HIST 303 Rebels and Renegades Comparative Paper – Conroy & Drakulic In a well-written analysis of about 3 pages, compare and contrast Conroy’s Belfast Diary or Drakulic’s How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed in response to the following question: It can be argued that in the midst of deprivation and hardship, people still exercise considerable agency—or the power to act within one’s particular socio-political context. In fact, living the ordinary can be considered an act of rebellion against an imposing power. That is, people use and experience their lives as resistance to oppression or war. This is sometimes referred to as the “politics of everyday life”. How does this concept of agency play out in these works? In your response, do not simply list examples, but analyze the examples by the authors in relation to the larger themes of the course. A successful assignment will (this is a checklist, so heed it well!!!): * have a solid introduction with an arguable thesis; * be well organized with coherent paragraphs relevant to the thesis; * have a concluding paragraph that concisely and accurately summarizes the paper; * adequately analyze the histories and their connections to each other; * use relevant evidence to substantiate claims; * be analytic, not descriptive; * properly cite and punctuate quotations and evidence; * be paginated; * have an interesting title relevant to the argument (e.g. “Comparative Paper” is unacceptable); * be well written, well edited and well documented. Author Specific Points that discuss everyday activities as resistance Relate to your other Reading (Williams, Hall, Hebdige, etc.) Conroy Drakulic Working Thesis: _____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ****FORMATTING DIRECTIONS: This paper should be 3 – 4 pages (no more), typed, doublespaced, with one-inch margins and 12-point font. This assignment is worth 25% of your grade in this course. You must head your paper with your name and date and include your name and pages (x of x) in a header or footer of each page. At the end of your paper, you must skip four lines then sign with the following: “I attest that the work contained in this document is entirely my own and it numbers x pages.” *****

HIST 303 Rebels and Renegades Comparative Paper – Conroy & Drakulic In a well-written analysis of about 3 pages, compare and contrast Conroy’s Belfast Diary or Drakulic’s How We Survived Communism and Even Laughed in response to the following question: It can be argued that in the midst of deprivation and hardship, people still exercise considerable agency—or the power to act within one’s particular socio-political context. In fact, living the ordinary can be considered an act of rebellion against an imposing power. That is, people use and experience their lives as resistance to oppression or war. This is sometimes referred to as the “politics of everyday life”. How does this concept of agency play out in these works? In your response, do not simply list examples, but analyze the examples by the authors in relation to the larger themes of the course. A successful assignment will (this is a checklist, so heed it well!!!): * have a solid introduction with an arguable thesis; * be well organized with coherent paragraphs relevant to the thesis; * have a concluding paragraph that concisely and accurately summarizes the paper; * adequately analyze the histories and their connections to each other; * use relevant evidence to substantiate claims; * be analytic, not descriptive; * properly cite and punctuate quotations and evidence; * be paginated; * have an interesting title relevant to the argument (e.g. “Comparative Paper” is unacceptable); * be well written, well edited and well documented. Author Specific Points that discuss everyday activities as resistance Relate to your other Reading (Williams, Hall, Hebdige, etc.) Conroy Drakulic Working Thesis: _____________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ****FORMATTING DIRECTIONS: This paper should be 3 – 4 pages (no more), typed, doublespaced, with one-inch margins and 12-point font. This assignment is worth 25% of your grade in this course. You must head your paper with your name and date and include your name and pages (x of x) in a header or footer of each page. At the end of your paper, you must skip four lines then sign with the following: “I attest that the work contained in this document is entirely my own and it numbers x pages.” *****

Relative analysis of Conroy & Drakulic The Belfast Diary: War … Read More...
Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
TEXT The sole text is Daniel Bonevac’s Today’s Moral Issues. This is an extremely accessible work that organizes the subject matter of ethics into well-structured units involving both general principles and focused ethical dilemmas. The instructor will guide the students through the pertinent readings and discussion topics. Exam #3: WAR ECONOMIC EQUALITY 1. Aquinas 5. Mill 2. Grotius 6. Hospers 3. Clausewitz 7. Anderson 4. Gandhi CONCERNING THE SHORT PAPER Choose one of our dilemma topics from our book as the focus of your short paper. If you have another topic in mind, please consult with me for permission. —length: 4 to 5 pages — format: typed —number of points: 10 — submission via Bb, under “Assignments” — Format: Microsoft Word — Line Spacing: Double-Spaced —Print: Black The following is merely a suggestion for the organization of the paper, but it might be useful as an indication of how it could look: a) Initial statement of your position concerning the moral dilemma; how to resolve it, how you plan to argue for/against it. b) Amplification of your position; your main points or position. c) Backup: some cited references and supporting evidence for your position. d) Your criticisms of alternative or contrary points of view. e) Your conclusion/summing up. Plagiarism is a serious breach of academic integrity. If you submit plagiarized materials you will receive a zero on the assignment. If you need an extension of the due date for the paper, please consult with me.

