A rectangular wire loop, 10 cm by 10 cm is mounted on an axle and is free to rotate. The loop is placed into an essentially constant magnetic field of strength 1 T that points perpendicular to the axle. A current of 1 A is set to run through the loop. How large is the maximal torque the wire loop can experience

A rectangular wire loop, 10 cm by 10 cm is mounted on an axle and is free to rotate. The loop is placed into an essentially constant magnetic field of strength 1 T that points perpendicular to the axle. A current of 1 A is set to run through the loop. How large is the maximal torque the wire loop can experience

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Please answer questions and then submit them in the assignment. Put your name in the document’s title. Eight points for questions 1-10, ten points each for questions 11 and 12. 1. What were the crusades, how did they begin, and how were they justified? 2. Describe the 1348 plague in Europe and how it changed human behavior. 3. What other calamities besides the plague occurred during the 14th century? What were the results? 4. What inventions during the middle ages and the Renaissance had the biggest impact on human culture in Western Europe? 5. What was a pilgrimage? Why did people go on them? 6. Describe what is happening in this image? Who is the central figure? Where might this image be located? How does it exemplify the era in which it was made? 7. Why was Socrates condemned to death? How did he handle his death sentence? What was the impact of his death for Athenians and the Western Heritage? 8. Name three Western legacies from ancient Egypt. How did the ancient Egyptians have a lasting impact on Western civilization? 9. How did Themistocles and the Greeks keep the Persians under Xerxes from invading? How did the trireme help? 10. Compare these two buildings. Identify them and say how they are alike and different and why we might want to know what they are. Where are they located? When were they constructed? What purposes did they serve? (5 points) 11. Compare ancient Rome and the contemporary United States. In what ways are the two superpowers similar? What are the similarities between their military strength, their colonization, the division of wealth, and their ways of appeasing the masses? In what ways did the Romans assume that assimilation to the Roman way would work for everyone they colonized? Has the U.S. done the same thing? In what ways is the Roman history different from the U.S. history of revolution against the British? Is the United States doomed to fail in the way ancient Rome did? 12. Compare the work of art you viewed in a museum with a work of text that we read in class or a work if art or architecture in the textbook. In what ways do they inform one another? In what ways can you connect the image with the text?

Please answer questions and then submit them in the assignment. Put your name in the document’s title. Eight points for questions 1-10, ten points each for questions 11 and 12. 1. What were the crusades, how did they begin, and how were they justified? 2. Describe the 1348 plague in Europe and how it changed human behavior. 3. What other calamities besides the plague occurred during the 14th century? What were the results? 4. What inventions during the middle ages and the Renaissance had the biggest impact on human culture in Western Europe? 5. What was a pilgrimage? Why did people go on them? 6. Describe what is happening in this image? Who is the central figure? Where might this image be located? How does it exemplify the era in which it was made? 7. Why was Socrates condemned to death? How did he handle his death sentence? What was the impact of his death for Athenians and the Western Heritage? 8. Name three Western legacies from ancient Egypt. How did the ancient Egyptians have a lasting impact on Western civilization? 9. How did Themistocles and the Greeks keep the Persians under Xerxes from invading? How did the trireme help? 10. Compare these two buildings. Identify them and say how they are alike and different and why we might want to know what they are. Where are they located? When were they constructed? What purposes did they serve? (5 points) 11. Compare ancient Rome and the contemporary United States. In what ways are the two superpowers similar? What are the similarities between their military strength, their colonization, the division of wealth, and their ways of appeasing the masses? In what ways did the Romans assume that assimilation to the Roman way would work for everyone they colonized? Has the U.S. done the same thing? In what ways is the Roman history different from the U.S. history of revolution against the British? Is the United States doomed to fail in the way ancient Rome did? 12. Compare the work of art you viewed in a museum with a work of text that we read in class or a work if art or architecture in the textbook. In what ways do they inform one another? In what ways can you connect the image with the text?

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Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

