History 108 Research Paper Assignment In order to fulfill the requirements for the course students will research and write on research paper Option 1: Research Paper You will write a 8-10 page research paper on a topic of your choosing based on the materials covered in class. The topic is of your choosing but must be approved by me in advance. The paper must be double spaced, Times New Roman with 12 Font, and have a proper introduction and conclusion. The paper must also incorporate at least 5 sources of academic quality, “Wikipedia does not count.” Sources include primary sources or books and articles, newspapers, video materials, or audio broadcasts etc. If you have a question, check with me. The paper will be due on November 23, 2015. The Paper will count for 20% of the final grade. The heading should be as follows in the upper left hand corner. Name Course Number, Title, and Section Number Professors Name Date Followed by the Title of the Paper Centered

History 108 Research Paper Assignment In order to fulfill the requirements for the course students will research and write on research paper Option 1: Research Paper You will write a 8-10 page research paper on a topic of your choosing based on the materials covered in class. The topic is of your choosing but must be approved by me in advance. The paper must be double spaced, Times New Roman with 12 Font, and have a proper introduction and conclusion. The paper must also incorporate at least 5 sources of academic quality, “Wikipedia does not count.” Sources include primary sources or books and articles, newspapers, video materials, or audio broadcasts etc. If you have a question, check with me. The paper will be due on November 23, 2015. The Paper will count for 20% of the final grade. The heading should be as follows in the upper left hand corner. Name Course Number, Title, and Section Number Professors Name Date Followed by the Title of the Paper Centered

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You are to create and administer a public opinion survey. • Step 1: choose a topic – person, issue, event, opinion, etc. • Step 2: write at least 10 questions asking for opinions on your chosen topic. Use a standard scale 1-10 (to show direction and intensity). Do not ask open-ended (what do you think/feel ) questions! • Step 3: poll a random sample (at least 10 individuals) of your target group (everyone, men/women, old/young, student, unemployed, etc.) • Step 4: Write a brief analysis of the actual survey you created and the results of your poll. (1-2 pages) Submit the analysis, an original copy of the survey, and all survey responses. You will be graded on the survey quality and analysis, NOT on the topic – issue or candidate. Please remember: o You cannot poll your classmates. You must find a random sample of other individuals. o Make sure your questions aren’t leading their opinion. o Consider the placement of your questions – is it leading as well? o In your analysis, think about the margin of error, the people who did/did not respond, the quality of questions, the situational factors, etc. o Use your book for assistance. o Additional websites to look for guidance (not copy/paste): www.polllingreport.com / www.gallup.com ***NOTE: You may work with a partner for this assignment. IF you choose to do so, you MUST increase to a minimum of 20 individuals surveyed.

You are to create and administer a public opinion survey. • Step 1: choose a topic – person, issue, event, opinion, etc. • Step 2: write at least 10 questions asking for opinions on your chosen topic. Use a standard scale 1-10 (to show direction and intensity). Do not ask open-ended (what do you think/feel ) questions! • Step 3: poll a random sample (at least 10 individuals) of your target group (everyone, men/women, old/young, student, unemployed, etc.) • Step 4: Write a brief analysis of the actual survey you created and the results of your poll. (1-2 pages) Submit the analysis, an original copy of the survey, and all survey responses. You will be graded on the survey quality and analysis, NOT on the topic – issue or candidate. Please remember: o You cannot poll your classmates. You must find a random sample of other individuals. o Make sure your questions aren’t leading their opinion. o Consider the placement of your questions – is it leading as well? o In your analysis, think about the margin of error, the people who did/did not respond, the quality of questions, the situational factors, etc. o Use your book for assistance. o Additional websites to look for guidance (not copy/paste): www.polllingreport.com / www.gallup.com ***NOTE: You may work with a partner for this assignment. IF you choose to do so, you MUST increase to a minimum of 20 individuals surveyed.

