6. What is meant by the threshold service level of a least-cost system?

6. What is meant by the threshold service level of a least-cost system?

What is meant by the threshold service level of a … Read More...
A young guy just graduating college scored a good job and has a job that will allow him to buy a new car.he was heartbroken to find out the tesla roadster is out of his price range and out of production.he lives near a tesla dealership and has been a fan of the idea of an electric car, but he is not sure it would work for him.he needs your help in evaluating decision. He drives about 20,000 miles a year, and his commute to work is 30 miles each way and was thinking he could even keep his 1998 pontiac sunfire around as a second.it only costs about 300$ a year to keep insurance on the sunfire.he was surprised that the insurance and related fees were really pretty much the same.he knows he will be bound by the 300 miles range of the electric , but he likes the idea of them. If he gets a Tesla, he will plan on just keeping the sunfire too.an added benefits of going with the Buick is that he could just have one car around.if it would meet his needs, he is willing to rent a car if he goes on a long trip. 1) Which is cheaper?is it financially better to keep the sunfire around and get a tesla S, or should be get the buick? 2) If he was to finance his new car purchase a 0 % interest for four years, what is the total cost of fuel/power, vechile, and oil changes at 5,000 miles? 3) His garage has a 15amp 120 volt plug, but for $750 he could get a 50 amp 220 plug added.Tesla claims 48 hours charging time for 15 amp plug in and a 50 amp plug in.is it worth the cost and can be save enough to justify this extra cost if he goes electric. Here is the information he has to compare the two cars. Tesla mOdel S 4 door 85 k Wh battery 85

A young guy just graduating college scored a good job and has a job that will allow him to buy a new car.he was heartbroken to find out the tesla roadster is out of his price range and out of production.he lives near a tesla dealership and has been a fan of the idea of an electric car, but he is not sure it would work for him.he needs your help in evaluating decision. He drives about 20,000 miles a year, and his commute to work is 30 miles each way and was thinking he could even keep his 1998 pontiac sunfire around as a second.it only costs about 300$ a year to keep insurance on the sunfire.he was surprised that the insurance and related fees were really pretty much the same.he knows he will be bound by the 300 miles range of the electric , but he likes the idea of them. If he gets a Tesla, he will plan on just keeping the sunfire too.an added benefits of going with the Buick is that he could just have one car around.if it would meet his needs, he is willing to rent a car if he goes on a long trip. 1) Which is cheaper?is it financially better to keep the sunfire around and get a tesla S, or should be get the buick? 2) If he was to finance his new car purchase a 0 % interest for four years, what is the total cost of fuel/power, vechile, and oil changes at 5,000 miles? 3) His garage has a 15amp 120 volt plug, but for $750 he could get a 50 amp 220 plug added.Tesla claims 48 hours charging time for 15 amp plug in and a 50 amp plug in.is it worth the cost and can be save enough to justify this extra cost if he goes electric. Here is the information he has to compare the two cars. Tesla mOdel S 4 door 85 k Wh battery 85

 
average maintance costs are $ 1.50 per machine hour at an activity level of 8000 machine hours and $ 1.20 per machine hour at an activity level of 13000 machine hour . assuming that this activity is within the relevant range, total expected maintenance cost for a budgeted activity level of 10000 machine hours would be closest to, A) $16128, B) $15000, C) $13440, D) $11433

average maintance costs are $ 1.50 per machine hour at an activity level of 8000 machine hours and $ 1.20 per machine hour at an activity level of 13000 machine hour . assuming that this activity is within the relevant range, total expected maintenance cost for a budgeted activity level of 10000 machine hours would be closest to, A) $16128, B) $15000, C) $13440, D) $11433

