9. Identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with operating a supply chain that handles both forward and reverse movements as compared with separate supply chains for these movements.

9. Identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with operating a supply chain that handles both forward and reverse movements as compared with separate supply chains for these movements.

By strategic plan, forward supply chains normally struggle to be … Read More...
HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: xbus(t) a t x(t) = x(0) + v(0)t + (1/2)at2 vbus(0) = 0 xbus = 1 a 2 t2 tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? xman(tcatch) > xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) < xbus(tcatch) c = a  tcatch xman(t) xbus(t) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) −b+ct = a catch 1 2 t2 catch 1 a −c +b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch c tcatch cmin c a b 1 a − c + b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , \texttip{B}{B}, and \texttip{C}{C} are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, \Delta = c^2-2ab, the equation may have Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 x = −B±B2−4AC 2A  = cc − 2ab tcatch c cmin cmin = (2ab) −−−−  c > cmin Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 A Typesetting math: 15% two real valued solutions 1. if \Delta > 0, 2. one real valued solution if \Delta = 0, or 3. two complex valued solutions if \Delta < 0. In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Typesetting math: 15% Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Typesetting math: 15% To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} is decomposed into component vectors \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} and \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit y}}{A_vec_y} parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec}, denoted \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} and \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y}. TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value |A_x| of the x component \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\1. mit x}}{A_vec_x}. The sign of \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is positive if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the positive x direction; it is negative if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: Correct |A_x| = 5 \rm m Typesetting math: 15% Part B What is the sign of the y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x} and \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y}, of vector \texttip{\vec{B}}{B_vec} shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. positive negative Typesetting math: 15% ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth's gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{1. v_x}, is constant. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by \texttip{g}{g}, is equal to 9.80 \rm{m/s^2} near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit y}}{v_y}, changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time \texttip{t}{t} the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time t_0 = 0\;\rm{s} corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position x_0 = 0\;\rm{m} and y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_vec_0}. Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 1}}{v_1_vec}. Its position at this moment is denoted by (x_1, y_1) or (x_1, y_{\max}) since it is at its maximum \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x}, \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y} = -2,-5 \rm m, \rm m Typesetting math: 15% The other point, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 2}}{v_2_vec}, corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is (x_2, y_2), also known as (x_{\max}, y_2) since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence y_2 = y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Part A How do the speeds \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0}, \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} (at times \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}, and \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}) compare? ANSWER: Correct Here \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} equals \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} by symmetry and both exceed \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}. This is because \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} include vertical speed as well as the constant horizontal speed. Consider a diagram of the ball at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}. Recall that \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} refers to the instant just after the ball has been launched, so it is still at ground level (x_0 = y_0= 0\;\rm{m}). However, it is already moving with initial velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec}, whose magnitude is v_0 = 30.0\;{\rm m/s} and direction is \theta = 60.0\;{\rm degrees} counterclockwise from the positive x direction. \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 Typesetting math: 15% Part B What are the values of the intial velocity vector components \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{0,x}}{a_0, x} and \texttip{a_{0,y}}{a_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 0 means “at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}.” Hint 1. Determining components of a vector that is aligned with an axis If a vector points along a single axis direction, such as in the positive x direction, its x component will be its full magnitude, whereas its y component will be zero since the vector is perpendicular to the y direction. If the vector points in the negative x direction, its x component will be the negative of its full magnitude. Hint 2. Calculating the components of the initial velocity Notice that the vector \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec} points up and to the right. Since “up” is the positive y axis direction and “to the right” is the positive x axis direction, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} will both be positive. As shown in the figure, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x}, \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} are three sides of a right triangle, one angle of which is \texttip{\theta }{theta}. Thus \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} can be found using the definition of the sine and cosine functions given below. Recall that v_0 = 30.0\;\rm{m/s} and \theta = 60.0\;\rm{degrees} and note that \large{\sin(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;opposite\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, y}}{v_0}}, \large{\cos(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;adjacent\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, x}}{v_0}.} What are the values of \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}? Enter your answers numerically in meters per second separated by a comma. ANSWER: ANSWER: 15.0,26.0 \rm{m/s} Typesetting math: 15% Correct Also notice that at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}, just before the ball lands, its velocity components are v_{2, x} = 15\;\rm{m/s} (the same as always) and v_{2, y} = – 26.0\;\rm{m/s} (the same size but opposite sign from \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} by symmetry). The acceleration at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} will have components (0, -9.80 \rm{m/s^2}), exactly the same as at \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, as required by Rule 2. The peak of the trajectory occurs at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. This is the point where the ball reaches its maximum height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}. At the peak the ball switches from moving up to moving down, even as it continues to travel horizontally at a constant rate. Part C What are the values of the velocity vector components \texttip{v_{1,x}}{v_1, x} and \texttip{v_{1,y}}{v_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{1,x}}{a_1, x} and \texttip{a_{1,y}}{a_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 1 means that these are all at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. ANSWER: 30.0, 0, 0, 0 0, 30.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 30.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 30.