Ch 2 Questions that might be on the test. If you cannot answer them, check your class notes or the textbook. 1. A mineral is a naturally occurring substance formed through geological processes that has: a) a characteristic chemical composition, b) a highly ordered atomic structure c) specific physical properties d) all of the above 2. There are currently more than ______ known minerals, according to the International Mineralogical Association, a) 40 b) 400 c) 4000 d) 40 000 3. Some minerals, like quartz, mica or feldspar are: a) rare b) common c) valuable d) priceless 4. Rocks from which minerals are mined for economic purposes are referred to as: a) gangue b) tailings c) ores d) granite 5. Electrons, which have a _____ charge, a size which is so small as to be currently unmeasurable, and which are the least massive of the three types of basic particles. a) positive b) negative c) neutral 6. Both protons and neutrons are themselves now thought to be composed of even more elementary particles called: a) quarks b) quakes c) parsons d) megans 7. In processes which change the number of protons in a nucleus, the atom becomes an atom of a different chemical: a) isotope b) compound c) element d) planet 8. Atoms which have either a deficit or a surplus of electrons are called: a) elements b) isotopes c) ions d) molecules 9. In the Bohr model of the atom, electrons can only orbit the nucleus in particular circular orbits with fixed angular momentum and energy, their distances from the nucleus being proportional to their respective energies. They can only make _____ leaps between the fixed energy levels. a) tiny b) quantum c) gradual 10. It is impossible to simultaneously derive precise values for both the position and momentum of a particle for any given point in time; this became known as the ______ principle. a) Bohr b) Einstein c) uncertainty d) quantum 11. The modern model of the atom describes the positions of electrons in an atom in terms of: a) quantum levels b) orbital paths c) probabilities d) GPS 12. Isotopes of an element have nuclei with the same number of protons (the same atomic number) but different numbers of: a) electrons b) neutrons c) ions d) photons 13. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many protons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 14. In helium-3 (or 3He), how many neutrons are present? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) 4 15. The relative abundance of an isotope is strongly correlated with its tendency toward nuclear _____, short-lived nuclides quickly go away, while their long-lived counterparts endure. a) fission b) fusion c) decay d) bombardment 16. The isotopic composition of elements is different on different planets. a) True b) False 17. As a general rule, the fewer electrons in an atom’s valence shell, the ____ reactive it is. Lithium, sodium, and potassium have one electron in their outer shells. a) more b) less 18. Every atom is much more stable, or less reactive, with a ____ valence shell. a) partly full b) completely full 19. A positively-charged ion, which has fewer electrons than protons, is known as a: a) anion b) cation c) fermion d) bation 20. Bonds vary widely in their strength. Generally covalent and ionic bonds are often described as “strong”, whereas ______ bonds are generally considered to be “weak”. a) van der Waals b) Faradays c) van Neumans 21. This bonding involves sharing of electrons in which the positively charged nuclei of two or more atoms simultaneously attract the negatively charged electrons that are being shared a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 22. This bond results from electrostatic attraction between atoms: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 23. A sea of delocalized electrons causes this bonding: a) ionic b) covalent c) van der Waals d) metallic 24. The chemical composition of minerals may vary between end members of a mineral system. For example the ______ feldspars comprise a continuous series from sodiumrich albite to calcium-rich anorthite. a) plagioclase b) orthoclase c) alkaline d) acidic 25. Crystal structure is based on ____ internal atomic arrangement. a) irregular b) regular c) random d) curvilinear 26. Pyrite and marcasite are both _______, but their arrangement of atoms differs. a) iron sulfide b) lead sulfide c) copper silfide d) silver sulfide 27. The carbon atoms in ______ are arranged into sheets which can slide easily past each other, while the carbon atoms in diamond form a strong, interlocking three-dimensional network. a) sapphire b) graphite c) aluminum d) carbonate 28. TGCFAOQTCD a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale 29. Dull to metallic, submetallic, adamantine, vitreous, pearly, resinous, or silky. a) Crystal habit b) Hardness scale c) Luster scale d) Heft scale 30. The color of the powder a mineral leaves after rubbing it on unglazed porcelain. a) color b) streak c) lustre d) iridescense 31. Describes the way a mineral may split apart along various planes. a) fracture b) streak c) lustre d) cleavage 32. In modern physics, the position of electrons about a nucleus are defined in terms of: a) probabilities b) circles c) ellipses d) chromodomes 33. The symbol H+ suggests a: a) hydrogen atom b) hydrogen isotope c) hydrogen cation d) hydrogen anion 34. The tabulated atomic mass of natural carbon is not exactly 12 because carbon in nature always has multiple ________ present. a) electrons b) isotopes c) quarks d) protons 35. This type of bonding due to delocalized electrons leads to malleability, ductility, and high melting points: a) covalent b) ionic c) van der Waals d) metallic 36. The mineral ___________ is 3 on Mohs Scale whereas the mineral ___________ is 9. a) calcite, corundum b) corundum, calcite c) caliche, calcite d) chalcedony, quartz 37. In hand specimens, geologists identify most minerals based on: a) physical properties b) chemical analyses c) xray diffraction 38. This type of chemical bonding is the weakest but occurs in all substances. a) covalent b) ionic c) metallic d) none of the above 39. Quartz, feldspar, mica, chlorite, kaolin, calcite, epidote, olivine, augite, hornblende, magnetite, hematite, limonite: these minerals are: a) common in rocks b) occasionally found c) rare d) extremely rare 40. Characteristics of a mineral do NOT include: a) naturally occurring b) characteristic chemical formula c) crystalline d) organic e) all of the above 41. The chemical composition of a particular mineral may vary between end members. For example, the common mineral plagioclase feldspar varies from being _______-rich to being _________-rich. a) sodium, calcium b) potassium, sodium c) iron, magnesium d) carbon, oxygen 42. Sharing of electrons typifies the __________ bond whereas electrostatic attraction typifies the _______ bond. a) ionic, covalent b) ionic, triclinic c) covalent, ionic d) triclinic, covalent 43. If number of protons does not equal the number of electrons, the atom is a(n) : a) isotope b) ion c) quark d) simplex e) google 44. Atoms generally consist of: a) electrons b) protons c) neutrons d) all of the above 45. Not counting rare minerals, about how many mineral species are at least occasionally encountered in rocks? a) 20 b) 200 c) 2000 46. Carbon is atomic number 6. Carbon-13 has _______ protons and _______ neutrons. a) thirteen, six b) six, seven c) twelve, twenty-five d) twelve, twelve 47. Which of these particles are not nucleons? a) electrons b) neutrons c) protons 48. A mineral with visibly recognizable crystals is said to have good crystal habit; otherwise the mineral is said to be: a) massive b) granular c) compact d) any of the above 49. In chemical bonding, two atoms become linked by moving or sharing __________. a) neutrons b) protons c) electrons 50. The name of an element is determined by the number of ______ present in the ______ of an atom. a) electrons, nucleus b) neutrons, nucleus c) protons, nucleus d) protons, electron cloud e) neutrons, electron cloud 51. Generally ________ and ____________ bonds are strong whereas the ______________ bond is weak. a) covalent, ionic, van der Waals b) van der Waals, covalent, ionic c) ionic, van der Waals, covalent 52. Which of the following are held together by chemical bonds? a) molecules b) crystals c) diatomic gases 53. An ion with fewer electrons than protons is called an ______ and it carries a _________ electric charge. a) cation, positive b) anion, negative c) cation, negative d) anion, positive 54. Two or more minerals may have the same _________ composition but different _______ structure. These are called polymorphs. a) crystal, chemical b) chemical, crystal 55. Industrial minerals are: a) gem quality b) commercially valuable c) tailings d) worthless 56. All minerals are crystalline. If the crystals are too small to see, they can be detected by: a) x-ray diffraction b) cosmic rays c) sound waves d) odor 57. If two atomes have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons, the atoms are _______ of the same _________. a) elements, mineral b) atoms, isotope c) elements, isotope d) isotopes, element 58. Modern physics recognizes that electrons show both particle and ______ behavior. a) wave b) emotional c) thermal d) revolting 59. Sodium and potassium have one ______ electron in their outer shells and are extremely ________. a) valence, stable b) inverted, reactive c) valence, reactive d) contaminated, inactive 60. The luster of _______ would be described as ________. a) glass, vitreous b) diamond, dull c) pyrite, silky d) graphite, resinous 61. The minerals ________ and __________ are polymorphs of carbon. a) diamond, graphite b) calcite, silicate c) bonite, bronzite 62. In the ______ atom based on _______ physics, electrons were restricted to circular orbits of fixed energy levels. a) Bohr , quantum b) Rutherford, classical c) Bohr, classical d) Rutherford, quantum 63. Virtually all elements other than ______ and _______ were formed in stars and supernovae long after the Big Bang. a) hydrogen, helium b) carbon, phosphorus c) carbon, oxygen d) silica, carbon 64. Physicist Werner _________ developed the ___________ principle which means that it is impossible to know exactly the position and momentum of a particle. a) Heisenberg, certainty b) Heisenberg, uncertainty c) Bohr, uncertainty d) Bohr, certainty