No 4: C) Total cost ( 8,000 units) = 8,000 … Read More...
1 Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3.1 Laboratory Objective The objective of this laboratory is to understand the basic properties of sinusoids and sinusoid measurements. 3.2 Educational Objectives After performing this experiment, students should be able to: 1. Understand the properties of sinusoids. 2. Understand sinusoidal manipulation 3. Use a function generator 4. Obtain measurements using an oscilloscope 3.3 Background Sinusoids are sine or cosine waveforms that can describe many engineering phenomena. Any oscillatory motion can be described using sinusoids. Many types of electrical signals such as square, triangle, and sawtooth waves are modeled using sinusoids. Their manipulation incurs the understanding of certain quantities that describe sinusoidal behavior. These quantities are described below. 3.3.1 Sinusoid Characteristics Amplitude The amplitude A of a sine wave describes the height of the hills and valleys of a sinusoid. It carries the physical units of what the sinusoid is describing (volts, amps, meters, etc.). Frequency There are two types of frequencies that can describe a sinusoid. The normal frequency f is how many times the sinusoid repeats per unit time. It has units of cycles per second (s-1) or Hertz (Hz). The angular frequency ω is how many radians pass per second. Consequently, ω has units of radians per second. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 2 Period The period T is how long a sinusoid takes to repeat one complete cycle. The period is measured in seconds. Phase The phase φ of a sinusoid causes a horizontal shift along the t-axis. The phase has units of radians. TimeShift The time shift ts of a sinusoid is a horizontal shift along the t-axis and is a time measurement of the phase. The time shift has units of seconds. NOTE: A sine wave and a cosine wave only differ by a phase shift of 90° or ?2 radians. In reality, they are the same waveform but with a different φ value. 3.3.2 Sinusoidal Relationships Figure 3.1: Sinusoid The general equation of a sinusoid is given below and refers to Figure 3.1. ?(?) = ????(?? +?) (3.1) The angular frequency is related to the normal frequency by Equation 3.2. ?= 2?? (3.2) The angular frequency is also related to the period by Equation 3.3. ?=2?? (3.3) By inspection, the normal frequency is related to the period by Equation 3.4. ? =1? (3.4) ?? Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3 The time shift is related to the phase (radians) and the frequency by Equation 3.5. ??= ∅2?? (3.5) 3.3.3 Equipment 3.3.3.1 Inductors Inductors are electrical components that resist a change in the flow of current passing through them. They are essentially coils of wire. Inductors are electromagnets too. They are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment (with or without exposed wire): Figure 3.2: Symbol and Physical Example for Inductors 3.3.3.2 Capacitors Capacitors are electrical components that store energy. This enables engineers to store electrical energy from an input source such as a battery. Some capacitors are polarized and therefore have a negative and positive plate. One plate is straight, representing the positive terminal on the device, and the other is curved, representing the negative one. Polarized capacitors are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment: Figure 3.3: Symbol and Physical Example for Capacitors 3.3.3.3 Function Generator A function generator is used to create different types of electrical waveforms over a wide range of frequencies. It generates standard sine, square, and triangle waveforms and uses the analog output channel. 3.3.3.5 Oscilloscope An oscilloscope is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying voltages, usually as a two-dimensional plot of one or more signals as a function of time. It displays voltage data over time for the analysis of one or two voltage measurements taken from the analog input channels of the Oscilloscope. The observed waveform can be analyzed for amplitude, frequency, time interval and more. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 4 3.4 Procedure Follow the steps outlined below after the instructor has explained how to use the laboratory equipment 3.4.1 Sinusoidal Measurements 1. Connect the output channel of the Function Generator to the channel one of the Oscilloscope. 2. Complete Table 3.1 using the given values for voltage and frequency. Table 3.1: Sinusoid Measurements Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Voltage Amplitude, A (V ) Frequency (Hz) 2*A (Vp−p ) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) T (sec) 2.5 1000 3 5000 3.4.2 Circuit Measurements 1. Connect the circuit in figure 3.4 below with the given resistor and capacitor NOTE: Vs from the circuit comes from the Function Generator using a BNC connector. Figure 3.4: RC Circuit Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 5 2. Using the alligator to BNC cables, connect channel one of the Oscilloscope across the capacitor and complete Table 3.2 Table 3.2: Capacitor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) Vc (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 3. Disconnect channel one and connect channel two of the oscilloscope across the resistor and complete table 3.3. Table 3.3: Resistor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) VR (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 4. Leaving channel two connected across the resistor, clip the positive lead to the positive side of the capacitor and complete table 3.4 Table 3.4: Phase Difference Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (volts) Frequency (Hz) Divisions Time/Div (sec) ts (sec) ɸ (rad) ɸ (degrees) 2.5 100 5. Using the data from Tables 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, plot the capacitor sinusoidal equation and the resistor sinusoidal equation on the same graph using MATLAB. HINT: Plot over one period. 6. Kirchoff’s Voltage Law states that ??(?)=??(?)+??(?). Calculate Vs by hand using the following equation and Tables 3.2 and 3.3 ??(?)=√??2+??2???(??−???−1(????)) Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 6 3.5 New MATLAB Commands hold on  This command allows multiple graphs to be placed on the same XY axis and is placed after the first plot statement. legend (’string 1’, ’string2’, ‘string3’)  This command adds a legend to the plot. Strings must be placed in the order as the plots were generated. plot (x, y, ‘line specifiers’)  This command plots the data and uses line specifiers to differentiate between different plots on the same XY axis. In this lab, only use different line styles from the table below. Table 3.5: Line specifiers for the plot() command sqrt(X)  This command produces the square root of the elements of X. NOTE: The “help” command in MATLAB can be used to find a description and example for functions such as input.  For example, type “help input” in the command window to learn more about the input function. NOTE: Refer to section the “MATLAB Commands” sections from prior labs for previously discussed material that you may also need in order to complete this assignment. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 7 3.6 Lab Report Requirements 1. Complete Tables 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 (5 points each) 2. Show hand calculations for all four tables. Insert after this page (5 points each) 3. Draw the two sinusoids by hand from table 3.1. Label amplitude, period, and phase. Insert after this page. (5 points) 4. Insert MATLAB plot of Vc and VR as obtained from data in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 after this page. (5 points each) 5. Show hand calculations for Vs(t). Insert after this page. (5 points) 6. Using the data from the Tables, write: (10 points) a) Vc(t) = b) VR(t) = 7. Also, ???(?)=2.5???(628?). Write your Vs below and give reasons why they are different. (10 points) a) Vs(t) = b) Reasons: 8. Write an executive summary for this lab describing what you have done, and learned. (20 points)