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, +9.80 Typesetting math: 15% Correct At the peak of its trajectory the ball continues traveling horizontally at a constant rate. However, at this moment it stops moving up and is about to move back down. This constitutes a downward-directed change in velocity, so the ball is accelerating downward even at the peak. The flight time refers to the total amount of time the ball is in the air, from just after it is launched (\texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}) until just before it lands (\texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}). Hence the flight time can be calculated as t_2 – t_0, or just \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} in this particular situation since t_0 = 0. Because the ball lands at the same height from which it was launched, by symmetry it spends half its flight time traveling up to the peak and the other half traveling back down. The flight time is determined by the initial vertical component of the velocity and by the acceleration. The flight time does not depend on whether the object is moving horizontally while it is in the air. Part D If a second ball were dropped from rest from height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}, how long would it take to reach the ground? Ignore air resistance. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Kicking a ball of cliff; a related problem Consider two balls, one of which is dropped from rest off the edge of a cliff at the same moment that the other is kicked horizontally off the edge of the cliff. Which ball reaches the level ground at the base of the cliff first? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. Comparing position, velocity, and acceleration of the two balls Both balls start at the same height and have the same initial y velocity (v_{0,y} = 0) as well as the same acceleration (\vec a = g downward). They differ only in their x velocity (one is 0, 0, 0, 0 0, 0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 0, 0, 0 15.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 26.0, 0, 0 0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 Typesetting math: 15% zero, the other nonzero). This difference will affect their x motion but not their y motion. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct In projectile motion over level ground, it takes an object just as long to rise from the ground to the peak as it takes for it to fall from the peak back to the ground. The range \texttip{R}{R} of the ball refers to how far it moves horizontally, from just after it is launched until just before it lands. Range is defined as x_2 – x_0, or just \texttip{x_{\rm 2}}{x_2} in this particular situation since x_0 = 0. Range can be calculated as the product of the flight time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} and the x component of the velocity \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} (which is the same at all times, so v_x = v_{0,x}). The value of \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} can be found from the launch speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and the launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trigonometric functions, as was done in Part B. The flight time is related to the initial y component of the velocity, which may also be found from \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trig functions. The following equations may be useful in solving projectile motion problems, but these equations apply only to a projectile launched over level ground from position (x_0 = y_0 = 0) at time t_0 = 0 with initial speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} measured from the horizontal. As was the case above, \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} refers to the flight time and \texttip{R}{R} refers to the range of the projectile. flight time: \large{t_2 = \frac{2 v_{0, y}}{g} = \frac{2 v_0 \sin(\theta)}{g}} range: \large{R = v_x t_2 = \frac{v_0^2 \sin(2\theta)}{g}} The ball that falls straight down strikes the ground first. The ball that was kicked so it moves horizontally as it falls strikes the ground first. Both balls strike the ground at the same time. \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} t_1 – t_0 \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} t_2 – t_1 \large{\frac{t_2 – t_0}{2}} Typesetting math: 15% In general, a high launch angle yields a long flight time but a small horizontal speed and hence little range. A low launch angle gives a larger horizontal speed, but less flight time in which to accumulate range. The launch angle that achieves the maximum range for projectile motion over level ground is 45 degrees. Part E Which of the following changes would increase the range of the ball shown in the original figure? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct A solid understanding of the concepts of projectile motion will take you far, including giving you additional insight into the solution of projectile motion problems numerically. Even when the object does not land at the same height from which is was launched, the rules given in the introduction will still be useful. Recall that air resistance is assumed to be negligible here, so this projectile motion analysis may not be the best choice for describing things like frisbees or feathers, whose motion is strongly influenced by air. The value of the gravitational free-fall acceleration \texttip{g}{g} is also assumed to be constant, which may not be appropriate for objects that move vertically through distances of hundreds of kilometers, like rockets or missiles. However, for problems that involve relatively dense projectiles moving close to the surface of the earth, these assumptions are reasonable. A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude 15 \;{\rm m}/{\rm s}^{2}. Part A How much horizontal force \texttip{F}{F} must a sprinter of mass 64{\rm kg} exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Increase \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} above 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} below 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to 45 \rm{degrees}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to less than 30 \rm{degrees}. Increase \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} up toward 90 \rm{degrees}. Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. Newton’s 2nd law of motion According to Newton’s 2nd law of motion, if a net external force \texttip{F_{\rm net}}{F_net} acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass \texttip{m}{m} of the body times the acceleration \texttip{a}{a} of the body: F_{\rm net} = ma. ANSWER: Co

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: xbus(t) a t x(t) = x(0) + v(0)t + (1/2)at2 vbus(0) = 0 xbus = 1 a 2 t2 tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? xman(tcatch) > xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) < xbus(tcatch) c = a  tcatch xman(t) xbus(t) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) −b+ct = a catch 1 2 t2 catch 1 a −c +b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch c tcatch cmin c a b 1 a − c + b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , \texttip{B}{B}, and \texttip{C}{C} are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, \Delta = c^2-2ab, the equation may have Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 x = −B±B2−4AC 2A  = cc − 2ab tcatch c cmin cmin = (2ab) −−−−  c > cmin Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 A Typesetting math: 15% two real valued solutions 1. if \Delta > 0, 2. one real valued solution if \Delta = 0, or 3. two complex valued solutions if \Delta < 0. In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Typesetting math: 15% Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Typesetting math: 15% To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} is decomposed into component vectors \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} and \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit y}}{A_vec_y} parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec}, denoted \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} and \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y}. TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value |A_x| of the x component \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\1. mit x}}{A_vec_x}. The sign of \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is positive if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the positive x direction; it is negative if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: Correct |A_x| = 5 \rm m Typesetting math: 15% Part B What is the sign of the y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x} and \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y}, of vector \texttip{\vec{B}}{B_vec} shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. positive negative Typesetting math: 15% ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth's gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{1. v_x}, is constant. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by \texttip{g}{g}, is equal to 9.80 \rm{m/s^2} near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit y}}{v_y}, changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time \texttip{t}{t} the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time t_0 = 0\;\rm{s} corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position x_0 = 0\;\rm{m} and y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_vec_0}. Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 1}}{v_1_vec}. Its position at this moment is denoted by (x_1, y_1) or (x_1, y_{\max}) since it is at its maximum \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x}, \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y} = -2,-5 \rm m, \rm m Typesetting math: 15% The other point, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 2}}{v_2_vec}, corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is (x_2, y_2), also known as (x_{\max}, y_2) since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence y_2 = y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Part A How do the speeds \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0}, \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} (at times \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}, and \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}) compare? ANSWER: Correct Here \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} equals \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} by symmetry and both exceed \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}. This is because \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} include vertical speed as well as the constant horizontal speed. Consider a diagram of the ball at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}. Recall that \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} refers to the instant just after the ball has been launched, so it is still at ground level (x_0 = y_0= 0\;\rm{m}). However, it is already moving with initial velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec}, whose magnitude is v_0 = 30.0\;{\rm m/s} and direction is \theta = 60.0\;{\rm degrees} counterclockwise from the positive x direction. \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 Typesetting math: 15% Part B What are the values of the intial velocity vector components \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{0,x}}{a_0, x} and \texttip{a_{0,y}}{a_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 0 means “at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}.” Hint 1. Determining components of a vector that is aligned with an axis If a vector points along a single axis direction, such as in the positive x direction, its x component will be its full magnitude, whereas its y component will be zero since the vector is perpendicular to the y direction. If the vector points in the negative x direction, its x component will be the negative of its full magnitude. Hint 2. Calculating the components of the initial velocity Notice that the vector \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec} points up and to the right. Since “up” is the positive y axis direction and “to the right” is the positive x axis direction, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} will both be positive. As shown in the figure, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x}, \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} are three sides of a right triangle, one angle of which is \texttip{\theta }{theta}. Thus \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} can be found using the definition of the sine and cosine functions given below. Recall that v_0 = 30.0\;\rm{m/s} and \theta = 60.0\;\rm{degrees} and note that \large{\sin(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;opposite\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, y}}{v_0}}, \large{\cos(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;adjacent\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, x}}{v_0}.} What are the values of \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}? Enter your answers numerically in meters per second separated by a comma. ANSWER: ANSWER: 15.0,26.0 \rm{m/s} Typesetting math: 15% Correct Also notice that at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}, just before the ball lands, its velocity components are v_{2, x} = 15\;\rm{m/s} (the same as always) and v_{2, y} = – 26.0\;\rm{m/s} (the same size but opposite sign from \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} by symmetry). The acceleration at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} will have components (0, -9.80 \rm{m/s^2}), exactly the same as at \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, as required by Rule 2. The peak of the trajectory occurs at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. This is the point where the ball reaches its maximum height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}. At the peak the ball switches from moving up to moving down, even as it continues to travel horizontally at a constant rate. Part C What are the values of the velocity vector components \texttip{v_{1,x}}{v_1, x} and \texttip{v_{1,y}}{v_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{1,x}}{a_1, x} and \texttip{a_{1,y}}{a_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 1 means that these are all at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. ANSWER: 30.0, 0, 0, 0 0, 30.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 30.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 30.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, +9.80 Typesetting math: 15% Correct At the peak of its trajectory the ball continues traveling horizontally at a constant rate. However, at this moment it stops moving up and is about to move back down. This constitutes a downward-directed change in velocity, so the ball is accelerating downward even at the peak. The flight time refers to the total amount of time the ball is in the air, from just after it is launched (\texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}) until just before it lands (\texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}). Hence the flight time can be calculated as t_2 – t_0, or just \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} in this particular situation since t_0 = 0. Because the ball lands at the same height from which it was launched, by symmetry it spends half its flight time traveling up to the peak and the other half traveling back down. The flight time is determined by the initial vertical component of the velocity and by the acceleration. The flight time does not depend on whether the object is moving horizontally while it is in the air. Part D If a second ball were dropped from rest from height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}, how long would it take to reach the ground? Ignore air resistance. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Kicking a ball of cliff; a related problem Consider two balls, one of which is dropped from rest off the edge of a cliff at the same moment that the other is kicked horizontally off the edge of the cliff. Which ball reaches the level ground at the base of the cliff first? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. Comparing position, velocity, and acceleration of the two balls Both balls start at the same height and have the same initial y velocity (v_{0,y} = 0) as well as the same acceleration (\vec a = g downward). They differ only in their x velocity (one is 0, 0, 0, 0 0, 0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 0, 0, 0 15.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 26.0, 0, 0 0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 Typesetting math: 15% zero, the other nonzero). This difference will affect their x motion but not their y motion. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct In projectile motion over level ground, it takes an object just as long to rise from the ground to the peak as it takes for it to fall from the peak back to the ground. The range \texttip{R}{R} of the ball refers to how far it moves horizontally, from just after it is launched until just before it lands. Range is defined as x_2 – x_0, or just \texttip{x_{\rm 2}}{x_2} in this particular situation since x_0 = 0. Range can be calculated as the product of the flight time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} and the x component of the velocity \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} (which is the same at all times, so v_x = v_{0,x}). The value of \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} can be found from the launch speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and the launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trigonometric functions, as was done in Part B. The flight time is related to the initial y component of the velocity, which may also be found from \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trig functions. The following equations may be useful in solving projectile motion problems, but these equations apply only to a projectile launched over level ground from position (x_0 = y_0 = 0) at time t_0 = 0 with initial speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} measured from the horizontal. As was the case above, \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} refers to the flight time and \texttip{R}{R} refers to the range of the projectile. flight time: \large{t_2 = \frac{2 v_{0, y}}{g} = \frac{2 v_0 \sin(\theta)}{g}} range: \large{R = v_x t_2 = \frac{v_0^2 \sin(2\theta)}{g}} The ball that falls straight down strikes the ground first. The ball that was kicked so it moves horizontally as it falls strikes the ground first. Both balls strike the ground at the same time. \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} t_1 – t_0 \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} t_2 – t_1 \large{\frac{t_2 – t_0}{2}} Typesetting math: 15% In general, a high launch angle yields a long flight time but a small horizontal speed and hence little range. A low launch angle gives a larger horizontal speed, but less flight time in which to accumulate range. The launch angle that achieves the maximum range for projectile motion over level ground is 45 degrees. Part E Which of the following changes would increase the range of the ball shown in the original figure? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct A solid understanding of the concepts of projectile motion will take you far, including giving you additional insight into the solution of projectile motion problems numerically. Even when the object does not land at the same height from which is was launched, the rules given in the introduction will still be useful. Recall that air resistance is assumed to be negligible here, so this projectile motion analysis may not be the best choice for describing things like frisbees or feathers, whose motion is strongly influenced by air. The value of the gravitational free-fall acceleration \texttip{g}{g} is also assumed to be constant, which may not be appropriate for objects that move vertically through distances of hundreds of kilometers, like rockets or missiles. However, for problems that involve relatively dense projectiles moving close to the surface of the earth, these assumptions are reasonable. A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude 15 \;{\rm m}/{\rm s}^{2}. Part A How much horizontal force \texttip{F}{F} must a sprinter of mass 64{\rm kg} exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Increase \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} above 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} below 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to 45 \rm{degrees}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to less than 30 \rm{degrees}. Increase \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} up toward 90 \rm{degrees}. Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. Newton’s 2nd law of motion According to Newton’s 2nd law of motion, if a net external force \texttip{F_{\rm net}}{F_net} acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass \texttip{m}{m} of the body times the acceleration \texttip{a}{a} of the body: F_{\rm net} = ma. ANSWER: Co

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CIS CSC 315 01 Middleware for Enterprise Architecture – Winter 2014 Microsoft Project Objectives: Enterprise resource planning (ERP) is business management software—usually a suite of integrated applications—that a company can use to store and manage data from every stage of business, including: • Product planning, cost and development • Manufacturing • Marketing and sales • Inventory management • Shipping and payment ERP provides an integrated real-time view of core business processes, using common databases maintained by a database management system. ERP systems track business resources—cash, raw materials, production capacity—and the status of business commitments: orders, purchase orders, and payroll. The applications that make up the system share data across the various departments (manufacturing, purchasing, sales, accounting, etc.) that entered the data. ERP facilitates information flow between all business functions, and manages connections to outside stakeholders. Put together a PowerPoint presentation (about 15 minutes) addressing the issues below. ALL team members will participate in the presentation. The only “deliverable” is the PowerPoint presentation itself. The presentations will be the last day of class for the semester. 13-Discuss a failure or two.

CIS CSC 315 01 Middleware for Enterprise Architecture – Winter 2014 Microsoft Project Objectives: Enterprise resource planning (ERP) is business management software—usually a suite of integrated applications—that a company can use to store and manage data from every stage of business, including: • Product planning, cost and development • Manufacturing • Marketing and sales • Inventory management • Shipping and payment ERP provides an integrated real-time view of core business processes, using common databases maintained by a database management system. ERP systems track business resources—cash, raw materials, production capacity—and the status of business commitments: orders, purchase orders, and payroll. The applications that make up the system share data across the various departments (manufacturing, purchasing, sales, accounting, etc.) that entered the data. ERP facilitates information flow between all business functions, and manages connections to outside stakeholders. Put together a PowerPoint presentation (about 15 minutes) addressing the issues below. ALL team members will participate in the presentation. The only “deliverable” is the PowerPoint presentation itself. The presentations will be the last day of class for the semester. 13-Discuss a failure or two.

ERP solutions are intended for a huge audience of companies … Read More...
7. What are the major considerations regarding logistics alliances, for: a) initiation? b) Implementation? c) Maintenance? d) Termination?

7. What are the major considerations regarding logistics alliances, for: a) initiation? b) Implementation? c) Maintenance? d) Termination?

In addition to running the internal organization, supply chain executives … Read More...
1: Assume that demand for a commodity is represented by the equation P = 10 – 0.2 Q d, and supply by the equation P = 2 + 0.2 Qs where Qd and Q s are quantity demanded and quantity supplied, respectively, and P is the Price. Use the equilibrium condition Qs = Qd , 1: Solve the equations to determine equilibrium price. 2: Now determine equilibrium quantity. 3: Graph the two equations to substantiate your answers and label these two graphs as D1 and S1. 4: Furthermore; assume the demand for this product increases because of a change in income. A: graph the new demand curve and label as D 2. B: What will be the new equilibrium price and quantity compare to the initial one. C. Is this product normal good or inferior good?

1: Assume that demand for a commodity is represented by the equation P = 10 – 0.2 Q d, and supply by the equation P = 2 + 0.2 Qs where Qd and Q s are quantity demanded and quantity supplied, respectively, and P is the Price. Use the equilibrium condition Qs = Qd , 1: Solve the equations to determine equilibrium price. 2: Now determine equilibrium quantity. 3: Graph the two equations to substantiate your answers and label these two graphs as D1 and S1. 4: Furthermore; assume the demand for this product increases because of a change in income. A: graph the new demand curve and label as D 2. B: What will be the new equilibrium price and quantity compare to the initial one. C. Is this product normal good or inferior good?

