Using the exact number of digits reported in the property tables in the back of your book, what is the specific volume in m3/kg of water at a temperature of 160 degrees C and pressure of 0.7 bar?

Using the exact number of digits reported in the property tables in the back of your book, what is the specific volume in m3/kg of water at a temperature of 160 degrees C and pressure of 0.7 bar?

Selected Answer: 2.841
What is the prime purpose of selecting a composite material over material from the other family groups? MODULE 3 – STRUCTURE OF SOLID MATERIALS The ability of a material to exist in different space lattices is called a. Allotropic b. Crystalline c. Solvent d. Amorphous Amorphous metals develop their microstructure as a result of ___________. a. Dendrites b. Directional solidification c. Slip d. Extremely rapid cooling In an alloy, the material that dissolves the alloying element is the ___________. a. Solute b. Solvent c. Matrix d. Allotrope What is the coordination number (CN) for the fcc structure formed by ions of sodium and chlorine that is in the chemical compound NaCl (salt) ? a. 6 b. 8 c. 14 d. 16 What pressure is normally used in constructing a phase diagram? a. 100 psi b. Depends on material c. Ambient d. Normal atmospheric pressure What line on a binary diagram indicates the upper limit of the solid solution phase? a. Liquidus b. Eutectic c. Eutectoid d. Solidus What holds the atoms (ions) together in a compound such as NaCl are electrostatic forces between ___________. a. Atom and ion b. Covalent bonds c. Electrons and nuclei d. Neutrons Diffusion of atoms through a solid takes place by two main mechanisms. One is diffusion through vacancies in the atomic structure. Another method of diffusion is ___________. a. Cold b. APF c. Substitutional d. Interstitial Give a brief explanation of the Lever rule (P117) Grain boundaries ___________ movement of dislocations through a solid. a. Improve b. Inhibit c. Do not affect Iron can be alloyed with carbon because it is ___________. a. Crystalline b. Amorphous c. A mixture d. Allotropic Metals can be cooled only to crystalline solids. a. T (true) b. F (false) Sketch an fcc unit cell. Metals are classified as crystalline materials. Name one metal that is an amorphous solid and name at least one recent application in which its use is saving energy or providing greater strength and/or corrosion resistance. MODULE 4 – MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Give two examples of a mechanical property. a. Thermal resistance b. Wear resistance c. Hardness d. Strength Scissors used in the home cut material by concentrating forces that ultimately produce a certain type of stress within the material. Identify this stress. a. Bearing stress b. Shearing stress c. Compressive stress An aluminum rod 1 in. in diameter (E =10.4 x 106psi) experiences an elastic tensile strain of 0.0048 in./in. Calculate the stress in the rod. a. 49,920 ksi b. 49,920 psi c. 49,920 msi A 1-in.-diameter steel circular rod is subject to a tensile load that reduces its cross-sectional area to 0.64 in2. Express the rod’s ductility using a standard unit of measure. a. 18.5% b. 1.85% c. 18.5 d. (a) and (c) What term is used to describe the low-temperature creep of polymerics? a. Springback b. Creep rupture c. Cold flow d. Creep forming MODULE 7 – TESTING, FAILURE ANALYSIS, STANDARDS, & INSPECTION Factors of safety are defined either in terms of the ultimate strength of a material or its yield strength. In other words, by the use of a suitable factor, the ultimate or yield strength is reduced in size to what is known as the design stress or safe working stress. Which factor of safety would be more appropriate for a material that will be subjected to repetitious, suddenly applied loads? Product liability court cases have risen sharply in recent years because of poor procedures in selecting materials for particular applications. Assuming that a knowledge of a material’s properties is a valid step in the selection process, cite two examples where such lack of knowledge could or did lead to failure or unsatisfactory performance. Make a sketch and fully dimension an Izod impact test specimen. Which agency publishes the Annual Book of standard test methods used worldwide for evaluation of materials? a. NASA b. NIST c. ASTM d. SPE