1 Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3.1 Laboratory Objective The objective of this laboratory is to understand the basic properties of sinusoids and sinusoid measurements. 3.2 Educational Objectives After performing this experiment, students should be able to: 1. Understand the properties of sinusoids. 2. Understand sinusoidal manipulation 3. Use a function generator 4. Obtain measurements using an oscilloscope 3.3 Background Sinusoids are sine or cosine waveforms that can describe many engineering phenomena. Any oscillatory motion can be described using sinusoids. Many types of electrical signals such as square, triangle, and sawtooth waves are modeled using sinusoids. Their manipulation incurs the understanding of certain quantities that describe sinusoidal behavior. These quantities are described below. 3.3.1 Sinusoid Characteristics Amplitude The amplitude A of a sine wave describes the height of the hills and valleys of a sinusoid. It carries the physical units of what the sinusoid is describing (volts, amps, meters, etc.). Frequency There are two types of frequencies that can describe a sinusoid. The normal frequency f is how many times the sinusoid repeats per unit time. It has units of cycles per second (s-1) or Hertz (Hz). The angular frequency ω is how many radians pass per second. Consequently, ω has units of radians per second. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 2 Period The period T is how long a sinusoid takes to repeat one complete cycle. The period is measured in seconds. Phase The phase φ of a sinusoid causes a horizontal shift along the t-axis. The phase has units of radians. TimeShift The time shift ts of a sinusoid is a horizontal shift along the t-axis and is a time measurement of the phase. The time shift has units of seconds. NOTE: A sine wave and a cosine wave only differ by a phase shift of 90° or ?2 radians. In reality, they are the same waveform but with a different φ value. 3.3.2 Sinusoidal Relationships Figure 3.1: Sinusoid The general equation of a sinusoid is given below and refers to Figure 3.1. ?(?) = ????(?? +?) (3.1) The angular frequency is related to the normal frequency by Equation 3.2. ?= 2?? (3.2) The angular frequency is also related to the period by Equation 3.3. ?=2?? (3.3) By inspection, the normal frequency is related to the period by Equation 3.4. ? =1? (3.4) ?? Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3 The time shift is related to the phase (radians) and the frequency by Equation 3.5. ??= ∅2?? (3.5) 3.3.3 Equipment 3.3.3.1 Inductors Inductors are electrical components that resist a change in the flow of current passing through them. They are essentially coils of wire. Inductors are electromagnets too. They are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment (with or without exposed wire): Figure 3.2: Symbol and Physical Example for Inductors 3.3.3.2 Capacitors Capacitors are electrical components that store energy. This enables engineers to store electrical energy from an input source such as a battery. Some capacitors are polarized and therefore have a negative and positive plate. One plate is straight, representing the positive terminal on the device, and the other is curved, representing the negative one. Polarized capacitors are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment: Figure 3.3: Symbol and Physical Example for Capacitors 3.3.3.3 Function Generator A function generator is used to create different types of electrical waveforms over a wide range of frequencies. It generates standard sine, square, and triangle waveforms and uses the analog output channel. 3.3.3.5 Oscilloscope An oscilloscope is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying voltages, usually as a two-dimensional plot of one or more signals as a function of time. It displays voltage data over time for the analysis of one or two voltage measurements taken from the analog input channels of the Oscilloscope. The observed waveform can be analyzed for amplitude, frequency, time interval and more. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 4 3.4 Procedure Follow the steps outlined below after the instructor has explained how to use the laboratory equipment 3.4.1 Sinusoidal Measurements 1. Connect the output channel of the Function Generator to the channel one of the Oscilloscope. 2. Complete Table 3.1 using the given values for voltage and frequency. Table 3.1: Sinusoid Measurements Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Voltage Amplitude, A (V ) Frequency (Hz) 2*A (Vp−p ) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) T (sec) 2.5 1000 3 5000 3.4.2 Circuit Measurements 1. Connect the circuit in figure 3.4 below with the given resistor and capacitor NOTE: Vs from the circuit comes from the Function Generator using a BNC connector. Figure 3.4: RC Circuit Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 5 2. Using the alligator to BNC cables, connect channel one of the Oscilloscope across the capacitor and complete Table 3.2 Table 3.2: Capacitor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) Vc (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 3. Disconnect channel one and connect channel two of the oscilloscope across the resistor and complete table 3.3. Table 3.3: Resistor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) VR (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 4. Leaving channel two connected across the resistor, clip the positive lead to the positive side of the capacitor and complete table 3.4 Table 3.4: Phase Difference Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (volts) Frequency (Hz) Divisions Time/Div (sec) ts (sec) ɸ (rad) ɸ (degrees) 2.5 100 5. Using the data from Tables 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, plot the capacitor sinusoidal equation and the resistor sinusoidal equation on the same graph using MATLAB. HINT: Plot over one period. 6. Kirchoff’s Voltage Law states that ??(?)=??(?)+??(?). Calculate Vs by hand using the following equation and Tables 3.2 and 3.3 ??(?)=√??2+??2???(??−???−1(????)) Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 6 3.5 New MATLAB Commands hold on  This command allows multiple graphs to be placed on the same XY axis and is placed after the first plot statement. legend (’string 1’, ’string2’, ‘string3’)  This command adds a legend to the plot. Strings must be placed in the order as the plots were generated. plot (x, y, ‘line specifiers’)  This command plots the data and uses line specifiers to differentiate between different plots on the same XY axis. In this lab, only use different line styles from the table below. Table 3.5: Line specifiers for the plot() command sqrt(X)  This command produces the square root of the elements of X. NOTE: The “help” command in MATLAB can be used to find a description and example for functions such as input.  For example, type “help input” in the command window to learn more about the input function. NOTE: Refer to section the “MATLAB Commands” sections from prior labs for previously discussed material that you may also need in order to complete this assignment. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 7 3.6 Lab Report Requirements 1. Complete Tables 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 (5 points each) 2. Show hand calculations for all four tables. Insert after this page (5 points each) 3. Draw the two sinusoids by hand from table 3.1. Label amplitude, period, and phase. Insert after this page. (5 points) 4. Insert MATLAB plot of Vc and VR as obtained from data in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 after this page. (5 points each) 5. Show hand calculations for Vs(t). Insert after this page. (5 points) 6. Using the data from the Tables, write: (10 points) a) Vc(t) = b) VR(t) = 7. Also, ???(?)=2.5???(628?). Write your Vs below and give reasons why they are different. (10 points) a) Vs(t) = b) Reasons: 8. Write an executive summary for this lab describing what you have done, and learned. (20 points)

