1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms a. Balance b. Reaction c. Equation d. Reactant e. Product f. Dozen g. Mole Molar mass h. Reaction rate Activation energy i. Catalyst j. Equilibrium k. Dynamic equilibrium l. Chemical equilibrium Le Chatelier’s Principle m. Exergonic Endergonic n. Entropy o. Enthalpy p. Thermodynamics q. First Law of Thermodynamics Second Law of Thermodynamics

1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms a. Balance b. Reaction c. Equation d. Reactant e. Product f. Dozen g. Mole Molar mass h. Reaction rate Activation energy i. Catalyst j. Equilibrium k. Dynamic equilibrium l. Chemical equilibrium Le Chatelier’s Principle m. Exergonic Endergonic n. Entropy o. Enthalpy p. Thermodynamics q. First Law of Thermodynamics Second Law of Thermodynamics

Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: … Read More...
Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

Chapter 11 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Understanding Work and Kinetic Energy Learning Goal: To learn about the Work-Energy Theorem and its basic applications. In this problem, you will learn about the relationship between the work done on an object and the kinetic energy of that object. The kinetic energy of an object of mass moving at a speed is defined as . It seems reasonable to say that the speed of an object–and, therefore, its kinetic energy–can be changed by performing work on the object. In this problem, we will explore the mathematical relationship between the work done on an object and the change in the kinetic energy of that object. First, let us consider a sled of mass being pulled by a constant, horizontal force of magnitude along a rough, horizontal surface. The sled is speeding up. Part A How many forces are acting on the sled? ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C K m v K = (1/2)mv2 m F one two three four This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Work-Energy Theorem Reviewed Learning Goal: Review the work-energy theorem and apply it to a simple problem. If you push a particle of mass in the direction in which it is already moving, you expect the particle’s speed to increase. If you push with a constant force , then the particle will accelerate with acceleration (from Newton’s 2nd law). Part A Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied for a fixed interval of time , then the _____ of the particle will increase by an amount . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M F a = F/M t at Typesetting math: 91% Part B Enter a one- or two-word answer that correctly completes the following statement. If the constant force is applied over a given distance , along the path of the particle, then the _____ of the particle will increase by . ANSWER: Part C If the initial kinetic energy of the particle is , and its final kinetic energy is , express in terms of and the work done on the particle. ANSWER: Part D In general, the work done by a force is written as . Now, consider whether the following statements are true or false: The dot product assures that the integrand is always nonnegative. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force perpendicular to the path contributes to the integral. The dot product indicates that only the component of the force parallel to the path contributes to the integral. Enter t for true or f for false for each statement. Separate your responses with commas (e.g., t,f,t). ANSWER: D FD Ki Kf Kf Ki W Kf = F W =  ( ) d f i F r r Typesetting math: 91% Part E Assume that the particle has initial speed . Find its final kinetic energy in terms of , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F What is the final speed of the particle? Express your answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ± The Work Done in Pulling a Supertanker Two tugboats pull a disabled supertanker. Each tug exerts a constant force of 2.20×106 , one at an angle 10.0 west of north, and the other at an angle 10.0 east of north, as they pull the tanker a distance 0.660 toward the north. Part A What is the total work done by the two tugboats on the supertanker? Express your answer in joules, to three significant figures. vi Kf vi M F D Kf = Kf M vf = N km Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Energy Required to Lift a Heavy Box As you are trying to move a heavy box of mass , you realize that it is too heavy for you to lift by yourself. There is no one around to help, so you attach an ideal pulley to the box and a massless rope to the ceiling, which you wrap around the pulley. You pull up on the rope to lift the box. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity and neglect friction forces. Part A Once you have pulled hard enough to start the box moving upward, what is the magnitude of the upward force you must apply to the rope to start raising the box with constant velocity? Express the magnitude of the force in terms of , the mass of the box. J m g F m Typesetting math: 91% You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Pulling a Block on an Incline with Friction A block of weight sits on an inclined plane as shown. A force of magnitude is applied to pull the block up the incline at constant speed. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . Part A F = mg F μ Typesetting math: 91% What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express the work done by friction in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the total work done on the block by the applied force as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Now the applied force is changed so that instead of pulling the block up the incline, the force pulls the block down the incline at a constant speed. Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF F L μ m g  L F WF = Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the total work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance down the incline? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: Part D What is the total work done on the box by the appled force in this case? Express your answer in terms of any or all of the variables , , , , , and . ANSWER: When Push Comes to Shove Two forces, of magnitudes = 75.0 and = 25.0 , act in opposite directions on a block, which sits atop a frictionless surface, as shown in the figure. Initially, the center of the block is at position = -1.00 . At some later time, the block has moved to the right, and its center is at a new position, = 1.00 . Wfric L μ m g  L F Wfric = WF μ m g  L F WF = F1 N F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part A Find the work done on the block by the force of magnitude = 75.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the work done by the force of magnitude = 25.0 as the block moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: W1 F1 N xi cm xf cm W1 = J W2 F2 N xi cm xf cm Typesetting math: 91% Part C What is the net work done on the block by the two forces? Express your answer numerically, in joules. ANSWER: Part D Determine the change in the kinetic energy of the block as it moves from = -1.00 to = 1.00 . Express your answer numerically, in joules. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Work from a Constant Force Learning Goal: W2 = J Wnet Wnet = J Kf − Ki xi cm xf cm Kf − Ki = J Typesetting math: 91% To understand how to compute the work done by a constant force acting on a particle that moves in a straight line. In this problem, you will calculate the work done by a constant force. A force is considered constant if is independent of . This is the most frequently encountered situation in elementary Newtonian mechanics. Part A Consider a particle moving in a straight line from initial point B to final point A, acted upon by a constant force . The force (think of it as a field, having a magnitude and direction at every position ) is indicated by a series of identical vectors pointing to the left, parallel to the horizontal axis. The vectors are all identical only because the force is constant along the path. The magnitude of the force is , and the displacement vector from point B to point A is (of magnitude , making and angle (radians) with the positive x axis). Find , the work that the force performs on the particle as it moves from point B to point A. Express the work in terms of , , and . Remember to use radians, not degrees, for any angles that appear in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider the same force acting on a particle that travels from point A to point B. The displacement vector now points in the opposite direction as it did in Part A. Find the work done by in this case. Express your answer in terms of , , and . F( r) r F r F L L  WBA F L F  WBA = F L WAB F Typesetting math: 91% L F  You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Vector Dot Product Let vectors , , and . Calculate the following: Part A You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: WAB = A = (2, 1,−4) B = (−3, 0, 1) C = (−1,−1, 2) Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the angle between and ? Express your answer using one significant figure. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C ANSWER: Part D ANSWER: A B = AB A B AB = radians 2B 3C = Typesetting math: 91% Part E Which of the following can be computed? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: and are different vectors with lengths and respectively. Find the following: Part F Express your answer in terms of You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 2(B 3C) = A B C A (B C) A (B + C) 3 A V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V1 Typesetting math: 91% Part G If and are perpendicular, You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part H If and are parallel, Express your answer in terms of and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: ± Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force V = 1 V 1 V 1 V 2 V = 1 V 2 V 1 V 2 V1 V2 V = 1 V 2 Typesetting math: 91% Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 11.1 Calculating the Work Done by a Constant Force. Recall that the work done by a constant force at an angle to the displacement is . The vector magnitudes and are always positive, so the sign of is determined entirely by the angle between the force and the displacement. W F  d W = Fd cos  F d W  Typesetting math: 91% TACTICS BOX 11.1 Calculating the work done by a constant force Force and displacement Work Sign of Energy transfer Energy is transferred into the system. The particle speeds up. increases. No energy is transferred. Speed and are constant. Energy is transferred out of the system. The particle slows down. decreases. A box has weight of magnitude = 2.00 accelerates down a rough plane that is inclined at an angle = 30.0 above the horizontal, as shown at left. The normal force acting on the box has a magnitude = 1.732 , the coefficient of kinetic friction between the box and the plane is = 0.300, and the displacement of the box is 1.80 down the inclined plane.  W W 0 F(“r) + K < 90 F("r) cos  + 90 0 0 K > 90 F(“r) cos  − K 180 −F(“r) − FG N  n N μk d m Typesetting math: 91% Part A What is the work done on the box by gravity? Express your answers in joules to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Wgrav Wgrav = J Typesetting math: 91% Work and Potential Energy on a Sliding Block with Friction A block of weight sits on a plane inclined at an angle as shown. The coefficient of kinetic friction between the plane and the block is . A force is applied to push the block up the incline at constant speed. Part A What is the work done on the block by the force of friction as the block moves a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: w  μ F Wf L μ w  L Wf = Typesetting math: 91% Part B What is the work done by the applied force of magnitude ? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part C What is the change in the potential energy of the block, , after it has been pushed a distance up the incline? Express your answer in terms of some or all of the following: , , , . ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). W F μ w  L W = “U L μ w  L “U = Typesetting math: 91% Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Where’s the Energy? Learning Goal: To understand how to apply the law of conservation of energy to situations with and without nonconservative forces acting. The law of conservation of energy states the following: In an isolated system the total energy remains constant. If the objects within the system interact through gravitational and elastic forces only, then the total mechanical energy is conserved. The mechanical energy of a system is defined as the sum of kinetic energy and potential energy . For such systems where no forces other than the gravitational and elastic forces do work, the law of conservation of energy can be written as , where the quantities with subscript “i” refer to the “initial” moment and those with subscript “f” refer to the final moment. A wise choice of initial and final moments, which is not always obvious, may significantly simplify the solution. The kinetic energy of an object that has mass \texttip{m}{m} and velocity \texttip{v}{v} is given by \large{K=\frac{1}{2}mv^2}. Potential energy, instead, has many forms. The two forms that you will be dealing with most often in this chapter are the gravitational and elastic potential energy. Gravitational potential energy is the energy possessed by elevated objects. For small heights, it can be found as U_{\rm g}=mgh, where \texttip{m}{m} is the mass of the object, \texttip{g}{g} is the acceleration due to gravity, and \texttip{h}{h} is the elevation of the object above the zero level. The zero level is the elevation at which the gravitational potential energy is assumed to be (you guessed it) zero. The choice of the zero level is dictated by convenience; typically (but not necessarily), it is selected to coincide with the lowest position of the object during the motion explored in the problem. Elastic potential energy is associated with stretched or compressed elastic objects such as springs. For a spring with a force constant \texttip{k}{k}, stretched or compressed a distance \texttip{x}{x}, the associated elastic potential energy is \large{U_{\rm e}=\frac{1}{2}kx^2}. When all three types of energy change, the law of conservation of energy for an object of mass \texttip{m}{m} can be written as K U Ki + Ui = Kf + Uf Typesetting math: 91% \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}. The gravitational force and the elastic force are two examples of conservative forces. What if nonconservative forces, such as friction, also act within the system? In that case, the total mechanical energy would change. The law of conservation of energy is then written as \large{\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm i}^2+mgh_{\rm i}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm i}^2+W_{\rm nc}=\frac{1}{2}mv_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2+mgh_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}+\frac{1}{2}kx_{\rm f \hspace{1 pt}}^2}, where \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} represents the work done by the nonconservative forces acting on the object between the initial and the final moments. The work \texttip{W_{\rm nc}}{W_nc} is usually negative; that is, the nonconservative forces tend to decrease, or dissipate, the mechanical energy of the system. In this problem, we will consider the following situation as depicted in the diagram : A block of mass \texttip{m}{m} slides at a speed \texttip{v}{v} along a horizontal, smooth table. It next slides down a smooth ramp, descending a height \texttip{h}{h}, and then slides along a horizontal rough floor, stopping eventually. Assume that the block slides slowly enough so that it does not lose contact with the supporting surfaces (table, ramp, or floor). You will analyze the motion of the block at different moments using the law of conservation of energy. Part A Which word in the statement of this problem allows you to assume that the table is frictionless? ANSWER: Part B straight smooth horizontal Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H Typesetting math: 91% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part J This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part K This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Sliding In Socks Suppose that the coefficient of kinetic friction between Zak’s feet and the floor, while wearing socks, is 0.250. Knowing this, Zak decides to get a running start and then slide across the floor. Part A If Zak’s speed is 3.00 \rm m/s when he starts to slide, what distance \texttip{d}{d} will he slide before stopping? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 91% Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. \rm m Typesetting math: 91%

