Do an internet search to find the weirdest animal ( 25 animals) Information need included: 1- name of animals. 2-description. (Your own words) 3-why do you thing it’s weird?

Do an internet search to find the weirdest animal ( 25 animals) Information need included: 1- name of animals. 2-description. (Your own words) 3-why do you thing it’s weird?

S.no Name of the animal Description and Reasons of thinking … Read More...
Copper reacts with nitric acid to produce copper(II) nitrate, nitrogen dioxide gas, and water. Cu(s) + 4 HNO3(aq)  Cu(NO3)2(aq) + 2 NO2(g) + 2 H2O() If you have 0.500 moles of Cu you need at least 2.00 moles of HNO3 to produce 0.500 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 2.00 moles of HNO3 to produce 1.00 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 2.00 moles of HNO3 to produce 2.00 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 0.250 moles of HNO3 to produce 0.500 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 0.125 moles of HNO3 to produce 0.500 moles of Cu(NO3)2.

Copper reacts with nitric acid to produce copper(II) nitrate, nitrogen dioxide gas, and water. Cu(s) + 4 HNO3(aq)  Cu(NO3)2(aq) + 2 NO2(g) + 2 H2O() If you have 0.500 moles of Cu you need at least 2.00 moles of HNO3 to produce 0.500 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 2.00 moles of HNO3 to produce 1.00 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 2.00 moles of HNO3 to produce 2.00 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 0.250 moles of HNO3 to produce 0.500 moles of Cu(NO3)2. you need at least 0.125 moles of HNO3 to produce 0.500 moles of Cu(NO3)2.

Earlier in the history of Western medicine, surgeons did not know the immune function of the thymus gland and it was sometimes removed in children. What symptoms would you now predict these patients might display afterward? Select one: increased inflammatory and allergic responses to foreign material including viruses reduced ability to recognize foreign material and distinguish it from body proteins serious problems following receiving blood transfusions of any type of blood complete rejection of all normal body tissues failure to produce any white blood cells

Earlier in the history of Western medicine, surgeons did not know the immune function of the thymus gland and it was sometimes removed in children. What symptoms would you now predict these patients might display afterward? Select one: increased inflammatory and allergic responses to foreign material including viruses reduced ability to recognize foreign material and distinguish it from body proteins serious problems following receiving blood transfusions of any type of blood complete rejection of all normal body tissues failure to produce any white blood cells

Earlier in the history of Western medicine, surgeons did not … Read More...
1. How does the milk market respond to the following events? Show Change in Supply or Demand. A) Mad cow disease hits the US herds B) Genetically Enhanced cows are 80% of all the milk cows are destroyed created and produce 30% more milk $$ Supply $$ Supply Demand Demand 0 Quantity 0 Quantity EXPLAIN: EXPLAIN: C) Moms learn that if kids drink a gallon of D) A drought wipes out all the grain milk a day, they are guaranteed to get crops and there is no breakfast prefect grades cereal produced this year. $$ Supply $$ Supply Demand Demand 0 Quantity 0 Quantity EXPLAIN: EXPLAIN: 2. The market for movie tickets has the following demand and supply schedule. (4 points) Price Demand Supply $$ $10 35 165 $8 65 105 $7 87 87 $6 99 65 $5 130 55 $3 170 35 o Q A) GRAPH Demand & Supply B) What is the equilbrium price of Movie Tickets? C) If a Price Floor of $8 is imposed on market, how many Movie Tickets are sold? D) If a Price Ceiling of $5 is imposed on the market, how many Movie Tickets are sold? 3. The economy of Winterland, produces snowflakes and icicles. Icicles Snowflakes Icicles 352 0 280 250 215 400 160 550 105 700 51 850 0 950 0 Snowflakes A) Graph Winterland’s Production Possibility Frontier. LABEL THE POINTS B) What is the Opportunity Cost of making 215 Icicles? C) What is the Opportunity Cost of making 700 Snowflakes? D) Can Harmony make 160 Icicles and 500 Snowflakes at the same time? Why or Why Not? E) Does it make sense for Harmony to choose to produce 352 Icicles and 0 Snowflakes

