Project Part 1 Objective Our objective, in this Part 1 of our Project, is to practise solving a problem by composing and testing a Python program using all that we have learnt so far and discovering new things, such as lists of lists, on the way. Project – Hunting worms in our garden! No more turtles! In this project, we shall move on to worms. Indeed, our project is a game in which the player hunts for worms in our garden. Once our garden has been displayed, the player tries to guess where the worms are located by entering the coordinates of a cell in our garden. When the player has located all the worms, the game is over! Of course there are ways of making this game more exciting (hence complicated), but considering that we have 2 weeks for Part 1 and 2 weeks for Part 2, keeping it simple will be our goal. We will implement our game in two parts. In Part 1, we write code that constructs and tests our data structures i.e., our variables. In Part 2, we write code that allows the player to play a complete “worm hunting” game! ? Project – Part 1 – Description Data Structures (variables): As stated above, in Part 1, we write code that constructs our data structures i.e., our variables. In our game program, we will need data structures (variables) to represent: 1. Our garden that is displayed to the player (suggestion: list of lists), 2. The garden that contains all the worms (suggestion: another list of lists), Garden: Our garden in Part 1 of our Project will have a width and a height of 10. Warning: The width and the height of our garden may change in Part 2 of our Project. So, it may be a good idea to create 2 variables and assign the width and the height of our garden to these 2 variables. 3. Our worms and their information. For each worm, we may want to keep the following information: a. worm number, b. the location of the worm, for example, either the coordinates of the cells containing the worm OR the coordinate of the first cell containing the worm, its length and whether the worm is laying horizontally or vertically. Worms: We will create 6 worms of length 3. 4. And other variables as needed. Testing our data structures: ? Suggestion: as we create a data structure (the “displayed” garden, the garden containing the worms, each worm, etc…), print it with a “debug print statement”. Once we are certain the data structure is well constructed, comment out the “debug print statement”. Code: In Part 1, the code we write must include functions and it must include the main section of our program. In other words, in Part 1, the code we write must be a complete program. In terms of functions, here is a list of suggestions. We may have functions that … ? creates a garden (i.e., a garden data structure), ? creates the worms (i.e., the worm data structure), ? places a worm in the garden that is to hold the worms (i.e., another garden data structure), ? displays the garden on the screen for the player to see, ? displays a worm in the displayed garden, ? etc… ? Finally, in Part 1, the code we write must implement the following algorithm: Algorithm: Here is the algorithm for the main section of our game program: ? Welcome the player ? Create an empty “displayed” garden, (“displayed” because this is the garden we display to the player) ? Create the worms (worms’ information) ? Create an empty “hidden” garden Note 1: “hidden” because one can keep track of the worms in this “hidden” garden, which we do not show to the player. This is why it is called “hidden”. Note 2: One can keep track of worm’s locations using a different mechanism or data structure. It does not have to be a list of lists representing a “hidden” garden. We are free to choose how we want to keep track of where our worms are located in our garden. ? Place each worm in the “hidden” garden (or whatever mechanism or data structure we decide to use) ? Display the “displayed” garden on the screen for the player to see ? While the player wants to play, ask the player for a worm number (1 to 6), read this worm number and display this worm on the “displayed” garden. This is not the game. Remember, we shall implement the game itself in Part 2. Here, in this step, we make sure our code works properly, i.e., it can retrieve worm information and display worms properly. Displaying worms properly: Note that when we create worms and display them, it may be the case that worms overlap with other worms and that worms wrap around the garden. These 2 situations are illustrated in the 3 Sample Runs discussed below. At this point, we are ready for Part 2 of our Project. Sample Runs: In order to illustrate the explanations given above of what we are to do in this Part 1 of our Project, 3 sample runs have been posted below the description of this Part 1 of our Project on our course web site. Have a look at these 3 sample runs. The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs. Of course, the position of our worms will be different but everything else should be the same. What we see in each of these 3 sample runs is 1 execution of the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project. Note about Sample Run 1: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 2 wraps around: it starts at (row 7, column B), (row 7, column A) then wraps around to (row 7, column J). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column E), (row 1, column E) then wraps around to (row 10, column E). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 5 and 6 overlap at (row 1, column E). Note about Sample Run 2: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column B) then wraps around to (row 10, column B) and (row 9, column B). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column D) then wraps around to (row 10, column D) and (row 9, column D). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 2 and 4 overlap at (row 3, column H), worms 1 and 2 overlap at (row 3, column G) and worms 2 and 5 overlap at (row 3, column E). Note about Sample Run 3: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers in the following sequence: 3, 2, 6, 4, 5, 1, 7, 8. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column C), (row 1, column C) then wraps around to (row 10, column C). Worm 1 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column B), (row 2, column A) then wraps around to (row 2, column J). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 6 and 3 overlap at (row 1, column C) and (row 2, column C). Other Requirements: Here are a few more requirements the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project must satisfy. 1. The location of each worm in the garden must be determined randomly. 2. Whether a worm is lying horizontally or vertically must also be determined randomly. 3. It is acceptable in Part 1 of our Project if worms overlap each other (see Sample Runs) 4. When placing a worm in a garden, the worm must “wrap around” the garden. See Sample Runs for examples of what “wrapping around” signifies. How will we implement this wrapping around? Hint: wrapping around can be achieved using an arithmetic operator we have already seen. 5. We must make use of docstring when we implement our functions (have a look at our textbook for an explanation and an example). 6. Every time we encounter the word must in this description of Part 1 of our Project, we shall look upon that sentence as another requirement. For example, the sentence “The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs.”, even though it is not listed below the Other Requirements heading, is also a requirement because of its must.

