file and plot the resulting pattern. Once each point forming the pattern has been located, find and designate on the plot which of the resulting nodes was the farthest away from the origin. Also find and designate the center of the pattern as defined to occur at the coordinate location corresponding to (average x, average y). When plotting the resulting pattern on the Cartesian coordinate system, set the axes limits to appropriate values. HINT: Correlate the direction headings provided in the data files to a Cartesian coordinate system by using the following vector in your script file. This requires subscript manipulation. angle = [60; 30; 0; 330; 300; 270; 240; 210; 180; 150; 120; 90] -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 you are here

ENGR 1120 – PROGRAMMING FOR ENGINEERS (MATLAB) Homework Program #2 Objectives: Demonstrate knowledge of data files, vector variables, intrinsic functions, subscript manipulation, for loops, and plotting in MATLAB. You have been given a set of ASCII data files that contain directions for laying out patterns in a field. The data files contain in the first column a distance to travel and in the second column a direction heading. Unfortunately, the person who created the data did not have a good understanding of orienteering and the direction headings are given as referenced to a clock face. The pattern begins at the origin of a Cartesian coordinate system with the person facing 12 o’clock, see the figure below. The figure shows an example of the first step in the pattern being a distance of 1.5 feet in the direction of 7 o’clock. All direction headings are given in terms of this clock orientation. The distance values given are in feet. There are 5 data files provided online for testing of the program. Write a script file that will allow the user to input from the keyboard the filename of the file that they wish to analyze. Load only that ONE data file and plot the resulting pattern. Once each point forming the pattern has been located, find and designate on the plot which of the resulting nodes was the farthest away from the origin. Also find and designate the center of the pattern as defined to occur at the coordinate location corresponding to (average x, average y). When plotting the resulting pattern on the Cartesian coordinate system, set the axes limits to appropriate values. HINT: Correlate the direction headings provided in the data files to a Cartesian coordinate system by using the following vector in your script file. This requires subscript manipulation. angle = [60; 30; 0; 330; 300; 270; 240; 210; 180; 150; 120; 90] -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 -2 -1.5 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 you are here

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MAE 384: Advanced Mathematical Methods for Engineers Spring 2015 Homework #8 Due: Wednesday, April 8, in or before class. Note: Problems 2 (extra credit) and 3 have to be solved by hand. Problems 1 and 5 require MATLAB. The item 1(a) must be shown by hand. Problem 4 can be done either in Matlab or by hand. 1. Consider the following ODE: d y d x = ?8 y with y(0) = 3 on 0 < x < 5, (a) Calculate the largest step size required to maintain stability of the numerical solution to this equation using explicit Euler method. (b) Choose a step size two times smaller than this value. Solve the ODE with explicit Euler method using this step size. (c) Choose a step size two times larger than this value. Solve the ODE with explicit Euler method using this step size. (d) Now repeat parts (b) and (c) with implicit Euler method. (e) Plot all the solutions, including the analytical solution to this problem, on the same plot. Discuss your results. 2. Extra credit. Investigate the stability of the following numerical schemes on the example of an ODE d y d x = ? y with > 0. Show whether the scheme is conditionally or unconditionally stable. Derive the stability threshold if the scheme is conditionally stable. (a) The semi-implicit trapezoidal method: yi+1 = yi + 1 2 (f(xi; yi) + f(xi+1; yi+1)) h (b) The explicit midpoint method: yi+1 = yi + f  xi+1=2; yi + f(xi; yi) h 2  h 3. Solve Problem 25.1 from the textbook with third-order Runge-Kutta (page 734) and fourth-order Runge Kutta (page 735) methods with h = 0:5. Plot your results on the same plot. Also, include results from (a),(b),(c) from the two previous homeworks, on the same plot. 4. Solve Problem 25.2 from the textbook with third-order Runge-Kutta (page 734) and fourth-order Runge Kutta (page 735) methods with h = 0:25. Plot your results on the same plot. Also, include results from (a),(b),(c) from the two previous homeworks, on the same plot. There is a typo in this problem. The interval should be from t=0 to 1, not x=0 to 1. 5. For the following rst-order ODE d y d t = t2 ? 2 y t with y(1) = 2, the purpose will be to write MATLAB functions that solve this equation from t = 1 to t = 4 with 1 of 2 MAE 384: Advanced Mathematical Methods for Engineers Spring 2015 (a) Third-order Runge-Kutta (page 734) (b) Fourth-order Runge-Kutta (page 735) For each method, (a) Write the MATLAB function that solves the ODE by using the number of intervals N as an input argument. (b) Solve the ODE using your MATLAB function for N equal to 8, 16, 32, 64. Calculate the step size h inside the function. (c) Calculate the EL2 errors between the true solution and the numerical solution for each N (consult HW6 for the true solution). The following plots should be presented: 1. Plot your solutions for the methods (a), (b), along with the analytical solution, explicit Euler solution from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, on the same plot for N = 8. Do not print out the values at your grid points. 