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NAME: _____________________________________________ (print) INTRODUCTORY SURVEYING – MINING ENGINEERING 2400 Second Midterm Exam October 24, 2014 Work all four problems in the space provided. Solutions must be neat and logically presented for full credit. 1. (25 pts) Put an “X” over the letter corresponding to correct answers for the following multiple choice questions. A theodolite is used to estimate a distance using stadia. The stadia factor is 100, the stadia constant is zero, the zenith angle is 90°, the upper reading is 10.20, the rod reading is 7.75 and the lower reading is 5.30. The best estimate for horizontal distance is: (a) 1020 ft; (b) 490 ft; (c) 245 ft; (d) if none of the preceding – provide your answer . From B the azimuth to A is 233° 15′ 30″. The angle right to C is 215° 05′ 15″. The azimuth of C to B is: (a)88°20’45”; (b) 268°20’45”; (c) 250°10’30”; (d) if none of the preceding – provide your answer. A five-level station is described as C3.5/34.1 C4.8/25.0 C6.7/0.0 C9.2/25.0 C10.8/33.6. How wide is the road? (a) 50.0 ft, (b) 67.7 ft, (c) 25.0 ft, (e) if none of the preceding – provide your answer . An engineer used a total station to complete a closed traverse at a construction site. The sum of LAT and sum of DEP were determined to be 0.04 and 0.07 respectively. The total horizontal distance measured 2510.00 ft. What is the corresponding precision? (a) 1/63000; (b) 1/36000; (c) 1/31000; (d) if none of the preceding-provide your answer. The interior angles of a closed six sided traverse measure: 34° 28′ 20″ 185° 37′ 00″ 110° 59′ 20″ 195° 10′ 40″ 81° 40′ 20″ 112° 05′ 20″ In adjusting this traverse, the adjusted value for the first angle is: (a) 34° 28′ 20″; (b) 34° 28′ 10″; ( c) 34° 28′ 30″; (d) if none of the preceding – provide your answer . 2. (15 pts) Given the position of points A and B, determine the azimuth of A to B to the nearest second. Point A 5470.00N 4710.00E Point B 5130.00N 5350.00E 3. (25 pts) The volume of a fill between station 24+00 and 26+00 on a 50-foot wide road is to be determined by the prismoidal method. The three level sections are given by: Stn. 24+00 F10.0 F12.0 F8.0 52.0 0.0 65.0 Stn. 25+00 F8.0 F10.0 F10.0 55.0 0.0 52.0 Stn. 26+00 F12.0 F8.0 F15.0 61.0 0.0 55.0 Determine the volume to the nearest 100 cubic feet. (All fill dimensions are in feet.) (Hint: The area at Stn. 25 is 760 sq ft and the area at Stn. 26 is 801.5 sq ft.) 4. (35 points) The following information was obtained from an angle-right traverse conducted on the surface with a total station (conventional practice for HI and HS, i.e. HS is above the target of interest and, therefore, indicated as negative in the notes): BS IS FS Angle Rt. Zenith Angle SD HI HS A B C 261°12’20” 97° 25’20” 355.33 4.99 -0.33 261°11’40” 262° 34’20” The position of B is N5000.00, E5000.00, El 5000.00. The azimuth of A to B is 49°18’30”. Determine the coordinates and elevation of C. Show and identify all intermediate calculations.

NAME: _____________________________________________ (print) INTRODUCTORY SURVEYING – MINING ENGINEERING 2400 Second Midterm Exam October 24, 2014 Work all four problems in the space provided. Solutions must be neat and logically presented for full credit. 1. (25 pts) Put an “X” over the letter corresponding to correct answers for the following multiple choice questions. A theodolite is used to estimate a distance using stadia. The stadia factor is 100, the stadia constant is zero, the zenith angle is 90°, the upper reading is 10.20, the rod reading is 7.75 and the lower reading is 5.30. The best estimate for horizontal distance is: (a) 1020 ft; (b) 490 ft; (c) 245 ft; (d) if none of the preceding – provide your answer . From B the azimuth to A is 233° 15′ 30″. The angle right to C is 215° 05′ 15″. The azimuth of C to B is: (a)88°20’45”; (b) 268°20’45”; (c) 250°10’30”; (d) if none of the preceding – provide your answer. A five-level station is described as C3.5/34.1 C4.8/25.0 C6.7/0.0 C9.2/25.0 C10.8/33.6. How wide is the road? (a) 50.0 ft, (b) 67.7 ft, (c) 25.0 ft, (e) if none of the preceding – provide your answer . An engineer used a total station to complete a closed traverse at a construction site. The sum of LAT and sum of DEP were determined to be 0.04 and 0.07 respectively. The total horizontal distance measured 2510.00 ft. What is the corresponding precision? (a) 1/63000; (b) 1/36000; (c) 1/31000; (d) if none of the preceding-provide your answer. The interior angles of a closed six sided traverse measure: 34° 28′ 20″ 185° 37′ 00″ 110° 59′ 20″ 195° 10′ 40″ 81° 40′ 20″ 112° 05′ 20″ In adjusting this traverse, the adjusted value for the first angle is: (a) 34° 28′ 20″; (b) 34° 28′ 10″; ( c) 34° 28′ 30″; (d) if none of the preceding – provide your answer . 2. (15 pts) Given the position of points A and B, determine the azimuth of A to B to the nearest second. Point A 5470.00N 4710.00E Point B 5130.00N 5350.00E 3. (25 pts) The volume of a fill between station 24+00 and 26+00 on a 50-foot wide road is to be determined by the prismoidal method. The three level sections are given by: Stn. 24+00 F10.0 F12.0 F8.0 52.0 0.0 65.0 Stn. 25+00 F8.0 F10.0 F10.0 55.0 0.0 52.0 Stn. 26+00 F12.0 F8.0 F15.0 61.0 0.0 55.0 Determine the volume to the nearest 100 cubic feet. (All fill dimensions are in feet.) (Hint: The area at Stn. 25 is 760 sq ft and the area at Stn. 26 is 801.5 sq ft.) 4. (35 points) The following information was obtained from an angle-right traverse conducted on the surface with a total station (conventional practice for HI and HS, i.e. HS is above the target of interest and, therefore, indicated as negative in the notes): BS IS FS Angle Rt. Zenith Angle SD HI HS A B C 261°12’20” 97° 25’20” 355.33 4.99 -0.33 261°11’40” 262° 34’20” The position of B is N5000.00, E5000.00, El 5000.00. The azimuth of A to B is 49°18’30”. Determine the coordinates and elevation of C. Show and identify all intermediate calculations.