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Statistical Methods (STAT 4303) Review for Final Comprehensive Exam Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion Q.1. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in college algebra class. 10,12,15,20,13,16,14 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) Q.2. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in English class. 12,15,16,18,13,10,17,20 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) (f) Compare the results of Q.1 and Q.2, Which scores College Algebra or English do you think is more precise (less spread)? Q.3 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics (a) mean (b) median (c) mode (d) first and third quartiles (e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. (f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. (g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). (h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 26 is replaced by 37 (i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? (j) What will be the new median? (k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.4 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 19, 14, 14, 15, 17, 16, 17, 20, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26, 27, 28 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics a) mean b) median c) mode d) first and third quartiles e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 28 is replaced by 48 i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? j) What will be the new median? k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.5 Consider the following data of height (in inch) and weight(in lbs). Height(x) Frequency 50 2 52 3 55 2 60 4 62 3  Find the mean height.  What is the variance of height? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.6. The following table shows the number of miles run during one week for a sample of 20 runners: Miles Mid-value (x) Frequency (f) 5.5-10.5 1 10.5-15.5 2 15.5-20.5 3 20.5-25.5 5 25.5-30.5 4 (a) Find the average (mean) miles run. (Hint: Find mid-value of mile range first) (b) What is the variance of miles run? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.7. (a) If the mean of 20 observations is 20.5, find the sum of all observations? (b) If the mean of 30 observations is 40, find the sum of all observations? Probability Q.8 Out of forty students, 14 are taking English Composition and 29 are taking Chemistry. a) How many students are in both classes? b) What is the probability that a randomly-chosen student from this group is taking only the Chemistry class? Q.9 A drawer contains 4 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and then replaced. Another ball is taken from the drawer. What is the probability that (Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation). (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q.10 A drawer contains 3 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and not replaced. Another ball is then taken from the drawer. Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation. What is the probability that (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q. 11 Missile A has 45% chance of hitting target. Missile B has 55% chance of hitting a target. What is the probability that (i) both miss the target. (ii) at least one will hit the target. (iii) exactly one will hit the target. Q. 12 A politician from D party speaks truth 65% of times; another politician from rival party speaks truth 75% of times. Both politicians were asked about their personal love affair with their own office secretary, what is the probability that (i) both lie the actual fact . (ii) at least one will speak truth. (iii) exactly one speaks the truth. (iv) both speak the truth. Q.13 The question, “Do you drink alcohol?” was asked to 220 people. Results are shown in the table. . Yes No Total Male 48 82 Female 24 66 Total (a) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a male also drinks? (b) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a female? (c) What is the probability that a randomly selected individual drinks? (d) A person is selected at random and if the person is female, what is the probability that she drinks? (e) What is the probability that a randomly selected alcoholic person is a male? Q.14 A professor, Dr. Drakula, taught courses that included statements from across the five colleges abbreviated as AH, AS, BA, ED and EN. He taught at Texas A&M University – Kingsville (TAMUK) during the span of five academic years AY09 to AY13. The following table shows the total number of graduates during AY09 to AY13. One day, he was running late to his class. He was so focused on the class that he did not stop for a red light. As soon as he crossed through the intersection, a police officer Asked him to stop. ( a ) It is turned out that the police officer was TAMUK graduate during the past five years. What is the probability that the Police Officer was from ED College? ( b ) What is the probability that the Police Officer graduated in the academic year of 2011? ( c ) If the traffic officer graduated from TAMUK in the academic year of 2011(AY11). What is the conditional probability that he graduated from the ED college? ( d ) Are the events the academic year “AY 11” and the college of Education “ED” independent? Yes or no , why? Discrete Distribution Q.15 Find k and probability for X=2 and X=4. X 1 2 3 4 5 P(X=x) 0.1 3k 0.2 2k 0.2 (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers.What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Q.16 Find k. X 3 4 5 6 7 P(X=x) k 2k 2k k 2k (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers. What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Binomial Distribution: Q.17 (a) Hospital records show that of patients suffering from a certain disease, 75% die of it. What is the probability that of 6 randomly selected patients, 4 will recover? (b) A (blindfolded) marksman finds that on the average he hits the target 4 times out of 5. If he fires 4 shots, what is the probability of (i) more than 2 hits? (ii) at least 3 misses? (c) which of the following are binomial experiments? Explain the reason. i. Telephone surveying a group of 200 people to ask if they voted for George Bush. ii. Counting the average number of dogs seen at a veterinarian’s office daily. iii. You take a survey of 50 traffic lights in a certain city, at 3 p.m., recording whether the light was red, green, or yellow at that time. iv. You are at a fair, playing “pop the balloon” with 6 darts. There are 20 balloons. 10 of the balloons have a ticket inside that say “win,” and 10 have a ticket that says “lose.” Normal Distribution Q.18 Use standard normal distribution table to find the following probabilities: (a) P(Z<2.5) (b) P(Z< -1.3) (c) P(Z>0.12) (d) P(Z> -2.15) (e) P(0.11<Z<0.22) (f) P(-0.11<Z<0.5) Q.19. Use normal distribution table to find the missing values (?). (a) P(Z< ?)=0.40 (b) P(Z< ?)=0.76 (c) P(Z> ?)=0.87 (d) P(Z> ?)=0.34 Q.20. The length of life of certain type of light bulb is normally distributed with mean=220hrs and standard deviation=20hrs. (a) Define a random variable, X A light bulb is randomly selected, what is the probability that (b) it will last will last more than 207 hrs. ? (c) it will last less than 214 hrs. (d) it will last in between 199 to 207 hrs. Q.21. The length of life of an instrument produced by a machine has a normal distribution with a mean of 22 months and standard deviation of 4 months. Find the probability that an instrument produced by this machine will last (a) less than 10 months. (b) more than 28 months (c) between 10 and 28 months. Distribution of sample mean and Central Limit Theorem (CLT) Q.22 It is assumed that weight of teenage student is normally distributed with mean=140 lbs. and standard deviation =15 lbs. A simple random sample of 40 teenage students is taken and sample mean is calculated. If several such samples of same size are taken (i) what could be the mean of all sample means. (ii) what could be the standard deviation of all sample means. (iii) will the distribution of sample means be normal ? (iv) What is CLT? Write down the distribution of sample mean in the form of ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   . Q.23 The time it takes students in a cooking school to learn to prepare seafood gumbo is a random variable with a normal distribution where the average is 3.2 hours and a standard deviation of 1.8 hours. A sample of 40 students was investigated. What is the distribution of sample mean (express in numbers)? Hypothesis Testing Q.24 The NCHS reported that the mean total cholesterol level in 2002 for all adults was 203 with standard deviation of 37. Total cholesterol levels in participants who attended the seventh examination of the Offspring in the Framingham Heart Study are summarized as follows: n=3,00, =200.3. Is there statistical evidence of a difference in mean cholesterol levels in the Framingham Offspring (means does the result form current examination differs from 2002 report)?? (Follow the steps below to reach the conclusion) (i) Define null and alternate hypothesis (Also write what is  , and x in words at the beginning) (ii) Identify the significance level ,  and check whether it is one sided or two sided test. (iii) Calculate test statistics, Z. (iv) Use standard normal table to find the p-value and state whether you reject or accept (fail to reject) the null hypothesis. (v) what is the critical value, do you reject or accept the H0. (vi) Write down the conclusion based on part (iv). Q.25 A sample of 145 boxes of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran contain in average 1.95 scoops of raisins. It is known from past experiments that the standard deviation for the number of scoops of raisins is 0.25. The manufacturer of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran claimed that in average their product contains more than 2 scoops of raisins, do you reject or accept the manufacturers claim (follow all five steps)? Q.26 It is assumed that the mean systolic blood pressure is μ = 120 mm Hg. In the Honolulu Heart Study, a sample of n = 100 people had an average systolic blood pressure of 130.1 mm Hg. The standard deviation from the population is 21.21 mm Hg. Is the group significantly different (with respect to systolic blood pressure!) from the regular population? Use 10% level of significance. Q.27 A CEO claims that at least 80 percent of the company’s 1,000,000 customers are very satisfied. Again, 100 customers are surveyed using simple random sampling. The result: 73 percent are very satisfied. Based on these results, should we accept or reject the CEO’s hypothesis? Assume a significance level of 0.05. Q.28 True/False questions (These questions are collected from previous HW, review and exam problems, see the previous solutions for answers) (a) Total sum of probability can exceed 1. (b) If you throw a die, getting 2 or any even number are independent events. (c) If you roll a die for 20 times, the probability of getting 5 in 15th roll is 20 15 . (d) A student is taking a 5 question True-False quiz but he has not been doing any work in the course and does not know the material so he randomly guesses at all the answers. Probability that he gets the first question right is 2 1 . (e) Typing in laptop and writing emails using the same laptop are independent events. (f) Normal distribution is right skewed. (g) Mean is more robust to outliers. So mean is used for data with extreme values. (h) It is possible to have no mode in the data. (i) Standard normal variable, Z has some unit. (j) Only two parameters are required to describe the entire normal distribution. (k) Mean of standard normal variable, Z is 1. (l) If p-value of more than level of significance (alpha), we reject the H0. (m) Very small p-value indicates rejection of H0. (n) H0 always contains equality sign. (o) CLT indicates that distribution of sample mean can be anything, not just normal. (p) Sample mean is always equal to population mean. (q) Variance of sample mean is less than population mean. (r) Variance of sample mean does not depend on sample size. (s) Mr. A has cancer but a medical doctor diagnosed him as “no cancer”. It is a type I error. (t) Level of significance is probability of making type II error. (u) Type II error can be controlled. (v) Type I error is more serious than type II error. (w) Type I and Type II errors are based on null hypothesis. Q.29 Type I and Type II Errors : Make statements about Type I (False Positive) and Type II errors (False Negative). (a) The Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) Test has both Type I and Type II error possibilities. This test screens the mother’s blood during pregnancy for AFP and determines risk. Abnormally high or low levels may indicate Down syndrome. (Hint: Take actual status as down syndrome or not) Ho: patient is healthy Ha: patient is unhealthy (b) The mechanic inspects the brake pads for the minimum allowable thickness. Ho: Vehicles breaks meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. Ha: Vehicles brakes do not meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. (c) Celiac disease is one of the diseases which can be misdiagnosed or have less diagnosis. Following table shows the actual celiac patients and their diagnosis status by medical doctors: Actual Status Yes No Diagnosed as celiac Yes 85 5 No 25 105 I. Calculate the probability of making type I and type II error rates. II. Calculate the power of the test. (Power of the test= 1- P(type II error) Answers: USEFUL FORMULAE: Descriptive Statistics Possible Outliers, any value beyond the range of Q 1.5( ) and Q 1.5( ) Range = Maximum value -Minimum value 100 where 1 ( ) (Preferred) 1 and , n fx x For data with repeats, 1 ( ) (Preferred ) OR 1 and n x x For data without repeats, 1 3 1 3 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Q Q Q Q x s CV n f n f x x OR s n fx nx s n x x s n x nx s                             Discrete Distribution         ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) { ( )} ( ) ( ) 2 2 2 2 E X x P X x V X E X E X E X xP X x Binomial Distribution Probability mass function, P(X=x)= x n x n x C p q  for x=0,1,2,…,n. E(X)=np, Var(X)=npq Hypothesis Testing based on Normal Distribution      X std X mean Z Standard Normal Variable, Probability Bayes Rule, ( ) ( and ) ( ) ( ) ( | ) P B P A B P B P A B P A B    Central Limit Theorem For large n (n>30), ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   and ˆ ~ ( , ) n pq p N p For hypothesis testing of μ, σ known           n x Z   For hypothesis testing of p n pq p p Z   ˆ ANSWERS: Q.1 (a) 14.286 (b) 14 (c) none (d) 10.24 (e) 22.40 Q.2 (a) 15.125 (b) 15.5 (c) No (d) 10.98 (e) 21.9 (f) English Q.3 (a) 18.6 (b)19 (c) 16, 21, and 25 (d) 15, 22 (f) slightly left (g) 7 (h) no outliers (i) increase (j) same Q.4 (a) 0.41 (b) 20 (c)14, 17, 20, 21,25 (d) 16.5, 25 (f) slightly right (g) 8.5 (h) no (i) increase (j) same Q.5 (a)56.57 (b) 22.26 (c) 8.34 Q.6 (a) 21 (b) 38.57 (c) 29.57 Q.7 (a) 410 (b) 1200 Q.8 (a)3 (b) 0.65 Q.9 (a) 0.082 (b) 0.29 (c)0.34 (d) 0.66 (e)0.10 (f) 0.64 Q.10 (a) 0.038 (b)0.23 (c) 0.71 (d) 0.29 (e)0.096 (f) 0.62 Q.11 (i)0.248 (ii)0.752 (iii)0.505 Q.12 (i)0.0875 (ii)0.913 (iii)0.425 (iii)0.488 Q.13 (a)0.22 (b)0.41 (c)0.33 (d)0.27 (e) 0.67 Q.14 (a) 0.13 (b) 0.18 (c)0.12 Q.15 E(X)=3.1 , V(X)=1.69, $0.2 per game, $ 4 win. Q.16 E(X)=5.125, V(X)=1.86, $0.25 loss per game, $5 loss. Q.17 (a)0.201 (b) 0.819, 0.027 Q.18 (a)0.9938 (b)0.0968 (c)0.452 (d)0.984 (e) 0.0433 (f)0.2353 Q.19 (a) -0.25 (b)0.71 (c) -1.13 (d)0.41 Q.20 (b) 0.7422 (c) 0.3821 (d) 0.1109 Q.21 (a)0.0014 (b) 0.0668 (c) 0.9318 Q.22 (a) 140 (b)2.37 Q.24 Z=-1.26, Accept null. Q.25 Z=-2.41, accept null Q.26 Z=4.76, reject H0 Q.27 Z=-1.75, reject H0 Q.28 F, F, F, T , F, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T Q.29 (c)0.113 , 0.022 , 0.977 (or 98%)