1. How does the milk market respond to the following events? Show Change in Supply or Demand. A) Mad cow disease hits the US herds B) Genetically Enhanced cows are 80% of all the milk cows are destroyed created and produce 30% more milk $$ Supply $$ Supply Demand Demand 0 Quantity 0 Quantity EXPLAIN: EXPLAIN: C) Moms learn that if kids drink a gallon of D) A drought wipes out all the grain milk a day, they are guaranteed to get crops and there is no breakfast prefect grades cereal produced this year. $$ Supply $$ Supply Demand Demand 0 Quantity 0 Quantity EXPLAIN: EXPLAIN: 2. The market for movie tickets has the following demand and supply schedule. (4 points) Price Demand Supply $$ $10 35 165 $8 65 105 $7 87 87 $6 99 65 $5 130 55 $3 170 35 o Q A) GRAPH Demand & Supply B) What is the equilbrium price of Movie Tickets? C) If a Price Floor of $8 is imposed on market, how many Movie Tickets are sold? D) If a Price Ceiling of $5 is imposed on the market, how many Movie Tickets are sold? 3. The economy of Winterland, produces snowflakes and icicles. Icicles Snowflakes Icicles 352 0 280 250 215 400 160 550 105 700 51 850 0 950 0 Snowflakes A) Graph Winterland’s Production Possibility Frontier. LABEL THE POINTS B) What is the Opportunity Cost of making 215 Icicles? C) What is the Opportunity Cost of making 700 Snowflakes? D) Can Harmony make 160 Icicles and 500 Snowflakes at the same time? Why or Why Not? E) Does it make sense for Harmony to choose to produce 352 Icicles and 0 Snowflakes

For any additional help, please contact: info@checkyourstudy.com Call / Whatsapp … Read More...
This condition results from the inability of the pancreas of pregnant women to produce enough insulin. Question 41 options: gestational diabetes anemia leukorrhea Goodell’s sign

This condition results from the inability of the pancreas of pregnant women to produce enough insulin. Question 41 options: gestational diabetes anemia leukorrhea Goodell’s sign

This condition results from the inability of the pancreas of … Read More...
Describe and discuss: how your study of special education has informed your professional identity

Describe and discuss: how your study of special education has informed your professional identity

