Develop a 4 page-500 word précis on Chapter 7 “How to Monitor & Control a TPM Project” of the Wysocki 7th Ed. text.”

Develop a 4 page-500 word précis on Chapter 7 “How to Monitor & Control a TPM Project” of the Wysocki 7th Ed. text.”

Summary of ‘How to Monitor and Control a TPM Project’ … Read More...
Learning Objectives This part begins with what are probably the basic questions for a designer of a computing sytem’s human interface: • How should the functionality of the system be described and presented to the user? • How can the design of the interface help the user to understand and successfully use the system? Learning Goals At the conclusion of this module you will be able to: • define the user’s movement among the displays that make up the system; • the addition of visual and spatial cues to the information organization; and • methods of structuring and presenting the interface. Introduction This module deals with the development and utilization of a system. We all have systems for doing things. For instance, we may have a system for handling routine situations around the house that makes sense only to us. Or, we may be oriented toward systems that have a more widespread understanding such as personal finance or how to fill out our IRS forms. When humans use a system, whether natural or man-made, they do so based on their understanding of that system. A totally accurate understanding of a system is not a necessary condition for effective use of that system. Key Terms Systems, User Model, Model, Metaphor, Concept Modeling The Development of Human Systems I. The organization of knowledge about a phenomenon or system constitutes the human’s conceptual model of that system. Information gained from experience with a system contributes to the model, and the model in turn provides a reference or guide for future experience with the system. A. (Reinstein and Hersh, 1984) – a set of concepts a person gradually acquires to explain the behavior of a system. …. That enables that person to understand and interact with the system. 1. For the user, the important thing about a model is its ability to predict: when confronted with unfamiliar or incompletely understood situations, the user relies on their model, their conceptual understanding of the system, to make educated guesses about how to proceed. If the user’s model accurately reflects the effects of the system, then he will be more successful in learning and using the system, and likely will perceive the system as easy to use. 2. Because the model can server this important role in design of helping to create an understandable and predictable system, the creation of the user’s conceptual model should be the first task of system development. One of the more important examples of the use of conceptual model, the XEROX Star office automation system (whose design greatly influenced Apple’s Lisa and Macintosh systems), started with thirty man-years of design work on the user interface before either the hardware or the system software was designed (Smith, Irby, Kimball, Verplank and Harselm, 1982). 3. The conceptual model does not have to be an accurate representation of how the system actually functions. Indeed, it can be quite different from reality, and in most if not all circumstances for systems as complex as computers, should be. 4. The model may be a myth or metaphor, that explains the system: it “suggests that the computer is like something with which the user is already familiar” (Rubinstein and Hersh, 1984, p. 43), or provides a simple explanation of the system which can be used to predict the system’s behavior. 5. ….the conceptual models people form are based on their interactions with an environment … “people who have different roles within an environment … will form different conceptual systems of those environments. 6. People whose essential interaction with an environment is to create it will almost inevitably have an understanding and conceptualization of it which is different from those whose major interaction with it is to use it” Action Assignment Based on the readings for this module, please identify a personal “system” with which you act and perform within. This should be from personal experience and one that assists in providing a model for organization, understanding and problem solving.