Statistical Methods (STAT 4303) Review for Final Comprehensive Exam Measures of Central Tendency, Dispersion Q.1. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in college algebra class. 10,12,15,20,13,16,14 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) Q.2. The data below represents the test scores obtained by students in English class. 12,15,16,18,13,10,17,20 Calculate (a) Mean (b) Median (c) Mode (d) Variance, s2 (e) Coefficient of variation (CV) (f) Compare the results of Q.1 and Q.2, Which scores College Algebra or English do you think is more precise (less spread)? Q.3 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 9, 13, 14, 15, 16, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics (a) mean (b) median (c) mode (d) first and third quartiles (e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. (f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. (g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). (h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 26 is replaced by 37 (i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? (j) What will be the new median? (k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.4 Following data represents the score obtained by students in one of the exams 19, 14, 14, 15, 17, 16, 17, 20, 20, 21, 21, 22, 25, 25, 26, 27, 28 Create a frequency table to calculate the following descriptive statistics a) mean b) median c) mode d) first and third quartiles e) Construct Box and Whisker plot. f) Comment on the shape of the distribution. g) Find inter quartile range (IQR). h) Are there any outliers (based on IQR technique)? In the above problem, if the score 28 is replaced by 48 i) What will happen to the mean? Will it increase, decrease or remains the same? j) What will be the new median? k) What can you say about the effect of outliers on mean and median? Q.5 Consider the following data of height (in inch) and weight(in lbs). Height(x) Frequency 50 2 52 3 55 2 60 4 62 3  Find the mean height.  What is the variance of height? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.6. The following table shows the number of miles run during one week for a sample of 20 runners: Miles Mid-value (x) Frequency (f) 5.5-10.5 1 10.5-15.5 2 15.5-20.5 3 20.5-25.5 5 25.5-30.5 4 (a) Find the average (mean) miles run. (Hint: Find mid-value of mile range first) (b) What is the variance of miles run? Also, find the standard deviation. (c) Find the coefficient of variation (CV). Q.7. (a) If the mean of 20 observations is 20.5, find the sum of all observations? (b) If the mean of 30 observations is 40, find the sum of all observations? Probability Q.8 Out of forty students, 14 are taking English Composition and 29 are taking Chemistry. a) How many students are in both classes? b) What is the probability that a randomly-chosen student from this group is taking only the Chemistry class? Q.9 A drawer contains 4 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and then replaced. Another ball is taken from the drawer. What is the probability that (Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation). (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q.10 A drawer contains 3 red balls, 5 green balls, and 5 blue balls. One ball is taken from the drawer and not replaced. Another ball is then taken from the drawer. Draw tree diagram to facilitate your calculation. What is the probability that (a) both balls are red (b) first ball is red (c) both balls are of same colors (d) both balls are of different colors (e) first ball is red and second ball is blue (f) first ball is red or blue Q. 11 Missile A has 45% chance of hitting target. Missile B has 55% chance of hitting a target. What is the probability that (i) both miss the target. (ii) at least one will hit the target. (iii) exactly one will hit the target. Q. 12 A politician from D party speaks truth 65% of times; another politician from rival party speaks truth 75% of times. Both politicians were asked about their personal love affair with their own office secretary, what is the probability that (i) both lie the actual fact . (ii) at least one will speak truth. (iii) exactly one speaks the truth. (iv) both speak the truth. Q.13 The question, “Do you drink alcohol?” was asked to 220 people. Results are shown in the table. . Yes No Total Male 48 82 Female 24 66 Total (a) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a male also drinks? (b) What is the probability of a randomly selected individual being a female? (c) What is the probability that a randomly selected individual drinks? (d) A person is selected at random and if the person is female, what is the probability that she drinks? (e) What is the probability that a randomly selected alcoholic person is a male? Q.14 A professor, Dr. Drakula, taught courses that included statements from across the five colleges abbreviated as AH, AS, BA, ED and EN. He taught at Texas A&M University – Kingsville (TAMUK) during the span of five academic years AY09 to AY13. The following table shows the total number of graduates during AY09 to AY13. One day, he was running late to his class. He was so focused on the class that he did not stop for a red light. As soon as he crossed through the intersection, a police officer Asked him to stop. ( a ) It is turned out that the police officer was TAMUK graduate during the past five years. What is the probability that the Police Officer was from ED College? ( b ) What is the probability that the Police Officer graduated in the academic year of 2011? ( c ) If the traffic officer graduated from TAMUK in the academic year of 2011(AY11). What is the conditional probability that he graduated from the ED college? ( d ) Are the events the academic year “AY 11” and the college of Education “ED” independent? Yes or no , why? Discrete Distribution Q.15 Find k and probability for X=2 and X=4. X 1 2 3 4 5 P(X=x) 0.1 3k 0.2 2k 0.2 (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers.What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Q.16 Find k. X 3 4 5 6 7 P(X=x) k 2k 2k k 2k (Hint: First find k, and then plug in) Also, calculate the expected value of X, E(X) and variance V(X). A game plan is derived based on above table, a player wins $5 if he can blindly choose 3 and loses $1 if he chooses other numbers. What is his expected win or loss per game? If he plays this game for 20 times, what is total win or lose? Binomial Distribution: Q.17 (a) Hospital records show that of patients suffering from a certain disease, 75% die of it. What is the probability that of 6 randomly selected patients, 4 will recover? (b) A (blindfolded) marksman finds that on the average he hits the target 4 times out of 5. If he fires 4 shots, what is the probability of (i) more than 2 hits? (ii) at least 3 misses? (c) which of the following are binomial experiments? Explain the reason. i. Telephone surveying a group of 200 people to ask if they voted for George Bush. ii. Counting the average number of dogs seen at a veterinarian’s office daily. iii. You take a survey of 50 traffic lights in a certain city, at 3 p.m., recording whether the light was red, green, or yellow at that time. iv. You are at a fair, playing “pop the balloon” with 6 darts. There are 20 balloons. 10 of the balloons have a ticket inside that say “win,” and 10 have a ticket that says “lose.” Normal Distribution Q.18 Use standard normal distribution table to find the following probabilities: (a) P(Z<2.5) (b) P(Z< -1.3) (c) P(Z>0.12) (d) P(Z> -2.15) (e) P(0.11 ?)=0.87 (d) P(Z> ?)