The force on culture variety and linguistic diversity in special … Read More...
Project Part 1 Objective Our objective, in this Part 1 of our Project, is to practise solving a problem by composing and testing a Python program using all that we have learnt so far and discovering new things, such as lists of lists, on the way. Project – Hunting worms in our garden! No more turtles! In this project, we shall move on to worms. Indeed, our project is a game in which the player hunts for worms in our garden. Once our garden has been displayed, the player tries to guess where the worms are located by entering the coordinates of a cell in our garden. When the player has located all the worms, the game is over! Of course there are ways of making this game more exciting (hence complicated), but considering that we have 2 weeks for Part 1 and 2 weeks for Part 2, keeping it simple will be our goal. We will implement our game in two parts. In Part 1, we write code that constructs and tests our data structures i.e., our variables. In Part 2, we write code that allows the player to play a complete “worm hunting” game! ? Project – Part 1 – Description Data Structures (variables): As stated above, in Part 1, we write code that constructs our data structures i.e., our variables. In our game program, we will need data structures (variables) to represent: 1. Our garden that is displayed to the player (suggestion: list of lists), 2. The garden that contains all the worms (suggestion: another list of lists), Garden: Our garden in Part 1 of our Project will have a width and a height of 10. Warning: The width and the height of our garden may change in Part 2 of our Project. So, it may be a good idea to create 2 variables and assign the width and the height of our garden to these 2 variables. 3. Our worms and their information. For each worm, we may want to keep the following information: a. worm number, b. the location of the worm, for example, either the coordinates of the cells containing the worm OR the coordinate of the first cell containing the worm, its length and whether the worm is laying horizontally or vertically. Worms: We will create 6 worms of length 3. 4. And other variables as needed. Testing our data structures: ? Suggestion: as we create a data structure (the “displayed” garden, the garden containing the worms, each worm, etc…), print it with a “debug print statement”. Once we are certain the data structure is well constructed, comment out the “debug print statement”. Code: In Part 1, the code we write must include functions and it must include the main section of our program. In other words, in Part 1, the code we write must be a complete program. In terms of functions, here is a list of suggestions. We may have functions that … ? creates a garden (i.e., a garden data structure), ? creates the worms (i.e., the worm data structure), ? places a worm in the garden that is to hold the worms (i.e., another garden data structure), ? displays the garden on the screen for the player to see, ? displays a worm in the displayed garden, ? etc… ? Finally, in Part 1, the code we write must implement the following algorithm: Algorithm: Here is the algorithm for the main section of our game program: ? Welcome the player ? Create an empty “displayed” garden, (“displayed” because this is the garden we display to the player) ? Create the worms (worms’ information) ? Create an empty “hidden” garden Note 1: “hidden” because one can keep track of the worms in this “hidden” garden, which we do not show to the player. This is why it is called “hidden”. Note 2: One can keep track of worm’s locations using a different mechanism or data structure. It does not have to be a list of lists representing a “hidden” garden. We are free to choose how we want to keep track of where our worms are located in our garden. ? Place each worm in the “hidden” garden (or whatever mechanism or data structure we decide to use) ? Display the “displayed” garden on the screen for the player to see ? While the player wants to play, ask the player for a worm number (1 to 6), read this worm number and display this worm on the “displayed” garden. This is not the game. Remember, we shall implement the game itself in Part 2. Here, in this step, we make sure our code works properly, i.e., it can retrieve worm information and display worms properly. Displaying worms properly: Note that when we create worms and display them, it may be the case that worms overlap with other worms and that worms wrap around the garden. These 2 situations are illustrated in the 3 Sample Runs discussed below. At this point, we are ready for Part 2 of our Project. Sample Runs: In order to illustrate the explanations given above of what we are to do in this Part 1 of our Project, 3 sample runs have been posted below the description of this Part 1 of our Project on our course web site. Have a look at these 3 sample runs. The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs. Of course, the position of our worms will be different but everything else should be the same. What we see in each of these 3 sample runs is 1 execution of the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project. Note about Sample Run 1: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 2 wraps around: it starts at (row 7, column B), (row 7, column A) then wraps around to (row 7, column J). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column E), (row 1, column E) then wraps around to (row 10, column E). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 5 and 6 overlap at (row 1, column E). Note about Sample Run 2: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column B) then wraps around to (row 10, column B) and (row 9, column B). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column D) then wraps around to (row 10, column D) and (row 9, column D). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 2 and 4 overlap at (row 3, column H), worms 1 and 2 overlap at (row 3, column G) and worms 2 and 5 overlap at (row 3, column E). Note about Sample Run 3: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers in the following sequence: 3, 2, 6, 4, 5, 1, 7, 8. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column C), (row 1, column C) then wraps around to (row 10, column C). Worm 1 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column B), (row 2, column A) then wraps around to (row 2, column J). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 6 and 3 overlap at (row 1, column C) and (row 2, column C). Other Requirements: Here are a few more requirements the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project must satisfy. 1. The location of each worm in the garden must be determined randomly. 2. Whether a worm is lying horizontally or vertically must also be determined randomly. 3. It is acceptable in Part 1 of our Project if worms overlap each other (see Sample Runs) 4. When placing a worm in a garden, the worm must “wrap around” the garden. See Sample Runs for examples of what “wrapping around” signifies. How will we implement this wrapping around? Hint: wrapping around can be achieved using an arithmetic operator we have already seen. 5. We must make use of docstring when we implement our functions (have a look at our textbook for an explanation and an example). 6. Every time we encounter the word must in this description of Part 1 of our Project, we shall look upon that sentence as another requirement. For example, the sentence “The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs.”, even though it is not listed below the Other Requirements heading, is also a requirement because of its must.