2. Plot your solutions for the methods (a), (b), along with the analytical solution, explicit Euler solution from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, on the same plot for N = 32. Do not print out the values at your grid points. 3. Plot the values of EL2 errors for the methods (a), (b), as well as for the explicit Euler method from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, as a function of h, on the same plot. What do you observe? 4. Plot the values of EL2 errors for all the methods (a)-(c), as well as for the explicit Euler method from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, as a function of h, on the same plot, but in log-log scale. Discuss how you can estimate the order of convergence for each method from this plot. Estimate the order of convergence for each method. 5. Plot the values of EL2 errors for all the methods (a)-(c), as well as for the explicit Euler method from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, as a function of N, on the same plot, but in log-log scale. Discuss how you can estimate the order of convergence for each method from this plot. Estimate the order of convergence for each method. 6. Discuss whether your convergence results for each method correspond to the known order of accuracy for each method. Explain why or why not. 2 of 2

MAE 384: Advanced Mathematical Methods for Engineers Spring 2015 Homework #8 Due: Wednesday, April 8, in or before class. Note: Problems 2 (extra credit) and 3 have to be solved by hand. Problems 1 and 5 require MATLAB. The item 1(a) must be shown by hand. Problem 4 can be done either in Matlab or by hand. 1. Consider the following ODE: d y d x = ?8 y with y(0) = 3 on 0 < x < 5, (a) Calculate the largest step size required to maintain stability of the numerical solution to this equation using explicit Euler method. (b) Choose a step size two times smaller than this value. Solve the ODE with explicit Euler method using this step size. (c) Choose a step size two times larger than this value. Solve the ODE with explicit Euler method using this step size. (d) Now repeat parts (b) and (c) with implicit Euler method. (e) Plot all the solutions, including the analytical solution to this problem, on the same plot. Discuss your results. 2. Extra credit. Investigate the stability of the following numerical schemes on the example of an ODE d y d x = ? y with > 0. Show whether the scheme is conditionally or unconditionally stable. Derive the stability threshold if the scheme is conditionally stable. (a) The semi-implicit trapezoidal method: yi+1 = yi + 1 2 (f(xi; yi) + f(xi+1; yi+1)) h (b) The explicit midpoint method: yi+1 = yi + f  xi+1=2; yi + f(xi; yi) h 2  h 3. Solve Problem 25.1 from the textbook with third-order Runge-Kutta (page 734) and fourth-order Runge Kutta (page 735) methods with h = 0:5. Plot your results on the same plot. Also, include results from (a),(b),(c) from the two previous homeworks, on the same plot. 4. Solve Problem 25.2 from the textbook with third-order Runge-Kutta (page 734) and fourth-order Runge Kutta (page 735) methods with h = 0:25. Plot your results on the same plot. Also, include results from (a),(b),(c) from the two previous homeworks, on the same plot. There is a typo in this problem. The interval should be from t=0 to 1, not x=0 to 1. 5. For the following rst-order ODE d y d t = t2 ? 2 y t with y(1) = 2, the purpose will be to write MATLAB functions that solve this equation from t = 1 to t = 4 with 1 of 2 MAE 384: Advanced Mathematical Methods for Engineers Spring 2015 (a) Third-order Runge-Kutta (page 734) (b) Fourth-order Runge-Kutta (page 735) For each method, (a) Write the MATLAB function that solves the ODE by using the number of intervals N as an input argument. (b) Solve the ODE using your MATLAB function for N equal to 8, 16, 32, 64. Calculate the step size h inside the function. (c) Calculate the EL2 errors between the true solution and the numerical solution for each N (consult HW6 for the true solution). The following plots should be presented: 1. Plot your solutions for the methods (a), (b), along with the analytical solution, explicit Euler solution from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, on the same plot for N = 8. Do not print out the values at your grid points. 2. Plot your solutions for the methods (a), (b), along with the analytical solution, explicit Euler solution from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, on the same plot for N = 32. Do not print out the values at your grid points. 3. Plot the values of EL2 errors for the methods (a), (b), as well as for the explicit Euler method from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, as a function of h, on the same plot. What do you observe? 4. Plot the values of EL2 errors for all the methods (a)-(c), as well as for the explicit Euler method from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, as a function of h, on the same plot, but in log-log scale. Discuss how you can estimate the order of convergence for each method from this plot. Estimate the order of convergence for each method. 5. Plot the values of EL2 errors for all the methods (a)-(c), as well as for the explicit Euler method from HW6, and solutions to problem 5 (a) – (c) from HW7, as a function of N, on the same plot, but in log-log scale. Discuss how you can estimate the order of convergence for each method from this plot. Estimate the order of convergence for each method. 6. Discuss whether your convergence results for each method correspond to the known order of accuracy for each method. Explain why or why not. 2 of 2