Learning Objectives This part begins with what are probably the basic questions for a designer of a computing sytem’s human interface: • How should the functionality of the system be described and presented to the user? • How can the design of the interface help the user to understand and successfully use the system? Learning Goals At the conclusion of this module you will be able to: • define the user’s movement among the displays that make up the system; • the addition of visual and spatial cues to the information organization; and • methods of structuring and presenting the interface. Introduction This module deals with the development and utilization of a system. We all have systems for doing things. For instance, we may have a system for handling routine situations around the house that makes sense only to us. Or, we may be oriented toward systems that have a more widespread understanding such as personal finance or how to fill out our IRS forms. When humans use a system, whether natural or man-made, they do so based on their understanding of that system. A totally accurate understanding of a system is not a necessary condition for effective use of that system. Key Terms Systems, User Model, Model, Metaphor, Concept Modeling The Development of Human Systems I. The organization of knowledge about a phenomenon or system constitutes the human’s conceptual model of that system. Information gained from experience with a system contributes to the model, and the model in turn provides a reference or guide for future experience with the system. A. (Reinstein and Hersh, 1984) – a set of concepts a person gradually acquires to explain the behavior of a system. …. That enables that person to understand and interact with the system. 1. For the user, the important thing about a model is its ability to predict: when confronted with unfamiliar or incompletely understood situations, the user relies on their model, their conceptual understanding of the system, to make educated guesses about how to proceed. If the user’s model accurately reflects the effects of the system, then he will be more successful in learning and using the system, and likely will perceive the system as easy to use. 2. Because the model can server this important role in design of helping to create an understandable and predictable system, the creation of the user’s conceptual model should be the first task of system development. One of the more important examples of the use of conceptual model, the XEROX Star office automation system (whose design greatly influenced Apple’s Lisa and Macintosh systems), started with thirty man-years of design work on the user interface before either the hardware or the system software was designed (Smith, Irby, Kimball, Verplank and Harselm, 1982). 3. The conceptual model does not have to be an accurate representation of how the system actually functions. Indeed, it can be quite different from reality, and in most if not all circumstances for systems as complex as computers, should be. 4. The model may be a myth or metaphor, that explains the system: it “suggests that the computer is like something with which the user is already familiar” (Rubinstein and Hersh, 1984, p. 43), or provides a simple explanation of the system which can be used to predict the system’s behavior. 5. ….the conceptual models people form are based on their interactions with an environment … “people who have different roles within an environment … will form different conceptual systems of those environments. 6. People whose essential interaction with an environment is to create it will almost inevitably have an understanding and conceptualization of it which is different from those whose major interaction with it is to use it” Action Assignment Based on the readings for this module, please identify a personal “system” with which you act and perform within. This should be from personal experience and one that assists in providing a model for organization, understanding and problem solving.

. Imagine yourself teaching a carefully planned lesson. Do the activities you imagine doing with your students correlate to your own strengths? Why or why not?

. Imagine yourself teaching a carefully planned lesson. Do the activities you imagine doing with your students correlate to your own strengths? Why or why not?

In some instances the educator plans and teaches mini-lessons using … Read More...
CS 180 Term Project 10% of course grade Due midnight on Dec 8, 2015 The purpose of this project is to implement a general purpose big integer library that can handle common arithmetic operations for big integers. 1. The class should be named WKUBigInt 2. You should support the following (public) methods: a. constructors: WKUBigInt(int value) and WKUBigInt(String value) b. add(WKUBigInt another) c. sub(WKUBigInt another) d. mult(WKUBigInt another) e. toString(), which will return the String representation f. div(WKUBigInt another) for integer divisions g. mod(WKUBigInt another) div and mod are for those students who would like to have more challenges and are not required. Internally, you should use a long array to represent the value of a big integer. Each element in the array is used to represent a chunk of the integer. To make the project more manageable, you are required to have a detailed description on how to implement each method. The descriptions of the methods should be part of the final report. Even though the final report is due at the end, it is expected that you will complete these descriptions before you implement your idea. The final report should have the following sections: 1. Description of each method. The description should be detailed enough to show HOW the implementation can be done.. 2. Discuss what type of testing you have done to ensure the correctness of your implementation. 3. Have a table to count the number of arithmetic operations that are needed for each operation using input data set from the instructor. This also implies additional requirements in your implementation. Submit your source code and a final report in a word document before the due date.

CS 180 Term Project 10% of course grade Due midnight on Dec 8, 2015 The purpose of this project is to implement a general purpose big integer library that can handle common arithmetic operations for big integers. 1. The class should be named WKUBigInt 2. You should support the following (public) methods: a. constructors: WKUBigInt(int value) and WKUBigInt(String value) b. add(WKUBigInt another) c. sub(WKUBigInt another) d. mult(WKUBigInt another) e. toString(), which will return the String representation f. div(WKUBigInt another) for integer divisions g. mod(WKUBigInt another) div and mod are for those students who would like to have more challenges and are not required. Internally, you should use a long array to represent the value of a big integer. Each element in the array is used to represent a chunk of the integer. To make the project more manageable, you are required to have a detailed description on how to implement each method. The descriptions of the methods should be part of the final report. Even though the final report is due at the end, it is expected that you will complete these descriptions before you implement your idea. The final report should have the following sections: 1. Description of each method. The description should be detailed enough to show HOW the implementation can be done.. 2. Discuss what type of testing you have done to ensure the correctness of your implementation. 3. Have a table to count the number of arithmetic operations that are needed for each operation using input data set from the instructor. This also implies additional requirements in your implementation. Submit your source code and a final report in a word document before the due date.

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4. Name a big idea (major concept) in your subject area and write a one paragraph rationale for why students should learn it.