What is the prime purpose of selecting a composite material over material from the other family groups? MODULE 3 – STRUCTURE OF SOLID MATERIALS The ability of a material to exist in different space lattices is called a. Allotropic b. Crystalline c. Solvent d. Amorphous Amorphous metals develop their microstructure as a result of ___________. a. Dendrites b. Directional solidification c. Slip d. Extremely rapid cooling In an alloy, the material that dissolves the alloying element is the ___________. a. Solute b. Solvent c. Matrix d. Allotrope What is the coordination number (CN) for the fcc structure formed by ions of sodium and chlorine that is in the chemical compound NaCl (salt) ? a. 6 b. 8 c. 14 d. 16 What pressure is normally used in constructing a phase diagram? a. 100 psi b. Depends on material c. Ambient d. Normal atmospheric pressure What line on a binary diagram indicates the upper limit of the solid solution phase? a. Liquidus b. Eutectic c. Eutectoid d. Solidus What holds the atoms (ions) together in a compound such as NaCl are electrostatic forces between ___________. a. Atom and ion b. Covalent bonds c. Electrons and nuclei d. Neutrons Diffusion of atoms through a solid takes place by two main mechanisms. One is diffusion through vacancies in the atomic structure. Another method of diffusion is ___________. a. Cold b. APF c. Substitutional d. Interstitial Give a brief explanation of the Lever rule (P117) Grain boundaries ___________ movement of dislocations through a solid. a. Improve b. Inhibit c. Do not affect Iron can be alloyed with carbon because it is ___________. a. Crystalline b. Amorphous c. A mixture d. Allotropic Metals can be cooled only to crystalline solids. a. T (true) b. F (false) Sketch an fcc unit cell. Metals are classified as crystalline materials. Name one metal that is an amorphous solid and name at least one recent application in which its use is saving energy or providing greater strength and/or corrosion resistance. MODULE 4 – MECHANICAL PROPERTIES Give two examples of a mechanical property. a. Thermal resistance b. Wear resistance c. Hardness d. Strength Scissors used in the home cut material by concentrating forces that ultimately produce a certain type of stress within the material. Identify this stress. a. Bearing stress b. Shearing stress c. Compressive stress An aluminum rod 1 in. in diameter (E =10.4 x 106psi) experiences an elastic tensile strain of 0.0048 in./in. Calculate the stress in the rod. a. 49,920 ksi b. 49,920 psi c. 49,920 msi A 1-in.-diameter steel circular rod is subject to a tensile load that reduces its cross-sectional area to 0.64 in2. Express the rod’s ductility using a standard unit of measure. a. 18.5% b. 1.85% c. 18.5 d. (a) and (c) What term is used to describe the low-temperature creep of polymerics? a. Springback b. Creep rupture c. Cold flow d. Creep forming MODULE 7 – TESTING, FAILURE ANALYSIS, STANDARDS, & INSPECTION Factors of safety are defined either in terms of the ultimate strength of a material or its yield strength. In other words, by the use of a suitable factor, the ultimate or yield strength is reduced in size to what is known as the design stress or safe working stress. Which factor of safety would be more appropriate for a material that will be subjected to repetitious, suddenly applied loads? Product liability court cases have risen sharply in recent years because of poor procedures in selecting materials for particular applications. Assuming that a knowledge of a material’s properties is a valid step in the selection process, cite two examples where such lack of knowledge could or did lead to failure or unsatisfactory performance. Make a sketch and fully dimension an Izod impact test specimen. Which agency publishes the Annual Book of standard test methods used worldwide for evaluation of materials? a. NASA b. NIST c. ASTM d. SPE

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Governmental attitudes toward issues such as private property, intellectual property, zoning, pollution, and employment stability may change over time. What is the term associated with this phenomenon? Answer bureaucratic risk political risk legislative risk judicial risk democratic risk

