1. Which of the following statements for electric field lines are true? (Give ALL correct answers, i.e., B, AC, BCD…) A) E-field lines point inward toward negative charges. B) E-field lines may cross. C) E-field lines do not begin or end in a charge-free region (except at infinity). D) Where the E-field lines are dense the E-field must be weak. E) E-field lines make circles around positive charges. F) A point charge q, released from rest will initially move along an E-field line. G) E-field lines point outward from positive charges. 2. Consider two uniformly charged parallel plates as shown above. The magnitudes of the charges are equal. (For each statement select T True, F False). A) If the plates are oppositely charged, there is no electric field at c. B) If both plates are negatively charged, the electric field at a points towards the top of the page. C) If both plates are positively charged, there is no electric field at b. 3. As shown in the figure above, a ball of mass 1.050 g and positive charge q =38.1microC is suspended on a string of negligible mass in a uniform electric field. We observe that the ball hangs at an angle of theta=15.0° from the vertical. What is the magnitude of the electric field?

1. Which of the following statements for electric field lines are true? (Give ALL correct answers, i.e., B, AC, BCD…) A) E-field lines point inward toward negative charges. B) E-field lines may cross. C) E-field lines do not begin or end in a charge-free region (except at infinity). D) Where the E-field lines are dense the E-field must be weak. E) E-field lines make circles around positive charges. F) A point charge q, released from rest will initially move along an E-field line. G) E-field lines point outward from positive charges. 2. Consider two uniformly charged parallel plates as shown above. The magnitudes of the charges are equal. (For each statement select T True, F False). A) If the plates are oppositely charged, there is no electric field at c. B) If both plates are negatively charged, the electric field at a points towards the top of the page. C) If both plates are positively charged, there is no electric field at b. 3. As shown in the figure above, a ball of mass 1.050 g and positive charge q =38.1microC is suspended on a string of negligible mass in a uniform electric field. We observe that the ball hangs at an angle of theta=15.0° from the vertical. What is the magnitude of the electric field?

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WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT #5.5/EXAM REVIEW YOU 1. True/False Answers Probably want to think about them before you read the answers: (a) fy(a; b) = limh!b f(a;y)?f(a;b) y?b is True (b) There exists a function f with continuous second-order partial derivatives such that fx(x; y) = x + y2 and fy(x; y) = x ? y2. This is False. (c) fxy = @2f @x@y . This is False, because order of differentiation matters (d) Dkf(x; y; z) = fz(x; y; z). This is True. (e) If f(x; y) ! L as (x; y) ! (a; b) along every strait line through (a; b), then lim(x;y)!(a;b) f(x; y) = L. This is False, because there could be a non-strait path that gives a different answer. (f) If fx(a; b) and fy(a; b) both exist, the f is differentiable at (a; b). This is False, read theorem 8 in 14.4 (g) If f has a local minimum at (a; b) and f is differentiable at (a; b), then rf(a; b) = 0. This is True. (h) If f(x; y) = ln y, then rf(x; y) = 1=y. This is false, since gradient of f is a vector function. (i) If f is a function, then lim (x;y)!(2;5) f(x; y) = f(2; 5): This is false, since f may not be continuous. (j) If (2; 1) is a critical point of f and fxx(2; 1)fyy(2; 1) < fxy(2; 1)2 then f has a saddle point at (2; 1). This is True (k) if f(x; y) = sin x + sin y then ? p 2  Duf(x; y)  p 2: This is True since the gradient vector will always have length less than p 2. (l) If f(x; y) has two local maxima, then f must have a local minimum. This is False. It is true for single variable continuous functions, but even if the f(x; y) is continuous this is still not true. Think a bit about why and consider the example (x2 ? 1)2 ? (x2  y ? x ? 1)2. From the review section of chapter 14 (question and answers attached) Do as many as you have time for and pay particular attention to the following : 8-11, 13-17, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35-37, 43-47, 51-56, 59-63. These bolded ones haven’t been collected on any homework, so make sure you can do these especially. I know that is a lot to study and I’m not expecting most people to do them all, but do a bunch and you should be good. 1 Questions from the exam will include true false, only from the above problems. The rest of the questions will come directly (or with minor changes) from the homework and from the review questions listed above from the chapter 14 review. 2

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT #5.5/EXAM REVIEW YOU 1. True/False Answers Probably want to think about them before you read the answers: (a) fy(a; b) = limh!b f(a;y)?f(a;b) y?b is True (b) There exists a function f with continuous second-order partial derivatives such that fx(x; y) = x + y2 and fy(x; y) = x ? y2. This is False. (c) fxy = @2f @x@y . This is False, because order of differentiation matters (d) Dkf(x; y; z) = fz(x; y; z). This is True. (e) If f(x; y) ! L as (x; y) ! (a; b) along every strait line through (a; b), then lim(x;y)!(a;b) f(x; y) = L. This is False, because there could be a non-strait path that gives a different answer. (f) If fx(a; b) and fy(a; b) both exist, the f is differentiable at (a; b). This is False, read theorem 8 in 14.4 (g) If f has a local minimum at (a; b) and f is differentiable at (a; b), then rf(a; b) = 0. This is True. (h) If f(x; y) = ln y, then rf(x; y) = 1=y. This is false, since gradient of f is a vector function. (i) If f is a function, then lim (x;y)!(2;5) f(x; y) = f(2; 5): This is false, since f may not be continuous. (j) If (2; 1) is a critical point of f and fxx(2; 1)fyy(2; 1) < fxy(2; 1)2 then f has a saddle point at (2; 1). This is True (k) if f(x; y) = sin x + sin y then ? p 2  Duf(x; y)  p 2: This is True since the gradient vector will always have length less than p 2. (l) If f(x; y) has two local maxima, then f must have a local minimum. This is False. It is true for single variable continuous functions, but even if the f(x; y) is continuous this is still not true. Think a bit about why and consider the example (x2 ? 1)2 ? (x2  y ? x ? 1)2. From the review section of chapter 14 (question and answers attached) Do as many as you have time for and pay particular attention to the following : 8-11, 13-17, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35-37, 43-47, 51-56, 59-63. These bolded ones haven’t been collected on any homework, so make sure you can do these especially. I know that is a lot to study and I’m not expecting most people to do them all, but do a bunch and you should be good. 1 Questions from the exam will include true false, only from the above problems. The rest of the questions will come directly (or with minor changes) from the homework and from the review questions listed above from the chapter 14 review. 2