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BLY 101L – Take Home Assignment (20 pts. TOTAL) Due: Start of class time – Monday, June 30, 2014 OR Tuesday, July 1, 2014 1. Calculate the % of disks floating (%DF) for each time point and both Control and Treatment groups. (5 pts.) • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 2. Neatly graph experimental results. (5 pts.) • graph paper • Microsoft Excel • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 3. What was the overarching QUESTION addressed by the lab exercise? (1 pt.) 4. State “null” (H0) and “alternative” (HA) HYPOTHESES. (2 pts.) 5. State your PREDICTION in “If…., then…” format, based upon your knowledge of PS and as written in your lab guide. (1 pt.) 6. Applying what you’ve learned about photosynthesis… • Undoubtedly, you have heard mention of the effect of increasing concentrations of certain gasses (one of which is CO2) in Earth’s atmosphere, and its relevance to Climate Change. Sometime around two decades ago or so, plant scientists began to earnestly think about CO2 level and its effects on plant physiology and growth. Based upon your knowledge of photosynthesis and what you’ve learned from this week’s lab experiment… Formulate testable hypotheses (H0, HA) AND a prediction for this scenario. (3 pts.) • As a follow-on to the previous question and in the context of the experiment you performed in class…Aside from affecting “aesthetics” and habitat for fuzzy wuzzy animals, why are plant and conservation scientists worried about the effects of “clear cutting” (i.e., cutting down forests for development or other agricultural and industrial uses) in combination with rising CO2 levels? (NOTE: O2 HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE ANSWER TO THIS QUESTION…; 3 pts.) You MUST hand in the following: o Data table o Line graph of experimental results (plot both data sets on the SAME set of axes; see lecture notes) o Neatly typed answers to questions 3-6 REMEMBER: Images, written text AND/OR ideas are intellectual property and/or copyrighted! If you consult/borrow any published material (e.g., internet webpage text, published paper or report, your textbook, etc.) to construct answers to the questions above, you MUST CITE THE SOURCE FROM WHICH YOU COPIED THE IMAGES, TEXT or IDEAS. See below… Scientific Paper Chase, J. 2010. Stochastic community assembly causes higher biodiversity in more productive environments. Science 328: 1388-1391. Book Stein, B.A., Kutner, L.S., and Adams, J.S. 2000. Precious Heritage, The Status of Biodiversity in the United States. Oxford University Press, Oxford, England. Webpage NOAA, National Atmospheric and Oceanographic Administration. Accessed 01/05/12. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml#tracks_us.

BLY 101L – Take Home Assignment (20 pts. TOTAL) Due: Start of class time – Monday, June 30, 2014 OR Tuesday, July 1, 2014 1. Calculate the % of disks floating (%DF) for each time point and both Control and Treatment groups. (5 pts.) • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 2. Neatly graph experimental results. (5 pts.) • graph paper • Microsoft Excel • refer to the class notes re: how to do this… 3. What was the overarching QUESTION addressed by the lab exercise? (1 pt.) 4. State “null” (H0) and “alternative” (HA) HYPOTHESES. (2 pts.) 5. State your PREDICTION in “If…., then…” format, based upon your knowledge of PS and as written in your lab guide. (1 pt.) 6. Applying what you’ve learned about photosynthesis… • Undoubtedly, you have heard mention of the effect of increasing concentrations of certain gasses (one of which is CO2) in Earth’s atmosphere, and its relevance to Climate Change. Sometime around two decades ago or so, plant scientists began to earnestly think about CO2 level and its effects on plant physiology and growth. Based upon your knowledge of photosynthesis and what you’ve learned from this week’s lab experiment… Formulate testable hypotheses (H0, HA) AND a prediction for this scenario. (3 pts.) • As a follow-on to the previous question and in the context of the experiment you performed in class…Aside from affecting “aesthetics” and habitat for fuzzy wuzzy animals, why are plant and conservation scientists worried about the effects of “clear cutting” (i.e., cutting down forests for development or other agricultural and industrial uses) in combination with rising CO2 levels? (NOTE: O2 HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH THE ANSWER TO THIS QUESTION…; 3 pts.) You MUST hand in the following: o Data table o Line graph of experimental results (plot both data sets on the SAME set of axes; see lecture notes) o Neatly typed answers to questions 3-6 REMEMBER: Images, written text AND/OR ideas are intellectual property and/or copyrighted! If you consult/borrow any published material (e.g., internet webpage text, published paper or report, your textbook, etc.) to construct answers to the questions above, you MUST CITE THE SOURCE FROM WHICH YOU COPIED THE IMAGES, TEXT or IDEAS. See below… Scientific Paper Chase, J. 2010. Stochastic community assembly causes higher biodiversity in more productive environments. Science 328: 1388-1391. Book Stein, B.A., Kutner, L.S., and Adams, J.S. 2000. Precious Heritage, The Status of Biodiversity in the United States. Oxford University Press, Oxford, England. Webpage NOAA, National Atmospheric and Oceanographic Administration. Accessed 01/05/12. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pastall.shtml#tracks_us.