4. Name a big idea (major concept) in your subject area and write a one paragraph rationale for why students should learn it.

Computer education improves students’ investigation skill by encouraging them to … Read More...
EE118 FALL 2012 SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Electrical Engineering TEST 2 — Digital Design I October 24, 2012 10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. — Closed Book & Closed Notes — — No Crib Sheet Allowed — STUDENT NAME: (Last) Claussen , (First) Matthew STUDENT ID NUMBER (LAST 4 DIGITS): No interpretation of test problems will be given during the test. If you are not sure of what is intended, make appropriate assumptions and continue. Do not unstaple !!! Problems 1-14(4 points each) TOTAL Problems 15 – 17 (15 pts each) 1203 2 For the next 14 problems, circle the correct answer. No partial credit will be given. PROBLEM 1 (4 points) Which statement is not true? A. Any combinational circuit may be designed using multiplexers only. B. Any combinational circuit may be designed using decoders only. C. All Sequential circuits are based on cross-coupled NAND or NOR gates. D. A hazard in a digital system is an undesirable effect caused by either a deficiency in the system or external influences. E. None of the above PROBLEM 2 (4 points) For a 2-bit comparator comparing 2-bit numbers A = (a1 a0) and B = (b1 b0), what is the proper function for the f(A>B) output through logical reasoning? A. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1 + a1’b1’ ) a0 b0’ B. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1’+ a1’b1 ) a0 b0 C. a1 a0’ + (a1 a0 + b1’b0’ ) b1 b0’ D. a1 a0 + (a1 a0’+ b1’b0 ) b1 b0 PROBLEM 3 (4 points) What is the priority scheme of this encoder? Inputs Outputs I3 I2 I1 I0 O1 O 0 d d 1 d 0 1 d d 0 1 0 0 d 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 A. I3 > I2 > I1 >I0 B. I0 > I1 > I2 >I3 C. I1 > I0 > I2 >I3 D. I2 > I1 > I3 >I0 3 PROBLEM 4 (4 points) Which is the correct binary representation of the decimal number 46.625? A. 101101.001 B. 101000.01 C. 111001.001 D. 101110.101 PROBLEM 5 (4 points) Which is the decimal equivalent number of the sum of the two 8-bit 2’s complement numbers FB16 and 3748? A. 3 B. 5 C. 7 D. 9 PROBLEM 6 (4 points) For the MUX-based circuit shown below, f(X,Y,Z) = ? X Y Z f A. X’Y’ + Y’Z’ B. X’Y’Z’ + YZ’ C. XYZ’ + Y’Z D. X’Y’Z’ + YZ 1 0 MUX 4 PROBLEM 7 (4 points) Which is the correct output F of this circuit? E C B D F A A. (A’E+AB)(C’D) B. (AE+A’B)(C’+D) C. (A’E+AB)(C’D’+CD’+CD) D. (A’E+AB)(CD’)’ PROBLEM 8 (5 points) In order to correctly perform 2910  14510, how many bits are required to represent the numbers? A 8 B 9 C 10 D 11 PROBLEM 9 (4 points) Which is the negative 2’s complement equivalent of the 8-bit number 01001101? A. 11001101 B. 10111100 C. 10110000 D. 10110011 0 2-1 1 MUX 0 0 1 1 2-4 decoder 2 EN 3 5 PROBLEM 10 (4 points) Which is the correct statement describing the behavior of the following Verilog code? module whatisthis(hmm, X, Y); output [3:0] hmm; input [3:0] X, Y; assign hmm = (X < Y) ? X : Y; endmodule A. If X>Y, hmm becomes 1111. B. hmm assumes min(X,Y). C. If X<Y, hmm becomes 1111. D. hmm assumes max(X,Y). PROBLEM 11 (4 points) Which Boolean expression corresponds to the function g(W,X,Y,Z) implemented by the following “non-priority” encoder-based circuit? Assume that one and only one input is high at any time. f W X g Y Z A. Y + Z B. W + Y C. X + Y D. X + Z PROBLEM 12 (4 points) Which Boolean expression corresponds to the output of the following logic diagram? (/B = B’) A. Z = ( A(B’ + C)’ )’ + ( (B’ + C)’ + D )’ B. Z= A(B C’) + (B C’ + D) C. Z = (A(B’ + C)(B’ + C + D) )’ D. Z = A(B’ + C)’ + (B’ + C + D)’ 0 0 1 1 2 3 Encoder 6 PROBLEM 13 (4 points) Which is the correct gate-level circuit in minimal SOP form for the following circuit? A F = Y’X’ + W’ZY’X B F = YX’ + W’Z’Y’X C F = YX’ + W’ZY’X D F = Y’X + W’ZY’X’ PROBLEM 14 (4 points) For the following flow map of a certain cross-coupled gate circuit, the circuit is currently in the underlined state. If the inputs YZ change to 11, the circuit becomes meta-stable. Between which two states (WX) does the circuit oscillate ? A 00  11 B 01  10 C 11  10 D 10  00 YZ WX 00 01 11 10 00 00 11 00 10 01 10 10 10 01 11 00 00 11 01 10 10 01 01 10 G1 Y0 G2A Y1 G2B Y2 Y3 A Y4 B Y5 C Y6 Y7 G1 Y0 G2A Y1 G2B Y2 Y3 A Y4 B Y5 C Y6 Y7 OR W X Y Z X Y Z F + 5 V 7 For each of the next 3 problems, show all your work. Partial credits will be given. PROBLEM 15 (15 points) 1) Which logic variable causes the hazard for the circuit given by the K-map below? 2) Using the timing diagram, clearly show how the hazard occurs. 3) Find the best hazard-free logic function. YZ WX 00 01 11 10 00 0 0 1 1 01 0 0 0 0 11 1 0 0 0 10 1 0 1 1 8 PROBLEM 16(15 points) Analyze the following cross-coupled NAND gates by showing: (a) flow map with stable states circled and with meta-stability condition shown by arrows, (b) state table, and (c) completed timing diagram below. Note that d is the propagation delay of each gate. XY G1(t)G2(t) 00 01 11 10 00 01 11 10 Inputs  XY=00 XY=01 XY=11 XY=10 Present States  X Y G1(t) G2(t) 0 d 2d 3d 4d 5d 6d 7d 8d 9d X Y G1 G2 9 PROBLEM 17 (15 points) Using Quine-McCluskey algorithm, find the minimal SOP for the following minterm list. f(A, B, C) = (1,2,3,4,6,7) w(j) j Match I Match II 0 1 2 3 PI Covering Table