Governmental attitudes toward issues such as private property, intellectual property, zoning, pollution, and employment stability may change over time. What is the term associated with this phenomenon? Answer bureaucratic risk political risk legislative risk judicial risk democratic risk

Governmental attitudes toward issues such as private property, intellectual property, … Read More...
1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

1-Two notions serve as the basis for all torts: wrongs and compensation. True False 2-The goal of tort law is to put a defendant in the position that he or she would have been in had the tort occurred to the defendant. True False 3-Hayley is injured in an accident precipitated by Isolde. Hayley files a tort action against Isolde, seeking to recover for the damage suffered. Damages that are intended to compensate or reimburse a plaintiff for actual losses are: compensatory damages. reimbursement damages. actual damages. punitive damages. 4-Ladd throws a rock intending to hit Minh but misses and hits Nasir instead. On the basis of the tort of battery, Nasir can sue: Ladd. Minh. the rightful owner of the rock. no one. 4-Luella trespasses on Merchandise Mart’s property. Through the use of reasonable force, Merchandise Mart’s security guard detains Luella until the police arrive. Merchandise Mart is liable for: assault. battery. false imprisonment. none of the choice 6-The extreme risk of an activity is a defense against imposing strict liability. True False 7-Misrepresentation in an ad is enough to show an intent to induce the reliance of anyone who may use the product. True False 8-Luke is playing a video game on a defective disk that melts in his game player, starting a fire that injures his hands. Luke files a suit against Mystic Maze, Inc., the game’s maker under the doctrine of strict liability. A significant application of this doctrine is in the area of: cyber torts. intentional torts. product liability. unintentional torts 9-More than two hundred years ago, the Declaration of Independence recognized the importance of protecting creative works. True False 10-n 2014, Cloud Computing Corporation registers its trademark as provided by federal law. After the first renewal, this registration: is renewable every ten years. is renewable every twenty years. runs for life of the corporation plus seventy years. runs forever. 11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices 12-Much of the material on the Internet, including software and database information, is not copyrighted. True False 13-In a criminal case, the state must prove its case by a preponderance of the evidence. True False 14-Under the Fourth Amendmentt, general searches through a person’s belongings are permissible. True False 15-Maura enters a gas station and points a gun at the clerk Nate. She then forces Nate to open the cash register and give her all the money. Maura can be charged with: burglary. robbery. larceny. receiving stolen property. 16-Reno, driving while intoxicated, causes a car accident that results in the death of Santo. Reno is arrested and charged with a felony. A felony is a crime punishable by death or imprisonment for: any period of time. more than one year. more than six months. more than ten days. 17-Corporate officers and directors may be held criminally liable for the actions of employees under their supervision. True False 18-Sal assures Tom that she will deliver a truckload of hay to his cattle ranch. A person’s declaration to do a certain act is part of the definition of: an expectation. a moral obligation. a prediction. a promise. 19-Lark promises to buy Mac’s used textbook for $60. Lark is: an offeror. an offeree a promisee. a promisor. 20-Casey offers to sell a certain used forklift to DIY Lumber Outlet, but Casey dies before DIY accepts. Most likely, Casey’s death: did not affect the offer. shortened the time of the offer but did not terminated it. extended the time of the offer. terminated the offer.