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Vermont Technical College Electronics I – Laboratory ELT-2051 Lab 07: Transistor Biasing Circuits and Q-point Stability Objectives: • To set an operating point for a transistor using three different bias techniques • To explore amplification of an AC signal • To use MultiSim to verify your experimental data General: In this laboratory, you will be supplied with two NPN transistors with varying ß’s. Prelab: Calculate values of Rb in Figures 1 and 2 assuming ß = 200, VCE = 6V . For Figure 3, calculate R1 and R2 so that their parallel resistance is about 20KΩ or 10% of (ß+1)RE. Also, calculate the critical frequency of the 1uF capacitor in Figure 4. Materials: • 2N3904, 2N4123 NPN TXs (1 high ß, 1 low ß) • (2) 1 k Ohm, 100 k Ohm, assorted resistors • 1uF, 10uF capacitors • Curve Tracer • DC Power Supply • Multimeter • Signal Generator • Oscilloscope • Breadboard Procedure: 1. Use the curve tracer to plot the curves for each of your transistors. From these curves, again using the curve tracer, determine the ßDC for each transistor at the IC currents of 1mA, 3mA, 6mA, and 10mA with VCE = 6V. Of course, be sure to keep track of which transistor goes with which curve. Verify that the ßDC values that you obtain are within the manufacturer’s specifications. Remember– ßDC = hFE ! 2. For each of the three circuits shown in Figures 1-3, using the R values calculated in your prelab, determine the operating points IC and VCE for each of the transistors. Be sure to table your data. In addition, plot ß vs IC for both transistors on a single graph so that the data is meaningful! What conclusions can be reached for the 3 biasing circuits? 3. Lastly – Build Figure 4 and determine the ratio (Gain) of Vout/Vin at 1KHz. Now vary the frequency of Vin to determine at what frequencies this ratio decreases to 0.707 of the value at 1KHz. 4. Use the Bode Plotter feature in MultiSim to verify your data of Part 3. Is the cut-off frequency the same as you measured in the lab? Base Bias: Parameter Calculated Value Simulated Value Measured Value VCE1 (high β) VCE2 (low β) n/a n/a |VCE1 – VCE2| 0 0 IC1 (high β) IC2 (low β) n/a n/a |IC1 – IC2| 0 0 Emitter Bias: Parameter Calculated Value Simulated Value Measured Value VCE1 (high β) VCE2 (low β) n/a n/a |VCE1 – VCE2| 0 0 IC1 (high β) IC2 (low β) n/a n/a |IC1 – IC2| 0 0 Voltage Divider Bias: Parameter Calculated Value Simulated Value Measured Value VCE1 (high β) VCE2 (low β) n/a n/a |VCE1 – VCE2| 0 0 IC1 (high β) IC2 (low β) n/a n/a |IC1 – IC2| 0 0 Laboratory Report: This lab is a semi-formal lab. Be sure to collect all data necessary to make observations and answer questions before you leave the lab. Also, you and your lab partner should discuss the results and outcomes prior to leaving. Take notes, fill in tables and include diagrams as needed. Your report should include: • Data Table • Beta Plot • MultiSim Frequency Response • Comparison of biasing schemes • Comparison of measurements vs. simulations and expectations.