Project Part 1 Objective Our objective, in this Part 1 of our Project, is to practise solving a problem by composing and testing a Python program using all that we have learnt so far and discovering new things, such as lists of lists, on the way. Project – Hunting worms in our garden! No more turtles! In this project, we shall move on to worms. Indeed, our project is a game in which the player hunts for worms in our garden. Once our garden has been displayed, the player tries to guess where the worms are located by entering the coordinates of a cell in our garden. When the player has located all the worms, the game is over! Of course there are ways of making this game more exciting (hence complicated), but considering that we have 2 weeks for Part 1 and 2 weeks for Part 2, keeping it simple will be our goal. We will implement our game in two parts. In Part 1, we write code that constructs and tests our data structures i.e., our variables. In Part 2, we write code that allows the player to play a complete “worm hunting” game! ? Project – Part 1 – Description Data Structures (variables): As stated above, in Part 1, we write code that constructs our data structures i.e., our variables. In our game program, we will need data structures (variables) to represent: 1. Our garden that is displayed to the player (suggestion: list of lists), 2. The garden that contains all the worms (suggestion: another list of lists), Garden: Our garden in Part 1 of our Project will have a width and a height of 10. Warning: The width and the height of our garden may change in Part 2 of our Project. So, it may be a good idea to create 2 variables and assign the width and the height of our garden to these 2 variables. 3. Our worms and their information. For each worm, we may want to keep the following information: a. worm number, b. the location of the worm, for example, either the coordinates of the cells containing the worm OR the coordinate of the first cell containing the worm, its length and whether the worm is laying horizontally or vertically. Worms: We will create 6 worms of length 3. 4. And other variables as needed. Testing our data structures: ? Suggestion: as we create a data structure (the “displayed” garden, the garden containing the worms, each worm, etc…), print it with a “debug print statement”. Once we are certain the data structure is well constructed, comment out the “debug print statement”. Code: In Part 1, the code we write must include functions and it must include the main section of our program. In other words, in Part 1, the code we write must be a complete program. In terms of functions, here is a list of suggestions. We may have functions that … ? creates a garden (i.e., a garden data structure), ? creates the worms (i.e., the worm data structure), ? places a worm in the garden that is to hold the worms (i.e., another garden data structure), ? displays the garden on the screen for the player to see, ? displays a worm in the displayed garden, ? etc… ? Finally, in Part 1, the code we write must implement the following algorithm: Algorithm: Here is the algorithm for the main section of our game program: ? Welcome the player ? Create an empty “displayed” garden, (“displayed” because this is the garden we display to the player) ? Create the worms (worms’ information) ? Create an empty “hidden” garden Note 1: “hidden” because one can keep track of the worms in this “hidden” garden, which we do not show to the player. This is why it is called “hidden”. Note 2: One can keep track of worm’s locations using a different mechanism or data structure. It does not have to be a list of lists representing a “hidden” garden. We are free to choose how we want to keep track of where our worms are located in our garden. ? Place each worm in the “hidden” garden (or whatever mechanism or data structure we decide to use) ? Display the “displayed” garden on the screen for the player to see ? While the player wants to play, ask the player for a worm number (1 to 6), read this worm number and display this worm on the “displayed” garden. This is not the game. Remember, we shall implement the game itself in Part 2. Here, in this step, we make sure our code works properly, i.e., it can retrieve worm information and display worms properly. Displaying worms properly: Note that when we create worms and display them, it may be the case that worms overlap with other worms and that worms wrap around the garden. These 2 situations are illustrated in the 3 Sample Runs discussed below. At this point, we are ready for Part 2 of our Project. Sample Runs: In order to illustrate the explanations given above of what we are to do in this Part 1 of our Project, 3 sample runs have been posted below the description of this Part 1 of our Project on our course web site. Have a look at these 3 sample runs. The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs. Of course, the position of our worms will be different but everything else should be the same. What we see in each of these 3 sample runs is 1 execution of the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project. Note about Sample Run 1: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 2 wraps around: it starts at (row 7, column B), (row 7, column A) then wraps around to (row 7, column J). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column E), (row 1, column E) then wraps around to (row 10, column E). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 5 and 6 overlap at (row 1, column E). Note about Sample Run 2: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column B) then wraps around to (row 10, column B) and (row 9, column B). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column D) then wraps around to (row 10, column D) and (row 9, column D). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 2 and 4 overlap at (row 3, column H), worms 1 and 2 overlap at (row 3, column G) and worms 2 and 5 overlap at (row 3, column E). Note about Sample Run 3: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers in the following sequence: 3, 2, 6, 4, 5, 1, 7, 8. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column C), (row 1, column C) then wraps around to (row 10, column C). Worm 1 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column B), (row 2, column A) then wraps around to (row 2, column J). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 6 and 3 overlap at (row 1, column C) and (row 2, column C). Other Requirements: Here are a few more requirements the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project must satisfy. 1. The location of each worm in the garden must be determined randomly. 2. Whether a worm is lying horizontally or vertically must also be determined randomly. 3. It is acceptable in Part 1 of our Project if worms overlap each other (see Sample Runs) 4. When placing a worm in a garden, the worm must “wrap around” the garden. See Sample Runs for examples of what “wrapping around” signifies. How will we implement this wrapping around? Hint: wrapping around can be achieved using an arithmetic operator we have already seen. 5. We must make use of docstring when we implement our functions (have a look at our textbook for an explanation and an example). 6. Every time we encounter the word must in this description of Part 1 of our Project, we shall look upon that sentence as another requirement. For example, the sentence “The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs.”, even though it is not listed below the Other Requirements heading, is also a requirement because of its must.