Project Part 1 Objective Our objective, in this Part 1 of our Project, is to practise solving a problem by composing and testing a Python program using all that we have learnt so far and discovering new things, such as lists of lists, on the way. Project – Hunting worms in our garden! No more turtles! In this project, we shall move on to worms. Indeed, our project is a game in which the player hunts for worms in our garden. Once our garden has been displayed, the player tries to guess where the worms are located by entering the coordinates of a cell in our garden. When the player has located all the worms, the game is over! Of course there are ways of making this game more exciting (hence complicated), but considering that we have 2 weeks for Part 1 and 2 weeks for Part 2, keeping it simple will be our goal. We will implement our game in two parts. In Part 1, we write code that constructs and tests our data structures i.e., our variables. In Part 2, we write code that allows the player to play a complete “worm hunting” game! ? Project – Part 1 – Description Data Structures (variables): As stated above, in Part 1, we write code that constructs our data structures i.e., our variables. In our game program, we will need data structures (variables) to represent: 1. Our garden that is displayed to the player (suggestion: list of lists), 2. The garden that contains all the worms (suggestion: another list of lists), Garden: Our garden in Part 1 of our Project will have a width and a height of 10. Warning: The width and the height of our garden may change in Part 2 of our Project. So, it may be a good idea to create 2 variables and assign the width and the height of our garden to these 2 variables. 3. Our worms and their information. For each worm, we may want to keep the following information: a. worm number, b. the location of the worm, for example, either the coordinates of the cells containing the worm OR the coordinate of the first cell containing the worm, its length and whether the worm is laying horizontally or vertically. Worms: We will create 6 worms of length 3. 4. And other variables as needed. Testing our data structures: ? Suggestion: as we create a data structure (the “displayed” garden, the garden containing the worms, each worm, etc…), print it with a “debug print statement”. Once we are certain the data structure is well constructed, comment out the “debug print statement”. Code: In Part 1, the code we write must include functions and it must include the main section of our program. In other words, in Part 1, the code we write must be a complete program. In terms of functions, here is a list of suggestions. We may have functions that … ? creates a garden (i.e., a garden data structure), ? creates the worms (i.e., the worm data structure), ? places a worm in the garden that is to hold the worms (i.e., another garden data structure), ? displays the garden on the screen for the player to see, ? displays a worm in the displayed garden, ? etc… ? Finally, in Part 1, the code we write must implement the following algorithm: Algorithm: Here is the algorithm for the main section of our game program: ? Welcome the player ? Create an empty “displayed” garden, (“displayed” because this is the garden we display to the player) ? Create the worms (worms’ information) ? Create an empty “hidden” garden Note 1: “hidden” because one can keep track of the worms in this “hidden” garden, which we do not show to the player. This is why it is called “hidden”. Note 2: One can keep track of worm’s locations using a different mechanism or data structure. It does not have to be a list of lists representing a “hidden” garden. We are free to choose how we want to keep track of where our worms are located in our garden. ? Place each worm in the “hidden” garden (or whatever mechanism or data structure we decide to use) ? Display the “displayed” garden on the screen for the player to see ? While the player wants to play, ask the player for a worm number (1 to 6), read this worm number and display this worm on the “displayed” garden. This is not the game. Remember, we shall implement the game itself in Part 2. Here, in this step, we make sure our code works properly, i.e., it can retrieve worm information and display worms properly. Displaying worms properly: Note that when we create worms and display them, it may be the case that worms overlap with other worms and that worms wrap around the garden. These 2 situations are illustrated in the 3 Sample Runs discussed below. At this point, we are ready for Part 2 of our Project. Sample Runs: In order to illustrate the explanations given above of what we are to do in this Part 1 of our Project, 3 sample runs have been posted below the description of this Part 1 of our Project on our course web site. Have a look at these 3 sample runs. The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs. Of course, the position of our worms will be different but everything else should be the same. What we see in each of these 3 sample runs is 1 execution of the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project. Note about Sample Run 1: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 2 wraps around: it starts at (row 7, column B), (row 7, column A) then wraps around to (row 7, column J). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column E), (row 1, column E) then wraps around to (row 10, column E). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 5 and 6 overlap at (row 1, column E). Note about Sample Run 2: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column B) then wraps around to (row 10, column B) and (row 9, column B). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column D) then wraps around to (row 10, column D) and (row 9, column D). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 2 and 4 overlap at (row 3, column H), worms 1 and 2 overlap at (row 3, column G) and worms 2 and 5 overlap at (row 3, column E). Note about Sample Run 3: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers in the following sequence: 3, 2, 6, 4, 5, 1, 7, 8. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column C), (row 1, column C) then wraps around to (row 10, column C). Worm 1 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column B), (row 2, column A) then wraps around to (row 2, column J). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 6 and 3 overlap at (row 1, column C) and (row 2, column C). Other Requirements: Here are a few more requirements the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project must satisfy. 1. The location of each worm in the garden must be determined randomly. 2. Whether a worm is lying horizontally or vertically must also be determined randomly. 3. It is acceptable in Part 1 of our Project if worms overlap each other (see Sample Runs) 4. When placing a worm in a garden, the worm must “wrap around” the garden. See Sample Runs for examples of what “wrapping around” signifies. How will we implement this wrapping around? Hint: wrapping around can be achieved using an arithmetic operator we have already seen. 5. We must make use of docstring when we implement our functions (have a look at our textbook for an explanation and an example). 6. Every time we encounter the word must in this description of Part 1 of our Project, we shall look upon that sentence as another requirement. For example, the sentence “The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs.”, even though it is not listed below the Other Requirements heading, is also a requirement because of its must.

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CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

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1 ACTIVITY PURPOSE The purpose of this activity is to give you practice preparing a four-week work schedule. PROCESS Follow the steps listed below to prepare a schedule. 1. Read the Information Sheet: Scheduling Employees. 2. The pay week for this medical record service runs Sunday – Saturday. The pay period is two pay weeks. Each full-time employee cannot work more than 40 hours per pay week, or 80 hours per pay period. Each part-time employee works 20 hours per pay week – 40 hours per pay period. 3. The first Friday of the four – week period is a holiday. 4. The medical record service has 24 hour coverage, seven days a week. All full-time employees work a five day pay week, eight hours per day, with rotating weekend coverage. Part-time employees work four hours Monday – Friday, except for their rotation weekend. On those days they work an eight hour shift. Remember to adjust their time accordingly. 5. The Assistant Director and all supervisors, except the Tumor Registry Supervisor, should be scheduled for rotating weekend coverage. 2 6. All employees, except the Tumor Registry employees, should be scheduled on a rotating basis for weekend coverage. 7. For weekend and holiday coverage, there needs to be at least two clerks and one transcriptionist on days and evenings, one clerk and one transcriptionist at night. 8. The Department Director has scheduled a two – week vacation for the first two full weeks of the four – week schedule. 9. Employees who work holidays must take the holiday time within the pay period in which the holiday occurs. 