Vermont Technical College Electronics I – Laboratory ELT-2051 Lab 07: Transistor Biasing Circuits and Q-point Stability Objectives: • To set an operating point for a transistor using three different bias techniques • To explore amplification of an AC signal • To use MultiSim to verify your experimental data General: In this laboratory, you will be supplied with two NPN transistors with varying ß’s. Prelab: Calculate values of Rb in Figures 1 and 2 assuming ß = 200, VCE = 6V . For Figure 3, calculate R1 and R2 so that their parallel resistance is about 20KΩ or 10% of (ß+1)RE. Also, calculate the critical frequency of the 1uF capacitor in Figure 4. Materials: • 2N3904, 2N4123 NPN TXs (1 high ß, 1 low ß) • (2) 1 k Ohm, 100 k Ohm, assorted resistors • 1uF, 10uF capacitors • Curve Tracer • DC Power Supply • Multimeter • Signal Generator • Oscilloscope • Breadboard Procedure: 1. Use the curve tracer to plot the curves for each of your transistors. From these curves, again using the curve tracer, determine the ßDC for each transistor at the IC currents of 1mA, 3mA, 6mA, and 10mA with VCE = 6V. Of course, be sure to keep track of which transistor goes with which curve. Verify that the ßDC values that you obtain are within the manufacturer’s specifications. Remember– ßDC = hFE ! 2. For each of the three circuits shown in Figures 1-3, using the R values calculated in your prelab, determine the operating points IC and VCE for each of the transistors. Be sure to table your data. In addition, plot ß vs IC for both transistors on a single graph so that the data is meaningful! What conclusions can be reached for the 3 biasing circuits? 3. Lastly – Build Figure 4 and determine the ratio (Gain) of Vout/Vin at 1KHz. Now vary the frequency of Vin to determine at what frequencies this ratio decreases to 0.707 of the value at 1KHz. 4. Use the Bode Plotter feature in MultiSim to verify your data of Part 3. Is the cut-off frequency the same as you measured in the lab? Base Bias: Parameter Calculated Value Simulated Value Measured Value VCE1 (high β) VCE2 (low β) n/a n/a |VCE1 – VCE2| 0 0 IC1 (high β) IC2 (low β) n/a n/a |IC1 – IC2| 0 0 Emitter Bias: Parameter Calculated Value Simulated Value Measured Value VCE1 (high β) VCE2 (low β) n/a n/a |VCE1 – VCE2| 0 0 IC1 (high β) IC2 (low β) n/a n/a |IC1 – IC2| 0 0 Voltage Divider Bias: Parameter Calculated Value Simulated Value Measured Value VCE1 (high β) VCE2 (low β) n/a n/a |VCE1 – VCE2| 0 0 IC1 (high β) IC2 (low β) n/a n/a |IC1 – IC2| 0 0 Laboratory Report: This lab is a semi-formal lab. Be sure to collect all data necessary to make observations and answer questions before you leave the lab. Also, you and your lab partner should discuss the results and outcomes prior to leaving. Take notes, fill in tables and include diagrams as needed. Your report should include: • Data Table • Beta Plot • MultiSim Frequency Response • Comparison of biasing schemes • Comparison of measurements vs. simulations and expectations.

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ENGR 2010 (Section 02) – Assignment 7 Due: Wednesday November 25th, 11:59 pm Points: 20 Prof. Lei Reading: Sections 6.2-6.3 of Nilsson and Riedel, Electric Circuits, 9th Edition Submit electronic solutions (i.e. using Microsoft Word or a scanned copy of your written work) to the following problems on Blackboard. To receive credit, you must show work indicating how you arrived at each final answer. Problem 1 Consider the RC circuit on the right. and suppose that Vs(t) is a time-varying voltage input shown at the bottom. a) Suppose VC(0) = 0V. Plot VR(t) and VC(t) from 0ms to 300ms. Show your work in obtaining VR(t) and VC(t). b) Suppose the capacitance value is changed to 2μF, and VC(0) = 0V. Plot VR(t) and VC(t) from 0ms to 300ms. Show your work in obtaining VR(t) and VC(t). c) Explain how VC(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t), and how VR(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t). d) Explain how the capacitance value affects VC(t). t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 150ms 200ms 250ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms 1 uF + – VC(t) + – VR(t) 0ms 300ms Note: Capacitors are often used to protect against sudden changes in a voltage value, which could damage electronic components. Here, Vs(t) undergoes many sudden changes, but VC(t) undergoes less change. Problem 2 Using PSpice, perform two transient analysis simulations – one for the circuit in part (a), and one for the circuit in part(b) of problem 1 – to verify that your plots in problem 1 are correct. For each simulation, plot the traces for VR(t) and VC(t). Hint: You may need to perform arithmetic operations between simulation traces. Take a screenshot of your constructed circuits and the simulation traces for VR(t) and VC(t), which you will submit onto Blackboard. t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 150ms 200ms 250ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms 1 uF + – VC(t) + – VR(t) 0ms 300ms 1 uF or 2 uF Problem 3 Consider the Resistor-Diode circuit on the right, and suppose that Vs(t) is a time-varying voltage input shown at the bottom. Suppose that for the diode to turn on, it needs 0.7V between the positive and negative terminals. a) Plot VR(t) and VD(t) from 0ms to 300ms b) Explain how VD(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t), and how VR(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t). t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 0ms 150ms 200ms 250ms 300ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms + – VD(t) + – VR(t) Problem 4 Using PSpice, perform a transient analysis simulation for the circuit in problem 3 – to verify that your plots in problem 3 are correct. For the simulation, plot the traces for VR(t) and VD(t). To create the diode in PSpice, use the Dbreak component. After placing the component on the page, highlight the component, and edit the Pspice model (Edit -> PSpice Model) and set Rs to 0. Hint: You may need to perform arithmetic operations between simulation traces. Take a screenshot of your constructed circuit and the simulation traces for VR(t) and VD(t), which you will submit onto Blackboard. Note that your simulation trace plots may not be exactly the same as those from Problem 3, since the PSpice diode model has a turn-on voltage that’s not exactly 0.7V. t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 0ms 150ms 200ms 250ms 300ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms + – VD(t) + – VR(t) Problem 5 (Bonus: 5 points) In the circuit from problem 1 (shown on the right), write several sentences to explain why VC(t) is often referred to as the “low-pass filtered” output, and VR(t) is often referred to as the “high-pass filtered” output. You will need to look up the definitions for “low-pass” and “high-pass” filters. Examining your plots for VC(t) and VR(t) will help. t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 150ms 200ms 250ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms 1 uF + – VC(t) + – VR(t) 0ms 300ms

ENGR 2010 (Section 02) – Assignment 7 Due: Wednesday November 25th, 11:59 pm Points: 20 Prof. Lei Reading: Sections 6.2-6.3 of Nilsson and Riedel, Electric Circuits, 9th Edition Submit electronic solutions (i.e. using Microsoft Word or a scanned copy of your written work) to the following problems on Blackboard. To receive credit, you must show work indicating how you arrived at each final answer. Problem 1 Consider the RC circuit on the right. and suppose that Vs(t) is a time-varying voltage input shown at the bottom. a) Suppose VC(0) = 0V. Plot VR(t) and VC(t) from 0ms to 300ms. Show your work in obtaining VR(t) and VC(t). b) Suppose the capacitance value is changed to 2μF, and VC(0) = 0V. Plot VR(t) and VC(t) from 0ms to 300ms. Show your work in obtaining VR(t) and VC(t). c) Explain how VC(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t), and how VR(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t). d) Explain how the capacitance value affects VC(t). t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 150ms 200ms 250ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms 1 uF + – VC(t) + – VR(t) 0ms 300ms Note: Capacitors are often used to protect against sudden changes in a voltage value, which could damage electronic components. Here, Vs(t) undergoes many sudden changes, but VC(t) undergoes less change. Problem 2 Using PSpice, perform two transient analysis simulations – one for the circuit in part (a), and one for the circuit in part(b) of problem 1 – to verify that your plots in problem 1 are correct. For each simulation, plot the traces for VR(t) and VC(t). Hint: You may need to perform arithmetic operations between simulation traces. Take a screenshot of your constructed circuits and the simulation traces for VR(t) and VC(t), which you will submit onto Blackboard. t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 150ms 200ms 250ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms 1 uF + – VC(t) + – VR(t) 0ms 300ms 1 uF or 2 uF Problem 3 Consider the Resistor-Diode circuit on the right, and suppose that Vs(t) is a time-varying voltage input shown at the bottom. Suppose that for the diode to turn on, it needs 0.7V between the positive and negative terminals. a) Plot VR(t) and VD(t) from 0ms to 300ms b) Explain how VD(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t), and how VR(t) qualitatively compares with Vs(t). t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 0ms 150ms 200ms 250ms 300ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms + – VD(t) + – VR(t) Problem 4 Using PSpice, perform a transient analysis simulation for the circuit in problem 3 – to verify that your plots in problem 3 are correct. For the simulation, plot the traces for VR(t) and VD(t). To create the diode in PSpice, use the Dbreak component. After placing the component on the page, highlight the component, and edit the Pspice model (Edit -> PSpice Model) and set Rs to 0. Hint: You may need to perform arithmetic operations between simulation traces. Take a screenshot of your constructed circuit and the simulation traces for VR(t) and VD(t), which you will submit onto Blackboard. Note that your simulation trace plots may not be exactly the same as those from Problem 3, since the PSpice diode model has a turn-on voltage that’s not exactly 0.7V. t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 0ms 150ms 200ms 250ms 300ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms + – VD(t) + – VR(t) Problem 5 (Bonus: 5 points) In the circuit from problem 1 (shown on the right), write several sentences to explain why VC(t) is often referred to as the “low-pass filtered” output, and VR(t) is often referred to as the “high-pass filtered” output. You will need to look up the definitions for “low-pass” and “high-pass” filters. Examining your plots for VC(t) and VR(t) will help. t Vs(t) 1V -1V 50ms 100ms 150ms 200ms 250ms + – Vs(t) 100000 Ohms 1 uF + – VC(t) + – VR(t) 0ms 300ms