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Which animals have had the bovine growth hormone injected into them in order to produce larger individuals? Select one: all of these cows fish pigs sheep

Which animals have had the bovine growth hormone injected into them in order to produce larger individuals? Select one: all of these cows fish pigs sheep

Which animals have had the bovine growth hormone injected into … Read More...
A groundwater has excellent water quality, except that NO3- is 20 mg N/L, due to agricultural impacts. A separate surface-water supply needs extensive treatment for taste, odor, and turbidity, but its NO3- is low, only 1 mg N/L. What blend ratio is needed to produce a water with one half the NO3- primary standard?

A groundwater has excellent water quality, except that NO3- is 20 mg N/L, due to agricultural impacts. A separate surface-water supply needs extensive treatment for taste, odor, and turbidity, but its NO3- is low, only 1 mg N/L. What blend ratio is needed to produce a water with one half the NO3- primary standard?

For any additional help, please contact: info@checkyourstudy.com Call and Whatsapp … Read More...
Berkeley College International Economics Quiz 1 Student name: Class & Session (Type all your answers in the parenthesis) Multiple Choice Questions (75 points) 1. The person credited with the first systematic expression of the principle of comparative advantage was ( ) A. Alan Greenspan. B. John Maynard Keynes. C. David Ricardo. D. Adam Smith. 2. A regulation that sets the highest price at which it is legal to trade a good is a ( ) A. Production quota B. Price floor C. Price ceiling D. Tax ceiling 3. In Country J, it takes one hour to knit a pair of socks, and five hours to brew a gallon of cider. In Country K, it takes three hours to knit a pair of socks, and six hours to brew a gallon of cider. If trade were to open between the two countries, Ricardo would predict that ( ) A. Country J will export cider and Country K will export socks. B. Country J will export socks and Country K will export cider. C. Country J will export both socks and cider. D. Country K will export both socks and cider. 4. If Nation A can produce either 3x or 3y with one hour of labor, while nation B can produce either 1x or 1y with one hour of labor, and if labor is the only input, then ( ) A. Nation A has an absolute advantage in both goods. B. Nation B has an absolute advantage in both goods. C. Nation A has a comparative disadvantage in both goods. D. Nation A has a comparative advantage in both goods. 5. Mutually beneficial trade A. Allows both countries to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred.( ) B. Allows only the more productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. C. Allows only the less productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. D. Causes changes only in production, not consumption. 6. In the absence of trade, the consumption points available to a nation ( ) A. Are above the production possibility curve. B. Are on or inside the production possibility curve. C. Lie on the production possibility curve. D. Cannot be identified. 7. For Heckscher-Ohlin, the most important cause of the differences in relative commodity prices is the difference between countries in ( ) A. Factor endowments. B. National income. C. Technology. D. Tastes. 8. Country J has 1 million machines and 1 million workers, while country K has 2 million machines and 3 million workers. If computers are produced mostly by capital and beer is produced mostly by labor, the H-O model predicts that ( ) A. Country K will export computers in exchange for beer. B. Country J will export computers in exchange for beer. C. Country J is too small to be of economic interest to Country K. D. Computers and beer don’t mix, so trade cannot increase either country’s well-being. 