10.Use the following marks on the schedule: X – work eight hours V – vacation H – holiday D – day off 4 – hours for part-time employees 3 PERSONNEL OF HUFFMAN MEMORIAL MEDICAL RECORD DEPARTMENT DAYS (7:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M.) Director Diane Lucas Assistant Director JoAnn DeWitt Coding 1 Supervisor – Nina Long 3 Coding/PAS Clerks – Cheryl Newman Pam Rogers Janet Bennett Transcription 1 Supervisor – 6 Transcribers – Jessica DuBois Eileen Andrews Iris Williams Diane Henderson Vivian Thomas Lois Fisher Emma Daily Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 4 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Bill James Darlene Cook Janice Stivers Larry Patterson Don Williamson Susan Evanston Tumor Registry 1 Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Part-time Clerk – Mabel Smith Pauline Erskine Suzanne Chapman EVENING (3:00 P.M. – 11:00 P.M.) Transcription 1 Part-time – Beth Richman Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 2 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Daniel Johnson Harry Skinner Matthew Scott Anne Madison NIGHTS (11:00 P.M. – 7:00 A.M.) Transcription 3 Transcribers – Louise Wilson Jane Matters Nancy Lipman Filing/Retrieval 2 Clerks – Lily Jamison Helen Benson 4 INFORMATION SHEET SCHEDULING EMPLOYEES In addition to the planning, organizing and controlling of a medical record service, managers must accurately plan the work pattern for employees. This plan must insure that all duties are adequately covered, all shifts have sufficient numbers of people to perform duties, and employees are given appropriate days off. Scheduling encompasses both short term and long term plans. Short term scheduling involves planning work on a daily and/or weekly basis. Long term scheduling generally covers a four – to six – week time period, as well as yearly planning for holidays. In larger health care facilities with the medical record service providing 24 hour service, seven days a week, advanced planning is a requisite to a smooth operation. In smaller facilities with shorter hours of service, the schedule is less complex. The number of employees needed for weekend work for those facilities open on weekends is totally dependent upon the weekend workload. A volume of seventy (70) to ninety (90) discharges per day generally requires two (2) medical record clerks to process those discharges, as well as to perform the other daily responsibilities of the medical record service. It is also advisable to schedule a supervisor during the weekend in the event that any problems arise which a clerk might not be able to handle (i.e. medico-legal questions, irate patients or physicians). If you work in a department that has an active work 5 measurement program, valuable scheduling information can be obtained from the data reported. In planning for holidays, it is important to remember to: 1. obtain employee preferences for which holidays they might choose to work; 2. keep track of who has worked which holidays; 3. if a holiday occurs on a Friday or a Monday and the employee must work on the holiday, try to give them a Friday or Monday off to compensate. It is important for you to be fair in terms of assigning employees weekend work and scheduling Holidays. Everyone should share the responsibility equally. If you have all supervisors work one weekend per month, then that schedule should be followed. If you have clerks working every other weekend, then that pattern should be followed consistently. When preparing a schedule it is best to put in all the “givens” first. For example, if you have vacations scheduled for the four weeks you’re preparing, then those should be marked in first. Also included in this category would be employees who do not work weekends (i.e. personnel in the Tumor Registry). Once all work times have been scheduled, you must be certain that an employee receives two (2) days off for every seven (7) days. If an employee works more than forty (40) hours in one (1) week, the facility must pat time-an-a-half for all hours over forty. Some facilities are experimenting with a variety of scheduling techniques: flex time and the four-day work week. Both techniques have been 6 heavily debated. The final questions regarding these nontraditional alternatives end up being: 1. Are your employees willing to try it? 2. Are you ready to handle the extra planning these alternatives may warrant? 3. Do you have the necessary resources, including equipment, to accommodate a nontraditional scheduling alternative? 4. Will administrator of the facility support your proposal? Once you have established answers to those questions you are ready to embark on a new technique of scheduling. Scheduling employees can be one of the most challenging tasks that a manager faces. Whether you elect to try one of the nontraditional alternatives or use the five-day work week, the manager must: 1. be fair; 2. apply all guidelines to every employee consistently 3. utilize all available data to arrive at appropriate numbers for weekend and holiday staffing requirements; and 4. maximize the utilization of equipment and resources.