EE118 FALL 2012 SAN JOSE STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Electrical Engineering TEST 2 — Digital Design I October 24, 2012 10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. — Closed Book & Closed Notes — — No Crib Sheet Allowed — STUDENT NAME: (Last) Claussen , (First) Matthew STUDENT ID NUMBER (LAST 4 DIGITS): No interpretation of test problems will be given during the test. If you are not sure of what is intended, make appropriate assumptions and continue. Do not unstaple !!! Problems 1-14(4 points each) TOTAL Problems 15 – 17 (15 pts each) 1203 2 For the next 14 problems, circle the correct answer. No partial credit will be given. PROBLEM 1 (4 points) Which statement is not true? A. Any combinational circuit may be designed using multiplexers only. B. Any combinational circuit may be designed using decoders only. C. All Sequential circuits are based on cross-coupled NAND or NOR gates. D. A hazard in a digital system is an undesirable effect caused by either a deficiency in the system or external influences. E. None of the above PROBLEM 2 (4 points) For a 2-bit comparator comparing 2-bit numbers A = (a1 a0) and B = (b1 b0), what is the proper function for the f(A>B) output through logical reasoning? A. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1 + a1’b1’ ) a0 b0’ B. a1 b1’ + (a1 b1’+ a1’b1 ) a0 b0 C. a1 a0’ + (a1 a0 + b1’b0’ ) b1 b0’ D. a1 a0 + (a1 a0’+ b1’b0 ) b1 b0 PROBLEM 3 (4 points) What is the priority scheme of this encoder? Inputs Outputs I3 I2 I1 I0 O1 O 0 d d 1 d 0 1 d d 0 1 0 0 d 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 A. I3 > I2 > I1 >I0 B. I0 > I1 > I2 >I3 C. I1 > I0 > I2 >I3 D. I2 > I1 > I3 >I0 3 PROBLEM 4 (4 points) Which is the correct binary representation of the decimal number 46.625? A. 101101.001 B. 101000.01 C. 111001.001 D. 101110.101 PROBLEM 5 (4 points) Which is the decimal equivalent number of the sum of the two 8-bit 2’s complement numbers FB16 and 3748? A. 3 B. 5 C. 7 D. 9 PROBLEM 6 (4 points) For the MUX-based circuit shown below, f(X,Y,Z) = ? X Y Z f A. X’Y’ + Y’Z’ B. X’Y’Z’ + YZ’ C. XYZ’ + Y’Z D. X’Y’Z’ + YZ 1 0 MUX 4 PROBLEM 7 (4 points) Which is the correct output F of this circuit? E C B D F A A. (A’E+AB)(C’D) B. (AE+A’B)(C’+D) C. (A’E+AB)(C’D’+CD’+CD) D. (A’E+AB)(CD’)’ PROBLEM 8 (5 points) In order to correctly perform 2910  14510, how many bits are required to represent the numbers? A 8 B 9 C 10 D 11 PROBLEM 9 (4 points) Which is the negative 2’s complement equivalent of the 8-bit number 01001101? A. 11001101 B. 10111100 C. 10110000 D. 10110011 0 2-1 1 MUX 0 0 1 1 2-4 decoder 2 EN 3 5 PROBLEM 10 (4 points) Which is the correct statement describing the behavior of the following Verilog code? module whatisthis(hmm, X, Y); output [3:0] hmm; input [3:0] X, Y; assign hmm = (X < Y) ? X : Y; endmodule A. If X>Y, hmm becomes 1111. B. hmm assumes min(X,Y). C. If X