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: xbus(t) a t x(t) = x(0) + v(0)t + (1/2)at2 vbus(0) = 0 xbus = 1 a 2 t2 tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? xman(tcatch) > xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) < xbus(tcatch) c = a  tcatch xman(t) xbus(t) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) −b+ct = a catch 1 2 t2 catch 1 a −c +b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch c tcatch cmin c a b 1 a − c + b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , \texttip{B}{B}, and \texttip{C}{C} are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, \Delta = c^2-2ab, the equation may have Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 x = −B±B2−4AC 2A  = cc − 2ab tcatch c cmin cmin = (2ab) −−−−  c > cmin Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 A Typesetting math: 15% two real valued solutions 1. if \Delta > 0, 2. one real valued solution if \Delta = 0, or 3. two complex valued solutions if \Delta < 0. In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Typesetting math: 15% Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Typesetting math: 15% To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} is decomposed into component vectors \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} and \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit y}}{A_vec_y} parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec}, denoted \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} and \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y}. TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value |A_x| of the x component \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\1. mit x}}{A_vec_x}. The sign of \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is positive if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the positive x direction; it is negative if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: Correct |A_x| = 5 \rm m Typesetting math: 15% Part B What is the sign of the y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x} and \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y}, of vector \texttip{\vec{B}}{B_vec} shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. positive negative Typesetting math: 15% ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth's gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{1. v_x}, is constant. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by \texttip{g}{g}, is equal to 9.80 \rm{m/s^2} near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit y}}{v_y}, changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time \texttip{t}{t} the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time t_0 = 0\;\rm{s} corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position x_0 = 0\;\rm{m} and y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_vec_0}. Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 1}}{v_1_vec}. Its position at this moment is denoted by (x_1, y_1) or (x_1, y_{\max}) since it is at its maximum \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x}, \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y} = -2,-5 \rm m, \rm m Typesetting math: 15% The other point, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 2}}{v_2_vec}, corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is (x_2, y_2), also known as (x_{\max}, y_2) since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence y_2 = y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Part A How do the speeds \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0}, \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} (at times \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}, and \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}) compare? ANSWER: Correct Here \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} equals \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} by symmetry and both exceed \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}. This is because \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} include vertical speed as well as the constant horizontal speed. Consider a diagram of the ball at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}. Recall that \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} refers to the instant just after the ball has been launched, so it is still at ground level (x_0 = y_0= 0\;\rm{m}). However, it is already moving with initial velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec}, whose magnitude is v_0 = 30.0\;{\rm m/s} and direction is \theta = 60.0\;{\rm degrees} counterclockwise from the positive x direction. \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 Typesetting math: 15% Part B What are the values of the intial velocity vector components \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{0,x}}{a_0, x} and \texttip{a_{0,y}}{a_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 0 means “at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}.” Hint 1. Determining components of a vector that is aligned with an axis If a vector points along a single axis direction, such as in the positive x direction, its x component will be its full magnitude, whereas its y component will be zero since the vector is perpendicular to the y direction. If the vector points in the negative x direction, its x component will be the negative of its full magnitude. Hint 2. Calculating the components of the initial velocity Notice that the vector \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec} points up and to the right. Since “up” is the positive y axis direction and “to the right” is the positive x axis direction, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} will both be positive. As shown in the figure, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x}, \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} are three sides of a right triangle, one angle of which is \texttip{\theta }{theta}. Thus \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} can be found using the definition of the sine and cosine functions given below. Recall that v_0 = 30.0\;\rm{m/s} and \theta = 60.0\;\rm{degrees} and note that \large{\sin(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;opposite\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, y}}{v_0}}, \large{\cos(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;adjacent\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, x}}{v_0}.} What are the values of \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}? Enter your answers numerically in meters per second separated by a comma. ANSWER: ANSWER: 15.0,26.0 \rm{m/s} Typesetting math: 15% Correct Also notice that at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}, just before the ball lands, its velocity components are v_{2, x} = 15\;\rm{m/s} (the same as always) and v_{2, y} = – 26.0\;\rm{m/s} (the same size but opposite sign from \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} by symmetry). The acceleration at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} will have components (0, -9.80 \rm{m/s^2}), exactly the same as at \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, as required by Rule 2. The peak of the trajectory occurs at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. This is the point where the ball reaches its maximum height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}. At the peak the ball switches from moving up to moving down, even as it continues to travel horizontally at a constant rate. Part C What are the values of the velocity vector components \texttip{v_{1,x}}{v_1, x} and \texttip{v_{1,y}}{v_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{1,x}}{a_1, x} and \texttip{a_{1,y}}{a_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 1 means that these are all at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. ANSWER: 30.0, 0, 0, 0 0, 30.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 30.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 30.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, +9.80 Typesetting math: 15% Correct At the peak of its trajectory the ball continues traveling horizontally at a constant rate. However, at this moment it stops moving up and is about to move back down. This constitutes a downward-directed change in velocity, so the ball is accelerating downward even at the peak. The flight time refers to the total amount of time the ball is in the air, from just after it is launched (\texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}) until just before it lands (\texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}). Hence the flight time can be calculated as t_2 – t_0, or just \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} in this particular situation since t_0 = 0. Because the ball lands at the same height from which it was launched, by symmetry it spends half its flight time traveling up to the peak and the other half traveling back down. The flight time is determined by the initial vertical component of the velocity and by the acceleration. The flight time does not depend on whether the object is moving horizontally while it is in the air. Part D If a second ball were dropped from rest from height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}, how long would it take to reach the ground? Ignore air resistance. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Kicking a ball of cliff; a related problem Consider two balls, one of which is dropped from rest off the edge of a cliff at the same moment that the other is kicked horizontally off the edge of the cliff. Which ball reaches the level ground at the base of the cliff first? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. Comparing position, velocity, and acceleration of the two balls Both balls start at the same height and have the same initial y velocity (v_{0,y} = 0) as well as the same acceleration (\vec a = g downward). They differ only in their x velocity (one is 0, 0, 0, 0 0, 0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 0, 0, 0 15.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 26.0, 0, 0 0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 Typesetting math: 15% zero, the other nonzero). This difference will affect their x motion but not their y motion. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct In projectile motion over level ground, it takes an object just as long to rise from the ground to the peak as it takes for it to fall from the peak back to the ground. The range \texttip{R}{R} of the ball refers to how far it moves horizontally, from just after it is launched until just before it lands. Range is defined as x_2 – x_0, or just \texttip{x_{\rm 2}}{x_2} in this particular situation since x_0 = 0. Range can be calculated as the product of the flight time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} and the x component of the velocity \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} (which is the same at all times, so v_x = v_{0,x}). The value of \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} can be found from the launch speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and the launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trigonometric functions, as was done in Part B. The flight time is related to the initial y component of the velocity, which may also be found from \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trig functions. The following equations may be useful in solving projectile motion problems, but these equations apply only to a projectile launched over level ground from position (x_0 = y_0 = 0) at time t_0 = 0 with initial speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} measured from the horizontal. As was the case above, \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} refers to the flight time and \texttip{R}{R} refers to the range of the projectile. flight time: \large{t_2 = \frac{2 v_{0, y}}{g} = \frac{2 v_0 \sin(\theta)}{g}} range: \large{R = v_x t_2 = \frac{v_0^2 \sin(2\theta)}{g}} The ball that falls straight down strikes the ground first. The ball that was kicked so it moves horizontally as it falls strikes the ground first. Both balls strike the ground at the same time. \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} t_1 – t_0 \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} t_2 – t_1 \large{\frac{t_2 – t_0}{2}} Typesetting math: 15% In general, a high launch angle yields a long flight time but a small horizontal speed and hence little range. A low launch angle gives a larger horizontal speed, but less flight time in which to accumulate range. The launch angle that achieves the maximum range for projectile motion over level ground is 45 degrees. Part E Which of the following changes would increase the range of the ball shown in the original figure? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct A solid understanding of the concepts of projectile motion will take you far, including giving you additional insight into the solution of projectile motion problems numerically. Even when the object does not land at the same height from which is was launched, the rules given in the introduction will still be useful. Recall that air resistance is assumed to be negligible here, so this projectile motion analysis may not be the best choice for describing things like frisbees or feathers, whose motion is strongly influenced by air. The value of the gravitational free-fall acceleration \texttip{g}{g} is also assumed to be constant, which may not be appropriate for objects that move vertically through distances of hundreds of kilometers, like rockets or missiles. However, for problems that involve relatively dense projectiles moving close to the surface of the earth, these assumptions are reasonable. A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude 15 \;{\rm m}/{\rm s}^{2}. Part A How much horizontal force \texttip{F}{F} must a sprinter of mass 64{\rm kg} exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Increase \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} above 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} below 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to 45 \rm{degrees}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to less than 30 \rm{degrees}. Increase \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} up toward 90 \rm{degrees}. Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. Newton’s 2nd law of motion According to Newton’s 2nd law of motion, if a net external force \texttip{F_{\rm net}}{F_net} acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass \texttip{m}{m} of the body times the acceleration \texttip{a}{a} of the body: F_{\rm net} = ma. ANSWER: Co