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MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Homework 4 Problem 1: (Points: 25) The circuit shown in Fig. 1 is excited by an impulse of 0.015V. Assuming the capacitor is initially discharged, obtain an analytic expression of vO (t), and make a Matlab program that plots the system response to the impulse. Figure 1 Problem 2: Extra Credit (Points: 25) A winding oscillator consists of two steel spheres on each end of a long slender rod, as shown in Fig. 2. The rod is hung on a thin wire that can be twisted many revolutions without breaking. The device will be wound up 4000 degrees. Make a Matlab script that computes the system response and determine how long will it take until the motion decays to a swing of only 10 degrees? Assume that the thin wire has a rotational spring constant of 2  10?4Nm/rad and that the viscous friction coecient for the sphere in air is 2  10?4Nms/rad. Each sphere has a mass of 1Kg. Figure 2: Winding oscillator. Problem 3: (Points: 25) Find the equivalent transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) for the system shown in Fig. 3. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 1 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 3 Problem 4: (Points: 25) Reduce the block diagram shown in Fig. 4 to a single transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) . Figure 4 Problem 5: (Points: 25) Consider the rotational mechanical system shown in Fig. 5. Represent the system as a block diagram. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 2 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 5 Problem 6: (Points: 25) During ascent the space shuttle is steered by commands generated by the computer’s guidance calcu- lations. These commands are in the form of vehicle attitude, attitude rates, and attitude accelerations obtained through measurements made by the vehicle’s inertial measuring unit, rate gyro assembly, and accelerometer assembly, respectively. The ascent digital autopilot uses the errors between the actual and commanded attitude, rates, and accelerations to gimbal the space shuttle main engines (called thrust vectoring) and the solid rocket boosters to a ect the desired vehicle attitude. The space shut- tle’s attitude control system employs the same method in the pitch, roll, and yaw control systems. A simpli ed model of the pitch control system is shown in Fig. 6.  a) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch to commanded pitch. Assume all other inputs are zero.  b) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch rate to commanded pitch rate. Assume all other inputs are zero.  c) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch acceleration to commanded pitch acceleration. Assume all other inputs are zero. Figure 6: Space shuttle pitch control system (simpli ed). Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 3 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Problem 7: (Extra Credit Points: 25) Extenders are robot manipulators that extend (i.e. increase) the strength of the human arm in load- maneuvering tasks (see Fig. 7). The system is represented by the transfer function Y (s) U(s) = G(s) = 30 s2+4s+3 where U (s) is the force of the human hand applied to the robot manipulator, and Y (s) is the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load. Assuming that the force of the human hand that is applied is given by u (t) = 5 sin (!t), create a MATLAB code that will compute and plot the di erence in magnitude and phase between the applied human force and the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load, as a function of the frequency !. Use 100 values for ! in the range ! 2 [0:01; 100] rad s for your two plots. See Fig. 8 on how to de ne di erence in magnitude and phase between two signals. You need to include your code and the two resulted plots in your solution. Figure 7: Human extender. A B dt T: signal period magnitude difference phase difference B A Figure 8: Magnitude and phase di erence (deg) between two sinusoidal signals.

MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Homework 4 Problem 1: (Points: 25) The circuit shown in Fig. 1 is excited by an impulse of 0.015V. Assuming the capacitor is initially discharged, obtain an analytic expression of vO (t), and make a Matlab program that plots the system response to the impulse. Figure 1 Problem 2: Extra Credit (Points: 25) A winding oscillator consists of two steel spheres on each end of a long slender rod, as shown in Fig. 2. The rod is hung on a thin wire that can be twisted many revolutions without breaking. The device will be wound up 4000 degrees. Make a Matlab script that computes the system response and determine how long will it take until the motion decays to a swing of only 10 degrees? Assume that the thin wire has a rotational spring constant of 2  10?4Nm/rad and that the viscous friction coecient for the sphere in air is 2  10?4Nms/rad. Each sphere has a mass of 1Kg. Figure 2: Winding oscillator. Problem 3: (Points: 25) Find the equivalent transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) for the system shown in Fig. 3. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 1 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 3 Problem 4: (Points: 25) Reduce the block diagram shown in Fig. 4 to a single transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) . Figure 4 Problem 5: (Points: 25) Consider the rotational mechanical system shown in Fig. 5. Represent the system as a block diagram. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 2 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 5 Problem 6: (Points: 25) During ascent the space shuttle is steered by commands generated by the computer’s guidance calcu- lations. These commands are in the form of vehicle attitude, attitude rates, and attitude accelerations obtained through measurements made by the vehicle’s inertial measuring unit, rate gyro assembly, and accelerometer assembly, respectively. The ascent digital autopilot uses the errors between the actual and commanded attitude, rates, and accelerations to gimbal the space shuttle main engines (called thrust vectoring) and the solid rocket boosters to a ect the desired vehicle attitude. The space shut- tle’s attitude control system employs the same method in the pitch, roll, and yaw control systems. A simpli ed model of the pitch control system is shown in Fig. 6.  a) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch to commanded pitch. Assume all other inputs are zero.  b) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch rate to commanded pitch rate. Assume all other inputs are zero.  c) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch acceleration to commanded pitch acceleration. Assume all other inputs are zero. Figure 6: Space shuttle pitch control system (simpli ed). Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 3 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Problem 7: (Extra Credit Points: 25) Extenders are robot manipulators that extend (i.e. increase) the strength of the human arm in load- maneuvering tasks (see Fig. 7). The system is represented by the transfer function Y (s) U(s) = G(s) = 30 s2+4s+3 where U (s) is the force of the human hand applied to the robot manipulator, and Y (s) is the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load. Assuming that the force of the human hand that is applied is given by u (t) = 5 sin (!t), create a MATLAB code that will compute and plot the di erence in magnitude and phase between the applied human force and the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load, as a function of the frequency !. Use 100 values for ! in the range ! 2 [0:01; 100] rad s for your two plots. See Fig. 8 on how to de ne di erence in magnitude and phase between two signals. You need to include your code and the two resulted plots in your solution. Figure 7: Human extender. A B dt T: signal period magnitude difference phase difference B A Figure 8: Magnitude and phase di erence (deg) between two sinusoidal signals.

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EEGR 221 MATLAB Project 1 Basic Signals Fall 2015 Due date: 10/5/15 1. (a) Plot ?1(?) = ?(?+1)−?(?−5) where -7 < t < 7 seconds. Use millisecond units. (b) Plot ? = 5 ??? (??)[ ?(?+1)−?(?−5)] 2. (a) Plot x2(t) exactly as shown in this figure. Include the same titles and labels for the signal. Hint: Find the amplitude equations as function of time and insert those to your MATLAB script to create and plot this signal. (b) Decompose x2(t) into its even and odd components and plot x2e(t) and x2o(t). (c) Plot x2e(t) + x2o(t) and verify that x2e(t) + x2o(t) = x2(t). How to report the results?  For each plot you must label x and y axis and have a title for the plot. Following commands could be used. heaviside, plot, axis, ylabel, ylabel, title, fliplr, etc … At the command prompt of MATLAB you can type >> help [command name] to get help with any command.  Plot all of the signal for t between -7 and 7 seconds.  Save your commands in an m-file with your name in the name field. (e.g. John_Scott.m) and append the code to the end of your report.  Your report must be organized and your solution for each question mu st be clearly marked by the number of the question. Example 2.a or 2.b, … In each part the problem should be clearly identified. Type the problem statement in each section. Show the plots of input and output signals. Draw conclusions based on your plots and in problem 3 discuss why the property is not satisfied based on your plots.  Turn in a hard copy of your report in class. This report must include a cover page with the name of both student partners.

EEGR 221 MATLAB Project 1 Basic Signals Fall 2015 Due date: 10/5/15 1. (a) Plot ?1(?) = ?(?+1)−?(?−5) where -7 < t < 7 seconds. Use millisecond units. (b) Plot ? = 5 ??? (??)[ ?(?+1)−?(?−5)] 2. (a) Plot x2(t) exactly as shown in this figure. Include the same titles and labels for the signal. Hint: Find the amplitude equations as function of time and insert those to your MATLAB script to create and plot this signal. (b) Decompose x2(t) into its even and odd components and plot x2e(t) and x2o(t). (c) Plot x2e(t) + x2o(t) and verify that x2e(t) + x2o(t) = x2(t). How to report the results?  For each plot you must label x and y axis and have a title for the plot. Following commands could be used. heaviside, plot, axis, ylabel, ylabel, title, fliplr, etc … At the command prompt of MATLAB you can type >> help [command name] to get help with any command.  Plot all of the signal for t between -7 and 7 seconds.  Save your commands in an m-file with your name in the name field. (e.g. John_Scott.m) and append the code to the end of your report.  Your report must be organized and your solution for each question mu st be clearly marked by the number of the question. Example 2.a or 2.b, … In each part the problem should be clearly identified. Type the problem statement in each section. Show the plots of input and output signals. Draw conclusions based on your plots and in problem 3 discuss why the property is not satisfied based on your plots.  Turn in a hard copy of your report in class. This report must include a cover page with the name of both student partners.