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MCE 260 Fall 2015 Homework 9, due November 12, 2015. PRESENT CLEARLY HOW YOU DEVELOPED THE SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS Each problem is worth up to 5 points. Points are given as follows: 5 points: Work was complete and presented clearly, the answer is correct 4 points: Work was complete, but not clearly presented or some errors in calculation 3 points: Some errors or omissions in methods or presentation 2 points: Major errors or omissions in methods or presentation 1 point: Problem was understood but incorrect approach was used 1. The radial compressor shown above (with dimensions) has a crank that rotates at 120 RPM. What is the maximal acceleration of each piston? 2. Design a follower displacement profile for a double-dwell (RDFD) cam, with these performance specifications: Machine cycle is 5 seconds. Rise from 0 to 22 mm in 45 degrees. Dwell for 45 degrees. Fall from 22 mm back to zero in 90 degrees. Dwell for the remainder of the machine cycle. You may use any profile that satisfies the fundamental law of cam design. Write equations for follower displacement (s) as a function of cam angle (θ) for each of the four segments of the cam. 3. (10% extra credit) What is the maximal acceleration of the follower? At which point in the cycle does it occur? Page 1 of 1

MCE 260 Fall 2015 Homework 9, due November 12, 2015. PRESENT CLEARLY HOW YOU DEVELOPED THE SOLUTION TO THE PROBLEMS Each problem is worth up to 5 points. Points are given as follows: 5 points: Work was complete and presented clearly, the answer is correct 4 points: Work was complete, but not clearly presented or some errors in calculation 3 points: Some errors or omissions in methods or presentation 2 points: Major errors or omissions in methods or presentation 1 point: Problem was understood but incorrect approach was used 1. The radial compressor shown above (with dimensions) has a crank that rotates at 120 RPM. What is the maximal acceleration of each piston? 2. Design a follower displacement profile for a double-dwell (RDFD) cam, with these performance specifications: Machine cycle is 5 seconds. Rise from 0 to 22 mm in 45 degrees. Dwell for 45 degrees. Fall from 22 mm back to zero in 90 degrees. Dwell for the remainder of the machine cycle. You may use any profile that satisfies the fundamental law of cam design. Write equations for follower displacement (s) as a function of cam angle (θ) for each of the four segments of the cam. 3. (10% extra credit) What is the maximal acceleration of the follower? At which point in the cycle does it occur? Page 1 of 1

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Attached Files: File Operational Definitions for 670.doc (25.5 KB) Amply armed with all the information you have learned throughout these last 7 weeks (paying special attention to Chapters 11-14), complete a “mini public relations proposal.” Following is a checklist of what is expected in this proposal: 1. Name of the organization and a brief explanation/description (Example: it is a boutique that specializes in selling high-end bridal gowns; it is a nonprofit organization that raises money for children whose parents are wounded veterans, etc.) PLEASE NOTE: No fictitious organizations, please! 2. ONE Overaching Goal (to persuade, inform, educate, etc.) 3. ONE suggestion for the research you plan to conduct. Explain the method (survey, phone interviews, etc.), who you are researching, and why you think this method is most conducive for this communication campaign. 4. ONE behavioral objective (see handouts a) RECALL PLOT: public, level of obtainment, timeframe) b). RECALL that the objective is what you want your target public to do 5. ONE action strategy (RECALL that the strategy is what you are planning to do meet your objective – your gameplan) 6. ONE message strategy (what your message will say) 7. TWO communication tactics 8. ONE technique for measuring whether the objective was met IMPORTANT NOTES: > USE the prsa operational definitions (SEE ATTACHED HANDOUT) > USE subheads for each part of the proposal OR you can just number the components (1-8) > The rubric for this last report is very simple: points will be deducted for each component you do not include or if it is written incorrectly or does not meet all the critiera mapped out in the attached handout.

Attached Files: File Operational Definitions for 670.doc (25.5 KB) Amply armed with all the information you have learned throughout these last 7 weeks (paying special attention to Chapters 11-14), complete a “mini public relations proposal.” Following is a checklist of what is expected in this proposal: 1. Name of the organization and a brief explanation/description (Example: it is a boutique that specializes in selling high-end bridal gowns; it is a nonprofit organization that raises money for children whose parents are wounded veterans, etc.) PLEASE NOTE: No fictitious organizations, please! 2. ONE Overaching Goal (to persuade, inform, educate, etc.) 3. ONE suggestion for the research you plan to conduct. Explain the method (survey, phone interviews, etc.), who you are researching, and why you think this method is most conducive for this communication campaign. 4. ONE behavioral objective (see handouts a) RECALL PLOT: public, level of obtainment, timeframe) b). RECALL that the objective is what you want your target public to do 5. ONE action strategy (RECALL that the strategy is what you are planning to do meet your objective – your gameplan) 6. ONE message strategy (what your message will say) 7. TWO communication tactics 8. ONE technique for measuring whether the objective was met IMPORTANT NOTES: > USE the prsa operational definitions (SEE ATTACHED HANDOUT) > USE subheads for each part of the proposal OR you can just number the components (1-8) > The rubric for this last report is very simple: points will be deducted for each component you do not include or if it is written incorrectly or does not meet all the critiera mapped out in the attached handout.

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– 1 – Laboratory 1 Introduction: In this lab you will look at two problems that are at the heart of calculus. Each of these experiments illustrates a core calculus concept. You should perform each experiment taking notes and pictures. You will use these to write up your results. You are expected to use a word processor to produce the laboratory. Graphing software should be used to draw your graphs and illustrations. You can also include pictures you have taken. Equations should be written using “equation editor” software. In short, the laboratory should have a professional look and feel to it. It should be of publishable quality. You report should be printed on 8.5 x 11 inch paper and include a title page (format will be discussed in class). Each page should be numbered. You can work in groups of 3 on this laboratory. If you do this, you must include a page right after the title page and before the report that includes a list of the contributions of each member of the group has made. Question 1 Suppose you start 10 feet away from a wall and walk 5 feet toward the wall and stop. Now walk 2.5 feet toward the wall and stop. Keep going each time walking half the distance of your previous walk toward the wall. 1. Where are you after three walks? 2. Where are you after 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 walks? 3. Create a function where n is the number of the walk and f(n) is the distance from the wall. 4. Graph this function. 5. Using your modeling skills find a model for this function. 6. If you walk forever, were will you end up? For this one write a paragraph defending your location. 7. If instead of walking one half as far as the previous walk, walk one third. That is start 9 feet away from the wall and walk 3 feet, then 1 foot, then 1/3 of a foot, etc. Where do you end up this time? Again write a paragraph. 8. Discuss you experiment in relation Zeno’s Paradox called Achilles and Tortoise. – 2 – Question 2 Here you are going to find the circumference and area of a circle by approximating it with polygons. 1. Start by drawing a circle with radius 3” on a sheet of paper. (You should include your drawings in laboratory report. You should be able to get two per page.) 2. Divide the circle into 3 equal parts. 3. Now connect adjacent points on the circumference to form 3 triangles as shown below. You need to find the area of these isosceles triangles and the length of the bases (red lines). 4. In a table keep track of the following: a. The number of triangles. b. The sum of the lengths of the bases. This is your approximation for the circumference. Label this column, C. c. The sum of the areas of the triangles. This is your approximation for the area of the circle. Label this column , A. d. In a column divide your approximation for the circumference by 2*r. This value should be 6 since r is the radius of your circle is 3. Label this column P1 e. In a column divide your approximation for the area by r2 or 9. Label this column P2. – 3 – 5. Repeat this process for n = 4 … 15 recording your results in the correct columns. 6. Create the two functions described below. You should the graph for each of these functions separately. a. C(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the circumference. b. A(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the area. 7. For the two functions created in step 6 find a model for each function. 8. If we were to continue this experiment — let n grow larger without bound then what values do C and A will approach. Write a paragraph for each variable explaining your reasoning. 9. Then examine the P1 and P2 columns of your table. Write a paragraph on what you if n is allowed to grow larger without bound.