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: c t = 0 b a x = 0 xman(t) b c t x(t) = x(0) + vt xman(t) = −b + ct Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: xbus(t) a t x(t) = x(0) + v(0)t + (1/2)at2 vbus(0) = 0 xbus = 1 a 2 t2 tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? xman(tcatch) > xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) xman(tcatch) < xbus(tcatch) c = a  tcatch xman(t) xbus(t) xman(tcatch) = xbus(tcatch) −b+ct = a catch 1 2 t2 catch 1 a −c +b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch c tcatch cmin c a b 1 a − c + b = 0 2 t2 catch tcatch tcatch Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , \texttip{B}{B}, and \texttip{C}{C} are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, \Delta = c^2-2ab, the equation may have Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 x = −B±B2−4AC 2A  = cc − 2ab tcatch c cmin cmin = (2ab) −−−−  c > cmin Ax2 + Bx + C = 0 A Typesetting math: 15% two real valued solutions 1. if \Delta > 0, 2. one real valued solution if \Delta = 0, or 3. two complex valued solutions if \Delta < 0. In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Typesetting math: 15% Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D Typesetting math: 15% Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Typesetting math: 15% To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} is decomposed into component vectors \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} and \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit y}}{A_vec_y} parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec}, denoted \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} and \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y}. TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value |A_x| of the x component \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\1. mit x}}{A_vec_x}. The sign of \texttip{A_{\mit x}}{A_x} is positive if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the positive x direction; it is negative if \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector \texttip{\vec{A}_{\mit x}}{A_vec_x} shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: Correct |A_x| = 5 \rm m Typesetting math: 15% Part B What is the sign of the y component \texttip{A_{\mit y}}{A_y} of vector \texttip{\vec{A}}{A_vec} shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x} and \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y}, of vector \texttip{\vec{B}}{B_vec} shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. positive negative Typesetting math: 15% ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth's gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{1. v_x}, is constant. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by \texttip{g}{g}, is equal to 9.80 \rm{m/s^2} near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, \texttip{v_{\mit y}}{v_y}, changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time \texttip{t}{t} the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time t_0 = 0\;\rm{s} corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position x_0 = 0\;\rm{m} and y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_vec_0}. Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 1}}{v_1_vec}. Its position at this moment is denoted by (x_1, y_1) or (x_1, y_{\max}) since it is at its maximum \texttip{B_{\mit x}}{B_x}, \texttip{B_{\mit y}}{B_y} = -2,-5 \rm m, \rm m Typesetting math: 15% The other point, at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} with velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 2}}{v_2_vec}, corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is (x_2, y_2), also known as (x_{\max}, y_2) since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence y_2 = y_0 = 0\;\rm{m}. Part A How do the speeds \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0}, \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} (at times \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}, and \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}) compare? ANSWER: Correct Here \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} equals \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} by symmetry and both exceed \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1}. This is because \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} include vertical speed as well as the constant horizontal speed. Consider a diagram of the ball at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}. Recall that \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} refers to the instant just after the ball has been launched, so it is still at ground level (x_0 = y_0= 0\;\rm{m}). However, it is already moving with initial velocity \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec}, whose magnitude is v_0 = 30.0\;{\rm m/s} and direction is \theta = 60.0\;{\rm degrees} counterclockwise from the positive x direction. \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} = \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > 0 \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} > \texttip{v_{\rm 2}}{v_2} > \texttip{v_{\rm 1}}{v_1} = 0 Typesetting math: 15% Part B What are the values of the intial velocity vector components \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{0,x}}{a_0, x} and \texttip{a_{0,y}}{a_0, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 0 means “at time \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}.” Hint 1. Determining components of a vector that is aligned with an axis If a vector points along a single axis direction, such as in the positive x direction, its x component will be its full magnitude, whereas its y component will be zero since the vector is perpendicular to the y direction. If the vector points in the negative x direction, its x component will be the negative of its full magnitude. Hint 2. Calculating the components of the initial velocity Notice that the vector \texttip{\vec{v}_{\rm 0}}{v_0_vec} points up and to the right. Since “up” is the positive y axis direction and “to the right” is the positive x axis direction, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} will both be positive. As shown in the figure, \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x}, \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}, and \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} are three sides of a right triangle, one angle of which is \texttip{\theta }{theta}. Thus \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} can be found using the definition of the sine and cosine functions given below. Recall that v_0 = 30.0\;\rm{m/s} and \theta = 60.0\;\rm{degrees} and note that \large{\sin(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;opposite\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, y}}{v_0}}, \large{\cos(\theta) = \frac{\rm{length\;of\;adjacent\;side}}{\rm{length\;of\;hypotenuse}}} \large{= \frac{v_{0, x}}{v_0}.} What are the values of \texttip{v_{0,x}}{v_0, x} and \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y}? Enter your answers numerically in meters per second separated by a comma. ANSWER: ANSWER: 15.0,26.0 \rm{m/s} Typesetting math: 15% Correct Also notice that at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}, just before the ball lands, its velocity components are v_{2, x} = 15\;\rm{m/s} (the same as always) and v_{2, y} = – 26.0\;\rm{m/s} (the same size but opposite sign from \texttip{v_{0,y}}{v_0, y} by symmetry). The acceleration at time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} will have components (0, -9.80 \rm{m/s^2}), exactly the same as at \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}, as required by Rule 2. The peak of the trajectory occurs at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. This is the point where the ball reaches its maximum height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}. At the peak the ball switches from moving up to moving down, even as it continues to travel horizontally at a constant rate. Part C What are the values of the velocity vector components \texttip{v_{1,x}}{v_1, x} and \texttip{v_{1,y}}{v_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s}) as well as the acceleration vector components \texttip{a_{1,x}}{a_1, x} and \texttip{a_{1,y}}{a_1, y} (both in \rm{m/s^2})? Here the subscript 1 means that these are all at time \texttip{t_{\rm 1}}{t_1}. ANSWER: 30.0, 0, 0, 0 0, 30.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 30.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 30.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, +9.80 Typesetting math: 15% Correct At the peak of its trajectory the ball continues traveling horizontally at a constant rate. However, at this moment it stops moving up and is about to move back down. This constitutes a downward-directed change in velocity, so the ball is accelerating downward even at the peak. The flight time refers to the total amount of time the ball is in the air, from just after it is launched (\texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0}) until just before it lands (\texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2}). Hence the flight time can be calculated as t_2 – t_0, or just \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} in this particular situation since t_0 = 0. Because the ball lands at the same height from which it was launched, by symmetry it spends half its flight time traveling up to the peak and the other half traveling back down. The flight time is determined by the initial vertical component of the velocity and by the acceleration. The flight time does not depend on whether the object is moving horizontally while it is in the air. Part D If a second ball were dropped from rest from height \texttip{y_{\rm max}}{y_max}, how long would it take to reach the ground? Ignore air resistance. Check all that apply. Hint 1. Kicking a ball of cliff; a related problem Consider two balls, one of which is dropped from rest off the edge of a cliff at the same moment that the other is kicked horizontally off the edge of the cliff. Which ball reaches the level ground at the base of the cliff first? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. Comparing position, velocity, and acceleration of the two balls Both balls start at the same height and have the same initial y velocity (v_{0,y} = 0) as well as the same acceleration (\vec a = g downward). They differ only in their x velocity (one is 0, 0, 0, 0 0, 0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 0, 0, 0 15.0, 0, 0, -9.80 0, 26.0, 0, 0 0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 15.0, 26.0, 0, 0 15.0, 26.0, 0, -9.80 Typesetting math: 15% zero, the other nonzero). This difference will affect their x motion but not their y motion. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct In projectile motion over level ground, it takes an object just as long to rise from the ground to the peak as it takes for it to fall from the peak back to the ground. The range \texttip{R}{R} of the ball refers to how far it moves horizontally, from just after it is launched until just before it lands. Range is defined as x_2 – x_0, or just \texttip{x_{\rm 2}}{x_2} in this particular situation since x_0 = 0. Range can be calculated as the product of the flight time \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} and the x component of the velocity \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} (which is the same at all times, so v_x = v_{0,x}). The value of \texttip{v_{\mit x}}{v_x} can be found from the launch speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and the launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trigonometric functions, as was done in Part B. The flight time is related to the initial y component of the velocity, which may also be found from \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and \texttip{\theta }{theta} using trig functions. The following equations may be useful in solving projectile motion problems, but these equations apply only to a projectile launched over level ground from position (x_0 = y_0 = 0) at time t_0 = 0 with initial speed \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} and launch angle \texttip{\theta }{theta} measured from the horizontal. As was the case above, \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} refers to the flight time and \texttip{R}{R} refers to the range of the projectile. flight time: \large{t_2 = \frac{2 v_{0, y}}{g} = \frac{2 v_0 \sin(\theta)}{g}} range: \large{R = v_x t_2 = \frac{v_0^2 \sin(2\theta)}{g}} The ball that falls straight down strikes the ground first. The ball that was kicked so it moves horizontally as it falls strikes the ground first. Both balls strike the ground at the same time. \texttip{t_{\rm 0}}{t_0} t_1 – t_0 \texttip{t_{\rm 2}}{t_2} t_2 – t_1 \large{\frac{t_2 – t_0}{2}} Typesetting math: 15% In general, a high launch angle yields a long flight time but a small horizontal speed and hence little range. A low launch angle gives a larger horizontal speed, but less flight time in which to accumulate range. The launch angle that achieves the maximum range for projectile motion over level ground is 45 degrees. Part E Which of the following changes would increase the range of the ball shown in the original figure? Check all that apply. ANSWER: Correct A solid understanding of the concepts of projectile motion will take you far, including giving you additional insight into the solution of projectile motion problems numerically. Even when the object does not land at the same height from which is was launched, the rules given in the introduction will still be useful. Recall that air resistance is assumed to be negligible here, so this projectile motion analysis may not be the best choice for describing things like frisbees or feathers, whose motion is strongly influenced by air. The value of the gravitational free-fall acceleration \texttip{g}{g} is also assumed to be constant, which may not be appropriate for objects that move vertically through distances of hundreds of kilometers, like rockets or missiles. However, for problems that involve relatively dense projectiles moving close to the surface of the earth, these assumptions are reasonable. A World-Class Sprinter World-class sprinters can accelerate out of the starting blocks with an acceleration that is nearly horizontal and has magnitude 15 \;{\rm m}/{\rm s}^{2}. Part A How much horizontal force \texttip{F}{F} must a sprinter of mass 64{\rm kg} exert on the starting blocks to produce this acceleration? Express your answer in newtons using two significant figures. Increase \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} above 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{v_{\rm 0}}{v_0} below 30 \rm{m/s}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to 45 \rm{degrees}. Reduce \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} to less than 30 \rm{degrees}. Increase \texttip{\theta }{theta} from 60 \rm{degrees} up toward 90 \rm{degrees}. Typesetting math: 15% Hint 1. Newton’s 2nd law of motion According to Newton’s 2nd law of motion, if a net external force \texttip{F_{\rm net}}{F_net} acts on a body, the body accelerates, and the net force is equal to the mass \texttip{m}{m} of the body times the acceleration \texttip{a}{a} of the body: F_{\rm net} = ma. ANSWER: Co