=0.34 Q.20. The length of life of certain type of light bulb is normally distributed with mean=220hrs and standard deviation=20hrs. (a) Define a random variable, X A light bulb is randomly selected, what is the probability that (b) it will last will last more than 207 hrs. ? (c) it will last less than 214 hrs. (d) it will last in between 199 to 207 hrs. Q.21. The length of life of an instrument produced by a machine has a normal distribution with a mean of 22 months and standard deviation of 4 months. Find the probability that an instrument produced by this machine will last (a) less than 10 months. (b) more than 28 months (c) between 10 and 28 months. Distribution of sample mean and Central Limit Theorem (CLT) Q.22 It is assumed that weight of teenage student is normally distributed with mean=140 lbs. and standard deviation =15 lbs. A simple random sample of 40 teenage students is taken and sample mean is calculated. If several such samples of same size are taken (i) what could be the mean of all sample means. (ii) what could be the standard deviation of all sample means. (iii) will the distribution of sample means be normal ? (iv) What is CLT? Write down the distribution of sample mean in the form of ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   . Q.23 The time it takes students in a cooking school to learn to prepare seafood gumbo is a random variable with a normal distribution where the average is 3.2 hours and a standard deviation of 1.8 hours. A sample of 40 students was investigated. What is the distribution of sample mean (express in numbers)? Hypothesis Testing Q.24 The NCHS reported that the mean total cholesterol level in 2002 for all adults was 203 with standard deviation of 37. Total cholesterol levels in participants who attended the seventh examination of the Offspring in the Framingham Heart Study are summarized as follows: n=3,00, =200.3. Is there statistical evidence of a difference in mean cholesterol levels in the Framingham Offspring (means does the result form current examination differs from 2002 report)?? (Follow the steps below to reach the conclusion) (i) Define null and alternate hypothesis (Also write what is  , and x in words at the beginning) (ii) Identify the significance level ,  and check whether it is one sided or two sided test. (iii) Calculate test statistics, Z. (iv) Use standard normal table to find the p-value and state whether you reject or accept (fail to reject) the null hypothesis. (v) what is the critical value, do you reject or accept the H0. (vi) Write down the conclusion based on part (iv). Q.25 A sample of 145 boxes of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran contain in average 1.95 scoops of raisins. It is known from past experiments that the standard deviation for the number of scoops of raisins is 0.25. The manufacturer of Kellogg’s Raisin Bran claimed that in average their product contains more than 2 scoops of raisins, do you reject or accept the manufacturers claim (follow all five steps)? Q.26 It is assumed that the mean systolic blood pressure is μ = 120 mm Hg. In the Honolulu Heart Study, a sample of n = 100 people had an average systolic blood pressure of 130.1 mm Hg. The standard deviation from the population is 21.21 mm Hg. Is the group significantly different (with respect to systolic blood pressure!) from the regular population? Use 10% level of significance. Q.27 A CEO claims that at least 80 percent of the company’s 1,000,000 customers are very satisfied. Again, 100 customers are surveyed using simple random sampling. The result: 73 percent are very satisfied. Based on these results, should we accept or reject the CEO’s hypothesis? Assume a significance level of 0.05. Q.28 True/False questions (These questions are collected from previous HW, review and exam problems, see the previous solutions for answers) (a) Total sum of probability can exceed 1. (b) If you throw a die, getting 2 or any even number are independent events. (c) If you roll a die for 20 times, the probability of getting 5 in 15th roll is 20 15 . (d) A student is taking a 5 question True-False quiz but he has not been doing any work in the course and does not know the material so he randomly guesses at all the answers. Probability that he gets the first question right is 2 1 . (e) Typing in laptop and writing emails using the same laptop are independent events. (f) Normal distribution is right skewed. (g) Mean is more robust to outliers. So mean is used for data with extreme values. (h) It is possible to have no mode in the data. (i) Standard normal variable, Z has some unit. (j) Only two parameters are required to describe the entire normal distribution. (k) Mean of standard normal variable, Z is 1. (l) If p-value of more than level of significance (alpha), we reject the H0. (m) Very small p-value indicates rejection of H0. (n) H0 always contains equality sign. (o) CLT indicates that distribution of sample mean can be anything, not just normal. (p) Sample mean is always equal to population mean. (q) Variance of sample mean is less than population mean. (r) Variance of sample mean does not depend on sample size. (s) Mr. A has cancer but a medical doctor diagnosed him as “no cancer”. It is a type I error. (t) Level of significance is probability of making type II error. (u) Type II error can be controlled. (v) Type I error is more serious than type II error. (w) Type I and Type II errors are based on null hypothesis. Q.29 Type I and Type II Errors : Make statements about Type I (False Positive) and Type II errors (False Negative). (a) The Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) Test has both Type I and Type II error possibilities. This test screens the mother’s blood during pregnancy for AFP and determines risk. Abnormally high or low levels may indicate Down syndrome. (Hint: Take actual status as down syndrome or not) Ho: patient is healthy Ha: patient is unhealthy (b) The mechanic inspects the brake pads for the minimum allowable thickness. Ho: Vehicles breaks meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. Ha: Vehicles brakes do not meet the standard for the minimum allowable thickness. (c) Celiac disease is one of the diseases which can be misdiagnosed or have less diagnosis. Following table shows the actual celiac patients and their diagnosis status by medical doctors: Actual Status Yes No Diagnosed as celiac Yes 85 5 No 25 105 I. Calculate the probability of making type I and type II error rates. II. Calculate the power of the test. (Power of the test= 1- P(type II error) Answers: USEFUL FORMULAE: Descriptive Statistics Possible Outliers, any value beyond the range of Q 1.5( ) and Q 1.5( ) Range = Maximum value -Minimum value 100 where 1 ( ) (Preferred) 1 and , n fx x For data with repeats, 1 ( ) (Preferred ) OR 1 and n x x For data without repeats, 1 3 1 3 3 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Q Q Q Q x s CV n f n f x x OR s n fx nx s n x x s n x nx s                             Discrete Distribution         ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) { ( )} ( ) ( ) 2 2 2 2 E X x P X x V X E X E X E X xP X x Binomial Distribution Probability mass function, P(X=x)= x n x n x C p q  for x=0,1,2,…,n. E(X)=np, Var(X)=npq Hypothesis Testing based on Normal Distribution      X std X mean Z Standard Normal Variable, Probability Bayes Rule, ( ) ( and ) ( ) ( ) ( | ) P B P A B P B P A B P A B    Central Limit Theorem For large n (n>30), ~ ( , ) 2 n X N   and ˆ ~ ( , ) n pq p N p For hypothesis testing of μ, σ known           n x Z   For hypothesis testing of p n pq p p Z   ˆ ANSWERS: Q.1 (a) 14.286 (b) 14 (c) none (d) 10.24 (e) 22.40 Q.2 (a) 15.125 (b) 15.5 (c) No (d) 10.98 (e) 21.9 (f) English Q.3 (a) 18.6 (b)19 (c) 16, 21, and 25 (d) 15, 22 (f) slightly left (g) 7 (h) no outliers (i) increase (j) same Q.4 (a) 0.41 (b) 20 (c)14, 17, 20, 21,25 (d) 16.5, 25 (f) slightly right (g) 8.5 (h) no (i) increase (j) same Q.5 (a)56.57 (b) 22.26 (c) 8.34 Q.6 (a) 21 (b) 38.57 (c) 29.57 Q.7 (a) 410 (b) 1200 Q.8 (a)3 (b) 0.65 Q.9 (a) 0.082 (b) 0.29 (c)0.34 (d) 0.66 (e)0.10 (f) 0.64 Q.10 (a) 0.038 (b)0.23 (c) 0.71 (d) 0.29 (e)0.096 (f) 0.62 Q.11 (i)0.248 (ii)0.752 (iii)0.505 Q.12 (i)0.0875 (ii)0.913 (iii)0.425 (iii)0.488 Q.13 (a)0.22 (b)0.41 (c)0.33 (d)0.27 (e) 0.67 Q.14 (a) 0.13 (b) 0.18 (c)0.12 Q.15 E(X)=3.1 , V(X)=1.69, $0.2 per game, $ 4 win. Q.16 E(X)=5.125, V(X)=1.86, $0.25 loss per game, $5 loss. Q.17 (a)0.201 (b) 0.819, 0.027 Q.18 (a)0.9938 (b)0.0968 (c)0.452 (d)0.984 (e) 0.0433 (f)0.2353 Q.19 (a) -0.25 (b)0.71 (c) -1.13 (d)0.41 Q.20 (b) 0.7422 (c) 0.3821 (d) 0.1109 Q.21 (a)0.0014 (b) 0.0668 (c) 0.9318 Q.22 (a) 140 (b)2.37 Q.24 Z=-1.26, Accept null. Q.25 Z=-2.41, accept null Q.26 Z=4.76, reject H0 Q.27 Z=-1.75, reject H0 Q.28 F, F, F, T , F, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T, F, F, T, F, T, F, F, T, T Q.29 (c)0.113 , 0.022 , 0.977 (or 98%)