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(b) Based on the lessons learned, best practices and any additional steps you came up with in part (a), what if project manager X then got a job at Bank of America. Would it be possible for him/her to implement lean in the banking industry based on experience from the previous positions held at the automotive plant and the pharmaceutical company? Please state yes or no and explain the logic clearly for the same. Also, explain the steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at Bank of America (in the service industry) [10 points] You can refer to your class notes and will also have to do research online for both parts (a) and (b). Please state all the references used for each question.

(b) Based on the lessons learned, best practices and any additional steps you came up with in part (a), what if project manager X then got a job at Bank of America. Would it be possible for him/her to implement lean in the banking industry based on experience from the previous positions held at the automotive plant and the pharmaceutical company? Please state yes or no and explain the logic clearly for the same. Also, explain the steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at Bank of America (in the service industry) [10 points] You can refer to your class notes and will also have to do research online for both parts (a) and (b). Please state all the references used for each question.

Yes, lean can be applied to the banking industry.   … Read More...
Linkage analysis: The linkage shown below is the kinematic sketch for the rear suspension of a motorcycle. The dimensions are given in the drawing; consider BC = 2” along the AB direction for the given configuration. For the analysis, assume that the angular velocity of the input link (link 2) is constant and operating in the CW direction (corresponding to the motorcycle going over a bump). a. Calculate the mobility of the linkage. How many loop equations are needed to solve for the dependent joint variables? b. Formulate the loop equations. c. Solve the loop equations and give explicit expressions for the dependent variables as a function of the input angle ?. d. Compute the limits for the input angle ?. Is the linkage going to work as expected? (is the range of motion of ? enough?) e. Write the position vector of point C. Use Maple, GIM or similar software to plot the trajectory of point C over the range of ? calculated in d). f. Use Maple or similar software to plot ? and s as a function of ?. g. Use GIM to create a simulation for the motion of the linkage. Provide a snapshot. h. Compute the velocity vector for point C. Give the value of the velocity for the configuration shown in the kinematic sketch (? = 200o), for an input angular velocity of 200 rpm. i. Compute the velocity s of the slider. Plot this velocity as a function of ? for a constant input angular velocity of 200rpm. j. Plot the acceleration of the slide, s, as a function of ?, for the same constant input angular velocity

Linkage analysis: The linkage shown below is the kinematic sketch for the rear suspension of a motorcycle. The dimensions are given in the drawing; consider BC = 2” along the AB direction for the given configuration. For the analysis, assume that the angular velocity of the input link (link 2) is constant and operating in the CW direction (corresponding to the motorcycle going over a bump). a. Calculate the mobility of the linkage. How many loop equations are needed to solve for the dependent joint variables? b. Formulate the loop equations. c. Solve the loop equations and give explicit expressions for the dependent variables as a function of the input angle ?. d. Compute the limits for the input angle ?. Is the linkage going to work as expected? (is the range of motion of ? enough?) e. Write the position vector of point C. Use Maple, GIM or similar software to plot the trajectory of point C over the range of ? calculated in d). f. Use Maple or similar software to plot ? and s as a function of ?. g. Use GIM to create a simulation for the motion of the linkage. Provide a snapshot. h. Compute the velocity vector for point C. Give the value of the velocity for the configuration shown in the kinematic sketch (? = 200o), for an input angular velocity of 200 rpm. i. Compute the velocity s of the slider. Plot this velocity as a function of ? for a constant input angular velocity of 200rpm. j. Plot the acceleration of the slide, s, as a function of ?, for the same constant input angular velocity