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Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 1 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Incorrect; Try Again Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen = 32 = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 2 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 3 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 4 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 5 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 6 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Clockwise Counterclockwise = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 7 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 8 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. = = rev Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 9 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 10 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). = N = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 11 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = N = s = N Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 12 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 13 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Problem 12.46 into the page out of the page Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 14 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 15 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1. Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 16 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 17 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 18 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 19 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 20 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 4.0%. You received 7.84 out of a possible total of 198 points. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?disp

Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 1 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Incorrect; Try Again Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen = 32 = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 2 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 3 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 4 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 5 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 6 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Clockwise Counterclockwise = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 7 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 8 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. = = rev Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 9 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 10 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). = N = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 11 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = N = s = N Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 12 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 13 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Problem 12.46 into the page out of the page Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 14 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 15 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1. Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 16 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 17 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 18 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 19 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 20 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 4.0%. You received 7.84 out of a possible total of 198 points. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?disp

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Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Athlete’s high salaries: Should they be paid that amount or … Read More...
EBIO/ECHM 100 – Homework #6 2015 Due Thursday October 8, 2015 1. Flow rates – in most bio- or chemical engineering problems, you will be working with flow rates rather than a singular amount of mass, moles or volume. When working with gases, a molar flow rate (mol/time) or a volumetric flow rate (volume/time) can be used in the ideal gas law. Consider a mixed gas consisting of 60% Hydrogen, 20% Nitrogen and 20% Carbon Monoxide (CO) which has a molar flow rate of 175 lbmol/min. The temperature is 200oF and pressure is 3 atm gauge. a. Calculate the individual molar flow rates of each component (mol/min) b. Calculate the total volumetric flow rate in ft3/min c. Determine the molar density of the mixed gas (mol/ft3) d. Determine the mass flow rate of the gas (g/min) e. Determine the mass fraction of hydrogen in the gas Read Section 6.5 of your textbook and/or watch the mini-lecture on statistics. That information will help you complete problems 2-4 In previous years, students in EBIO/ECHM 100 would test their ability to brew a repeatable batch of coffee. Let’s say you tried your best to brew three identical batches of coffee – you ground your own beans and measured exactly how many grounds you added to the pot. You took three samples from each batch and measured the absorbance. Representative data for the absorbance readings is given below. Batch 1 Batch 2 Batch 3 Measurement 1 0.343 0.374 0.327 Measurement 2 0.342 0.372 0.327 Measurement 3 0.371 0.375 0.328 2. For each batch of coffee (data in a vertical column), calculate the mean and standard deviation of the absorbance measurement of the three measurements taken from each batch (batch 1 has 3 absorbance measurements of .343, 0.342 and 0.371). Show at least one hand calculation on engineering paper, but you can do the rest in Excel if you wish, using the functions for average, =average(), and standard deviation, =stdev(). For example if you put data from batch 1 in column B, cells B2, B3 and B4 you could tell Excel to compute the average of those numbers by entering the equation =average(B2,B3,B4) in a neighboring cell. An alternate to way compute the average would be to type =(B2+B3+B4)/3. While you get the same answer with both methods, the second method become more cumbersome as your number of samples goes up. 3. Now, calculate the mean and standard deviation for the combination of all nine samples. 4. Why is the standard deviation calculated in #3 greater than those calculated in #2? Discuss this question in terms of experimental factors that could lead to scatter in your data (think back to the steps of making coffee and try to come up with at least 3 factors – these can address sample to sample variations or batch to batch variations). Staple the spreadsheet to the rest of your HW if using Excel. Adjust numbers so they report correct significant figures.

EBIO/ECHM 100 – Homework #6 2015 Due Thursday October 8, 2015 1. Flow rates – in most bio- or chemical engineering problems, you will be working with flow rates rather than a singular amount of mass, moles or volume. When working with gases, a molar flow rate (mol/time) or a volumetric flow rate (volume/time) can be used in the ideal gas law. Consider a mixed gas consisting of 60% Hydrogen, 20% Nitrogen and 20% Carbon Monoxide (CO) which has a molar flow rate of 175 lbmol/min. The temperature is 200oF and pressure is 3 atm gauge. a. Calculate the individual molar flow rates of each component (mol/min) b. Calculate the total volumetric flow rate in ft3/min c. Determine the molar density of the mixed gas (mol/ft3) d. Determine the mass flow rate of the gas (g/min) e. Determine the mass fraction of hydrogen in the gas Read Section 6.5 of your textbook and/or watch the mini-lecture on statistics. That information will help you complete problems 2-4 In previous years, students in EBIO/ECHM 100 would test their ability to brew a repeatable batch of coffee. Let’s say you tried your best to brew three identical batches of coffee – you ground your own beans and measured exactly how many grounds you added to the pot. You took three samples from each batch and measured the absorbance. Representative data for the absorbance readings is given below. Batch 1 Batch 2 Batch 3 Measurement 1 0.343 0.374 0.327 Measurement 2 0.342 0.372 0.327 Measurement 3 0.371 0.375 0.328 2. For each batch of coffee (data in a vertical column), calculate the mean and standard deviation of the absorbance measurement of the three measurements taken from each batch (batch 1 has 3 absorbance measurements of .343, 0.342 and 0.371). Show at least one hand calculation on engineering paper, but you can do the rest in Excel if you wish, using the functions for average, =average(), and standard deviation, =stdev(). For example if you put data from batch 1 in column B, cells B2, B3 and B4 you could tell Excel to compute the average of those numbers by entering the equation =average(B2,B3,B4) in a neighboring cell. An alternate to way compute the average would be to type =(B2+B3+B4)/3. While you get the same answer with both methods, the second method become more cumbersome as your number of samples goes up. 3. Now, calculate the mean and standard deviation for the combination of all nine samples. 4. Why is the standard deviation calculated in #3 greater than those calculated in #2? Discuss this question in terms of experimental factors that could lead to scatter in your data (think back to the steps of making coffee and try to come up with at least 3 factors – these can address sample to sample variations or batch to batch variations). Staple the spreadsheet to the rest of your HW if using Excel. Adjust numbers so they report correct significant figures.

Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

Assignment 3 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Problem 2.68 As a science project, you drop a watermelon off the top of the Empire State Building, 320 m above the sidewalk. It so happens that Superman flies by at the instant you release the watermelon. Superman is headed straight down with a speed of 36.0 . Part A How fast is the watermelon going when it passes Superman? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.63 A motorist is driving at when she sees that a traffic light ahead has just turned red. She knows that this light stays red for , and she wants to reach the light just as it turns green again. It takes her to step on the brakes and begin slowing. Part A What is her speed as she reaches the light at the instant it turns green? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: m/s 72.0 ms 20 m/s 200 m 15 s 1.0 s 5.71 ms Correct Conceptual Question 4.1 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the figurespeeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Correct Part B Is this particle curving to the right, curving to the left, or traveling straight? Speeding up Slowing down Traveling at constant speed ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 4.2 Part A At this instant, is the particle in the following figure speeding up, slowing down, or traveling at constant speed? ANSWER: Curving to the right Curving to the left Traveling straight Correct Part B Is this particle curving upward, curving downward, or traveling straight? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.8 A particle’s trajectory is described by and , where is in s. Part A What is the particle’s speed at ? ANSWER: The particle is speeding up. The particle is slowing down. The particle is traveling at constant speed. The particle is curving upward. The particle is curving downward. The particle is traveling straight. x = ( 1 −2 ) m 2 t3 t2 y = ( 1 −2t) m 2 t2 t t = 0 s v = 2 m/s Correct Part B What is the particle’s speed at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the particle’s direction of motion, measured as an angle from the x-axis, at ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: t = 5.0s v = 18 m/s t = 0 s  = -90  counterclockwise from the +x axis. t = 5.0s  = 9.7  counterclockwise from the +x axis. Correct Problem 4.9 A rocket-powered hockey puck moves on a horizontal frictionless table. The figure shows the graph of and the figure shows the graph of , the x- and y-components of the puck’s velocity, respectively. The puck starts at the origin. Part A In which direction is the puck moving at = 3 ? Give your answer as an angle from the x-axis. Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part B vx vy t s = 51   above the x-axis How far from the origin is the puck at 5 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.13 A rifle is aimed horizontally at a target 51.0 away. The bullet hits the target 1.50 below the aim point. You may want to review ( pages 91 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A What was the bullet’s flight time? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the bullet’s trajectory, including where it leaves the gun and where it hits the target. You can assume that the gun was held parallel to the ground. Label the distances given in the problem. Choose an x-y coordinate system, making sure to label the origin. It is conventional to have x in the horizontal direction and y in the vertical direction. What is the y coordinate when the bullet leaves the gun? What is the y coordinate when it hits the target? What is the initial velocity in the y direction? What is the acceleration in the y direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the vertical y direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the time of flight? Why was it not necessary to include the motion in the x direction? s s = 180 cm m cm y(t) y(t) ANSWER: Correct Part B What was the bullet’s speed as it left the barrel? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In the coordinate system introduced in Part A, what are the x coordinates when the bullet leaves the gun and when it hits the target? Is there any acceleration in the x direction? What is the equation that describes the motion in the horizontal x direction as a function of time? Can you use the equation for to determine the initial velocity? ANSWER: Correct Introduction to Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand the basic concepts of projectile motion. Projectile motion may seem rather complex at first. However, by breaking it down into components, you will find that it is really no different than the one-dimensional motions that you have already studied. One of the most often used techniques in physics is to divide two- and three-dimensional quantities into components. For instance, in projectile motion, a particle has some initial velocity . In general, this velocity can point in any direction on the xy plane and can have any magnitude. To make a problem more managable, it is common to break up such a quantity into its x component and its y component . 5.53×10−2 s x(t) x(t) 922 ms v vx vy Consider a particle with initial velocity that has magnitude 12.0 and is directed 60.0 above the negative x axis. Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer in meters per second. ANSWER: Correct Breaking up the velocities into components is particularly useful when the components do not affect each other. Eventually, you will learn about situations in which the components of velocity do affect one another, but for now you will only be looking at problems where they do not. So, if there is acceleration in the x direction but not in the y direction, then the x component of the velocity will change, but the y component of the velocity will not. Part C Look at this applet. The motion diagram for a projectile is displayed, as are the motion diagrams for each component. The x-component motion diagram is what you would get if you shined a spotlight down on the particle as it moved and recorded the motion of its shadow. Similarly, if you shined a spotlight to the left and recorded the particle’s shadow, you would get the motion diagram for its y component. How would you describe the two motion diagrams for the components? ANSWER: v m/s degrees vx v vx = -6.00 m/s vy v vy = 10.4 m/s Correct As you can see, the two components of the motion obey their own independent kinematic laws. For the vertical component, there is an acceleration downward with magnitude . Thus, you can calculate the vertical position of the particle at any time using the standard kinematic equation . Similarly, there is no acceleration in the horizontal direction, so the horizontal position of the particle is given by the standard kinematic equation . Now, consider this applet. Two balls are simultaneously dropped from a height of 5.0 . Part D How long does it take for the balls to reach the ground? Use 10 for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Express your answer in seconds to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem The balls are released from rest at a height of 5.0 at time . Using these numbers and basic kinematics, you can determine the amount of time it takes for the balls to reach the ground. ANSWER: Correct This situation, which you have dealt with before (motion under the constant acceleration of gravity), is actually a special case of projectile motion. Think of this as projectile motion where the horizontal component of the initial velocity is zero. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant nonzero acceleration. The vertical component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration, whereas the horizontal component exhibits constant-velocity motion. The vertical component exhibits constant-velocity motion, whereas the horizontal component exhibits motion with constant nonzero acceleration. Both the vertical and horizontal components exhibit motion with constant velocity. g = 10 m/s2 y = y0 + v0 t + (1/2)at2 x = x0 + v0 t m tg m/s2 m t = 0 s tg = 1.0 s Part E Imagine the ball on the left is given a nonzero initial speed in the horizontal direction, while the ball on the right continues to fall with zero initial velocity. What horizontal speed must the ball on the left start with so that it hits the ground at the same position as the ball on the right? Remember that the two balls are released, starting a horizontal distance of 3.0 apart. Express your answer in meters per second to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall from Part B that the horizontal component of velocity does not change during projectile motion. Therefore, you need to find the horizontal component of velocity such that, in a time , the ball will move horizontally 3.0 . You can assume that its initial x coordinate is . ANSWER: Correct You can adjust the horizontal speeds in this applet. Notice that regardless of what horizontal speeds you give to the balls, they continue to move vertically in the same way (i.e., they are at the same y coordinate at the same time). Problem 4.12 A ball thrown horizontally at 27 travels a horizontal distance of 49 before hitting the ground. Part A From what height was the ball thrown? Express your answer using two significant figures with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vx m vx tg = 1.0 s m x0 = 0.0 m vx = 3.0 m/s m/s m h = 16 m Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.20 The figure shows the angular-velocity-versus-time graph for a particle moving in a circle. You may want to review ( page ) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Definite Integral Part A How many revolutions does the object make during the first 3.5 ? Express your answer using two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: s n = Incorrect; Try Again Problem 4.26 To withstand “g-forces” of up to 10 g’s, caused by suddenly pulling out of a steep dive, fighter jet pilots train on a “human centrifuge.” 10 g’s is an acceleration of . Part A If the length of the centrifuge arm is 10.0 , at what speed is the rider moving when she experiences 10 g’s? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.28 Your roommate is working on his bicycle and has the bike upside down. He spins the 60.0 -diameter wheel, and you notice that a pebble stuck in the tread goes by three times every second. Part A What is the pebble’s speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct 98 m/s2 m 31.3 ms cm 5.65 ms Part B What is the pebble’s acceleration? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 4.43 On the Apollo 14 mission to the moon, astronaut Alan Shepard hit a golf ball with a 6 iron. The acceleration due to gravity on the moon is 1/6 of its value on earth. Suppose he hits the ball with a speed of 13 at an angle 50 above the horizontal. You may want to review ( pages 90 – 95) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations Part A How much farther did the ball travel on the moon than it would have on earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the golf ball, showing its starting and ending points. Choose a coordinate system, and label the origin. It is conventional to let x be the horizontal direction and y the vertical direction. What is the initial velocity in the x and y directions? What is the acceleration in the x and y directions on the moon and on the earth? What are the equations for and as a function of time, and , respectively? What is the y coordinate when the golf ball hits the ground? Can you use this information to determine the time of flight on the moon and on the earth? 107 m s2 m/s  x y x(t) y(t) Once you have the time of flight, how can you use the equation to determine the total distance traveled? Compare the distance traveled on the moon to the distance traveled on the earth . ANSWER: Correct Part B For how much more time was the ball in flight? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the equation describing as a function of time? What is the initial x component of the ball’s velocity? How are the initial x component of the ball’s velocity and the distance traveled related to the time of flight? What is the difference between the time of flight on the moon and on earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.42 In the Olympic shotput event, an athlete throws the shot with an initial speed of 12 at a 40.0 angle from the horizontal. The shot leaves her hand at a height of 1.8 above the ground. x(t) L = 85 m x(t) x t = 10 s m/s  m Part A How far does the shot travel? Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Repeat the calculation of part (a) for angles of 42.5 , 45.0 , and 47.5 . Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D x = 16.36 m    x(42.5 ) = 16.39 m x(45.0 ) = 16.31 m Express your answer to four significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part E At what angle of release does she throw the farthest? ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.44 A ball is thrown toward a cliff of height with a speed of 32 and an angle of 60 above horizontal. It lands on the edge of the cliff 3.2 later. Part A How high is the cliff? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x(47.5 ) = 16.13 m 40.0 42.5 45.0 47.5 h m/s  s h = 39 m Answer Requested Part B What was the maximum height of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the ball’s impact speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.58 A typical laboratory centrifuge rotates at 3600 . Test tubes have to be placed into a centrifuge very carefully because of the very large accelerations. Part A What is the acceleration at the end of a test tube that is 10 from the axis of rotation? Express your answer with the appropriate units. hmax = 39 m v = 16 ms rpm cm ANSWER: Correct Part B For comparison, what is the magnitude of the acceleration a test tube would experience if dropped from a height of 1.0 and stopped in a 1.7-ms-long encounter with a hard floor? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 4.62 Communications satellites are placed in a circular orbit where they stay directly over a fixed point on the equator as the earth rotates. These are called geosynchronous orbits. The radius of the earth is , and the altitude of a geosynchronous orbit is ( 22000 miles). Part A What is the speed of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct a = 1.42×104 m s2 m a = 2610 m s2 6.37 × 106m 3.58 × 107m  v = 3070 ms Part B What is the magnitude of the acceleration of a satellite in a geosynchronous orbit? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 89.5%. You received 103.82 out of a possible total of 116 points. a = 0.223 m s2