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Homework 1 Q.1 what is product of these matrices? [■(3&2&6@-2&1&0@4&1&0)] ■(2@3@4) 6 Q.2 what is largest number of pivots a 7×5 matrix can have? Q.3 find standard matrix of linear transformation T: R^2→R^2 which rotates a point about the origion through an angle of π/4 radians. Q.4 True or False If matrices A and B are equivalent, they have same reduced echelon form In general A+B≠B+A I matrix A is symmetric then so is A+I_n A matrix A must be a square matrix to be invertible. If det (A) ≠ 0 then column of A are linearly independent. If n × n matrix is equivalent to I_n then A^(-1) is also equivalent toI_n. If m × n matrix has pivot position in every row then the equation Ax = b has a unique solution for each b in R^m If AB = I, then I is invertible.

Homework 1 Q.1 what is product of these matrices? [■(3&2&6@-2&1&0@4&1&0)] ■(2@3@4) 6 Q.2 what is largest number of pivots a 7×5 matrix can have? Q.3 find standard matrix of linear transformation T: R^2→R^2 which rotates a point about the origion through an angle of π/4 radians. Q.4 True or False If matrices A and B are equivalent, they have same reduced echelon form In general A+B≠B+A I matrix A is symmetric then so is A+I_n A matrix A must be a square matrix to be invertible. If det (A) ≠ 0 then column of A are linearly independent. If n × n matrix is equivalent to I_n then A^(-1) is also equivalent toI_n. If m × n matrix has pivot position in every row then the equation Ax = b has a unique solution for each b in R^m If AB = I, then I is invertible.