TEXT The sole text is Daniel Bonevac’s Today’s Moral Issues. This is an extremely accessible work that organizes the subject matter of ethics into well-structured units involving both general principles and focused ethical dilemmas. The instructor will guide the students through the pertinent readings and discussion topics. Exam #3: WAR ECONOMIC EQUALITY 1. Aquinas 5. Mill 2. Grotius 6. Hospers 3. Clausewitz 7. Anderson 4. Gandhi CONCERNING THE SHORT PAPER Choose one of our dilemma topics from our book as the focus of your short paper. If you have another topic in mind, please consult with me for permission. —length: 4 to 5 pages — format: typed —number of points: 10 — submission via Bb, under “Assignments” — Format: Microsoft Word — Line Spacing: Double-Spaced —Print: Black The following is merely a suggestion for the organization of the paper, but it might be useful as an indication of how it could look: a) Initial statement of your position concerning the moral dilemma; how to resolve it, how you plan to argue for/against it. b) Amplification of your position; your main points or position. c) Backup: some cited references and supporting evidence for your position. d) Your criticisms of alternative or contrary points of view. e) Your conclusion/summing up. Plagiarism is a serious breach of academic integrity. If you submit plagiarized materials you will receive a zero on the assignment. If you need an extension of the due date for the paper, please consult with me.

Non-violence as a rule of love   The mainly essential … Read More...
Does Prime Minister Thatcher’s seeming willingness to fight controvert the arguments of feminist thought about international politics? A. Yes, since feminists suggest that the world would be less power- and security-oriented, their argument fails with the evidence provided by Thatcher. B. Yes, since feminist thought uniformly believes that women are naturally peace seeking, Thatcher’s rejoicing in military success destroys feminist arguments. C. No, some feminist thought suggests that women socialized in a male dominant environment would act the same as men. D. No, because Thatcher never actually spoke about the soldiers and their successes. She was shielded from having to speak about it. E. No, some feminist thought suggests that women socialized in a male dominant environment would act the same as men AND because Thatcher never actually spoke about the soldiers and their successes; she was shielded from having to speak about it.

Does Prime Minister Thatcher’s seeming willingness to fight controvert the arguments of feminist thought about international politics? A. Yes, since feminists suggest that the world would be less power- and security-oriented, their argument fails with the evidence provided by Thatcher. B. Yes, since feminist thought uniformly believes that women are naturally peace seeking, Thatcher’s rejoicing in military success destroys feminist arguments. C. No, some feminist thought suggests that women socialized in a male dominant environment would act the same as men. D. No, because Thatcher never actually spoke about the soldiers and their successes. She was shielded from having to speak about it. E. No, some feminist thought suggests that women socialized in a male dominant environment would act the same as men AND because Thatcher never actually spoke about the soldiers and their successes; she was shielded from having to speak about it.

Does Prime Minister Thatcher’s seeming willingness to fight controvert the … Read More...
A total of 800 students responded to the MATH1530 class survey during the spring semester of 2015. The name of the data file is Sp15Math1530CSTPData.MTW. The Minitab worksheet is set up as follows: C1: ID (an identification number given to each student in the data file) C2: GENDER C3: AGE (yrs) C4: WEIGHT (lbs) C5: HEIGHT (in) C6: NUCLEAR SAFETY C7: TALK POLITICS C8: WASH HANDS C9: L E CAMERAS C10: CLOTHING ARTICLES C11: CLOTHING PURCHASE ($) C12: LOWEST GAS PRICE ($) C13: FITNESS C14: SEXUAL PREDATOR MATH-1530 CAPSTONE TECHNOLOGY PROJECT SPRING SEMESTER 2015 Problem 1: Identify Variable Type. Which of these questions from the class survey measured variables that are categorical and which are quantitative? Use your word processor to underline the best option (or you may highlight in yellow if you are using a color printer). a. AGE Categorical Quantitative Neither b. NUCLEAR SAFETY Categorical Quantitative Neither c. WASH HANDS Categorical Quantitative Neither d. CLOTHING PURCHASE Categorical Quantitative Neither e. FITNESS Categorical Quantitative Neither Problem 2: Sampling. In the survey data, the variable “AGE” is the current age reported by each student. a. Type the first 10 observations from the column representing the variable AGE into the table below, and use this as your sample data for part (a). Then calculate the mean age of these first 10 observations and report the value below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AGE (yrs) The mean age of the first 10 students is years. (Type the value into the space provided) Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: b. Next, select a random sample of size n = 10 (Go to Calc > Random Data > Sample from Columns). Type the number 10 in the “Number of rows to Sample” slot. Enter the variable “ID” and “AGE” into the “From columns” slot. Enter C17-C18 into the “Store samples in” slot. Record the data for your sample in the table below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ID AGE (yrs) Calculate and report the mean age for your random sample of 10 students. The sample mean age is years. Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: c. Let’s treat all the students who responded to the survey as a population for the purposes of this problem. Use Minitab to calculate the mean age for all 800 observations included in the data set and report this value below. The mean age of the population is years. d. Compare the population mean you found in Part (c) to the sample means you found in Parts (a) and (b). Which sample provided a closer estimate of the population mean age in this case?