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Nature and Culture Prof. David Backes Catalog of Personal Property Our possessions have symbolic meaning, both in a personal sense and in a cultural sense. A good way to reflect on the meaning of ownership, and of our own consumption patterns, is to make a list of everything we own. And that is what you will do for this assignment. I want you to spend a few hours taking an inventory of your possessions, and making a reasonably detailed list of what you own. (If you own several dozen books, for example, write that down. But you don’t need to give an exact count, or list the titles and authors. ) Once you’ve made the list, I want you to look it over carefully, think about it, and type a page or two about the meaning of possessions in your life, now and in the future. Most of you are young enough that you don’t have too many possessions yet, but here are some questions I’d like you to think about and that may help you decide what to write about in your brief essay. • Do you think that your life would be happier if you had more money? Why? What income do you think you will need to fulfill your dreams? • Do you use student loans or credit cards to pay for things you want but don’t need? Do you worry about your ability to repay the amount you’ve borrowed? What does this say about the role of material possessions in your life? • Have you ever thought about how the things you buy and the things you do have an impact on the environment and also on the world’s poorest people? Do you think awareness of this will affect how you choose to live? Why? • To raise a similar point, but in a different way: when you are making buying decisions, do you consider whether the items are environmentally or socially friendly? Why? • Do you often feel rushed, with too much to do and not enough time to do it? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? • What’s more important to you? A high-paying job, or a job that is truly fulfilling? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? “We Americans are great on fillers, as if what we have, what we are, is not enough. We have a cultural tendency toward denial, but, being affluent, we strangle ourselves with what we can buy. We have only to look at the houses we build to see how we build against space, the way we drink against pain and loneliness. We fill up space as if it were a pie shell, with things whose opacity further obstructs our ability to see what is already there.” — Gretel Ehrlich —

Nature and Culture Prof. David Backes Catalog of Personal Property Our possessions have symbolic meaning, both in a personal sense and in a cultural sense. A good way to reflect on the meaning of ownership, and of our own consumption patterns, is to make a list of everything we own. And that is what you will do for this assignment. I want you to spend a few hours taking an inventory of your possessions, and making a reasonably detailed list of what you own. (If you own several dozen books, for example, write that down. But you don’t need to give an exact count, or list the titles and authors. ) Once you’ve made the list, I want you to look it over carefully, think about it, and type a page or two about the meaning of possessions in your life, now and in the future. Most of you are young enough that you don’t have too many possessions yet, but here are some questions I’d like you to think about and that may help you decide what to write about in your brief essay. • Do you think that your life would be happier if you had more money? Why? What income do you think you will need to fulfill your dreams? • Do you use student loans or credit cards to pay for things you want but don’t need? Do you worry about your ability to repay the amount you’ve borrowed? What does this say about the role of material possessions in your life? • Have you ever thought about how the things you buy and the things you do have an impact on the environment and also on the world’s poorest people? Do you think awareness of this will affect how you choose to live? Why? • To raise a similar point, but in a different way: when you are making buying decisions, do you consider whether the items are environmentally or socially friendly? Why? • Do you often feel rushed, with too much to do and not enough time to do it? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? • What’s more important to you? A high-paying job, or a job that is truly fulfilling? How does your answer compare with your ideas about the amount of money you need to fulfill your dreams? “We Americans are great on fillers, as if what we have, what we are, is not enough. We have a cultural tendency toward denial, but, being affluent, we strangle ourselves with what we can buy. We have only to look at the houses we build to see how we build against space, the way we drink against pain and loneliness. We fill up space as if it were a pie shell, with things whose opacity further obstructs our ability to see what is already there.” — Gretel Ehrlich —