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What is the prime purpose of selecting a composite material over material from the other family groups? MODULE 3 – STRUCTURE OF SOLID MATERIALS The ability of a material to exist in different space lattices is called a. Allotropic b. Crystalline c. Solvent d. Amorphous Amorphous metals develop their microstructure as a result of ___________. a. Dendrites b. Directional solidification c. Slip d. Extremely rapid cooling In an alloy, the material that dissolves the alloying element is the ___________. a. Solute b. Solvent c. Matrix d. Allotrope What is the coordination number (CN) for the fcc structure formed by ions of sodium and chlorine that is in the chemical compound NaCl (salt) ? a. 6 b. 8 c. 14 d. 16 What pressure is normally used in constructing a phase diagram? a. 100 psi b. Depends on material c. Ambient d. Normal atmospheric pressure What line on a binary diagram indicates the upper limit of the solid solution phase? a. Liquidus b. Eutectic c. Eutectoid d. Solidus What holds the atoms (ions) together in a compound such as NaCl are electrostatic forces between ___________. a. Atom and ion b. Covalent bonds c. Electrons and nuclei d. Neutrons Diffusion of atoms through a solid takes place by two main mechanisms. One is diffusion through vacancies in the atomic structure. Another method of diffusion is ___________. a. Cold b. APF c. Substitutional d. Interstitial Give a brief explanation of the Lever rule (P117) Grain boundaries ___________ movement of dislocations through a solid. a. Improve b. Inhibit c. Do not affect Iron can be alloyed with carbon because it is ___________. a. Crystalline b. Amorphous c. A mixture d. Allotropic Metals can be cooled only to crystalline solids. a. T (true) b. F (false) Sketch an fcc unit cell. Metals are classified as crystalline materials. Name one metal that is an amorphous solid and name at least one recent application in which its use is saving energy or providing greater strength and/or corrosion resistance. MODULE 4 – MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Give two examples of a mechanical property. a. Thermal resistance b. Wear resistance c. Hardness d. Strength Scissors used in the home cut material by concentrating forces that ultimately produce a certain type of stress within the material. Identify this stress. a. Bearing stress b. Shearing stress c. Compressive stress An aluminum rod 1 in. in diameter (E =10.4 x 106psi) experiences an elastic tensile strain of 0.0048 in./in. Calculate the stress in the rod. a. 49,920 ksi b. 49,920 psi c. 49,920 msi A 1-in.-diameter steel circular rod is subject to a tensile load that reduces its cross-sectional area to 0.64 in2. Express the rod’s ductility using a standard unit of measure. a. 18.5% b. 1.85% c. 18.5 d. (a) and (c) What term is used to describe the low-temperature creep of polymerics? a. Springback b. Creep rupture c. Cold flow d. Creep forming MODULE 7 – TESTING, FAILURE ANALYSIS, STANDARDS, & INSPECTION Factors of safety are defined either in terms of the ultimate strength of a material or its yield strength. In other words, by the use of a suitable factor, the ultimate or yield strength is reduced in size to what is known as the design stress or safe working stress. Which factor of safety would be more appropriate for a material that will be subjected to repetitious, suddenly applied loads? Product liability court cases have risen sharply in recent years because of poor procedures in selecting materials for particular applications. Assuming that a knowledge of a material’s properties is a valid step in the selection process, cite two examples where such lack of knowledge could or did lead to failure or unsatisfactory performance. Make a sketch and fully dimension an Izod impact test specimen. Which agency publishes the Annual Book of standard test methods used worldwide for evaluation of materials? a. NASA b. NIST c. ASTM d. SPE

What is the prime purpose of selecting a composite material over material from the other family groups? MODULE 3 – STRUCTURE OF SOLID MATERIALS The ability of a material to exist in different space lattices is called a. Allotropic b. Crystalline c. Solvent d. Amorphous Amorphous metals develop their microstructure as a result of ___________. a. Dendrites b. Directional solidification c. Slip d. Extremely rapid cooling In an alloy, the material that dissolves the alloying element is the ___________. a. Solute b. Solvent c. Matrix d. Allotrope What is the coordination number (CN) for the fcc structure formed by ions of sodium and chlorine that is in the chemical compound NaCl (salt) ? a. 6 b. 8 c. 14 d. 16 What pressure is normally used in constructing a phase diagram? a. 100 psi b. Depends on material c. Ambient d. Normal atmospheric pressure What line on a binary diagram indicates the upper limit of the solid solution phase? a. Liquidus b. Eutectic c. Eutectoid d. Solidus What holds the atoms (ions) together in a compound such as NaCl are electrostatic forces between ___________. a. Atom and ion b. Covalent bonds c. Electrons and nuclei d. Neutrons Diffusion of atoms through a solid takes place by two main mechanisms. One is diffusion through vacancies in the atomic structure. Another method of diffusion is ___________. a. Cold b. APF c. Substitutional d. Interstitial Give a brief explanation of the Lever rule (P117) Grain boundaries ___________ movement of dislocations through a solid. a. Improve b. Inhibit c. Do not affect Iron can be alloyed with carbon because it is ___________. a. Crystalline b. Amorphous c. A mixture d. Allotropic Metals can be cooled only to crystalline solids. a. T (true) b. F (false) Sketch an fcc unit cell. Metals are classified as crystalline materials. Name one metal that is an amorphous solid and name at least one recent application in which its use is saving energy or providing greater strength and/or corrosion resistance. MODULE 4 – MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Give two examples of a mechanical property. a. Thermal resistance b. Wear resistance c. Hardness d. Strength Scissors used in the home cut material by concentrating forces that ultimately produce a certain type of stress within the material. Identify this stress. a. Bearing stress b. Shearing stress c. Compressive stress An aluminum rod 1 in. in diameter (E =10.4 x 106psi) experiences an elastic tensile strain of 0.0048 in./in. Calculate the stress in the rod. a. 49,920 ksi b. 49,920 psi c. 49,920 msi A 1-in.-diameter steel circular rod is subject to a tensile load that reduces its cross-sectional area to 0.64 in2. Express the rod’s ductility using a standard unit of measure. a. 18.5% b. 1.85% c. 18.5 d. (a) and (c) What term is used to describe the low-temperature creep of polymerics? a. Springback b. Creep rupture c. Cold flow d. Creep forming MODULE 7 – TESTING, FAILURE ANALYSIS, STANDARDS, & INSPECTION Factors of safety are defined either in terms of the ultimate strength of a material or its yield strength. In other words, by the use of a suitable factor, the ultimate or yield strength is reduced in size to what is known as the design stress or safe working stress. Which factor of safety would be more appropriate for a material that will be subjected to repetitious, suddenly applied loads? Product liability court cases have risen sharply in recent years because of poor procedures in selecting materials for particular applications. Assuming that a knowledge of a material’s properties is a valid step in the selection process, cite two examples where such lack of knowledge could or did lead to failure or unsatisfactory performance. Make a sketch and fully dimension an Izod impact test specimen. Which agency publishes the Annual Book of standard test methods used worldwide for evaluation of materials? a. NASA b. NIST c. ASTM d. SPE

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The 300 kg mass, m, is supported at point C by cables CA and CB. A 200 N force, F, is also applied to the supporting hook at point C. The direction of F is given in the figure. The coordinates of points A, B, and C are also shown. . For all answers, use the x,y coordinate system shown. a. Draw the fiee body diagram (FBD) of the supporting hook at C. This FBD must I be a new figure; do not do it on top of the figure shown, (10 points). b. Write the cable force vector, Tcq, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (10 points). c. Write the cable force vector TCB, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (1 0 points). d. Determine the unit vector, ec~f,io m point C to B (10 points). e. Using the vector dot product, calculate the angle, a, between the two cables (1 0 points). f. Write (but do not solve) the two equations needed to calculate the tensions in the

The 300 kg mass, m, is supported at point C by cables CA and CB. A 200 N force, F, is also applied to the supporting hook at point C. The direction of F is given in the figure. The coordinates of points A, B, and C are also shown. . For all answers, use the x,y coordinate system shown. a. Draw the fiee body diagram (FBD) of the supporting hook at C. This FBD must I be a new figure; do not do it on top of the figure shown, (10 points). b. Write the cable force vector, Tcq, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (10 points). c. Write the cable force vector TCB, in Cartesian vector form, where the magnitude of the force vector is left as a variable (1 0 points). d. Determine the unit vector, ec~f,io m point C to B (10 points). e. Using the vector dot product, calculate the angle, a, between the two cables (1 0 points). f. Write (but do not solve) the two equations needed to calculate the tensions in the