9. Mexico is an unskilled labor abundant country, while the United States is a skilled labor abundant country. With the opening of trade, you would expect that, in the long run, wages for unskilled workers ( ) A. Decline in both countries. B. Decline in the United States and rise in Mexico. C. Rise in the United States and decline in Mexico. D. Rise in both countries 10. According to trade theory, if a nation has a comparative advantage in a capital-intensively produced good, and the rate of growth of capital is greater than the rate of growth of other inputs (e.g., labor), the pattern of growth which results will be ( ) A. Import replacing. B. Neutral as between capital intensive and other products. C. Export expanding. D. None of the above. 11. Arguments in favor of having developing countries focus on exporting manufactured goods include ( ) A. Strong support in industrialized countries for free trade in manufactured goods. B. Very low tariffs on manufactured textiles, apparel, and footwear in industrialized countries. C. Political preference for VERs among importing countries. D. A downward trend in the prices of primary products. 12. Which group definitely loses from international migration of labor? ( ) A. The migrants. B. The migrants’ new employers in the receiving country. C. The migrants’ old employers in the sending country. D. The migrants’ fellow workers who did not emigrate. 13. As technology advances, ( ) A. All opportunity cost decreases B. The PPF shift outward C. A country moves toward the midpoint along its PPF D. The PPF shift inward because unemployment occurs 14. If a country is operating at a point of production efficiency ( ) A. It enjoys growth when increasing production B. It produces on its production possibility frontier curve C. It must specialize in the production of a good D. It operates on its trade line 15. A cartel is ( ) A. Another name for a firm in an oligopoly B. A collusive agreement among a number of firms C. A government body that regulates an industry D. An antitrust law (Type and show your work) Practicum Question (25 points) Two countries, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, produce fruits and timber. Each island has a labor force of 1200 and the monthly productivity of each worker is as follow Basket of fruit Board feet of timber Haiti 10 5 Dominican Republic 30 10 a. Which county has an absolute advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? b. Which country has a comparative advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? c. Sketch the production possibility frontier (PPF) of both countries d. Both countries want to produce an equal amount of baskets of fruit and feet of timber. How should they allocate their workers to the two sectors? e. How can free trade move both countries beyond their respective PPF Extra credits (10 points) The demand and supply curves of the market for DVD at the local (US) market are as follow: P = 30 – Qd/2 and P= -1.5 + Qs/4 a. Find the equilibrium price and the equilibrium quantity when there is no international trade ( hint: solve for Qd and Qs And then make Qd=Qs to solve for Price and quantities) b. What are the equilibrium quantities when the nations trade freely at price of $15? Explain your rationale. c. How many units are exported? d. What is the resulting national gain? e. Do consumers and producers gain or lose from the free trade?