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Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

Question 1 1. When the rules of perspective are applied in order to represent unusual points of view, we call this ________. a. foreshortening b. chiaroscuro c. convergence d. highlight e. overlapping 10 points Question 2 1. A flat work of art has two dimensions: ________ and width. a. breadth b. depth c. size d. mass e. height 10 points Question 3 1. Méret Oppenheim was part of an art movement that rejected rational, conscious thought. Her fur-lined teacup and saucer, Object, conjures an unexpected and illogical sensation for the viewer by using ________ texture. a. smooth b. familiar c. expected d. subversive e. silky 10 points Question 4 1. In James Allen’s etching The Connectors, an image of workers erecting the Empire State Building, the artist created a feeling of great height by using ________ line to lead the viewer’s eye diagonally downward. a. horizontal b. communicative c. regular d. directional e. implied 10 points Question 5 1. Because it is three-dimensional, a form has these three spatial measurements: height, width, and ________. a. mass b. length c. size d. depth e. strength 10 points Question 6 1. The ancient Egyptian depiction of the journey of the Sun god Re (0.1) was painted on ________. a. stone b. a coffin c. the wall of a tomb d. copper e. a vase 10 points Question 7 1. The area covered by a pattern is called the ________. a. field b. motif c. background d. size e. foreground 10 points Question 8 1. ________ balance is achieved when two halves of a composition are not mirror images of each other. a. unified b. radial c. varied d. asymmetrical e. symmetrical 10 points Question 9 1. In Audrey Flack’s Marilyn Monroe, the burning candle, the flower, and the hourglass are typical of a kind of symbolism in art that reminds us of death. This kind of symbolism is known as ________. a. vanitas b. feminism c. abstract d. eternal e. none of the other answers 10 points Question 10 1. Tibetan Buddhist monks create colored sand images with a radial design. This representation of the universe is called a ________. a. prayer wheel b. rotunda c. mandala d. prayer flag e. lotus 10 points Question 11 1. In The School of Athens, Raphael focused our attention on two Greek philosophers positioned in the center of the work. They are ________ and ________. a. Plato . . . Aristotle b. Aristotle . . . Socrates c. Diogenes . . . Socrates d. Diogenes . . . Aristotle e. Socrates . . . Plato 10 points Question 12 1. In his Obey campaign poster Shepard Fairey used a striking contrast between positive and ________ shapes to attract the attention of the public. a. figure–ground reversal b. implied c. geometric d. organic e. negative 10 points Question 13 1. The Italian architect Andrea Palladio created a radial design in his plan for the Villa Capra. This building is also called the ________. a. Colosseum b. Pantheon c. Villa Rotonda d. Villa Caprese e. Parthenon 10 points Question 14 1. The French artist Georges Seurat employed a new technique to create a jewel-like diffusion of light and vibration of color in his work The Circus. This type of painting, made up of small dots of color, is known as ________. a. Fauvism b. Luminism c. pointillism d. Pop art e. Impressionism 10 points Question 15 1. The rarity of an artwork, and its value, are often closely related. True False 10 points Question 16 1. By orienting lines so that they attract attention to a specific area of a work of art the artist is using ________. a. actual line b. implied line c. directional line d. measured line e. chaotic line 10 points Question 17 1. Kindred Spirits by Asher Brown Durand uses the effects of ________ to give a sense of the vastness of the American landscape. a. pencil drawing b. geometry c. atmospheric perspective d. foreshortening e. color 10 points Question 18 1. The opposite of emphasis is ________. a. subordination b. tone c. focal point d. color e. proportion 10 points Question 19 1. Gustav Klimt’s portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer was typical of his portraits of the wives and sisters of ________. a. foreign tourists b. Nazi rulers c. German scientists d. Austrian