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Module Overview Summary of Module Description For full details, go to Module Descriptor. Aims The aim of this module is to: • Develop individuals for a career in business and management • Enhance and develop employability , professional and lifelong learning skills and personal development Learning Outcomes Learners will be able to critically evaluate the acquisition of a range of academic and professional skills using a number of theoretical frameworks. Assessment – Summary Category Assessment Description Duration Word Count Weight (%) Written Assignment Essay 1 Reflective Essay N/A 3000 45 For full details, go to Assessment. Additional Information Remember that a variety of Resources is available to support your learning materials.Skills and character audit This document provides an initial picture of your skills and character. It will also provide the basis of further documents that make up the first assignment on the module. It is based on the skills statements that form a fundamental part of your Masters programme which were approved by a validation panel that consisted of members of staff in the Business School, academic staff from other higher education institutions and employers. The statements in the form are there for you and you will not be judged on whether your responses are positive or negative. The responses should enable you to identify what you are good or bad at from which you can create a personal SLOT analysis (Strengths, Limitations, Opportunities, Threats). From this SLOT analysis you can then concentrate on developing certain areas that will enhance your academic and professional development. We would very much like to” get to know” you through this document and would encourage you to also complete the notes section. In this you could give us a rationale for your responses to the questions. As a guide to how you should gauge your response consider the following: Strongly agree – I have a wide range of experience in this area and have been commended by a tutor or employer for my efforts in this area Agree – I am comfortable with this aspect and have been able to demonstrate my ability Disagree – I am Ok with this but realise that I do need to improve Strongly disagree – I know I am weak in this area and need to focus on this as I could fine this weakness to be detrimental to my progression Explain why – please take the room to consider the reasons for your answer as this is the reflection that is of most value. Do not worry if your section spills onto the next page.   Intellectual (thinking) skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am a creative person who can adapt my thinking to circumstances I am able to organise my thoughts, analyse, synthesise and critically appraise situations I can identify assumptions, evaluate statements in terms of evidence, detect false logic or reasoning, identify implicit values, define terms adequately and generalise appropriately Explain why: Professional/Vocational skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I use a wide range of techniques in approaching and solving problems. I am comfortable with a range of research techniques I am able to analyse and interpret quantitative data I am able to analyse and interpret qualitative data My leadership skills are well developed and I can adapt them to different situations I am able to manage people effectively Motivating myself and others comes easy to me I am aware of my responsibilities to myself, the organisation and other people I treat people with respect and consideration Explain why:   Key/Common skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am able to use mathematical techniques to analyse data I can effectively interpret numerical data including tables and charts I am able to use a wide range of software on a PC I use a range Information Technology devices to communicate and access information I am a good listener I am able to communicate my ideas well in a face-to-face situation I can adapt my written style to suit an audiences needs I am comfortable presenting my ideas to an audience Whenever I have completed a task I always reflect on the experience with a view to seeking continuous improvement I manage my time effectively I am always prompt when asked to complete a task I am aware of the need to be sensitive to the cultural differences to which I have been exposed I am keen to learn about other people and their country and culture I enjoy working with others to complete a task I know my own character and am sensitive of this in a group situation I understand that a group is made of individuals and I am sensitive to the needs and preferences of others I will always ensure that I get my views across in a meeting I am willing to accept the viewpoint of others I always give 100% in a group task Explain why: SLOT Analysis Having responded to the statements above you should now be in a position to look forward and recognise those areas on which your development will be based. The SLOT analysis can help you to arrange this. Strengths – can be those skills and characteristics to which you have responded positively to in the previous section. It is worth noting that whilst you may be strong in these areas that does not mean you ignore their development. Indeed you may be able to utilise these strengths in the development of areas identified as weaknesses or to overcome strengths, this will enhance those skills and characteristics. Limitations – All of us can identify some sort of limitation to our skills. None of us should be afraid of doing this as this is the first stage on the improvement and development of these weaknesses. Opportunities – These arise or can be created. When thinking of this look ahead at opportunities that will arise in a professional, academic or social context within which your development can take place. Threats – Many threats from your development can come from within – your own characteristics e.g. poor time management can lead to missing deadlines. However we could equally identify a busy lifestyle as a threat to our development. Once again think widely in terms of where the threat will come from. Do not worry if you find that a strength can also be a limitation. This is often true as a characteristic you have may be strength in one situation but a limitation in another. E.g. you may be an assertive person, which is positive, but this could be negative in a group situation. Please try and elaborate this in the notes section at the foot of the table. SLOT Analysis (you may need to use two pages to set out this analysis) Strengths Limitations Opportunities Threats Analysis of the Bullet points in the SLOT table Objectives Having undertaken some analysis of your skills and characteristics the aim of this next section is to identify various aspects of your development during the course of this module, other modules on your course, and extra-curricular activities. Make sure the objectives are SMART:- S – Specific. Clearly identified from the exercises undertaken M – Measurable. The outcomes can be easily demonstrated (to yourself, and where possible others) A – Achievable. They can be done given the opportunities available to you R – Relevant. They form part of your development either on this award, in your employability prospects or in your current job role T – Timebound. They can be achieved within a given timescale Whilst there are 5 rows in the table below, please feel free to add more. However be sure that you need to do this development and that they fit within the scope of the above criteria. Area What I am going to do. How I am going to do it When I am going to do it by Force Field Analysis This technique was designed by Kurt Lewin (1947 and 1953). In the business world it is used for decision making, looking at forces that need to be considered when implementing change – it can be said to be a specialised method of weighing up the pros and cons of a decision. Having looked at your personal strengths and weaknesses we would like you to use this technique to become aware of those factors that will help/hinder, give you motivation for or may act against, your personal development. Whilst you could do this for each of your objectives we want you to think in terms of where you would like to be at the end of your Masters programme. In the central pillar, put in a statement of where you want to be at the end of the course. Then in the arrows either side look at those factors/forces that may work in your favour. Be realistic and please add as many arrows that you think may be necessary; use a separate page for the module if it makes it easier to structure your thoughts. Forces or factors working for achieving your desired outcome Where I want to be Forces or factors against working against you achieving your desired outcome