 
Assignment 1 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 1.6 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Positive Negative Negative Positive Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 1.7 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Positive Negative Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 1.18 The figure shows the motion diagram of a drag racer. The camera took one frame every 2 . Positive Negative Positive Negative Negative Positive s You may want to review ( pages 16 – 19) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Plotting Points on a Graph Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the drag racer. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Based on Table 1.1 in the book/e-text, what two observables are associated with each point? Which position or point of the drag racer occurs first? Which position occurs last? If you label the first point as happening at , at what time does the next point occur? At what time does the last position point occur? What is the position of a point halfway in between and ? Can you think of a way to estimate the positions of the points using a ruler? ANSWER: t = 0 s x = 0 m x = 200 m Correct Motion of Two Rockets Learning Goal: To learn to use images of an object in motion to determine velocity and acceleration. Two toy rockets are traveling in the same direction (taken to be the x axis). A diagram is shown of a time-exposure image where a stroboscope has illuminated the rockets at the uniform time intervals indicated. Part A At what time(s) do the rockets have the same velocity? Hint 1. How to determine the velocity The diagram shows position, not velocity. You can’t find instantaneous velocity from this diagram, but you can determine the average velocity between two times and : . Note that no position values are given in the diagram; you will need to estimate these based on the distance between successive positions of the rockets. ANSWER: Correct t1 t2 vavg[t1, t2] = x(t2)−x(t1) t2−t1 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Part B At what time(s) do the rockets have the same x position? ANSWER: Correct Part C At what time(s) do the two rockets have the same acceleration? Hint 1. How to determine the acceleration The velocity is related to the spacing between images in a stroboscopic diagram. Since acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes, the acceleration is related to the how much this spacing changes from one interval to the next. ANSWER: at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct Part D The motion of the rocket labeled A is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part E The motion of the rocket labeled B is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part F At what time(s) is rocket A ahead of rocket B? and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time Hint 1. Use the diagram You can answer this question by looking at the diagram and identifying the time(s) when rocket A is to the right of rocket B. ANSWER: Correct Dimensions of Physical Quantities Learning Goal: To introduce the idea of physical dimensions and to learn how to find them. Physical quantities are generally not purely numerical: They have a particular dimension or combination of dimensions associated with them. Thus, your height is not 74, but rather 74 inches, often expressed as 6 feet 2 inches. Although feet and inches are different units they have the same dimension–length. Part A In classical mechanics there are three base dimensions. Length is one of them. What are the other two? Hint 1. MKS system The current system of units is called the International System (abbreviated SI from the French Système International). In the past this system was called the mks system for its base units: meter, kilogram, and second. What are the dimensions of these quantities? ANSWER: before only after only before and after between and at no time(s) shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct There are three dimensions used in mechanics: length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). A combination of these three dimensions suffices to express any physical quantity, because when a new physical quantity is needed (e.g., velocity), it always obeys an equation that permits it to be expressed in terms of the units used for these three dimensions. One then derives a unit to measure the new physical quantity from that equation, and often its unit is given a special name. Such new dimensions are called derived dimensions and the units they are measured in are called derived units. For example, area has derived dimensions . (Note that “dimensions of variable ” is symbolized as .) You can find these dimensions by looking at the formula for the area of a square , where is the length of a side of the square. Clearly . Plugging this into the equation gives . Part B Find the dimensions of volume. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for volume You have likely learned many formulas for the volume of various shapes in geometry. Any of these equations will give you the dimensions for volume. You can find the dimensions most easily from the volume of a cube , where is the length of the edge of the cube. ANSWER: acceleration and mass acceleration and time acceleration and charge mass and time mass and charge time and charge l m t A [A] = l2 x [x] A = s2 s [s] = l [A] = [s] = 2 l2 [V ] l m t V = e3 e [V ] = l3 Correct Part C Find the dimensions of speed. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for speed Speed is defined in terms of distance and time as . Therefore, . Hint 2. Familiar units for speed You are probably accustomed to hearing speeds in miles per hour (or possibly kilometers per hour). Think about the dimensions for miles and hours. If you divide the dimensions for miles by the dimensions for hours, you will have the dimensions for speed. ANSWER: Correct The dimensions of a quantity are not changed by addition or subtraction of another quantity with the same dimensions. This means that , which comes from subtracting two speeds, has the same dimensions as speed. It does not make physical sense to add or subtract two quanitites that have different dimensions, like length plus time. You can add quantities that have different units, like miles per hour and kilometers per hour, as long as you convert both quantities to the same set of units before you actually compute the sum. You can use this rule to check your answers to any physics problem you work. If the answer involves the sum or difference of two quantities with different dimensions, then it must be incorrect. This rule also ensures that the dimensions of any physical quantity will never involve sums or differences of the base dimensions. (As in the preceeding example, is not a valid dimension for a [v] l m t v d t v = d t [v] = [d]/[t] [v] = lt−1 v l + t physical quantitiy.) A valid dimension will only involve the product or ratio of powers of the base dimensions (e.g. ). Part D Find the dimensions of acceleration. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for acceleration In physics, acceleration is defined as the change in velocity in a certain time. This is shown by the equation . The is a symbol that means “the change in.” ANSWER: Correct Consistency of Units In physics, every physical quantity is measured with respect to a unit. Time is measured in seconds, length is measured in meters, and mass is measured in kilograms. Knowing the units of physical quantities will help you solve problems in physics. Part A Gravity causes objects to be attracted to one another. This attraction keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground and causes the moon to orbit the earth. The force of gravitational attraction is represented by the equation , where is the magnitude of the gravitational attraction on either body, and are the masses of the bodies, is the distance between them, and is the gravitational constant. In SI units, the units of force are , the units of mass are , and the units of distance are . For this equation to have consistent units, the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation m2/3 l2 t−2 [a] l m t a a = v/t  [a] = lt−2 F = Gm1m2 r2 F m1 m2 r G kg  m/s2 kg m G . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: Correct Part B One consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that mass is a form of energy. This mass-energy relationship is perhaps the most famous of all physics equations: , where is mass, is the speed of the light, and is the energy. In SI units, the units of speed are . For the preceding equation to have consistent units (the same units on both sides of the equation), the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: F = Gm1m2 r2 m1 kg G kg3 ms2 kgs2 m3 m3 kgs2 m kgs2 E = mc2 m c E m/s E E = mc2 m kg E Correct To solve the types of problems typified by these examples, we start with the given equation. For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for the units of the unknown variable. Problem 1.24 Convert the following to SI units: Part A 5.0 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B 54 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. kgm s kgm2 s2 kgs2 m2 kgm2 s m kg in 0.13 m ft/s ANSWER: Correct Part C 72 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D 17 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 1.55 The figure shows a motion diagram of a car traveling down a street. The camera took one frame every 10 . A distance scale is provided. 16 ms mph 32 ms in2 1.1×10−2 m2 s Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the car. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again ± Moving at the Speed of Light Part A How many nanoseconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 in vacuum? Express your answer numerically in nanoseconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Light travels at a constant speed; therefore, you can use the formula for the distance traveled in a certain amount of time by an object moving at constant speed. Before performing any calculations, it is often recommended, although it is not strictly necessary, to convert all quantities to their fundamental units rather than to multiples of the fundamental unit. km Hint 2. Find how many seconds it takes light to travel the given distance Given that the speed of light in vacuum is , how many seconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 ? Express your answer numerically in seconds. Hint 1. Find the time it takes light to travel a certain distance How long does it take light to travel a distance ? Let be the speed of light. Hint 1. The speed of an object The equation that relates the distance traveled by an object with constant speed in a time is . ANSWER: Correct Hint 2. Convert the given distance to meters Convert = 4.40 to meters. Express your answer numerically in meters. Hint 1. Conversion of kilometers to meters Recall that . 3.00 × 108 m/s km r c s v t s = vt r  c r c c r d km 1 km = 103 m ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Correct Now convert the time into nanoseconds. Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.7%. You received 50.84 out of a possible total of 60 points. 4.40km = 4400 m 1.47×10−5 s 1 ns = 10−9 s 1.47×104 ns