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Our readings on statistics this week emphasize the normal distribution and Z-score for determining probabilities in our process and design data, and many of the probabilities we’ll be interested in will be describable in that fashion. The variable control charts that we’ll work on in the next few weeks are based on the validity of the normal distribution as a model for our process data. In this week’s lecture, we discuss three other probability distributions that are used to describe other data samples in this class: hypergeometric, binomial, and Poisson. Each serves a purpose in quality analysis that supplements the more commonly used normal distribution. Think about these three alternate probability distributions in the context of the abridged Red Bead experiment that we performed in our first class of the semester. Describe one or more ways that you might use any of these distributions to explore the experiment, or to explain its results. (Such usage need not be particularly economically valuable to be appropriate in this discussion.) Response Guideline Post your initial response of 1-3 paragraphs (about 150-250 words) early in the week, and then reply to at least two initial responses of your peers, particularly focusing on responses that might differ from your own. Also respond appropriately to anyone who posts questions or comments against your own postings. If you use outside materials to develop your posts, make sure you cite your sources and provide references. Your alternate sources, when used, should be academic or scholarly sources and not web pages or blogs. You don’t need to provide a reference for our text when you use it since we all know that source, but please indicate page numbers when referring to portions of the text. Remember that the initial posting cycle is required of all learners who do not attend the live lecture class (regardless of the class section in which you are enrolled), and is optional for those learners who do attend the live class. The response posting cycle is required for all learners in this class.

Our readings on statistics this week emphasize the normal distribution and Z-score for determining probabilities in our process and design data, and many of the probabilities we’ll be interested in will be describable in that fashion. The variable control charts that we’ll work on in the next few weeks are based on the validity of the normal distribution as a model for our process data. In this week’s lecture, we discuss three other probability distributions that are used to describe other data samples in this class: hypergeometric, binomial, and Poisson. Each serves a purpose in quality analysis that supplements the more commonly used normal distribution. Think about these three alternate probability distributions in the context of the abridged Red Bead experiment that we performed in our first class of the semester. Describe one or more ways that you might use any of these distributions to explore the experiment, or to explain its results. (Such usage need not be particularly economically valuable to be appropriate in this discussion.) Response Guideline Post your initial response of 1-3 paragraphs (about 150-250 words) early in the week, and then reply to at least two initial responses of your peers, particularly focusing on responses that might differ from your own. Also respond appropriately to anyone who posts questions or comments against your own postings. If you use outside materials to develop your posts, make sure you cite your sources and provide references. Your alternate sources, when used, should be academic or scholarly sources and not web pages or blogs. You don’t need to provide a reference for our text when you use it since we all know that source, but please indicate page numbers when referring to portions of the text. Remember that the initial posting cycle is required of all learners who do not attend the live lecture class (regardless of the class section in which you are enrolled), and is optional for those learners who do attend the live class. The response posting cycle is required for all learners in this class.

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Why does customer service not increase proportionately to increases in total cost when a logistical system is being designed?

Why does customer service not increase proportionately to increases in total cost when a logistical system is being designed?

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Which statement would address the e-commerce success factor of security and reliability? Answers: “I don’t want to browse through a slow website or buy from a site where paying takes too long.” “A company’s prices don’t have to be the lowest on the Web if they build a reputation for high quality, guaranteed satisfaction and top customer support while shopping and after the sale.” “I want to know about sales when I log on to a site and even get free shipping if I order a certain dollar value of goods.” “I want to receive the exact products I ordered in the timeframe promised.”

Which statement would address the e-commerce success factor of security and reliability? Answers: “I don’t want to browse through a slow website or buy from a site where paying takes too long.” “A company’s prices don’t have to be the lowest on the Web if they build a reputation for high quality, guaranteed satisfaction and top customer support while shopping and after the sale.” “I want to know about sales when I log on to a site and even get free shipping if I order a certain dollar value of goods.” “I want to receive the exact products I ordered in the timeframe promised.”