Module Overview Summary of Module Description For full details, go to Module Descriptor. Aims The aim of this module is to: • Develop individuals for a career in business and management • Enhance and develop employability , professional and lifelong learning skills and personal development Learning Outcomes Learners will be able to critically evaluate the acquisition of a range of academic and professional skills using a number of theoretical frameworks. Assessment – Summary Category Assessment Description Duration Word Count Weight (%) Written Assignment Essay 1 Reflective Essay N/A 3000 45 For full details, go to Assessment. Additional Information Remember that a variety of Resources is available to support your learning materials.Skills and character audit This document provides an initial picture of your skills and character. It will also provide the basis of further documents that make up the first assignment on the module. It is based on the skills statements that form a fundamental part of your Masters programme which were approved by a validation panel that consisted of members of staff in the Business School, academic staff from other higher education institutions and employers. The statements in the form are there for you and you will not be judged on whether your responses are positive or negative. The responses should enable you to identify what you are good or bad at from which you can create a personal SLOT analysis (Strengths, Limitations, Opportunities, Threats). From this SLOT analysis you can then concentrate on developing certain areas that will enhance your academic and professional development. We would very much like to” get to know” you through this document and would encourage you to also complete the notes section. In this you could give us a rationale for your responses to the questions. As a guide to how you should gauge your response consider the following: Strongly agree – I have a wide range of experience in this area and have been commended by a tutor or employer for my efforts in this area Agree – I am comfortable with this aspect and have been able to demonstrate my ability Disagree – I am Ok with this but realise that I do need to improve Strongly disagree – I know I am weak in this area and need to focus on this as I could fine this weakness to be detrimental to my progression Explain why – please take the room to consider the reasons for your answer as this is the reflection that is of most value. Do not worry if your section spills onto the next page.   Intellectual (thinking) skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am a creative person who can adapt my thinking to circumstances I am able to organise my thoughts, analyse, synthesise and critically appraise situations I can identify assumptions, evaluate statements in terms of evidence, detect false logic or reasoning, identify implicit values, define terms adequately and generalise appropriately Explain why: Professional/Vocational skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I use a wide range of techniques in approaching and solving problems. I am comfortable with a range of research techniques I am able to analyse and interpret quantitative data I am able to analyse and interpret qualitative data My leadership skills are well developed and I can adapt them to different situations I am able to manage people effectively Motivating myself and others comes easy to me I am aware of my responsibilities to myself, the organisation and other people I treat people with respect and consideration Explain why:   Key/Common skills Strongly Agree Agree Disagree Strongly Disagree I am able to use mathematical techniques to analyse data I can effectively interpret numerical data including tables and charts I am able to use a wide range of software on a PC I use a range Information Technology devices to communicate and access information I am a good listener I am able to communicate my ideas well in a face-to-face situation I can adapt my written style to suit an audiences needs I am comfortable presenting my ideas to an audience Whenever I have completed a task I always reflect on the experience with a view to seeking continuous improvement I manage my time effectively I am always prompt when asked to complete a task I am aware of the need to be sensitive to the cultural differences to which I have been exposed I am keen to learn about other people and their country and culture I enjoy working with others to complete a task I know my own character and am sensitive of this in a group situation I understand that a group is made of individuals and I am sensitive to the needs and preferences of others I will always ensure that I get my views across in a meeting I am willing to accept the viewpoint of others I always give 100% in a group task Explain why: SLOT Analysis Having responded to the statements above you should now be in a position to look forward and recognise those areas on which your development will be based. The SLOT analysis can help you to arrange this. Strengths – can be those skills and characteristics to which you have responded positively to in the previous section. It is worth noting that whilst you may be strong in these areas that does not mean you ignore their development. Indeed you may be able to utilise these strengths in the development of areas identified as weaknesses or to overcome strengths, this will enhance those skills and characteristics. Limitations – All of us can identify some sort of limitation to our skills. None of us should be afraid of doing this as this is the first stage on the improvement and development of these weaknesses. Opportunities – These arise or can be created. When thinking of this look ahead at opportunities that will arise in a professional, academic or social context within which your development can take place. Threats – Many threats from your development can come from within – your own characteristics e.g. poor time management can lead to missing deadlines. However we could equally identify a busy lifestyle as a threat to our development. Once again think widely in terms of where the threat will come from. Do not worry if you find that a strength can also be a limitation. This is often true as a characteristic you have may be strength in one situation but a limitation in another. E.g. you may be an assertive person, which is positive, but this could be negative in a group situation. Please try and elaborate this in the notes section at the foot of the table. SLOT Analysis (you may need to use two pages to set out this analysis) Strengths Limitations Opportunities Threats Analysis of the Bullet points in the SLOT table Objectives Having undertaken some analysis of your skills and characteristics the aim of this next section is to identify various aspects of your development during the course of this module, other modules on your course, and extra-curricular activities. Make sure the objectives are SMART:- S – Specific. Clearly identified from the exercises undertaken M – Measurable. The outcomes can be easily demonstrated (to yourself, and where possible others) A – Achievable. They can be done given the opportunities available to you R – Relevant. They form part of your development either on this award, in your employability prospects or in your current job role T – Timebound. They can be achieved within a given timescale Whilst there are 5 rows in the table below, please feel free to add more. However be sure that you need to do this development and that they fit within the scope of the above criteria. Area What I am going to do. How I am going to do it When I am going to do it by Force Field Analysis This technique was designed by Kurt Lewin (1947 and 1953). In the business world it is used for decision making, looking at forces that need to be considered when implementing change – it can be said to be a specialised method of weighing up the pros and cons of a decision. Having looked at your personal strengths and weaknesses we would like you to use this technique to become aware of those factors that will help/hinder, give you motivation for or may act against, your personal development. Whilst you could do this for each of your objectives we want you to think in terms of where you would like to be at the end of your Masters programme. In the central pillar, put in a statement of where you want to be at the end of the course. Then in the arrows either side look at those factors/forces that may work in your favour. Be realistic and please add as many arrows that you think may be necessary; use a separate page for the module if it makes it easier to structure your thoughts. Forces or factors working for achieving your desired outcome Where I want to be Forces or factors against working against you achieving your desired outcome