Berkeley College International Economics Quiz 1 Student name: Class & Session (Type all your answers in the parenthesis) Multiple Choice Questions (75 points) 1. The person credited with the first systematic expression of the principle of comparative advantage was ( ) A. Alan Greenspan. B. John Maynard Keynes. C. David Ricardo. D. Adam Smith. 2. A regulation that sets the highest price at which it is legal to trade a good is a ( ) A. Production quota B. Price floor C. Price ceiling D. Tax ceiling 3. In Country J, it takes one hour to knit a pair of socks, and five hours to brew a gallon of cider. In Country K, it takes three hours to knit a pair of socks, and six hours to brew a gallon of cider. If trade were to open between the two countries, Ricardo would predict that ( ) A. Country J will export cider and Country K will export socks. B. Country J will export socks and Country K will export cider. C. Country J will export both socks and cider. D. Country K will export both socks and cider. 4. If Nation A can produce either 3x or 3y with one hour of labor, while nation B can produce either 1x or 1y with one hour of labor, and if labor is the only input, then ( ) A. Nation A has an absolute advantage in both goods. B. Nation B has an absolute advantage in both goods. C. Nation A has a comparative disadvantage in both goods. D. Nation A has a comparative advantage in both goods. 5. Mutually beneficial trade A. Allows both countries to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred.( ) B. Allows only the more productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. C. Allows only the less productive country to consume a larger bundle of goods than before trade occurred. D. Causes changes only in production, not consumption. 6. In the absence of trade, the consumption points available to a nation ( ) A. Are above the production possibility curve. B. Are on or inside the production possibility curve. C. Lie on the production possibility curve. D. Cannot be identified. 7. For Heckscher-Ohlin, the most important cause of the differences in relative commodity prices is the difference between countries in ( ) A. Factor endowments. B. National income. C. Technology. D. Tastes. 8. Country J has 1 million machines and 1 million workers, while country K has 2 million machines and 3 million workers. If computers are produced mostly by capital and beer is produced mostly by labor, the H-O model predicts that ( ) A. Country K will export computers in exchange for beer. B. Country J will export computers in exchange for beer. C. Country J is too small to be of economic interest to Country K. D. Computers and beer don’t mix, so trade cannot increase either country’s well-being. 9. Mexico is an unskilled labor abundant country, while the United States is a skilled labor abundant country. With the opening of trade, you would expect that, in the long run, wages for unskilled workers ( ) A. Decline in both countries. B. Decline in the United States and rise in Mexico. C. Rise in the United States and decline in Mexico. D. Rise in both countries 10. According to trade theory, if a nation has a comparative advantage in a capital-intensively produced good, and the rate of growth of capital is greater than the rate of growth of other inputs (e.g., labor), the pattern of growth which results will be ( ) A. Import replacing. B. Neutral as between capital intensive and other products. C. Export expanding. D. None of the above. 11. Arguments in favor of having developing countries focus on exporting manufactured goods include ( ) A. Strong support in industrialized countries for free trade in manufactured goods. B. Very low tariffs on manufactured textiles, apparel, and footwear in industrialized countries. C. Political preference for VERs among importing countries. D. A downward trend in the prices of primary products. 12. Which group definitely loses from international migration of labor? ( ) A. The migrants. B. The migrants’ new employers in the receiving country. C. The migrants’ old employers in the sending country. D. The migrants’ fellow workers who did not emigrate. 13. As technology advances, ( ) A. All opportunity cost decreases B. The PPF shift outward C. A country moves toward the midpoint along its PPF D. The PPF shift inward because unemployment occurs 14. If a country is operating at a point of production efficiency ( ) A. It enjoys growth when increasing production B. It produces on its production possibility frontier curve C. It must specialize in the production of a good D. It operates on its trade line 15. A cartel is ( ) A. Another name for a firm in an oligopoly B. A collusive agreement among a number of firms C. A government body that regulates an industry D. An antitrust law (Type and show your work) Practicum Question (25 points) Two countries, Haiti and the Dominican Republic, produce fruits and timber. Each island has a labor force of 1200 and the monthly productivity of each worker is as follow Basket of fruit Board feet of timber Haiti 10 5 Dominican Republic 30 10 a. Which county has an absolute advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? b. Which country has a comparative advantage in the production of fruit? Timber? c. Sketch the production possibility frontier (PPF) of both countries d. Both countries want to produce an equal amount of baskets of fruit and feet of timber. How should they allocate their workers to the two sectors? e. How can free trade move both countries beyond their respective PPF Extra credits (10 points) The demand and supply curves of the market for DVD at the local (US) market are as follow: P = 30 – Qd/2 and P= -1.5 + Qs/4 a. Find the equilibrium price and the equilibrium quantity when there is no international trade ( hint: solve for Qd and Qs And then make Qd=Qs to solve for Price and quantities) b. What are the equilibrium quantities when the nations trade freely at price of $15? Explain your rationale. c. How many units are exported? d. What is the resulting national gain? e. Do consumers and producers gain or lose from the free trade?

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