– 1 – Laboratory 1 Introduction: In this lab you will look at two problems that are at the heart of calculus. Each of these experiments illustrates a core calculus concept. You should perform each experiment taking notes and pictures. You will use these to write up your results. You are expected to use a word processor to produce the laboratory. Graphing software should be used to draw your graphs and illustrations. You can also include pictures you have taken. Equations should be written using “equation editor” software. In short, the laboratory should have a professional look and feel to it. It should be of publishable quality. You report should be printed on 8.5 x 11 inch paper and include a title page (format will be discussed in class). Each page should be numbered. You can work in groups of 3 on this laboratory. If you do this, you must include a page right after the title page and before the report that includes a list of the contributions of each member of the group has made. Question 1 Suppose you start 10 feet away from a wall and walk 5 feet toward the wall and stop. Now walk 2.5 feet toward the wall and stop. Keep going each time walking half the distance of your previous walk toward the wall. 1. Where are you after three walks? 2. Where are you after 2, 3, 4, 5, 10 walks? 3. Create a function where n is the number of the walk and f(n) is the distance from the wall. 4. Graph this function. 5. Using your modeling skills find a model for this function. 6. If you walk forever, were will you end up? For this one write a paragraph defending your location. 7. If instead of walking one half as far as the previous walk, walk one third. That is start 9 feet away from the wall and walk 3 feet, then 1 foot, then 1/3 of a foot, etc. Where do you end up this time? Again write a paragraph. 8. Discuss you experiment in relation Zeno’s Paradox called Achilles and Tortoise. – 2 – Question 2 Here you are going to find the circumference and area of a circle by approximating it with polygons. 1. Start by drawing a circle with radius 3” on a sheet of paper. (You should include your drawings in laboratory report. You should be able to get two per page.) 2. Divide the circle into 3 equal parts. 3. Now connect adjacent points on the circumference to form 3 triangles as shown below. You need to find the area of these isosceles triangles and the length of the bases (red lines). 4. In a table keep track of the following: a. The number of triangles. b. The sum of the lengths of the bases. This is your approximation for the circumference. Label this column, C. c. The sum of the areas of the triangles. This is your approximation for the area of the circle. Label this column , A. d. In a column divide your approximation for the circumference by 2*r. This value should be 6 since r is the radius of your circle is 3. Label this column P1 e. In a column divide your approximation for the area by r2 or 9. Label this column P2. – 3 – 5. Repeat this process for n = 4 … 15 recording your results in the correct columns. 6. Create the two functions described below. You should the graph for each of these functions separately. a. C(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the circumference. b. A(n) which associates n to the corresponding approximation of the area. 7. For the two functions created in step 6 find a model for each function. 8. If we were to continue this experiment — let n grow larger without bound then what values do C and A will approach. Write a paragraph for each variable explaining your reasoning. 9. Then examine the P1 and P2 columns of your table. Write a paragraph on what you if n is allowed to grow larger without bound.