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Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms Typesetting math: 100% What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Typesetting math: 100% Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 Typesetting math: 100% block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a Typesetting math: 100% period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Typesetting math: 100% Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = s t = 0 s cm cm/s Typesetting math: 100% Incorrect; Try Again Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: 0 = g cm s Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm 0.628 s Typesetting math: 100% The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Typesetting math: 100% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? N/m cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms m L T Typesetting math: 10T0% L , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. ANSWER: T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T &2T 2T g/6 T/6 T/&6 &6T 6T Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. g ( s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz N amax = 6.6 μm Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 81.4%. You received 117.25 out of a possible total of 144 points. vmax = 41 ms

Assignment 11 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 13.2 The gravitational force of a star on orbiting planet 1 is . Planet 2, which is twice as massive as planet 1 and orbits at twice the distance from the star, experiences gravitational force . Part A What is the ratio ? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 13.3 A 1500 satellite and a 2200 satellite follow exactly the same orbit around the earth. Part A What is the ratio of the force on the first satellite to that on the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct F1 F2 F1 F2 = 2 F1 F2 kg kg F1 F2 = 0.682 F1 F2 Part B What is the ratio of the acceleration of the first satellite to that of the second satellite? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.2 The centers of a 15.0 lead ball and a 90.0 lead ball are separated by 9.00 . Part A What gravitational force does each exert on the other? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the ratio of this gravitational force to the weight of the 90.0 ball? ANSWER: a1 a2 = 1 a1 a2 kg g cm 1.11×10−8 N g 1.26×10−8 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.6 The space shuttle orbits 310 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on a 7.5 sphere inside the space shuttle? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct ± A Satellite in Orbit A satellite used in a cellular telephone network has a mass of 2310 and is in a circular orbit at a height of 650 above the surface of the earth. Part A What is the gravitational force on the satellite? Take the gravitational constant to be = 6.67×10−11 , the mass of the earth to be = 5.97×1024 , and the radius of the Earth to be = 6.38×106 . Express your answer in newtons. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Use the equation for the law of gravitation to calculate the force on the satellite. Be careful about the units when performing the calculations. km kg Fe on s = 67.0 N kg km Fgrav G N m2/kg2 me kg re m Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Law of gravitation According to Newton’s law of gravitation, , where is the gravitational constant, and are the masses of the two objects, and is the distance between the centers of mass of the two objects. Hint 3. Calculate the distance between the centers of mass What is the distance from the center of mass of the satellite to the center of mass of the earth? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B What fraction is this of the satellite’s weight at the surface of the earth? Take the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the earth to be = 9.80 . Hint 1. How to approach the problem All you need to do is to take the ratio of the gravitational force on the satellite to the weight of the satellite at ground level. There are two ways to do this, depending on how you define the force of gravity at the surface of the earth. ANSWER: F = Gm1m2/r2 G m1 m2 r r = 7.03×10r 6 m = 1.86×10Fgrav 4 N g m/s2 0.824 Typesetting math: 100% Correct Although it is easy to find the weight of the satellite using the constant acceleration due to gravity, it is instructional to consider the weight calculated using the law of gravitation: . Dividing the gravitational force on the satellite by , we find that the ratio of the forces due to the earth’s gravity is simply the square of the ratio of the earth’s radius to the sum of the earth’s radius and the height of the orbit of the satellite above the earth, . This will also be the fraction of the weight of, say, an astronaut in an orbit at the same altitude. Notice that an astronaut’s weight is never zero. When people speak of “weightlessness” in space, what they really mean is “free fall.” Problem 13.8 Part A What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the moon? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the free-fall acceleration at the surface of the Jupiter? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct w = G m/ me r2e Fgrav = Gmem/(re + h)2 w [re/(re + h)]2 gmoon = 1.62 m s2 gJupiter = 25.9 m s2 Typesetting math: 100% Enhanced EOC: Problem 13.14 A rocket is launched straight up from the earth’s surface at a speed of 1.90×104 . You may want to review ( pages 362 – 365) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Mathematical Expressions Involving Squares Part A What is its speed when it is very far away from the earth? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is conserved in this problem? What is the rocket’s initial kinetic energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? What is the rocket’s initial gravitational potential energy in terms of its unknown mass, ? When the rocket is very far away from the Earth, what is its gravitational potential energy? Using conservation of energy, what is the rocket’s kinetic energy when it is very far away from the Earth? Therefore, what is the rocket’s velocity when it is very far away from the Earth? ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.13 Part A m/s m m 1.54×104 ms Typesetting math: 100% What is the escape speed from Venus? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.17 The asteroid belt circles the sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. One asteroid has a period of 4.2 earth years. Part A What is the asteroid’s orbital radius? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the asteroid’s orbital speed? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: vescape = 10.4 km s = 3.89×1011 R m = 1.85×104 v ms Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 13.32 Part A At what height above the earth is the acceleration due to gravity 15.0% of its value at the surface? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the speed of a satellite orbiting at that height? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 13.36 Two meteoroids are heading for earth. Their speeds as they cross the moon’s orbit are 2 . 1.01×107 m 4920 ms km/s Typesetting math: 100% Part A The first meteoroid is heading straight for earth. What is its speed of impact? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The second misses the earth by 5500 . What is its speed at its closest point? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.2 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates between the 11.0 mark and the 67.0 mark on the track. The glider completes 11.0 oscillations in 32.0 . Part A What is the period of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. v1 = 11.3 km s km v2 = cm cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the amplitude? Express your answer with the appropriate units. 2.91 s 0.344 Hz 2.16 rad s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part E What is the maximum speed of the glider? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Good Vibes: Introduction to Oscillations Learning Goal: To learn the basic terminology and relationships among the main characteristics of simple harmonic motion. Motion that repeats itself over and over is called periodic motion. There are many examples of periodic motion: the earth revolving around the sun, an elastic ball bouncing up and down, or a block attached to a spring oscillating back and forth. The last example differs from the first two, in that it represents a special kind of periodic motion called simple harmonic motion. The conditions that lead to simple harmonic motion are as follows: There must be a position of stable equilibrium. There must be a restoring force acting on the oscillating object. The direction of this force must always point toward the equilibrium, and its magnitude must be directly proportional to the magnitude of the object’s displacement from its equilibrium position. Mathematically, the restoring force is given by , where is the displacement from equilibrium and is a constant that depends on the properties of the oscillating system. The resistive forces in the system must be reasonably small. In this problem, we will introduce some of the basic quantities that describe oscillations and the relationships among them. Consider a block of mass attached to a spring with force constant , as shown in the figure. The spring can be either stretched or compressed. The block slides on a frictionless horizontal surface, as shown. When the spring is