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1181 Assignment #8 Parallel Arrays For this application, you will use parallel arrays to compare grades of a list of students. 1. Rename the form to frmGrades and give the form an appropriate title. 2. Add the following variables as global (class level) variables. String namesString = “Aaron Ben Carmelina Dorthey Erinn Karin ” + “Lester Mitsue Nichol Ria Sherie Zachary”; String assignmentsString = “44 92 100 100 100 97 100 95 100 0 100 100|” + “95 95 97 90 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 75|” + “98 100 65 0 100 100 100 100 100 100 95 75|” + “85 100 0 50 100 95 90 0 80 100 100 100”; 3. Create three global (class level) arrays. a. One will hold all of the names of your students. b. One will be a 2D array to hold each of the grades for each assignment. c. One will hold the calculated grade for each student for all of their assignments. 4. Add a ListBox to the form to display all of the student names and assignment grades in your arrays. 5. Add a button to do the following: a. Fill the name and assignment grades 2D global arrays from these two strings. The arrays will be ran in parallel. i. Remember Split(). b. DataTypes on the arrays must be appropriate. c. After filling the arrays, call a method to fill the ListBox with student names and grades. i. Remember to use a mono-spaced font. 6. Add a button that will calculate the grade of each student: a. A method to calculate the grade for each student will be called from this event to fill the grades array. 7. Add 3 Labels to display the Name, Grade, and Letter grade of a selected student. 8. Add a Button that will fill the three previously mentioned Labels from the name and grade arrays. a. You will need to make sure the code cannot run until all appropriate arrays have been filled. b. You will need to use the arrays to fill the Labels. c. A method to calculate and return the appropriate letter grade for the student will need to be called from this event method. i. Hint: there is a .SelectedIndex property on a ListBox to get which item in a ListBox is selected. 9. Add a four Labels for the average grade of each assignment. 10. Add a button to display the average of each assignment in the four Labels. a. This event method will need to call a method that calculates the average grade of an assignment from a given index relating to the assignment in the assignment array. 11. You will need a method for each of the following: a. Fill the arrays from the strings provided. i. Hint: the .Split() method is on a string. However, you will not be able to use this directly to fill the assignment array. b. Display the names and assignment grades of each students in the ListBox i. Hint: the .PadLeft() and .PadRight() methods are on a string. c. Get an array of student average across all assignments. i. This is calculated by iterating across the appropriate index of the 2D assignment array for each student and calculating the average of the four assignment grades. This array will be ran in parallel with the student names array. d. Display the name, grade, and letter grade for a given index in the labels. e. Letter grade is returned for a given grade (use +/- system) f. Get the average grade of an assignment using the index of that assignment in the assignments array. Structure Chart Scoring 1. 5% – Form contains controls necessary for assignment. 2. 10% – Validation as needed as described in the assignment. a. This can be either pre-checking or hiding of controls. 3. 5% – Proper datatypes used for each array to include 2D and parallel arrays. 4. 10% – Method used that correctly fills arrays from strings provided. 5. 10% – Method used that displays all students and grades in ListBox. 6. 10% – Method used to return grades for each student based on assignment grades. 7. 10% – Method used to correctly fill name, grade and letter grade to the form using parallel arrays. 8. 5% – Method used that returns the correct letter grade using +/- system. 9. 10% – Method used that returns the correct average of the grades from a given assignment index. 10. 5% – Parallel arrays use indexes correctly. 11. 15% – Meaningful comments; Correct formatting (indentation, braces, whitespace, etc). This should be done automatically if you set up your preferences correctly as described at the beginning of this document. a. Form, TextBoxes, and Buttons are named properly. b. Form and controls have proper titles and labels. 12. 5% – Wow Factor: do something more to the assignment that shows creativity. (Make sure to document it and that it works.) ButtonAverages_Click getAssgnAverageGrade fillArrays displayNames ButtonShow_Click assgnIndex showStudentDetails ButtonSelected_Click selectedIndex getLetterGrade gradeAvg letterGrade Letter Grade Range A 93 – 100 A – 90 – 92.9 B + 87 – 89.9 B 83 – 86.9 B – 80 – 82.9 C + 77 – 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C – 70 – 72.9 D + 67 – 69.9 D 63 – 66.9 D – 60 – 62.9 F < 60 avgGrade ButtonGrades_Click getStudentGrades studGrades