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Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER: Correct Part B At which lettered point or points is the object moving to the negative direction? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 2.7 The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Part A Is the object moving the fastest? ANSWER: A B C D E Correct Part B Is the object speeding up? ANSWER: Correct Part C Is the object moving to the left and turning around? ANSWER: A B C D E F A B C D E F Correct Kinematic Vocabulary One of the difficulties in studying mechanics is that many common words are used with highly specific technical meanings, among them velocity, acceleration, position, speed, and displacement. The series of questions in this problem is designed to get you to try to think of these quantities like a physicist. Answer the questions in this problem using words from the following list: A. position B. direction C. displacement D. coordinates E. velocity F. acceleration G. distance H. magnitude I. vector J. scalar K. components Part A Velocity differs from speed in that velocity indicates a particle’s __________ of motion. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part B Unlike speed, velocity is a __________ quantity. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part C A vector has, by definition, both __________ and direction. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part D Once you have selected a coordinate system, you can express a two-dimensional vector using a pair of quantities known collectively as __________. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part E Speed differs from velocity in the same way that __________ differs from displacement. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. Hint 1. Definition of displacement Displacement is the vector that indicates the difference of two positions (e.g., the final position from the initial position). Being a vector, it is independent of the coordinate system used to describe it (although its vector components depend on the coordinate system). ANSWER: Correct Part F Consider a physical situation in which a particle moves from point A to point B. This process is described from two coordinate systems that are identical except that they have different origins. The __________ of the particle at point A differ(s) as expressed in one coordinate system compared to the other, but the __________ from A to B is/are the same as expressed in both coordinate systems. Type the letters from the list given in the problem introduction that best complete the sentence. Separate the letters with commas. There is more than one correct answer, but you should only enter one pair of comma-separated letters. For example, if the words “vector” and “scalar” fit best in the blanks, enter I,J. ANSWER: Correct The coordinates of a point will depend on the coordinate system that is chosen, but there are several other quantities that are independent of the choice of origin for a coordinate system: in particular, distance, displacement, direction, and velocity. In working physics problems, unless you are interested in the position of an object or event relative to a specific origin, you can usually choose the coordinate system origin to be wherever is most convenient or intuitive. Note that the vector indicating a displacement from A to B is usually represented as . Part G Identify the following physical quantities as scalars or vectors. ANSWER: rB A = rB − rA Correct Problem 2.4 The figure is the position-versus-time graph of a jogger. Part A What is the jogger’s velocity at = 10 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What is the jogger’s velocity at = 25 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the jogger’s velocity at = 35 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t s v = 1.3 ms t s v = 0 ms t s v = -5.0 ms Correct Analyzing Position versus Time Graphs: Conceptual Question Two cars travel on the parallel lanes of a two-lane road. The cars’ motions are represented by the position versus time graph shown in the figure. Answer the questions using the times from the graph indicated by letters. Part A At which of the times do the two cars pass each other? Hint 1. Two cars passing Two objects can pass each other only if they have the same position at the same time. ANSWER: Correct Part B Are the two cars traveling in the same direction when they pass each other? ANSWER: Correct Part C At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #1 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E None Cannot be determined yes no Correct Part D At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #2 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E none cannot be determined A B C D E none cannot be determined Correct Part E At which of the lettered times are the cars moving with nearly identical velocity? Hint 1. Determining Velocity from a Position versus Time Graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.6 A particle starts from 10 at = 0 and moves with the velocity graph shown in the figure. A B C D E None Cannot be determined m t0 Part A Does this particle have a turning point? ANSWER: Correct Part B If so, at what time? Express your answer using two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the object’s position at = 2, 3, 4 ? Yes No t = 1.0 s t s Express your answers using two significant figures separated by commas. ANSWER: Correct Overcoming a Head Start Cars A and B are racing each other along the same straight road in the following manner: Car A has a head start and is a distance beyond the starting line at . The starting line is at . Car A travels at a constant speed . Car B starts at the starting line but has a better engine than Car A, and thus Car B travels at a constant speed , which is greater than . Part A How long after Car B started the race will Car B catch up with Car A? Express the time in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. Consider the kinematics relation Write an expression for the displacement of Car A from the starting line at a time after Car B starts. (Note that we are taking this time to be .) Answer in terms of , , , and for time, and take at the starting line. Hint 1. What is the acceleration of Car A? The acceleration of Car A is zero, so the general formula has at least one term equal to zero. ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the relation between the positions of the two cars? x2 , x3 , x4 = 10,16,26 m DA t = 0 x = 0 vA vB vA t t = 0 vA vB DA t x = 0 x(t) = x0 + v0t + (1/2)at2 xA(t) = DA + vAt The positions of the two cars are equal at time . Hint 3. Consider Car B’s position as a function of time Write down an expression for the position of Car B at time after starting. Give your answer in terms of any variables needed (use for time). ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How far from Car B’s starting line will the cars be when Car B passes Car A? Express your answer in terms of known quantities. (You may use as well.) Hint 1. Which expression should you use? Just use your expression for the position of either car after time , and substitute in the correct value for (found in the previous part). ANSWER: Correct tcatch t t xB(t) = vBt tcatch = DA vB−vA tcatch t = 0 tcatch dpass = vBDA vB−vA Problem 2.11 The figure shows the velocity graph of a particle moving along the x-axis. Its initial position is at . At = 2 , what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? Part A Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x0 = 2 m t0 = 0 t s x = 6.0 m vx = 4.0 ms Correct Part C Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.13 A jet plane is cruising at 300 when suddenly the pilot turns the engines up to full throttle. After traveling 3.9 , the jet is moving with a speed of 400 . Part A What is the jet’s acceleration, assuming it to be a constant acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.20 A rock is tossed straight up with a velocity of 22 When it returns, it falls into a hole deep. You may want to review ( pages 51 – 54) . ax = 2.0 m s2 m/s km m/s a = 9.0 m s2 m/s 10 m For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations For general problem-solving tips and strategies for this topic, you may want to view a Video Tutor Solution of Time in the air for a tossed ball. Part A What is the rock’s velocity as it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the rock, including its launch point, initial direction, and end point in the hole. Choose a coordinate system, and indicate it on your picture. Where is ? What is the positive direction? What is the position of the launch point and the bottom of the hole? In this coordinate system, what is the sign of the initial velocity and the sign of the acceleration? Calling the launch time , what is the equation for as a function of time? What is the position at the bottom of the hole? This will lead to a quadratic equation for the time when the rock hits the bottom of the hole. The quadratic equation has two solutions for the time. Not all mathematical solutions make sense physically. Which solution makes sense physically in terms of the picture that you drew at the beginning? Keeping the same coordinate system, what is the velocity in the direction as a function of time? What is the velocity when the rock hits the bottom of the hole? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rock in the air, from the instant it is released until it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. y = 0 m y t = 0 y y t y y v = -26.1 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the time the rock was in the air related to the time at which the rock hit the ground in Part A? ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.23 A particle moving along the x-axis has its position described by the function 2.00 5.00 5.00 , where is in s. At = 4.00, what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? You may want to review ( pages 38 – 42) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Polynomial Functions t = 4.90 s x = ( t3 − t + ) m t t Part A Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Evaluate the position at time = 4.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the velocity as a function of time, , from the position, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer with the appropriate units. t s 113 m v(t) x(t) v(t) v 91.0 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the acceleration as a function of time, , from the velocity, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine the acceleration at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.26 A particle’s position on the x-axis is given by the function 6.00 6.00 , where is in s. Part A Where is the particle when = 4.00 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.30 A particle’s velocity is described by the function = , where is in . a(t) v(t) a(t) 48.0 m s2 x = (t2 − t + ) m t vx m/s 1.00 m vx t2 − 7t + 7 m/s t s Part A How many turning points does the particle reach. Express your answer as an integer. ANSWER: Correct Part B At what times does the particle reach its turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s acceleration at each of the turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct 2 t1 , t2 = 5.8,1.2 s a1 , a2 = 4.6,-4.6 m/s2 Problem 2.49 A 200 weather rocket is loaded with 100 of fuel and fired straight up. It accelerates upward at 35 for 30 , then runs out of fuel. Ignore any air resistance effects. Part A What is the rocket’s maximum altitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rocket in the air? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Problem 2.52 A hotel elevator ascends with maximum speed of . Its acceleration and deceleration both have a magnitude of . Part A How far does the elevator move while accelerating to full speed from rest? kg kg m/s2 s h = 72 km t = 260 s 200 m 5 m/s 1.0 m/s2 Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take to make the complete trip from bottom to top? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from -5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. 12.5 m 45.0 s A D Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to derive the component A component of a vector is its length (but with appropriate sign) along a particular coordinate axis, the axes being specfied in advance. You are asked for the component of that lies along the x axis, which is horizontal in this problem. Imagine two lines perpendicular to the x axis running from the head (end with the arrow) and tail of down to the x axis. The length of the x axis between the points where these lines intersect is the x component of . In this problem, the x component is the x coordinate at which the perpendicular from the head of the vector hits the origin (because the tail of the vector is at the origin). ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct A A A A Ax = 2.5 A Ay = 3 Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Consider the direction Don’t forget the sign. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. How to find the start and end points of the vector components A vector is defined only by its magnitude and direction. The starting point of the vector is of no consequence to its definition. Therefore, you need to somehow eliminate the starting point from your answer. You can run two perpendiculars to the x axis, one from the head (end with the arrow) of , and another to the tail, with the x component being the difference between x coordinates of head and tail (negative if the tail is to the right of the head). Another way is to imagine bringing the tail of to the origin, and then using the same procedure you used before to find the components of and . This is equivalent to the previous method, but it might be easier to visualize. ANSWER: B By = -3 x C C C A B Cx = -2 Correct The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. A B Bx, By = 2,-3 D Dx, Dy = 2,-3 B D ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.6 Find x- and y-components of the following vectors. Part A Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. = (r 430m, 60& below positive x − axis) rx, ry = 210,-370 m v = (610m/s, 23& above positive x − axis) Correct Part C Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.10 Part A Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: vx, vy = 560,240 m/s a = (7.3m/s2 , negative y − direction) ax, ay = 0,-7.3 m/s2 B = −4 + 4 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct B B = 5.7 Part C Find the direction of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: B = 45 above the B negative x-axis & = (−2.0 − 1.0 ) cm r ı ^  ^ Correct Part E Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct r r = 2.2 cm Part F Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part G Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: r = 26.6 below the r negative x-axis & = (−10 − 100 ) m/s v ı ^  ^ Correct Part H Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using four significant figures. ANSWER: Correct v v = 100.5 m/s Part I Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part J Draw . Draw the vector with it’s tail at the origin. ANSWER: v = 84.3 below the v negative x-axis & = (20 + 10 ) m/ a ı ^  ^ s2 Correct Part K Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part L a a = 22.4 m/s2 Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.14 Let , , and . Part A What is the component form of vector ? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of vector ? ANSWER: a = 26.6 above the a positive x-axis & A = 5 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −2 + 6 ı ^  ^ D = A − B D D = 7 − 8 ı ^  ^ D = −7 − 5 ı ^  ^ D = 7 + 8 ı ^  ^ D = 4 + 5 ı ^  ^ D Correct Part C What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.15 Let , , and . Part A Write vector in component form. ANSWER: D = 10.6 D  = 49 & below positive x-axis A = 4 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −3 + 5 ı ^  ^ E = 4A + 2B E E = 10 + 2 ı ^  ^ E = + 10 ı ^  ^ E = −10 ^ E = 10 − 2 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Draw vectors , , and . Draw the vectors with their tails at the origin. ANSWER: Correct Part C A B E What is the magnitude of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.24 Part A What is the angle between vectors and in the figure? Express your answer with the appropriate units. E E = 10.0 E  = 11 & counterclockwise from positive direction of x-axis  E F ANSWER: Correct Part B Use components to determine the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part C Use components to determine the direction of . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 91.3%.  = 71.6 & G = E + F  G = 3.00 G = E + F   = 90.0 & You received 129.62 out of a possible total of 142 points.

Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER: Correct Part B At which lettered point or points is the object moving to the negative direction? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 2.7 The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Part A Is the object moving the fastest? ANSWER: A B C D E Correct Part B Is the object speeding up? ANSWER: Correct Part C Is the object moving to the left and turning around? ANSWER: A B C D E F A B C D E F Correct Kinematic Vocabulary One of the difficulties in studying mechanics is that many common words are used with highly specific technical meanings, among them velocity, acceleration, position, speed, and displacement. The series of questions in this problem is designed to get you to try to think of these quantities like a physicist. Answer the questions in this problem using words from the following list: A. position B. direction C. displacement D. coordinates E. velocity F. acceleration G. distance H. magnitude I. vector J. scalar K. components Part A Velocity differs from speed in that velocity indicates a particle’s __________ of motion. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part B Unlike speed, velocity is a __________ quantity. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part C A vector has, by definition, both __________ and direction. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part D Once you have selected a coordinate system, you can express a two-dimensional vector using a pair of quantities known collectively as __________. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part E Speed differs from velocity in the same way that __________ differs from displacement. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. Hint 1. Definition of displacement Displacement is the vector that indicates the difference of two positions (e.g., the final position from the initial position). Being a vector, it is independent of the coordinate system used to describe it (although its vector components depend on the coordinate system). ANSWER: Correct Part F Consider a physical situation in which a particle moves from point A to point B. This process is described from two coordinate systems that are identical except that they have different origins. The __________ of the particle at point A differ(s) as expressed in one coordinate system compared to the other, but the __________ from A to B is/are the same as expressed in both coordinate systems. Type the letters from the list given in the problem introduction that best complete the sentence. Separate the letters with commas. There is more than one correct answer, but you should only enter one pair of comma-separated letters. For example, if the words “vector” and “scalar” fit best in the blanks, enter I,J. ANSWER: Correct The coordinates of a point will depend on the coordinate system that is chosen, but there are several other quantities that are independent of the choice of origin for a coordinate system: in particular, distance, displacement, direction, and velocity. In working physics problems, unless you are interested in the position of an object or event relative to a specific origin, you can usually choose the coordinate system origin to be wherever is most convenient or intuitive. Note that the vector indicating a displacement from A to B is usually represented as . Part G Identify the following physical quantities as scalars or vectors. ANSWER: rB A = rB − rA Correct Problem 2.4 The figure is the position-versus-time graph of a jogger. Part A What is the jogger’s velocity at = 10 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What is the jogger’s velocity at = 25 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the jogger’s velocity at = 35 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t s v = 1.3 ms t s v = 0 ms t s v = -5.0 ms Correct Analyzing Position versus Time Graphs: Conceptual Question Two cars travel on the parallel lanes of a two-lane road. The cars’ motions are represented by the position versus time graph shown in the figure. Answer the questions using the times from the graph indicated by letters. Part A At which of the times do the two cars pass each other? Hint 1. Two cars passing Two objects can pass each other only if they have the same position at the same time. ANSWER: Correct Part B Are the two cars traveling in the same direction when they pass each other? ANSWER: Correct Part C At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #1 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E None Cannot be determined yes no Correct Part D At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #2 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E none cannot be determined A B C D E none cannot be determined Correct Part E At which of the lettered times are the cars moving with nearly identical velocity? Hint 1. Determining Velocity from a Position versus Time Graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.6 A particle starts from 10 at = 0 and moves with the velocity graph shown in the figure. A B C D E None Cannot be determined m t0 Part A Does this particle have a turning point? ANSWER: Correct Part B If so, at what time? Express your answer using two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the object’s position at = 2, 3, 4 ? Yes No t = 1.0 s t s Express your answers using two significant figures separated by commas. ANSWER: Correct Overcoming a Head Start Cars A and B are racing each other along the same straight road in the following manner: Car A has a head start and is a distance beyond the starting line at . The starting line is at . Car A travels at a constant speed . Car B starts at the starting line but has a better engine than Car A, and thus Car B travels at a constant speed , which is greater than . Part A How long after Car B started the race will Car B catch up with Car A? Express the time in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. Consider the kinematics relation Write an expression for the displacement of Car A from the starting line at a time after Car B starts. (Note that we are taking this time to be .) Answer in terms of , , , and for time, and take at the starting line. Hint 1. What is the acceleration of Car A? The acceleration of Car A is zero, so the general formula has at least one term equal to zero. ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the relation between the positions of the two cars? x2 , x3 , x4 = 10,16,26 m DA t = 0 x = 0 vA vB vA t t = 0 vA vB DA t x = 0 x(t) = x0 + v0t + (1/2)at2 xA(t) = DA + vAt The positions of the two cars are equal at time . Hint 3. Consider Car B’s position as a function of time Write down an expression for the position of Car B at time after starting. Give your answer in terms of any variables needed (use for time). ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How far from Car B’s starting line will the cars be when Car B passes Car A? Express your answer in terms of known quantities. (You may use as well.) Hint 1. Which expression should you use? Just use your expression for the position of either car after time , and substitute in the correct value for (found in the previous part). ANSWER: Correct tcatch t t xB(t) = vBt tcatch = DA vB−vA tcatch t = 0 tcatch dpass = vBDA vB−vA Problem 2.11 The figure shows the velocity graph of a particle moving along the x-axis. Its initial position is at . At = 2 , what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? Part A Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x0 = 2 m t0 = 0 t s x = 6.0 m vx = 4.0 ms Correct Part C Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.13 A jet plane is cruising at 300 when suddenly the pilot turns the engines up to full throttle. After traveling 3.9 , the jet is moving with a speed of 400 . Part A What is the jet’s acceleration, assuming it to be a constant acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.20 A rock is tossed straight up with a velocity of 22 When it returns, it falls into a hole deep. You may want to review ( pages 51 – 54) . ax = 2.0 m s2 m/s km m/s a = 9.0 m s2 m/s 10 m For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations For general problem-solving tips and strategies for this topic, you may want to view a Video Tutor Solution of Time in the air for a tossed ball. Part A What is the rock’s velocity as it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the rock, including its launch point, initial direction, and end point in the hole. Choose a coordinate system, and indicate it on your picture. Where is ? What is the positive direction? What is the position of the launch point and the bottom of the hole? In this coordinate system, what is the sign of the initial velocity and the sign of the acceleration? Calling the launch time , what is the equation for as a function of time? What is the position at the bottom of the hole? This will lead to a quadratic equation for the time when the rock hits the bottom of the hole. The quadratic equation has two solutions for the time. Not all mathematical solutions make sense physically. Which solution makes sense physically in terms of the picture that you drew at the beginning? Keeping the same coordinate system, what is the velocity in the direction as a function of time? What is the velocity when the rock hits the bottom of the hole? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rock in the air, from the instant it is released until it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. y = 0 m y t = 0 y y t y y v = -26.1 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the time the rock was in the air related to the time at which the rock hit the ground in Part A? ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.23 A particle moving along the x-axis has its position described by the function 2.00 5.00 5.00 , where is in s. At = 4.00, what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? You may want to review ( pages 38 – 42) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Polynomial Functions t = 4.90 s x = ( t3 − t + ) m t t Part A Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Evaluate the position at time = 4.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the velocity as a function of time, , from the position, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer with the appropriate units. t s 113 m v(t) x(t) v(t) v 91.0 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the acceleration as a function of time, , from the velocity, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine the acceleration at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.26 A particle’s position on the x-axis is given by the function 6.00 6.00 , where is in s. Part A Where is the particle when = 4.00 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.30 A particle’s velocity is described by the function = , where is in . a(t) v(t) a(t) 48.0 m s2 x = (t2 − t + ) m t vx m/s 1.00 m vx t2 − 7t + 7 m/s t s Part A How many turning points does the particle reach. Express your answer as an integer. ANSWER: Correct Part B At what times does the particle reach its turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s acceleration at each of the turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct 2 t1 , t2 = 5.8,1.2 s a1 , a2 = 4.6,-4.6 m/s2 Problem 2.49 A 200 weather rocket is loaded with 100 of fuel and fired straight up. It accelerates upward at 35 for 30 , then runs out of fuel. Ignore any air resistance effects. Part A What is the rocket’s maximum altitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rocket in the air? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Problem 2.52 A hotel elevator ascends with maximum speed of . Its acceleration and deceleration both have a magnitude of . Part A How far does the elevator move while accelerating to full speed from rest? kg kg m/s2 s h = 72 km t = 260 s 200 m 5 m/s 1.0 m/s2 Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take to make the complete trip from bottom to top? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from -5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. 12.5 m 45.0 s A D Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to derive the component A component of a vector is its length (but with appropriate sign) along a particular coordinate axis, the axes being specfied in advance. You are asked for the component of that lies along the x axis, which is horizontal in this problem. Imagine two lines perpendicular to the x axis running from the head (end with the arrow) and tail of down to the x axis. The length of the x axis between the points where these lines intersect is the x component of . In this problem, the x component is the x coordinate at which the perpendicular from the head of the vector hits the origin (because the tail of the vector is at the origin). ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct A A A A Ax = 2.5 A Ay = 3 Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Consider the direction Don’t forget the sign. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. How to find the start and end points of the vector components A vector is defined only by its magnitude and direction. The starting point of the vector is of no consequence to its definition. Therefore, you need to somehow eliminate the starting point from your answer. You can run two perpendiculars to the x axis, one from the head (end with the arrow) of , and another to the tail, with the x component being the difference between x coordinates of head and tail (negative if the tail is to the right of the head). Another way is to imagine bringing the tail of to the origin, and then using the same procedure you used before to find the components of and . This is equivalent to the previous method, but it might be easier to visualize. ANSWER: B By = -3 x C C C A B Cx = -2 Correct The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. A B Bx, By = 2,-3 D Dx, Dy = 2,-3 B D ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.6 Find x- and y-components of the following vectors. Part A Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. = (r 430m, 60& below positive x − axis) rx, ry = 210,-370 m v = (610m/s, 23& above positive x − axis) Correct Part C Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.10 Part A Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: vx, vy = 560,240 m/s a = (7.3m/s2 , negative y − direction) ax, ay = 0,-7.3 m/s2 B = −4 + 4 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct B B = 5.7 Part C Find the direction of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: B = 45 above the B negative x-axis & = (−2.0 − 1.0 ) cm r ı ^  ^ Correct Part E Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct r r = 2.2 cm Part F Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part G Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: r = 26.6 below the r negative x-axis & = (−10 − 100 ) m/s v ı ^  ^ Correct Part H Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using four significant figures. ANSWER: Correct v v = 100.5 m/s Part I Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part J Draw . Draw the vector with it’s tail at the origin. ANSWER: v = 84.3 below the v negative x-axis & = (20 + 10 ) m/ a ı ^  ^ s2 Correct Part K Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part L a a = 22.4 m/s2 Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.14 Let , , and . Part A What is the component form of vector ? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of vector ? ANSWER: a = 26.6 above the a positive x-axis & A = 5 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −2 + 6 ı ^  ^ D = A − B D D = 7 − 8 ı ^  ^ D = −7 − 5 ı ^  ^ D = 7 + 8 ı ^  ^ D = 4 + 5 ı ^  ^ D Correct Part C What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.15 Let , , and . Part A Write vector in component form. ANSWER: D = 10.6 D  = 49 & below positive x-axis A = 4 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −3 + 5 ı ^  ^ E = 4A + 2B E E = 10 + 2 ı ^  ^ E = + 10 ı ^  ^ E = −10 ^ E = 10 − 2 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Draw vectors , , and . Draw the vectors with their tails at the origin. ANSWER: Correct Part C A B E What is the magnitude of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.24 Part A What is the angle between vectors and in the figure? Express your answer with the appropriate units. E E = 10.0 E  = 11 & counterclockwise from positive direction of x-axis  E F ANSWER: Correct Part B Use components to determine the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part C Use components to determine the direction of . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 91.3%.  = 71.6 & G = E + F  G = 3.00 G = E + F   = 90.0 & You received 129.62 out of a possible total of 142 points.

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