1 ACTIVITY PURPOSE The purpose of this activity is to give you practice preparing a four-week work schedule. PROCESS Follow the steps listed below to prepare a schedule. 1. Read the Information Sheet: Scheduling Employees. 2. The pay week for this medical record service runs Sunday – Saturday. The pay period is two pay weeks. Each full-time employee cannot work more than 40 hours per pay week, or 80 hours per pay period. Each part-time employee works 20 hours per pay week – 40 hours per pay period. 3. The first Friday of the four – week period is a holiday. 4. The medical record service has 24 hour coverage, seven days a week. All full-time employees work a five day pay week, eight hours per day, with rotating weekend coverage. Part-time employees work four hours Monday – Friday, except for their rotation weekend. On those days they work an eight hour shift. Remember to adjust their time accordingly. 5. The Assistant Director and all supervisors, except the Tumor Registry Supervisor, should be scheduled for rotating weekend coverage. 2 6. All employees, except the Tumor Registry employees, should be scheduled on a rotating basis for weekend coverage. 7. For weekend and holiday coverage, there needs to be at least two clerks and one transcriptionist on days and evenings, one clerk and one transcriptionist at night. 8. The Department Director has scheduled a two – week vacation for the first two full weeks of the four – week schedule. 9. Employees who work holidays must take the holiday time within the pay period in which the holiday occurs. 10.Use the following marks on the schedule: X – work eight hours V – vacation H – holiday D – day off 4 – hours for part-time employees 3 PERSONNEL OF HUFFMAN MEMORIAL MEDICAL RECORD DEPARTMENT DAYS (7:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M.) Director Diane Lucas Assistant Director JoAnn DeWitt Coding 1 Supervisor – Nina Long 3 Coding/PAS Clerks – Cheryl Newman Pam Rogers Janet Bennett Transcription 1 Supervisor – 6 Transcribers – Jessica DuBois Eileen Andrews Iris Williams Diane Henderson Vivian Thomas Lois Fisher Emma Daily Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 4 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Bill James Darlene Cook Janice Stivers Larry Patterson Don Williamson Susan Evanston Tumor Registry 1 Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Part-time Clerk – Mabel Smith Pauline Erskine Suzanne Chapman EVENING (3:00 P.M. – 11:00 P.M.) Transcription 1 Part-time – Beth Richman Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 2 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Daniel Johnson Harry Skinner Matthew Scott Anne Madison NIGHTS (11:00 P.M. – 7:00 A.M.) Transcription 3 Transcribers – Louise Wilson Jane Matters Nancy Lipman Filing/Retrieval 2 Clerks – Lily Jamison Helen Benson 4 INFORMATION SHEET SCHEDULING EMPLOYEES In addition to the planning, organizing and controlling of a medical record service, managers must accurately plan the work pattern for employees. This plan must insure that all duties are adequately covered, all shifts have sufficient numbers of people to perform duties, and employees are given appropriate days off. Scheduling encompasses both short term and long term plans. Short term scheduling involves planning work on a daily and/or weekly basis. Long term scheduling generally covers a four – to six – week time period, as well as yearly planning for holidays. In larger health care facilities with the medical record service providing 24 hour service, seven days a week, advanced planning is a requisite to a smooth operation. In smaller facilities with shorter hours of service, the schedule is less complex. The number of employees needed for weekend work for those facilities open on weekends is totally dependent upon the weekend workload. A volume of seventy (70) to ninety (90) discharges per day generally requires two (2) medical record clerks to process those discharges, as well as to perform the other daily responsibilities of the medical record service. It is also advisable to schedule a supervisor during the weekend in the event that any problems arise which a clerk might not be able to handle (i.e. medico-legal questions, irate patients or physicians). If you work in a department that has an active work 5 measurement program, valuable scheduling information can be obtained from the data reported. In planning for holidays, it is important to remember to: 1. obtain employee preferences for which holidays they might choose to work; 2. keep track of who has worked which holidays; 3. if a holiday occurs on a Friday or a Monday and the employee must work on the holiday, try to give them a Friday or Monday off to compensate. It is important for you to be fair in terms of assigning employees weekend work and scheduling Holidays. Everyone should share the responsibility equally. If you have all supervisors work one weekend per month, then that schedule should be followed. If you have clerks working every other weekend, then that pattern should be followed consistently. When preparing a schedule it is best to put in all the “givens” first. For example, if you have vacations scheduled for the four weeks you’re preparing, then those should be marked in first. Also included in this category would be employees who do not work weekends (i.e. personnel in the Tumor Registry). Once all work times have been scheduled, you must be certain that an employee receives two (2) days off for every seven (7) days. If an employee works more than forty (40) hours in one (1) week, the facility must pat time-an-a-half for all hours over forty. Some facilities are experimenting with a variety of scheduling techniques: flex time and the four-day work week. Both techniques have been 6 heavily debated. The final questions regarding these nontraditional alternatives end up being: 1. Are your employees willing to try it? 2. Are you ready to handle the extra planning these alternatives may warrant? 3. Do you have the necessary resources, including equipment, to accommodate a nontraditional scheduling alternative? 4. Will administrator of the facility support your proposal? Once you have established answers to those questions you are ready to embark on a new technique of scheduling. Scheduling employees can be one of the most challenging tasks that a manager faces. Whether you elect to try one of the nontraditional alternatives or use the five-day work week, the manager must: 1. be fair; 2. apply all guidelines to every employee consistently 3. utilize all available data to arrive at appropriate numbers for weekend and holiday staffing requirements; and 4. maximize the utilization of equipment and resources.