1181 Assignment #8 Parallel Arrays For this application, you will use parallel arrays to compare grades of a list of students. 1. Rename the form to frmGrades and give the form an appropriate title. 2. Add the following variables as global (class level) variables. String namesString = “Aaron Ben Carmelina Dorthey Erinn Karin ” + “Lester Mitsue Nichol Ria Sherie Zachary”; String assignmentsString = “44 92 100 100 100 97 100 95 100 0 100 100|” + “95 95 97 90 100 95 100 100 100 100 100 75|” + “98 100 65 0 100 100 100 100 100 100 95 75|” + “85 100 0 50 100 95 90 0 80 100 100 100”; 3. Create three global (class level) arrays. a. One will hold all of the names of your students. b. One will be a 2D array to hold each of the grades for each assignment. c. One will hold the calculated grade for each student for all of their assignments. 4. Add a ListBox to the form to display all of the student names and assignment grades in your arrays. 5. Add a button to do the following: a. Fill the name and assignment grades 2D global arrays from these two strings. The arrays will be ran in parallel. i. Remember Split(). b. DataTypes on the arrays must be appropriate. c. After filling the arrays, call a method to fill the ListBox with student names and grades. i. Remember to use a mono-spaced font. 6. Add a button that will calculate the grade of each student: a. A method to calculate the grade for each student will be called from this event to fill the grades array. 7. Add 3 Labels to display the Name, Grade, and Letter grade of a selected student. 8. Add a Button that will fill the three previously mentioned Labels from the name and grade arrays. a. You will need to make sure the code cannot run until all appropriate arrays have been filled. b. You will need to use the arrays to fill the Labels. c. A method to calculate and return the appropriate letter grade for the student will need to be called from this event method. i. Hint: there is a .SelectedIndex property on a ListBox to get which item in a ListBox is selected. 9. Add a four Labels for the average grade of each assignment. 10. Add a button to display the average of each assignment in the four Labels. a. This event method will need to call a method that calculates the average grade of an assignment from a given index relating to the assignment in the assignment array. 11. You will need a method for each of the following: a. Fill the arrays from the strings provided. i. Hint: the .Split() method is on a string. However, you will not be able to use this directly to fill the assignment array. b. Display the names and assignment grades of each students in the ListBox i. Hint: the .PadLeft() and .PadRight() methods are on a string. c. Get an array of student average across all assignments. i. This is calculated by iterating across the appropriate index of the 2D assignment array for each student and calculating the average of the four assignment grades. This array will be ran in parallel with the student names array. d. Display the name, grade, and letter grade for a given index in the labels. e. Letter grade is returned for a given grade (use +/- system) f. Get the average grade of an assignment using the index of that assignment in the assignments array. Structure Chart Scoring 1. 5% – Form contains controls necessary for assignment. 2. 10% – Validation as needed as described in the assignment. a. This can be either pre-checking or hiding of controls. 3. 5% – Proper datatypes used for each array to include 2D and parallel arrays. 4. 10% – Method used that correctly fills arrays from strings provided. 5. 10% – Method used that displays all students and grades in ListBox. 6. 10% – Method used to return grades for each student based on assignment grades. 7. 10% – Method used to correctly fill name, grade and letter grade to the form using parallel arrays. 8. 5% – Method used that returns the correct letter grade using +/- system. 9. 10% – Method used that returns the correct average of the grades from a given assignment index. 10. 5% – Parallel arrays use indexes correctly. 11. 15% – Meaningful comments; Correct formatting (indentation, braces, whitespace, etc). This should be done automatically if you set up your preferences correctly as described at the beginning of this document. a. Form, TextBoxes, and Buttons are named properly. b. Form and controls have proper titles and labels. 12. 5% – Wow Factor: do something more to the assignment that shows creativity. (Make sure to document it and that it works.) ButtonAverages_Click getAssgnAverageGrade fillArrays displayNames ButtonShow_Click assgnIndex showStudentDetails ButtonSelected_Click selectedIndex getLetterGrade gradeAvg letterGrade Letter Grade Range A 93 – 100 A – 90 – 92.9 B + 87 – 89.9 B 83 – 86.9 B – 80 – 82.9 C + 77 – 79.9 C 73 – 76.9 C – 70 – 72.9 D + 67 – 69.9 D 63 – 66.9 D – 60 – 62.9 F < 60 avgGrade ButtonGrades_Click getStudentGrades studGrades

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This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

MEMO       To: Ms. Sara From: Ethics Monitoring … Read More...