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INDIRECT MESSAGE STRATEGY (DELIVERING BAD NEWS) As sales manager of Sol-Way, Inc., you must refuse to sell your solar collectors to the Dusek Construction Company. After viewing your website, they sent by email an order worth $64,544. But the prices they used came from the password-protected distributors only section of your website, intended and clearly labeled for your dealers only. You sell exclusively through dealers. You thought you made this clear on the web, but apparently Alfred Dusek, the Dusek president, found a way to obtain these prices. Your dealer in his area is Eli Toms and Son. Sol-Way management thinks that selling through exclusive dealers is necessary. After all, your technique of collecting and using solar energy is only in its infant stage, and consumers often need technical help. Thus factory-trained technicians are available at every dealership. Experience has shown that they are necessary. Your task now is to write a message to Mr. Dusek explaining Sol-Way’s distribution method and defending it. Probably Mr. Dusek already has learned much about your product from your website – how it uses its exclusive evacuated-glass-tubing technology to convey sunlight into useful heat, how the tubing is vacuum insulated, how it retains heat, how it collects significant improvement over flat-plate collectors. You may want to note some of its points in your response. As Dusek is a good prospective customer, be most tactful in your refusal. You will set this message up as an email. Mr. Dusek’s email address is: . Remember to include “to, from, subject, and date” as you set up your email. Please note – you will only create this email and send it to me, DO NOT send this to the email address above as it is a fictitious company. You will need to create this email as a Word document but it will need to look like an email.

INDIRECT MESSAGE STRATEGY (DELIVERING BAD NEWS) As sales manager of Sol-Way, Inc., you must refuse to sell your solar collectors to the Dusek Construction Company. After viewing your website, they sent by email an order worth $64,544. But the prices they used came from the password-protected distributors only section of your website, intended and clearly labeled for your dealers only. You sell exclusively through dealers. You thought you made this clear on the web, but apparently Alfred Dusek, the Dusek president, found a way to obtain these prices. Your dealer in his area is Eli Toms and Son. Sol-Way management thinks that selling through exclusive dealers is necessary. After all, your technique of collecting and using solar energy is only in its infant stage, and consumers often need technical help. Thus factory-trained technicians are available at every dealership. Experience has shown that they are necessary. Your task now is to write a message to Mr. Dusek explaining Sol-Way’s distribution method and defending it. Probably Mr. Dusek already has learned much about your product from your website – how it uses its exclusive evacuated-glass-tubing technology to convey sunlight into useful heat, how the tubing is vacuum insulated, how it retains heat, how it collects significant improvement over flat-plate collectors. You may want to note some of its points in your response. As Dusek is a good prospective customer, be most tactful in your refusal. You will set this message up as an email. Mr. Dusek’s email address is: . Remember to include “to, from, subject, and date” as you set up your email. Please note – you will only create this email and send it to me, DO NOT send this to the email address above as it is a fictitious company. You will need to create this email as a Word document but it will need to look like an email.

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Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Ka Kc Correct Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: I2 I1 Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct I2/I1 = 32 rpm s  = 440 rad s2 s  = 12 rev Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from your study of kinematics the three equations of motion derived for systems undergoing constant linear acceleration. You are now studying systems undergoing constant angular acceleration and will need to work with the three analogous equations of motion. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find the angular acceleration . Hint 2. Find the angular velocity of the salad spinner while Dario is spinning it What is the angular velocity of the salad spinner as Dario is spinning it? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees When the salad spinner spins through one revolution, it turns through 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the angular distance the salad spinner travels as it comes to rest Through how many degrees does the salad spinner rotate as it comes to rest? Express your answer numerically in degrees. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees  0 = 1440 degrees/s  =  − 0 One revolution is equivalent to 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 4. Determine which equation to use You know the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular distance through which the spinner rotates as it comes to a stop. Which equation should be used to solve for the unknown constant angular acceleration ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take for the salad spinner to come to rest? Express your answer numerically in seconds.  = 2160 degrees   = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0  = -480 degrees/s2 Hint 1. How to approach the problem Again, you will need the equations of rotational kinematics that apply to situations of constant angular acceleration. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find . Hint 2. Determine which equation to use You have the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular acceleration, which you found in the previous part. Which is the best equation to use to solve for the unknown time ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. Hint 1. Average acceleration Recall that if the angular velocity decreases uniformly, the angular acceleration will remain constant. Therefore, the angular acceleration is just the total change in angular velocity divided by t t  = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 t = 3.00 s rev/min rev/min s  the total change in time. Be careful of the sign of the angular acceleration. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. Hint 1. Determine the correct kinematic equation Which of the following kinematic equations is best suited to this problem? Here and are the initial and final angular velocities, is the elapsed time, is the constant angular acceleration, and and are the initial and final angular displacements. Hint 1. How to chose the right equation Notice that you were given in the problem introduction the initial and final speeds, as well as the length of time between them. In this problem, you are asked to find the number of revolutions (which here is the change in angular displacement, ). If you already found the angular acceleration in Part A, you could use that as well, but you would end up using a more complex equation. Also, in general, it is somewhat favorable to use given quantities instead of quantities that you have calculated. ANSWER:  = -1.10 rev/s2 0  t  0   − 0  = 0 + t  = 0 + t+  1 2 t2 = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 − 0 = (+ )t 1 2 0 ANSWER: Correct Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? Hint 1. Finding the total time for spin down To find the total time for spin down, just calculate when the velocity will equal zero. This is accomplished by setting the initial velocity plus the acceleration multipled by the time equal to zero and then solving for the time. One can then just subtract the time it took to reach 250 from the total time. Be careful of your signs when you set up the equation. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 29.0 rev rev/min 3.79 s g g cm rpm g Correct Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: v = 3.2 ms g cm J 3.65 ms cm g rpm K = 4.4 J Correct Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. Hint 1. Conditions for equilibrium If the blocks had the same mass, the system would be in equilibrium. The blocks would have zero acceleration and the tension in each part of the cord would equal the weight of each block. Both parts of the cord would then pull with equal force on the pulley, resulting in a zero net torque and no rotation of the pulley. Is this still the case in the current situation where block B has twice the mass of block A? Hint 2. Rotational analogue of Newton’s second law The net torque of all the forces acting on a rigid body is proportional to the angular acceleration of the body net  and is given by , where is the moment of inertia of the body. Hint 3. Relation between linear and angular acceleration A particle that rotates with angular acceleration has linear acceleration equal to , where is the distance of the particle from the axis of rotation. In the present case, where there is no slipping or stretching of the cord, the cord and the pulley must move together at the same speed. Therefore, if the cord moves with linear acceleration , the pulley must rotate with angular acceleration , where is the radius of the pulley. ANSWER: Correct Part B What happens when block B moves downward? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To determine whether the tensions in both parts of the cord are equal, it is convenient to write a mathematical expression for the net torque on the pulley. This will allow you to relate the tensions in the cord to the pulley’s angular acceleration. Hint 2. Find the net torque on the pulley Let’s assume that the tensions in both parts of the cord are different. Let be the tension in the right cord and the tension in the left cord. If is the radius of the pulley, what is the net torque acting on the pulley? Take the positive sense of rotation to be counterclockwise. Express your answer in terms of , , and . net = I I  a a = R R a  = a R R The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. T1 T2 R net T1 T2 R Hint 1. Torque The torque of a force with respect to a point is defined as the product of the magnitude times the perpendicular distance between the line of action of and the point . In other words, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Note that if the pulley were stationary (as in many systems where only linear motion is studied), then the tensions in both parts of the cord would be equal. However, if the pulley rotates with a certain angular acceleration, as in the present situation, the tensions must be different. If they were equal, the pulley could not have an angular acceleration. Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  F  O F l F  O  = Fl net = R(T2 − T1 ) The left cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the right cord. The left and right cord pull with equal force on the pulley. The right cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the left cord. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  = 0.20 Nm Clockwise Counterclockwise kg cm kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the center of mass Find the distance appropriate to this problem. That is, find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass of the rod to the axis passing through one end of the rod.  = 41 Nm 45  = 29 Nm Icm Ip Ip = Icm + Md2 d M L m Icm = m 1 12 L2 Iend Iend m L d ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the axis Find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass axis to the new edge axis (axis labeled p in the figure). ANSWER: d = L 2 Iend = mL2 3 m a Icm Icm = m 1 6 a2 Iedge Iedge m a o p d ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: d = a 2 Iedge = 2ma2 3 cm s rpm 2.5 × 10−5 kg m2 = 1.8×10−3  Nm Correct Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. N = 48 rev kgm2 rad/s2 8.14 N  m kg kg m Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A kg d = 1.4 m M1 = 3.6 kg L = 0.66 m L1 = 0.33 m L2 = 0.15 m  = 17 g = 9.8 m/s2 Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Nature of the problem Remember that this is a statics problem, so all forces and torques are balanced (their sums equal zero). Hint 2. Origin of torque Calculate the torque about the point at which the arm attaches to the rest of the body. This allows one to balance the torques without having to worry about the undefined forces at this point. Hint 3. Adding up the torques Add up the torques about the point in which the humerus attaches to the body. Answer in terms of , , , , , and . Remember that counterclockwise torque is positive. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. T L1 L2 M1 g T  total = 0 = L1M1g − Tsin()L2 T = 265 N Fy Hint 1. Total forces involved Recall that there are three vertical forces in this problem: the force of gravity acting on the bone, the force from the vertical component of the muscle tension, and the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where it attaches to the rest of the body). ANSWER: Correct Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). |Fy| = 42 N Fx |Fx| = 254 N F 1 F  2 F  3 Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. Hint 1. Finding torque about pivot from What is the magnitude of the torque | | provided by around the pivot point? Give your answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. F3 = 0 F1 = 12 N F 2 F 1   1 F  1 |  1 | = 0.36 N  m F2 = 4.5 N I = 9 kg m2 F1 = 12 N F2 = 27 N F3 = 0 t 45  Hint 1. Find the net torque about the pivot What is the magnitude of the total torque around the pivot point? Answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: Hint 2. Calculate Given the total torque around the pivot point, what is , the magnitude of the angular acceleration? Express your answer numerically in radians per second squared to two significant figures. Hint 1. Equation for If you know the magnitude of the total torque ( ) and the rotational inertia ( ), you can then find the rotational acceleration ( ) from ANSWER: Hint 3. Description of angular kinematics Now that you know the angular acceleration, this is a problem in rotational kinematics; find the time needed to go through a given angle . For constant acceleration ( ) and starting with (where is angular speed) the relation is given by which is analogous to the expression for linear displacement ( ) with constant acceleration ( ) starting from rest, | p ivot| | p ivot| = 1.8 N  m    vot Ivot  pivot = Ipivot.  = 0.20 radians/s2    = 0   = 1  , 2 t2 x a . ANSWER: Correct Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the required component of Only the tangential (perpendicular) component of (call it ) provides a torque. What is ? Answer in terms of . You will need to evaluate any trigonometric functions. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct x = 1 a 2 t2 t = 2.8 s F1 = 12 N F2 = 0 F3 F3 F 3 F  3 F3t F3t F3 F3t = 1 2 F3 F3 = 9.0 N Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: cm m/s 833 rpm 48.0 ms 0 ms Correct Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? g m/s 0.583 J g ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.46 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? 3.27 kgm2/s into the page out of the page kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. 3.66×10−2 kgm /s 2 x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction m Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1.  = 47 m kg kg m Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: F1 = 670 N F2 = 900 N kg m kg The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture of the four forces acting on the beam, indicating both their direction and the place on the beam that the forces are acting. Choose a coordinate system with a direction for the axis along the beam, and indicate the position of the boy. What is the net force on the beam if it is stationary? Just before the beam tips, the force of the left support on the beam is zero. Using the zero net force condition, what is the force due to the right support just before the beam tips? For the beam to remain stationary, what must be zero besides the net force on the beam? Choose a point on the beam, and compute the net torque on the beam about that point. Be sure to choose a positive direction for the rotation axis and therefore the torques. Using the zero torque condition, what is the position of the boy on the beam just prior to tipping? How far is this position from the right edge of the beam? ANSWER: Correct d = 2.0 m Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: m kg rpm N  m t = 250 s = 1.1×106 E J s Correct Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? P = 2.4×105 W  = 1800 Nm kg rpm s Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 5.76 N kg cm  = 22 rad s2 Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Score Summary:  = 6.6 rad s kg rev/s kg cm cm kg cm kg cm cm 2 = Your score on this assignment is 95.7%. You received 189.42 out of a possible total of 198 points.

Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Ka Kc Correct Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: I2 I1 Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct I2/I1 = 32 rpm s  = 440 rad s2 s  = 12 rev Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from your study of kinematics the three equations of motion derived for systems undergoing constant linear acceleration. You are now studying systems undergoing constant angular acceleration and will need to work with the three analogous equations of motion. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find the angular acceleration . Hint 2. Find the angular velocity of the salad spinner while Dario is spinning it What is the angular velocity of the salad spinner as Dario is spinning it? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees When the salad spinner spins through one revolution, it turns through 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 3. Find the angular distance the salad spinner travels as it comes to rest Through how many degrees does the salad spinner rotate as it comes to rest? Express your answer numerically in degrees. Hint 1. Converting rotations to degrees  0 = 1440 degrees/s  =  − 0 One revolution is equivalent to 360 degrees. ANSWER: Hint 4. Determine which equation to use You know the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular distance through which the spinner rotates as it comes to a stop. Which equation should be used to solve for the unknown constant angular acceleration ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take for the salad spinner to come to rest? Express your answer numerically in seconds.  = 2160 degrees   = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0  = -480 degrees/s2 Hint 1. How to approach the problem Again, you will need the equations of rotational kinematics that apply to situations of constant angular acceleration. Collect your known quantities and then determine which of the angular kinematic equations is appropriate to find . Hint 2. Determine which equation to use You have the initial and final velocities of the system and the angular acceleration, which you found in the previous part. Which is the best equation to use to solve for the unknown time ? ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. Hint 1. Average acceleration Recall that if the angular velocity decreases uniformly, the angular acceleration will remain constant. Therefore, the angular acceleration is just the total change in angular velocity divided by t t  = 0 + 0t+  1 2 t2  = 0 + t = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 t = 3.00 s rev/min rev/min s  the total change in time. Be careful of the sign of the angular acceleration. ANSWER: Correct Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. Hint 1. Determine the correct kinematic equation Which of the following kinematic equations is best suited to this problem? Here and are the initial and final angular velocities, is the elapsed time, is the constant angular acceleration, and and are the initial and final angular displacements. Hint 1. How to chose the right equation Notice that you were given in the problem introduction the initial and final speeds, as well as the length of time between them. In this problem, you are asked to find the number of revolutions (which here is the change in angular displacement, ). If you already found the angular acceleration in Part A, you could use that as well, but you would end up using a more complex equation. Also, in general, it is somewhat favorable to use given quantities instead of quantities that you have calculated. ANSWER:  = -1.10 rev/s2 0  t  0   − 0  = 0 + t  = 0 + t+  1 2 t2 = + 2( − ) 2 20 0 − 0 = (+ )t 1 2 0 ANSWER: Correct Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? Hint 1. Finding the total time for spin down To find the total time for spin down, just calculate when the velocity will equal zero. This is accomplished by setting the initial velocity plus the acceleration multipled by the time equal to zero and then solving for the time. One can then just subtract the time it took to reach 250 from the total time. Be careful of your signs when you set up the equation. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 29.0 rev rev/min 3.79 s g g cm rpm g Correct Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: v = 3.2 ms g cm J 3.65 ms cm g rpm K = 4.4 J Correct Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. Hint 1. Conditions for equilibrium If the blocks had the same mass, the system would be in equilibrium. The blocks would have zero acceleration and the tension in each part of the cord would equal the weight of each block. Both parts of the cord would then pull with equal force on the pulley, resulting in a zero net torque and no rotation of the pulley. Is this still the case in the current situation where block B has twice the mass of block A? Hint 2. Rotational analogue of Newton’s second law The net torque of all the forces acting on a rigid body is proportional to the angular acceleration of the body net  and is given by , where is the moment of inertia of the body. Hint 3. Relation between linear and angular acceleration A particle that rotates with angular acceleration has linear acceleration equal to , where is the distance of the particle from the axis of rotation. In the present case, where there is no slipping or stretching of the cord, the cord and the pulley must move together at the same speed. Therefore, if the cord moves with linear acceleration , the pulley must rotate with angular acceleration , where is the radius of the pulley. ANSWER: Correct Part B What happens when block B moves downward? Hint 1. How to approach the problem To determine whether the tensions in both parts of the cord are equal, it is convenient to write a mathematical expression for the net torque on the pulley. This will allow you to relate the tensions in the cord to the pulley’s angular acceleration. Hint 2. Find the net torque on the pulley Let’s assume that the tensions in both parts of the cord are different. Let be the tension in the right cord and the tension in the left cord. If is the radius of the pulley, what is the net torque acting on the pulley? Take the positive sense of rotation to be counterclockwise. Express your answer in terms of , , and . net = I I  a a = R R a  = a R R The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. T1 T2 R net T1 T2 R Hint 1. Torque The torque of a force with respect to a point is defined as the product of the magnitude times the perpendicular distance between the line of action of and the point . In other words, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Note that if the pulley were stationary (as in many systems where only linear motion is studied), then the tensions in both parts of the cord would be equal. However, if the pulley rotates with a certain angular acceleration, as in the present situation, the tensions must be different. If they were equal, the pulley could not have an angular acceleration. Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  F  O F l F  O  = Fl net = R(T2 − T1 ) The left cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the right cord. The left and right cord pull with equal force on the pulley. The right cord pulls on the pulley with greater force than the left cord. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units.  = 0.20 Nm Clockwise Counterclockwise kg cm kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the center of mass Find the distance appropriate to this problem. That is, find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass of the rod to the axis passing through one end of the rod.  = 41 Nm 45  = 29 Nm Icm Ip Ip = Icm + Md2 d M L m Icm = m 1 12 L2 Iend Iend m L d ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Hint 1. Find the distance from the axis to the axis Find the perpendicular distance from the center of mass axis to the new edge axis (axis labeled p in the figure). ANSWER: d = L 2 Iend = mL2 3 m a Icm Icm = m 1 6 a2 Iedge Iedge m a o p d ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: d = a 2 Iedge = 2ma2 3 cm s rpm 2.5 × 10−5 kg m2 = 1.8×10−3  Nm Correct Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. N = 48 rev kgm2 rad/s2 8.14 N  m kg kg m Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A kg d = 1.4 m M1 = 3.6 kg L = 0.66 m L1 = 0.33 m L2 = 0.15 m  = 17 g = 9.8 m/s2 Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Nature of the problem Remember that this is a statics problem, so all forces and torques are balanced (their sums equal zero). Hint 2. Origin of torque Calculate the torque about the point at which the arm attaches to the rest of the body. This allows one to balance the torques without having to worry about the undefined forces at this point. Hint 3. Adding up the torques Add up the torques about the point in which the humerus attaches to the body. Answer in terms of , , , , , and . Remember that counterclockwise torque is positive. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. T L1 L2 M1 g T  total = 0 = L1M1g − Tsin()L2 T = 265 N Fy Hint 1. Total forces involved Recall that there are three vertical forces in this problem: the force of gravity acting on the bone, the force from the vertical component of the muscle tension, and the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where it attaches to the rest of the body). ANSWER: Correct Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). |Fy| = 42 N Fx |Fx| = 254 N F 1 F  2 F  3 Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. Hint 1. Finding torque about pivot from What is the magnitude of the torque | | provided by around the pivot point? Give your answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. F3 = 0 F1 = 12 N F 2 F 1   1 F  1 |  1 | = 0.36 N  m F2 = 4.5 N I = 9 kg m2 F1 = 12 N F2 = 27 N F3 = 0 t 45  Hint 1. Find the net torque about the pivot What is the magnitude of the total torque around the pivot point? Answer numerically in newton-meters to two significant figures. ANSWER: Hint 2. Calculate Given the total torque around the pivot point, what is , the magnitude of the angular acceleration? Express your answer numerically in radians per second squared to two significant figures. Hint 1. Equation for If you know the magnitude of the total torque ( ) and the rotational inertia ( ), you can then find the rotational acceleration ( ) from ANSWER: Hint 3. Description of angular kinematics Now that you know the angular acceleration, this is a problem in rotational kinematics; find the time needed to go through a given angle . For constant acceleration ( ) and starting with (where is angular speed) the relation is given by which is analogous to the expression for linear displacement ( ) with constant acceleration ( ) starting from rest, | p ivot| | p ivot| = 1.8 N  m    vot Ivot  pivot = Ipivot.  = 0.20 radians/s2    = 0   = 1  , 2 t2 x a . ANSWER: Correct Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the required component of Only the tangential (perpendicular) component of (call it ) provides a torque. What is ? Answer in terms of . You will need to evaluate any trigonometric functions. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct x = 1 a 2 t2 t = 2.8 s F1 = 12 N F2 = 0 F3 F3 F 3 F  3 F3t F3t F3 F3t = 1 2 F3 F3 = 9.0 N Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: cm m/s 833 rpm 48.0 ms 0 ms Correct Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? g m/s 0.583 J g ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.46 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? 3.27 kgm2/s into the page out of the page kg ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. 3.66×10−2 kgm /s 2 x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction m Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1.  = 47 m kg kg m Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: F1 = 670 N F2 = 900 N kg m kg The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Draw a picture of the four forces acting on the beam, indicating both their direction and the place on the beam that the forces are acting. Choose a coordinate system with a direction for the axis along the beam, and indicate the position of the boy. What is the net force on the beam if it is stationary? Just before the beam tips, the force of the left support on the beam is zero. Using the zero net force condition, what is the force due to the right support just before the beam tips? For the beam to remain stationary, what must be zero besides the net force on the beam? Choose a point on the beam, and compute the net torque on the beam about that point. Be sure to choose a positive direction for the rotation axis and therefore the torques. Using the zero torque condition, what is the position of the boy on the beam just prior to tipping? How far is this position from the right edge of the beam? ANSWER: Correct d = 2.0 m Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: m kg rpm N  m t = 250 s = 1.1×106 E J s Correct Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? P = 2.4×105 W  = 1800 Nm kg rpm s Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: 5.76 N kg cm  = 22 rad s2 Correct Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Score Summary:  = 6.6 rad s kg rev/s kg cm cm kg cm kg cm cm 2 = Your score on this assignment is 95.7%. You received 189.42 out of a possible total of 198 points.

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