businessmen e. important politicians 10 points Question 20 1. The combination of jarring vertical and diagonal lines in Vincent van Gogh’s The Bedroom creates an atmosphere of ________. a. happiness b. rest c. anxiety d. expectation e. calm 10 points Question 21 1. If the clothing of the saint was the only light area in The Funeral of St. Bonaventure, the viewer’s eye would not be easily drawn to any other areas of the composition. True False 10 points Question 22 1. Miriam Schapiro’s collage Baby Blocks combines two different kinds of shape. ________ is the term used to describe a shape that suggests the natural world, while the term geometric suggests mathematical regularity. a. conceptual b. implied c. organic d. regular e. artificial 10 points Question 23 1. Any of the ________ of art can help focus our interest on specific areas of a work of art. a. styles b. elements c. periods d. tones e. themes 10 points Question 24 1. An artwork can be described as non-objective if its subject matter is ________. a. three-dimensional b. difficult c. unrecognizable d. recognizable e. animals 10 points Question 25 1. Match the methodological approach with its definition: biographical analysis feminist analysis formal analysis contextual analysis 2. iconographical analysis a. analyzes the use of formal elements in a work. b. considers the role of women in an artwork c. interprets objects and figures in the artwork as symbols d. considers the artist’s personal experiences e. considers the religious, political, and social environment in which the artwork was made and viewed 10 points Question 26 1. Alexander Calder invented the ________, a type of suspended, balanced sculpture that uses air currents to power its movement. a. mime b. relief c. mobile d. stabile e. zoetrope 10 points Question 27 1. Louise Nevelson’s work White Vertical Water is a realistic depiction of fish in a river. True False 10 points Question 28 1. William G. Wall’s Fort Edward was published as a ________. a. print b. watercolor c. photograph d. oil painting e. newspaper article 10 points Question 29 1. Artemisia Gentileschi worked during this stylistic and historical period. a. Surrealism b. Impressionism c. Baroque d. Renaissance e. Pop art 10 points Question 30 1. The process of using a series of parallel lines set close to one another to differentiate planes of value in a work of art is called ________. a. highlight b. core shadow c. perspective d. hatching e. palette 10 points Question 31 1. The artist Canaletto, in his drawing of the Ducal Palace in Venice, created an impression of three dimensions by using line to show the division between ________. a. planes b. two figures c. colors d. time periods e. mountains 10 points Question 32 1. Marisol’s work Father Damien was created to memorialize the heroism of a priest who lost his life helping the victims of leprosy. This sculpture stands in front of the State Capitol Building in the U.S. State of ________. a. Arizona b. Pennsylvania c. Utah d. Tennessee e. Hawaii 10 points Question 33 1. The medium of Marc Quinn’s Self is: a. clay b. the artist’s toenail clippings c. wood d. real human hair e. the artist’s own blood 10 points Question 34 1. The work now known as the Watts Towers was in fact given a different title by its creator. That title was ________. a. Nuestro Pueblo b. LA Towers c. Found Objects d. it had no title originally e. Skyscrapers 1 and 2 10 points Question 35 1. Why do we presume that the head of a woman from Benin (0.18) was made for someone wealthy? a. because it was made to be shown in a museum b. because it strongly resembles the Queen c. because it has a price carved on the back d. because it was made from rare ivory e. it was definitely not made for anyone wealthy 10 points Question 36 1. Shahzia Sikander’s art is best described as Abstract Expressionism Naturalist sculpture Pop Art Miniature Painting 10 points Question 37 1. A sunset is a work of art. True False 10 points Question 38 1. A mens’ urinal became a well known artwork in the 20th century. True False 10 points Question 39 1. Which artist has torn out people’s lawns to design and build edible gardens across the country? Andrea Zittel Fritz Haeg Ruben Ortiz Torres Mark Newport