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Transportation 1. What would be some major benefits to a city investing in mass transit? • Reduces congestion and fuel usage o 2011 – U.S. public transportation use saved 865 million hours in travel time and 450 million gallons of fuel in 498 urban areas o Decrease the need for road enhancements o Can be quicker to get to work when roads are congested o Incentivizes exercise o Mass transit can have less land use requirements • Provides economic opportunities o revitalization of cities o Provides jobs in transportation o City makes money off of transit revenue o More appealing to tourists • Air quality o Cuts carbon emissions by 37 million metric tons annually o Air quality improvement for the city (less smog) • Safety o Reduce the number of accidents 2. What would be some major benefits to the users of mass transit? • Traffic o Reduces frustration of driving in traffic o Reduces the need for gas in traffic o Reliable and predictable time of arrival o More options to travel o No waiting in DMV lines • Economics o Public transit vs. owning, driving, and parking a car = $803/month average savings (~$10,000 a year) o Connects people who don’t have a car to jobs, healthcare, home o Provides jobs in transportation o No longer have to pay car insurance • Social o Can interact/meet new people every day o Connects communities o Can do other things, like read, on the train or bus o Reduce in stress o • Safety o Reduce risk of accidents

Transportation 1. What would be some major benefits to a city investing in mass transit? • Reduces congestion and fuel usage o 2011 – U.S. public transportation use saved 865 million hours in travel time and 450 million gallons of fuel in 498 urban areas o Decrease the need for road enhancements o Can be quicker to get to work when roads are congested o Incentivizes exercise o Mass transit can have less land use requirements • Provides economic opportunities o revitalization of cities o Provides jobs in transportation o City makes money off of transit revenue o More appealing to tourists • Air quality o Cuts carbon emissions by 37 million metric tons annually o Air quality improvement for the city (less smog) • Safety o Reduce the number of accidents 2. What would be some major benefits to the users of mass transit? • Traffic o Reduces frustration of driving in traffic o Reduces the need for gas in traffic o Reliable and predictable time of arrival o More options to travel o No waiting in DMV lines • Economics o Public transit vs. owning, driving, and parking a car = $803/month average savings (~$10,000 a year) o Connects people who don’t have a car to jobs, healthcare, home o Provides jobs in transportation o No longer have to pay car insurance • Social o Can interact/meet new people every day o Connects communities o Can do other things, like read, on the train or bus o Reduce in stress o • Safety o Reduce risk of accidents

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Besides bandwidth and latency, what other parameter is needed to give a good characterization of the quality of service offered by a network used for (i) digitized voice traffic? (ii) video traffic? (iii) financial transaction traffic?

Besides bandwidth and latency, what other parameter is needed to give a good characterization of the quality of service offered by a network used for (i) digitized voice traffic? (ii) video traffic? (iii) financial transaction traffic?

1) Digitized voice traffic – A uniform delivery time is … Read More...
. Read the article on Lean Production at Jaguar (when it used to be part of Ford) which is provided at the link: http://businesscasestudies.co.uk/jaguar/lean-production/introduction.html#axzz2SrprdGnx Once you read this case study answer the following questions: (a) A generic pharmaceutical company wanted to implement Lean Manufacturing in their manufacturing process. They hired a project manager X from the automotive industry who had extensive experience implementing lean. Extract some lessons learned and best practices from the Jaguar case study that pharmaceutical company could implement at their plant once the new project manager in charge of lean came onboard. Explain each point in detail. Also, state any additional steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at pharmaceutical company. [10 points].

. Read the article on Lean Production at Jaguar (when it used to be part of Ford) which is provided at the link: http://businesscasestudies.co.uk/jaguar/lean-production/introduction.html#axzz2SrprdGnx Once you read this case study answer the following questions: (a) A generic pharmaceutical company wanted to implement Lean Manufacturing in their manufacturing process. They hired a project manager X from the automotive industry who had extensive experience implementing lean. Extract some lessons learned and best practices from the Jaguar case study that pharmaceutical company could implement at their plant once the new project manager in charge of lean came onboard. Explain each point in detail. Also, state any additional steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at pharmaceutical company. [10 points].

1) Transforming patterns of working relationships across all verticals The … Read More...
HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.