relaxed, the block is located at . If the 28.0 cm 60.5 cms F  F = −kx x k m k x = 0 Typesetting math: 100% block is pulled to the right a distance and then released, will be the amplitude of the resulting oscillations. Assume that the mechanical energy of the block-spring system remains unchanged in the subsequent motion of the block. Part A After the block is released from , it will ANSWER: Correct As the block begins its motion to the left, it accelerates. Although the restoring force decreases as the block approaches equilibrium, it still pulls the block to the left, so by the time the equilibrium position is reached, the block has gained some speed. It will, therefore, pass the equilibrium position and keep moving, compressing the spring. The spring will now be pushing the block to the right, and the block will slow down, temporarily coming to rest at . After is reached, the block will begin its motion to the right, pushed by the spring. The block will pass the equilibrium position and continue until it reaches , completing one cycle of motion. The motion will then repeat; if, as we’ve assumed, there is no friction, the motion will repeat indefinitely. The time it takes the block to complete one cycle is called the period. Usually, the period is denoted and is measured in seconds. The frequency, denoted , is the number of cycles that are completed per unit of time: . In SI units, is measured in inverse seconds, or hertz ( ). A A x = A remain at rest. move to the left until it reaches equilibrium and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and stop there. move to the left until it reaches and then begin to move to the right. x = −A x = −A x = −A x = −A x = A T f f = 1/T f Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part B If the period is doubled, the frequency is ANSWER: Correct Part C An oscillating object takes 0.10 to complete one cycle; that is, its period is 0.10 . What is its frequency ? Express your answer in hertz. ANSWER: Correct unchanged. doubled. halved. s s f f = 10 Hz Typesetting math: 100% Part D If the frequency is 40 , what is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct The following questions refer to the figure that graphically depicts the oscillations of the block on the spring. Note that the vertical axis represents the x coordinate of the oscillating object, and the horizontal axis represents time. Part E Which points on the x axis are located a distance from the equilibrium position? ANSWER: Hz T T = 0.025 s A Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part F Suppose that the period is . Which of the following points on the t axis are separated by the time interval ? ANSWER: Correct Now assume for the remaining Parts G – J, that the x coordinate of point R is 0.12 and the t coordinate of point K is 0.0050 . Part G What is the period ? Express your answer in seconds. Hint 1. How to approach the problem In moving from the point to the point K, what fraction of a full wavelength is covered? Call that fraction . Then you can set . Dividing by the fraction will give the R only Q only both R and Q T T K and L K and M K and P L and N M and P m s T t = 0 a aT = 0.005 s a Typesetting math: 100% period . ANSWER: Correct Part H How much time does the block take to travel from the point of maximum displacement to the opposite point of maximum displacement? Express your answer in seconds. ANSWER: Correct Part I What distance does the object cover during one period of oscillation? Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Part J What distance does the object cover between the moments labeled K and N on the graph? T T = 0.02 s t t = 0.01 s d d = 0.48 m d Typesetting math: 100% Express your answer in meters. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.4 Part A What is the amplitude of the oscillation shown in the figure? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct d = 0.36 m A = 20.0 cm Typesetting math: 100% Part B What is the frequency of this oscillation? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the phase constant? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Problem 14.10 An air-track glider attached to a spring oscillates with a period of 1.50 . At the glider is 4.60 left of the equilibrium position and moving to the right at 33.4 . Part A What is the phase constant? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: f = 0.25 Hz 0 = s t = 0 s cm cm/s Typesetting math: 100% Incorrect; Try Again Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 14.12 A 140 air-track glider is attached to a spring. The glider is pushed in 12.2 and released. A student with a stopwatch finds that 14.0 oscillations take 19.0 . Part A What is the spring constant? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: 0 = g cm s Typesetting math: 100% Correct Problem 14.14 The position of a 50 g oscillating mass is given by , where is in s. If necessary, round your answers to three significant figures. Determine: Part A The amplitude. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B The period. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C 3.00 Nm x(t) = (2.0 cm)cos(10t − /4) t 2.00 cm 0.628 s Typesetting math: 100% The spring constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part D The phase constant. Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part G Typesetting math: 100% This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part H This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part I This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Enhanced EOC: Problem 14.17 A spring with spring constant 16 hangs from the ceiling. A ball is attached to the spring and allowed to come to rest. It is then pulled down 4.0 and released. The ball makes 35 oscillations in 18 seconds. You may want to review ( pages 389 – 391) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Trigonometric Functions Part A What is its the mass of the ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the period of oscillation? What is the angular frequency of the oscillations? How is the angular frequency related to the mass and spring constant? What is the mass? N/m cm s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part B What is its maximum speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem What is the amplitude of the oscillations? How is the maximum speed related to the amplitude of the oscillations and the angular frequency? ANSWER: Correct Changing the Period of a Pendulum A simple pendulum consisting of a bob of mass attached to a string of length swings with a period . Part A If the bob’s mass is doubled, approximately what will the pendulum’s new period be? Hint 1. Period of a simple pendulum The period of a simple pendulum of length is given by m = 110 g vmax = 49 cms m L T Typesetting math: 10T0% L , where is the acceleration due to gravity. ANSWER: Correct Part B If the pendulum is brought on the moon where the gravitational acceleration is about , approximately what will its period now be? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall the formula of the period of a simple pendulum. Since the gravitational acceleration appears in the denominator, the period must increase when the gravitational acceleration decreases. ANSWER: T = 2 Lg −−  g T/2 T &2T 2T g/6 T/6 T/&6 &6T 6T Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part C If the pendulum is taken into the orbiting space station what will happen to the bob? Hint 1. How to approach the problem Recall that the oscillations of a simple pendulum occur when a pendulum bob is raised above its equilibrium position and let go, causing the pendulum bob to fall. The gravitational force acts to bring the bob back to its equilibrium position. In the space station, the earth’s gravity acts on both the station and everything inside it, giving them the same acceleration. These objects are said to be in free fall. ANSWER: Correct In the space station, where all objects undergo the same acceleration due to the earth’s gravity, the tension in the string is zero and the bob does not fall relative to the point to which the string is attached. Problem 14.20 A 175 ball is tied to a string. It is pulled to an angle of 8.0 and released to swing as a pendulum. A student with a stopwatch finds that 15 oscillations take 13 . Part A How long is the string? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. It will continue to oscillate in a vertical plane with the same period. It will no longer oscillate because there is no gravity in space. It will no longer oscillate because both the pendulum and the point to which it is attached are in free fall. It will oscillate much faster with a period that approaches zero. g ( s Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.22 Part A What is the length of a pendulum whose period on the moon matches the period of a 2.1- -long pendulum on the earth? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 14.42 An ultrasonic transducer, of the type used in medical ultrasound imaging, is a very thin disk ( = 0.17 ) driven back and forth in SHM at by an electromagnetic coil. Part A The maximum restoring force that can be applied to the disk without breaking it is 4.4×104 . What is the maximum oscillation amplitude that won’t rupture the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: L = 19 cm m lmoon = 0.35 m m g 1.0 MHz N amax = 6.6 μm Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B What is the disk’s maximum speed at this amplitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 81.4%. You received 117.25 out of a possible total of 144 points. vmax = 41 ms