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Course: PHYS 5426 — Quantum Statistical Physics Assignment #1 Instructor: Gennady Y. Chitov Date Assigned: January 15, 2014 Due Date: January 29, 2014 Problem 1. Prove [a; f(a†)] = @f(a†) @a† (1) [a†; f(a)] = −@f(a) @a (2) for arbitrary function f of operator which admits a series expansion. The Bose creation/ annihilation operators satisfy the standard commutation relations [a; a†] ≡ aa† − a†a = 1 (3) Hint: From Eqs.(1,2) one can figure out the corresponding commutation relations for the powers of creation/annihilation operators and then prove them by the method of mathematical induction. Note that for an arbitrary operator Aˆ: @A^n @A^ = nAˆn−1. Problem 2. In the presence of a constant external force acting on a one-dimensional oscillating particle its Hamiltonian becomes that of the so-called displaced oscillator, and the Schr¨odinger equation ˆH (q) = E (q) of the problem (cf. lecture notes) can be written in terms of dimensionless variables as ( − 1 2 d2 d2 + 1 2 2 − √ 2  ) () = ” () ; (4) where q = √ ~ m! and E = ~!”. a). Write the Schr¨odinger equation (4) in terms of the creation/annihilation operators of the harmonic oscillator ( = 0)  = √1 2 (a + a†) (5) d d = √1 2 (a − a†) (6) 1 Via a linear transformation to the new creation/annihilation operators ˜a†; ˜a preserving the bosonic commutation relations for ˜a†; ˜a map the problem (4) of the displaced oscillator onto that of a simple harmonic oscillator with new operators (˜a†; ˜a). b). Find the spectrum (eigenvalues) ” (E) of the displaced oscillator. c). Write the normalized eigenstates |n⟩ of the displaced Hamiltonian (4) via a† and the vacuum state |Θ◦⟩ of the new operators, i.e. ˜a|Θ◦⟩ = 0 (7) d). As follows from the completeness of the oscillator’s eigenstates, the vacuum state of the displaced oscillator |Θ◦⟩ can be related to the simple oscillator’s vacuum |0⟩ (i.e., a|0⟩ = 0) as |Θ◦⟩ = Ω(a†)|0⟩ (8) Find (up to a normalization factor) the operator function Ω(a†) relating two vacua. Hint: in working out Eqs.(7,8), employ Eqs.(1,2). Problem 3. Prove from the standard commutation relations ([ai; a † j ]∓ = ij , etc) that ⟨0|aiaja † ka † l |0⟩ = jkil ± ikjl (9) the sign depending on the statistics. Also calculate the vacuum expectation value ⟨0|ahaiaja † ka † l a† m |0⟩. Problem 4. In the formalism of second quantization the two-particle interaction term of the Hamiltonian for spinless fermions is given by ˆ V = 1 2 ∫ ∫ dxdy ˆ †(x) ˆ †(y)V(x; y) ˆ (y) ˆ (x) (10) For the short-ranged interaction V(x; y) = V(|x−y|) ≡ V(r) = e2 exp(−r)=r find ˆ V in the momentum representation. The field operators and the creation/annihilation operators in the momentum representation are related in the usual way, i.e., ˆ †(x) = ∫ dp (2)3 a†(p)e−ipx (11) Note that the limit  → 0 recovers the Coulomb (long-ranged) interaction V(r) = e2=r. What is the Fourier transform V(q) of the Coulomb interaction? 2 Problem 5. The matrix elements of a two-particle interaction from the previous problem can be written as ⟨k3k4|V|k1k2⟩ = (2)3(k1 + k2 − k3 − k4)V(q) (12) where q ≡ k3−k1 is the momentum transfer. Show that the diagonal part of the interaction operator ˆ V found on the previous problem in the k-representation, arises from momentum transfers q = 0 and q = k2−k1. Write down the two interaction terms and identify them as direct (q = 0) and exchange (q = k2 − k1) interactions. Draw the corresponding Feynman diagrams. Problem 6. Find the first correction to the temperature dependence of the chemical potential  of the degenerate ideal electron gas, assuming constant particle concentration ⟨N⟩=V . Express the result in terms of T and the zero-temperature chemical potential ◦. For the calculations the following formula (we set kB = 1) can be used: I ≡ ∫ ∞ 0 f(“)d” e(“−)=T + 1 = ∫  0 f(“)d” + 2 6 T2f′() + O(T4) (13) 3