Assignment 1 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 1.6 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Positive Negative Negative Positive Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 1.7 Part A Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the position for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Positive Negative Correct Part B Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the velocity for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Part C Determine the sign (positive or negative) of the acceleration for the particle in the figure. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 1.18 The figure shows the motion diagram of a drag racer. The camera took one frame every 2 . Positive Negative Positive Negative Negative Positive s You may want to review ( pages 16 – 19) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Plotting Points on a Graph Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the drag racer. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Based on Table 1.1 in the book/e-text, what two observables are associated with each point? Which position or point of the drag racer occurs first? Which position occurs last? If you label the first point as happening at , at what time does the next point occur? At what time does the last position point occur? What is the position of a point halfway in between and ? Can you think of a way to estimate the positions of the points using a ruler? ANSWER: t = 0 s x = 0 m x = 200 m Correct Motion of Two Rockets Learning Goal: To learn to use images of an object in motion to determine velocity and acceleration. Two toy rockets are traveling in the same direction (taken to be the x axis). A diagram is shown of a time-exposure image where a stroboscope has illuminated the rockets at the uniform time intervals indicated. Part A At what time(s) do the rockets have the same velocity? Hint 1. How to determine the velocity The diagram shows position, not velocity. You can’t find instantaneous velocity from this diagram, but you can determine the average velocity between two times and : . Note that no position values are given in the diagram; you will need to estimate these based on the distance between successive positions of the rockets. ANSWER: Correct t1 t2 vavg[t1, t2] = x(t2)−x(t1) t2−t1 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Part B At what time(s) do the rockets have the same x position? ANSWER: Correct Part C At what time(s) do the two rockets have the same acceleration? Hint 1. How to determine the acceleration The velocity is related to the spacing between images in a stroboscopic diagram. Since acceleration is the rate at which velocity changes, the acceleration is related to the how much this spacing changes from one interval to the next. ANSWER: at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 at time only at time only at times and at some instant in time between and at no time shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct Part D The motion of the rocket labeled A is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part E The motion of the rocket labeled B is an example of motion with uniform (i.e., constant) __________. ANSWER: Correct Part F At what time(s) is rocket A ahead of rocket B? and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time and nonzero acceleration velocity displacement time Hint 1. Use the diagram You can answer this question by looking at the diagram and identifying the time(s) when rocket A is to the right of rocket B. ANSWER: Correct Dimensions of Physical Quantities Learning Goal: To introduce the idea of physical dimensions and to learn how to find them. Physical quantities are generally not purely numerical: They have a particular dimension or combination of dimensions associated with them. Thus, your height is not 74, but rather 74 inches, often expressed as 6 feet 2 inches. Although feet and inches are different units they have the same dimension–length. Part A In classical mechanics there are three base dimensions. Length is one of them. What are the other two? Hint 1. MKS system The current system of units is called the International System (abbreviated SI from the French Système International). In the past this system was called the mks system for its base units: meter, kilogram, and second. What are the dimensions of these quantities? ANSWER: before only after only before and after between and at no time(s) shown in the figure t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 t = 1 t = 4 Correct There are three dimensions used in mechanics: length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). A combination of these three dimensions suffices to express any physical quantity, because when a new physical quantity is needed (e.g., velocity), it always obeys an equation that permits it to be expressed in terms of the units used for these three dimensions. One then derives a unit to measure the new physical quantity from that equation, and often its unit is given a special name. Such new dimensions are called derived dimensions and the units they are measured in are called derived units. For example, area has derived dimensions . (Note that “dimensions of variable ” is symbolized as .) You can find these dimensions by looking at the formula for the area of a square , where is the length of a side of the square. Clearly . Plugging this into the equation gives . Part B Find the dimensions of volume. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for volume You have likely learned many formulas for the volume of various shapes in geometry. Any of these equations will give you the dimensions for volume. You can find the dimensions most easily from the volume of a cube , where is the length of the edge of the cube. ANSWER: acceleration and mass acceleration and time acceleration and charge mass and time mass and charge time and charge l m t A [A] = l2 x [x] A = s2 s [s] = l [A] = [s] = 2 l2 [V ] l m t V = e3 e [V ] = l3 Correct Part C Find the dimensions of speed. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for speed Speed is defined in terms of distance and time as . Therefore, . Hint 2. Familiar units for speed You are probably accustomed to hearing speeds in miles per hour (or possibly kilometers per hour). Think about the dimensions for miles and hours. If you divide the dimensions for miles by the dimensions for hours, you will have the dimensions for speed. ANSWER: Correct The dimensions of a quantity are not changed by addition or subtraction of another quantity with the same dimensions. This means that , which comes from subtracting two speeds, has the same dimensions as speed. It does not make physical sense to add or subtract two quanitites that have different dimensions, like length plus time. You can add quantities that have different units, like miles per hour and kilometers per hour, as long as you convert both quantities to the same set of units before you actually compute the sum. You can use this rule to check your answers to any physics problem you work. If the answer involves the sum or difference of two quantities with different dimensions, then it must be incorrect. This rule also ensures that the dimensions of any physical quantity will never involve sums or differences of the base dimensions. (As in the preceeding example, is not a valid dimension for a [v] l m t v d t v = d t [v] = [d]/[t] [v] = lt−1 v l + t physical quantitiy.) A valid dimension will only involve the product or ratio of powers of the base dimensions (e.g. ). Part D Find the dimensions of acceleration. Express your answer as powers of length ( ), mass ( ), and time ( ). Hint 1. Equation for acceleration In physics, acceleration is defined as the change in velocity in a certain time. This is shown by the equation . The is a symbol that means “the change in.” ANSWER: Correct Consistency of Units In physics, every physical quantity is measured with respect to a unit. Time is measured in seconds, length is measured in meters, and mass is measured in kilograms. Knowing the units of physical quantities will help you solve problems in physics. Part A Gravity causes objects to be attracted to one another. This attraction keeps our feet firmly planted on the ground and causes the moon to orbit the earth. The force of gravitational attraction is represented by the equation , where is the magnitude of the gravitational attraction on either body, and are the masses of the bodies, is the distance between them, and is the gravitational constant. In SI units, the units of force are , the units of mass are , and the units of distance are . For this equation to have consistent units, the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation m2/3 l2 t−2 [a] l m t a a = v/t  [a] = lt−2 F = Gm1m2 r2 F m1 m2 r G kg  m/s2 kg m G . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: Correct Part B One consequence of Einstein’s theory of special relativity is that mass is a form of energy. This mass-energy relationship is perhaps the most famous of all physics equations: , where is mass, is the speed of the light, and is the energy. In SI units, the units of speed are . For the preceding equation to have consistent units (the same units on both sides of the equation), the units of must be which of the following? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To solve this problem, we start with the equation . For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for . ANSWER: F = Gm1m2 r2 m1 kg G kg3 ms2 kgs2 m3 m3 kgs2 m kgs2 E = mc2 m c E m/s E E = mc2 m kg E Correct To solve the types of problems typified by these examples, we start with the given equation. For each symbol whose units we know, we replace the symbol with those units. For example, we replace with . We now solve this equation for the units of the unknown variable. Problem 1.24 Convert the following to SI units: Part A 5.0 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B 54 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. kgm s kgm2 s2 kgs2 m2 kgm2 s m kg in 0.13 m ft/s ANSWER: Correct Part C 72 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D 17 Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 1.55 The figure shows a motion diagram of a car traveling down a street. The camera took one frame every 10 . A distance scale is provided. 16 ms mph 32 ms in2 1.1×10−2 m2 s Part A Make a position-versus-time graph for the car. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again ± Moving at the Speed of Light Part A How many nanoseconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 in vacuum? Express your answer numerically in nanoseconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Light travels at a constant speed; therefore, you can use the formula for the distance traveled in a certain amount of time by an object moving at constant speed. Before performing any calculations, it is often recommended, although it is not strictly necessary, to convert all quantities to their fundamental units rather than to multiples of the fundamental unit. km Hint 2. Find how many seconds it takes light to travel the given distance Given that the speed of light in vacuum is , how many seconds does it take light to travel a distance of 4.40 ? Express your answer numerically in seconds. Hint 1. Find the time it takes light to travel a certain distance How long does it take light to travel a distance ? Let be the speed of light. Hint 1. The speed of an object The equation that relates the distance traveled by an object with constant speed in a time is . ANSWER: Correct Hint 2. Convert the given distance to meters Convert = 4.40 to meters. Express your answer numerically in meters. Hint 1. Conversion of kilometers to meters Recall that . 3.00 × 108 m/s km r c s v t s = vt r  c r c c r d km 1 km = 103 m ANSWER: Correct ANSWER: Correct Now convert the time into nanoseconds. Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 84.7%. You received 50.84 out of a possible total of 60 points. 4.40km = 4400 m 1.47×10−5 s 1 ns = 10−9 s 1.47×104 ns

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If the gene product needed is either transfer RNA or ribosomal RNA, the most efficient way to produce this product is Select one: activating chromatin. increasing transcription factors. increasing the rate mRNA matures. increasing translational control. increasing posttranscriptional control.

If the gene product needed is either transfer RNA or ribosomal RNA, the most efficient way to produce this product is Select one: activating chromatin. increasing transcription factors. increasing the rate mRNA matures. increasing translational control. increasing posttranscriptional control.

If the gene product needed is either transfer RNA or … Read More...