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Critical Essay Guidelines FORMAT: Prepare your paper as a Microsoft Word file. Single-space the body of your paper; you may double-space between the headings (Introduction, Background Explanation and Critical Evaluation) described below. Use 1” margins on all sides. Use a font that is no larger than Times New Roman at 12 pt. and no smaller than Times New Roman at 10 pt. Put your name, course name, section and the date in a header on top of all pages. Include page numbers. LENGTH, TOPIC, ETC.: Write a 2 – 3 page (single-spaced) (1500 words) critical response on your topic. Back up your discussion with direct quotation from the relevant text, preferably short quotes, such as single sentences and (even better) crucial phrases. Leave out words or phrases using…ellipses…, etc. Less than 1/4 page total of your paper should be direct quotation. Cite any direct quotes simply by giving text title and page number in parentheses; the page number will either be from the textbook or what’s posted on Blackboard. For example, such a citation might look like: (Schoedinger, 25). Include a “Works Cited” page at the end of your paper citing the primary philosophic text from Schoedinger’s textbook. No other sources should be used. Treat your intended audience as someone who has some familiarity with philosophy generally, but no familiarity with the details of what you are writing on. STRUCTURE: In this critical response, you will do all and only the following three things, putting each under its OWN SECTION HEADING: A. INTRODUCTION Begin with a one-sentence introductory paragraph where you very briefly say what you will be doing in the rest of the critical response, one which has the exact form: “In this critical response, I will consider <insert chosen topic>, and then I will argue that <insert statement of main thesis>.” For example: “In this critical response, I will consider Socrates’ views on a worthwhile life, and then I will argue that the worthwhile life is nothing more or less than the life of pleasure.” B. BACKGROUND EXPLANATION Explain (in one-half to 1 page), as clearly as you can, the background to your chosen topic, including any relevant discussion in the text, and also including any relevant theories, arguments, objections, crucial notions and distinctions, etc. C. CRITICAL EVALUATION Critically evaluate (in 1½ – 2 pages) your chosen topic. This involves explaining and defending your thesis on the topic. In doing this, address relevant material from your “ Background Explanation” section. Also, you are encouraged (but not required) to anticipate potential objections and reply to them. Throughout your critical evaluation, pay careful attention (even if just informally) to the criteria of a good argument. This applies both when you are considering others’ arguments and when you are giving your own. GRADING: Grading will be based partly on whether or not you have successfully followed the instructions above (including the format requirements). Each defect in terms of failure to satisfy the instructions will cost you points. Any paper which completely ignores all instructions, however, will receive a zero. Barring prior consent from me or documented and sufficiently excusing special contingency, late papers will be graded in accord with the late policy on the syllabus. Grading will also be based on the writing quality. Here I have in mind things like: is the paper clear, concise, grammatical and accurate? Does it provide necessary explanations and avoid irrelevant material?

Critical Essay Guidelines FORMAT: Prepare your paper as a Microsoft Word file. Single-space the body of your paper; you may double-space between the headings (Introduction, Background Explanation and Critical Evaluation) described below. Use 1” margins on all sides. Use a font that is no larger than Times New Roman at 12 pt. and no smaller than Times New Roman at 10 pt. Put your name, course name, section and the date in a header on top of all pages. Include page numbers. LENGTH, TOPIC, ETC.: Write a 2 – 3 page (single-spaced) (1500 words) critical response on your topic. Back up your discussion with direct quotation from the relevant text, preferably short quotes, such as single sentences and (even better) crucial phrases. Leave out words or phrases using…ellipses…, etc. Less than 1/4 page total of your paper should be direct quotation. Cite any direct quotes simply by giving text title and page number in parentheses; the page number will either be from the textbook or what’s posted on Blackboard. For example, such a citation might look like: (Schoedinger, 25). Include a “Works Cited” page at the end of your paper citing the primary philosophic text from Schoedinger’s textbook. No other sources should be used. Treat your intended audience as someone who has some familiarity with philosophy generally, but no familiarity with the details of what you are writing on. STRUCTURE: In this critical response, you will do all and only the following three things, putting each under its OWN SECTION HEADING: A. INTRODUCTION Begin with a one-sentence introductory paragraph where you very briefly say what you will be doing in the rest of the critical response, one which has the exact form: “In this critical response, I will consider , and then I will argue that .” For example: “In this critical response, I will consider Socrates’ views on a worthwhile life, and then I will argue that the worthwhile life is nothing more or less than the life of pleasure.” B. BACKGROUND EXPLANATION Explain (in one-half to 1 page), as clearly as you can, the background to your chosen topic, including any relevant discussion in the text, and also including any relevant theories, arguments, objections, crucial notions and distinctions, etc. C. CRITICAL EVALUATION Critically evaluate (in 1½ – 2 pages) your chosen topic. This involves explaining and defending your thesis on the topic. In doing this, address relevant material from your “ Background Explanation” section. Also, you are encouraged (but not required) to anticipate potential objections and reply to them. Throughout your critical evaluation, pay careful attention (even if just informally) to the criteria of a good argument. This applies both when you are considering others’ arguments and when you are giving your own. GRADING: Grading will be based partly on whether or not you have successfully followed the instructions above (including the format requirements). Each defect in terms of failure to satisfy the instructions will cost you points. Any paper which completely ignores all instructions, however, will receive a zero. Barring prior consent from me or documented and sufficiently excusing special contingency, late papers will be graded in accord with the late policy on the syllabus. Grading will also be based on the writing quality. Here I have in mind things like: is the paper clear, concise, grammatical and accurate? Does it provide necessary explanations and avoid irrelevant material?

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Greek Philosophies Wiki Each person has been assigned a philosophy. Tell us who were the most well-known proponents of the idea. Tell us when and where it originated. Then tell us what the basic ideas of the philosophy were. Also tell us how the ideas were received by the rest of society. Then tell us your personal view of these ideas. Do you agree in any way with the ideas of this philosophy? Might you have participated in this philosophy if you were alive in Hellenistic society? Is there any modern insight we can glean from these ideas? Should we embrace this philosophy today? Cynicism Skepticism Stoicism Epicureanism

Greek Philosophies Wiki Each person has been assigned a philosophy. Tell us who were the most well-known proponents of the idea. Tell us when and where it originated. Then tell us what the basic ideas of the philosophy were. Also tell us how the ideas were received by the rest of society. Then tell us your personal view of these ideas. Do you agree in any way with the ideas of this philosophy? Might you have participated in this philosophy if you were alive in Hellenistic society? Is there any modern insight we can glean from these ideas? Should we embrace this philosophy today? Cynicism Skepticism Stoicism Epicureanism

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