A total of 800 students responded to the MATH1530 class survey during the spring semester of 2015. The name of the data file is Sp15Math1530CSTPData.MTW. The Minitab worksheet is set up as follows: C1: ID (an identification number given to each student in the data file) C2: GENDER C3: AGE (yrs) C4: WEIGHT (lbs) C5: HEIGHT (in) C6: NUCLEAR SAFETY C7: TALK POLITICS C8: WASH HANDS C9: L E CAMERAS C10: CLOTHING ARTICLES C11: CLOTHING PURCHASE ($) C12: LOWEST GAS PRICE ($) C13: FITNESS C14: SEXUAL PREDATOR MATH-1530 CAPSTONE TECHNOLOGY PROJECT SPRING SEMESTER 2015 Problem 1: Identify Variable Type. Which of these questions from the class survey measured variables that are categorical and which are quantitative? Use your word processor to underline the best option (or you may highlight in yellow if you are using a color printer). a. AGE Categorical Quantitative Neither b. NUCLEAR SAFETY Categorical Quantitative Neither c. WASH HANDS Categorical Quantitative Neither d. CLOTHING PURCHASE Categorical Quantitative Neither e. FITNESS Categorical Quantitative Neither Problem 2: Sampling. In the survey data, the variable “AGE” is the current age reported by each student. a. Type the first 10 observations from the column representing the variable AGE into the table below, and use this as your sample data for part (a). Then calculate the mean age of these first 10 observations and report the value below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 AGE (yrs) The mean age of the first 10 students is years. (Type the value into the space provided) Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: b. Next, select a random sample of size n = 10 (Go to Calc > Random Data > Sample from Columns). Type the number 10 in the “Number of rows to Sample” slot. Enter the variable “ID” and “AGE” into the “From columns” slot. Enter C17-C18 into the “Store samples in” slot. Record the data for your sample in the table below. n 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 ID AGE (yrs) Calculate and report the mean age for your random sample of 10 students. The sample mean age is years. Identify the type of sampling method you have just used: c. Let’s treat all the students who responded to the survey as a population for the purposes of this problem. Use Minitab to calculate the mean age for all 800 observations included in the data set and report this value below. The mean age of the population is years. d. Compare the population mean you found in Part (c) to the sample means you found in Parts (a) and (b). Which sample provided a closer estimate of the population mean age in this case?

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The following tenets of feminist theory are all TRUE except : a) The personal is political b) The relationship between counselor and client is hierarchical c) Women’s experiences have priority d) It focuses on the influence of gender, the oppression of women, and the influence of politics and is concerned with empowerment.

The following tenets of feminist theory are all TRUE except : a) The personal is political b) The relationship between counselor and client is hierarchical c) Women’s experiences have priority d) It focuses on the influence of gender, the oppression of women, and the influence of politics and is concerned with empowerment.

answer b
HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

The 1998 Rome Charter was drafted and negotiated and at critical time in the history of international politics. In addition to numerous crimes by states, organizations, and individuals; the national political interests and sovereignty of powerful nation-states was challenged. What role did UN politics play in drafting and the Charter? According to Cassese, what crimes fall within the jurisdiction of the ICC and under what conditions can the court take action? Use the terms, Articles, and Conventions below to discuss this question. The U.N. Charter The Assembly of States The ILC The Preparatory Commission The Security Council The Vienna Conventions UN Security Council Resolution 1593 Article 18 SOFA Agreements Rome Statute Articles 1-5 Propio Motu Mens Rea Nullum Crimen Sine Lege The Nuremberg Trials

The 1998 Rome Charter was drafted and negotiated and at critical time in the history of international politics. In addition to numerous crimes by states, organizations, and individuals; the national political interests and sovereignty of powerful nation-states was challenged. What role did UN politics play in drafting and the Charter? According to Cassese, what crimes fall within the jurisdiction of the ICC and under what conditions can the court take action? Use the terms, Articles, and Conventions below to discuss this question. The U.N. Charter The Assembly of States The ILC The Preparatory Commission The Security Council The Vienna Conventions UN Security Council Resolution 1593 Article 18 SOFA Agreements Rome Statute Articles 1-5 Propio Motu Mens Rea Nullum Crimen Sine Lege The Nuremberg Trials

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