Course: PHYS 5426 — Quantum Statistical Physics Assignment #1 Instructor: Gennady Y. Chitov Date Assigned: January 15, 2014 Due Date: January 29, 2014 Problem 1. Prove [a; f(a†)] = @f(a†) @a† (1) [a†; f(a)] = −@f(a) @a (2) for arbitrary function f of operator which admits a series expansion. The Bose creation/ annihilation operators satisfy the standard commutation relations [a; a†] ≡ aa† − a†a = 1 (3) Hint: From Eqs.(1,2) one can figure out the corresponding commutation relations for the powers of creation/annihilation operators and then prove them by the method of mathematical induction. Note that for an arbitrary operator Aˆ: @A^n @A^ = nAˆn−1. Problem 2. In the presence of a constant external force acting on a one-dimensional oscillating particle its Hamiltonian becomes that of the so-called displaced oscillator, and the Schr¨odinger equation ˆH (q) = E (q) of the problem (cf. lecture notes) can be written in terms of dimensionless variables as ( − 1 2 d2 d2 + 1 2 2 − √ 2  ) () = ” () ; (4) where q = √ ~ m! and E = ~!”. a). Write the Schr¨odinger equation (4) in terms of the creation/annihilation operators of the harmonic oscillator ( = 0)  = √1 2 (a + a†) (5) d d = √1 2 (a − a†) (6) 1 Via a linear transformation to the new creation/annihilation operators ˜a†; ˜a preserving the bosonic commutation relations for ˜a†; ˜a map the problem (4) of the displaced oscillator onto that of a simple harmonic oscillator with new operators (˜a†; ˜a). b). Find the spectrum (eigenvalues) ” (E) of the displaced oscillator. c). Write the normalized eigenstates |n⟩ of the displaced Hamiltonian (4) via a† and the vacuum state |Θ◦⟩ of the new operators, i.e. ˜a|Θ◦⟩ = 0 (7) d). As follows from the completeness of the oscillator’s eigenstates, the vacuum state of the displaced oscillator |Θ◦⟩ can be related to the simple oscillator’s vacuum |0⟩ (i.e., a|0⟩ = 0) as |Θ◦⟩ = Ω(a†)|0⟩ (8) Find (up to a normalization factor) the operator function Ω(a†) relating two vacua. Hint: in working out Eqs.(7,8), employ Eqs.(1,2). Problem 3. Prove from the standard commutation relations ([ai; a † j ]∓ = ij , etc) that ⟨0|aiaja † ka † l |0⟩ = jkil ± ikjl (9) the sign depending on the statistics. Also calculate the vacuum expectation value ⟨0|ahaiaja † ka † l a† m |0⟩. Problem 4. In the formalism of second quantization the two-particle interaction term of the Hamiltonian for spinless fermions is given by ˆ V = 1 2 ∫ ∫ dxdy ˆ †(x) ˆ †(y)V(x; y) ˆ (y) ˆ (x) (10) For the short-ranged interaction V(x; y) = V(|x−y|) ≡ V(r) = e2 exp(−r)=r find ˆ V in the momentum representation. The field operators and the creation/annihilation operators in the momentum representation are related in the usual way, i.e., ˆ †(x) = ∫ dp (2)3 a†(p)e−ipx (11) Note that the limit  → 0 recovers the Coulomb (long-ranged) interaction V(r) = e2=r. What is the Fourier transform V(q) of the Coulomb interaction? 2 Problem 5. The matrix elements of a two-particle interaction from the previous problem can be written as ⟨k3k4|V|k1k2⟩ = (2)3(k1 + k2 − k3 − k4)V(q) (12) where q ≡ k3−k1 is the momentum transfer. Show that the diagonal part of the interaction operator ˆ V found on the previous problem in the k-representation, arises from momentum transfers q = 0 and q = k2−k1. Write down the two interaction terms and identify them as direct (q = 0) and exchange (q = k2 − k1) interactions. Draw the corresponding Feynman diagrams. Problem 6. Find the first correction to the temperature dependence of the chemical potential  of the degenerate ideal electron gas, assuming constant particle concentration ⟨N⟩=V . Express the result in terms of T and the zero-temperature chemical potential ◦. For the calculations the following formula (we set kB = 1) can be used: I ≡ ∫ ∞ 0 f(“)d” e(“−)=T + 1 = ∫  0 f(“)d” + 2 6 T2f′() + O(T4) (13) 3

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