ECNS 203 – Principles of Economics Extra Credit Instructions – Fall 2015 As we are winding down our semester, I have decided to integrate some current events into our econ studies. Much is going on in the world oil market that pertains directly to what we have been studying this semester – related to both micro and macroeconomics. Therefore, I have decided to offer an extra credit opportunity for you if you are willing to do some research, summarize your findings in a short paper, and bring it to class on Tuesday, December 1st ready to discuss. To earn the extra credit complete the following: 1. Do some research on current issues (last 12 months) discussing world oil supply, demand and pricing. 2. Write a short (300 word minimum) paper on your findings relative to the micro and macro-economic issues found in your research. I especially want you to focus on the following questions: a. Why has the oil price dropped so much? b. Will it stay down? Why or Why Not? c. Does our discussion on production costs and decisions on running plants relevant to this issue? Why? d. Who are the winners and losers from a micro and macro-economic perspective? 3. Bring that paper to class with you on Tuesday, December 1st to submit it to me and discuss your findings. If you complete all three steps, I will award you with 10 extra credit points to be added to your total points earned for the semester. This will be in addition to the up to 20 extra credit points earned by answering the Clicker Questions correctly. Late submittals will not be accepted and you must be in attendance to receive the points. Papers given little to no effort will not be awarded points. In other words, don’t submit a bunch of non-sense and expect credit. Cite your resources using whatever style you prefer.

ECNS 203 – Principles of Economics Extra Credit Instructions – Fall 2015 As we are winding down our semester, I have decided to integrate some current events into our econ studies. Much is going on in the world oil market that pertains directly to what we have been studying this semester – related to both micro and macroeconomics. Therefore, I have decided to offer an extra credit opportunity for you if you are willing to do some research, summarize your findings in a short paper, and bring it to class on Tuesday, December 1st ready to discuss. To earn the extra credit complete the following: 1. Do some research on current issues (last 12 months) discussing world oil supply, demand and pricing. 2. Write a short (300 word minimum) paper on your findings relative to the micro and macro-economic issues found in your research. I especially want you to focus on the following questions: a. Why has the oil price dropped so much? b. Will it stay down? Why or Why Not? c. Does our discussion on production costs and decisions on running plants relevant to this issue? Why? d. Who are the winners and losers from a micro and macro-economic perspective? 3. Bring that paper to class with you on Tuesday, December 1st to submit it to me and discuss your findings. If you complete all three steps, I will award you with 10 extra credit points to be added to your total points earned for the semester. This will be in addition to the up to 20 extra credit points earned by answering the Clicker Questions correctly. Late submittals will not be accepted and you must be in attendance to receive the points. Papers given little to no effort will not be awarded points. In other words, don’t submit a bunch of non-sense and expect credit. Cite your resources using whatever style you prefer.

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Problem 1xc) Stirling Expansion Stroke During the isothermal expansion stroke of the idealized Stirling cycle shown, the right hand piston remains fixed as the left hand piston travels downward. Problem 2xc The steam accumulator shown is used to maintain a ready source of new steam at 300°C. A piston of 63.6 metric tonnes maintains the required pressure, and the top of the cylinder is open to the atmosphere. 1 metric tonne = 1,000 kg The initial cold condition is shown at right. Heat is added to achieve the required end conditions The chamber contains no air. Find the temperature and steam quality when the piston begins to move Find the work done during the process and the final height of the piston at the desired condition of 300°C.

Problem 1xc) Stirling Expansion Stroke During the isothermal expansion stroke of the idealized Stirling cycle shown, the right hand piston remains fixed as the left hand piston travels downward. Problem 2xc The steam accumulator shown is used to maintain a ready source of new steam at 300°C. A piston of 63.6 metric tonnes maintains the required pressure, and the top of the cylinder is open to the atmosphere. 1 metric tonne = 1,000 kg The initial cold condition is shown at right. Heat is added to achieve the required end conditions The chamber contains no air. Find the temperature and steam quality when the piston begins to move Find the work done during the process and the final height of the piston at the desired condition of 300°C.

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Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Athlete’s high salaries: Should they be paid that amount or … Read More...