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MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Homework 4 Problem 1: (Points: 25) The circuit shown in Fig. 1 is excited by an impulse of 0.015V. Assuming the capacitor is initially discharged, obtain an analytic expression of vO (t), and make a Matlab program that plots the system response to the impulse. Figure 1 Problem 2: Extra Credit (Points: 25) A winding oscillator consists of two steel spheres on each end of a long slender rod, as shown in Fig. 2. The rod is hung on a thin wire that can be twisted many revolutions without breaking. The device will be wound up 4000 degrees. Make a Matlab script that computes the system response and determine how long will it take until the motion decays to a swing of only 10 degrees? Assume that the thin wire has a rotational spring constant of 2  10?4Nm/rad and that the viscous friction coecient for the sphere in air is 2  10?4Nms/rad. Each sphere has a mass of 1Kg. Figure 2: Winding oscillator. Problem 3: (Points: 25) Find the equivalent transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) for the system shown in Fig. 3. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 1 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 3 Problem 4: (Points: 25) Reduce the block diagram shown in Fig. 4 to a single transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) . Figure 4 Problem 5: (Points: 25) Consider the rotational mechanical system shown in Fig. 5. Represent the system as a block diagram. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 2 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 5 Problem 6: (Points: 25) During ascent the space shuttle is steered by commands generated by the computer’s guidance calcu- lations. These commands are in the form of vehicle attitude, attitude rates, and attitude accelerations obtained through measurements made by the vehicle’s inertial measuring unit, rate gyro assembly, and accelerometer assembly, respectively. The ascent digital autopilot uses the errors between the actual and commanded attitude, rates, and accelerations to gimbal the space shuttle main engines (called thrust vectoring) and the solid rocket boosters to a ect the desired vehicle attitude. The space shut- tle’s attitude control system employs the same method in the pitch, roll, and yaw control systems. A simpli ed model of the pitch control system is shown in Fig. 6.  a) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch to commanded pitch. Assume all other inputs are zero.  b) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch rate to commanded pitch rate. Assume all other inputs are zero.  c) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch acceleration to commanded pitch acceleration. Assume all other inputs are zero. Figure 6: Space shuttle pitch control system (simpli ed). Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 3 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Problem 7: (Extra Credit Points: 25) Extenders are robot manipulators that extend (i.e. increase) the strength of the human arm in load- maneuvering tasks (see Fig. 7). The system is represented by the transfer function Y (s) U(s) = G(s) = 30 s2+4s+3 where U (s) is the force of the human hand applied to the robot manipulator, and Y (s) is the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load. Assuming that the force of the human hand that is applied is given by u (t) = 5 sin (!t), create a MATLAB code that will compute and plot the di erence in magnitude and phase between the applied human force and the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load, as a function of the frequency !. Use 100 values for ! in the range ! 2 [0:01; 100] rad s for your two plots. See Fig. 8 on how to de ne di erence in magnitude and phase between two signals. You need to include your code and the two resulted plots in your solution. Figure 7: Human extender. A B dt T: signal period magnitude difference phase difference B A Figure 8: Magnitude and phase di erence (deg) between two sinusoidal signals.

MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Homework 4 Problem 1: (Points: 25) The circuit shown in Fig. 1 is excited by an impulse of 0.015V. Assuming the capacitor is initially discharged, obtain an analytic expression of vO (t), and make a Matlab program that plots the system response to the impulse. Figure 1 Problem 2: Extra Credit (Points: 25) A winding oscillator consists of two steel spheres on each end of a long slender rod, as shown in Fig. 2. The rod is hung on a thin wire that can be twisted many revolutions without breaking. The device will be wound up 4000 degrees. Make a Matlab script that computes the system response and determine how long will it take until the motion decays to a swing of only 10 degrees? Assume that the thin wire has a rotational spring constant of 2  10?4Nm/rad and that the viscous friction coecient for the sphere in air is 2  10?4Nms/rad. Each sphere has a mass of 1Kg. Figure 2: Winding oscillator. Problem 3: (Points: 25) Find the equivalent transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) for the system shown in Fig. 3. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 1 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 3 Problem 4: (Points: 25) Reduce the block diagram shown in Fig. 4 to a single transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) . Figure 4 Problem 5: (Points: 25) Consider the rotational mechanical system shown in Fig. 5. Represent the system as a block diagram. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 2 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 5 Problem 6: (Points: 25) During ascent the space shuttle is steered by commands generated by the computer’s guidance calcu- lations. These commands are in the form of vehicle attitude, attitude rates, and attitude accelerations obtained through measurements made by the vehicle’s inertial measuring unit, rate gyro assembly, and accelerometer assembly, respectively. The ascent digital autopilot uses the errors between the actual and commanded attitude, rates, and accelerations to gimbal the space shuttle main engines (called thrust vectoring) and the solid rocket boosters to a ect the desired vehicle attitude. The space shut- tle’s attitude control system employs the same method in the pitch, roll, and yaw control systems. A simpli ed model of the pitch control system is shown in Fig. 6.  a) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch to commanded pitch. Assume all other inputs are zero.  b) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch rate to commanded pitch rate. Assume all other inputs are zero.  c) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch acceleration to commanded pitch acceleration. Assume all other inputs are zero. Figure 6: Space shuttle pitch control system (simpli ed). Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 3 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Problem 7: (Extra Credit Points: 25) Extenders are robot manipulators that extend (i.e. increase) the strength of the human arm in load- maneuvering tasks (see Fig. 7). The system is represented by the transfer function Y (s) U(s) = G(s) = 30 s2+4s+3 where U (s) is the force of the human hand applied to the robot manipulator, and Y (s) is the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load. Assuming that the force of the human hand that is applied is given by u (t) = 5 sin (!t), create a MATLAB code that will compute and plot the di erence in magnitude and phase between the applied human force and the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load, as a function of the frequency !. Use 100 values for ! in the range ! 2 [0:01; 100] rad s for your two plots. See Fig. 8 on how to de ne di erence in magnitude and phase between two signals. You need to include your code and the two resulted plots in your solution. Figure 7: Human extender. A B dt T: signal period magnitude difference phase difference B A Figure 8: Magnitude and phase di erence (deg) between two sinusoidal signals.

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8. Discuss the marketing and supply chain risks and benefits related to product complexity?

8. Discuss the marketing and supply chain risks and benefits related to product complexity?

Logistics and supply chain management have considerably augmented their visibility … Read More...
Children’s Literature course, length of course is 15 weeks Required Texts: Children’s Literature, Briefly (5th Edition) by Tunnell, Jacobs, Young and Bryan Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt The Watsons Go to Birmingham – 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis The Giver by Lois Lowry Holes by Louis Sachar Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins Course Requirements (must be completed in order to receive course credit): All required reading 2 two page papers 1 five page research paper All discussion board assignments All quizzes and exams as assigned Course Description: This course covers the broad range of literature for children, pre-school to age twelve, as they encounter it through the home, the library, and the school. Picture books, the classics, fairy tales, novels, poetry and plays for children are presented in a critical context. Your essays and research paper will be in MLA format. We will review the requirements more fully later, but you will be expected to use the normal MLA heading, intext citations and works cited page as necessary. You will use Times New Roman 12 as the font for all papers.

Children’s Literature course, length of course is 15 weeks Required Texts: Children’s Literature, Briefly (5th Edition) by Tunnell, Jacobs, Young and Bryan Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt The Watsons Go to Birmingham – 1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis The Giver by Lois Lowry Holes by Louis Sachar Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone by J.K. Rowling A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins Course Requirements (must be completed in order to receive course credit): All required reading 2 two page papers 1 five page research paper All discussion board assignments All quizzes and exams as assigned Course Description: This course covers the broad range of literature for children, pre-school to age twelve, as they encounter it through the home, the library, and the school. Picture books, the classics, fairy tales, novels, poetry and plays for children are presented in a critical context. Your essays and research paper will be in MLA format. We will review the requirements more fully later, but you will be expected to use the normal MLA heading, intext citations and works cited page as necessary. You will use Times New Roman 12 as the font for all papers.

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