ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

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Name: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬________________________________ HIST 2070 Reading Questions: Chapter 19, Source Reading Directions: Answer the following questions that pertain to chapter 19 and the Yangzhou Massacre source reading. Reading questions are due by 9:45a on Wednesday, September 16, 2015. Late submissions will not be accepted. Reading questions: 1. What were the sources of Spanish power in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Why was Spain unable to sustain its supremacy in Europe? 2. What were the strengths and weaknesses in the Ottoman and Safavid empires? What role did religion play in the Ottoman and Safavid empires? 3. Why were the Manchus able to conquer China? What significance did the Yangzhou massacre (source reading) play in this conquest? How did some people survive the massacre? What were some actions taken by Manchu soldiers? 4. How did the early Qing dynasty attempt to unite China? 5. In what ways did Japanese society change in the change in the seventeenth century? 6. How did slave communities in the Americas create autonomous institutions? 7. How did the slave trade affect African stated during this period?

Name: ¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬¬________________________________ HIST 2070 Reading Questions: Chapter 19, Source Reading Directions: Answer the following questions that pertain to chapter 19 and the Yangzhou Massacre source reading. Reading questions are due by 9:45a on Wednesday, September 16, 2015. Late submissions will not be accepted. Reading questions: 1. What were the sources of Spanish power in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Why was Spain unable to sustain its supremacy in Europe? 2. What were the strengths and weaknesses in the Ottoman and Safavid empires? What role did religion play in the Ottoman and Safavid empires? 3. Why were the Manchus able to conquer China? What significance did the Yangzhou massacre (source reading) play in this conquest? How did some people survive the massacre? What were some actions taken by Manchu soldiers? 4. How did the early Qing dynasty attempt to unite China? 5. In what ways did Japanese society change in the change in the seventeenth century? 6. How did slave communities in the Americas create autonomous institutions? 7. How did the slave trade affect African stated during this period?

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English 1 Professor Nielsen Essay One Topic and Guidelines The Context You are a non-profit organization Director of Fundraising, and your goal is to convince a wealthy individual to make a substantial donation to your cause. Choose from one of the following projects derived from the social issues from the course readings below: 1. The Prison Project: Reducing the incarceration rate and numbers in the U.S. 2. Birth Control Advocacy and Access: Supporting a birth control education and free product distribution in the U.S and/or internationally. 3. LGBT Advocacy: Funding education, campaigning, and lobbying for LGBT rights in the U.S. 4. Equality in Education: Supporting funding and scholarships for schools and individuals from less advantaged populations. 5. Migrant Welfare and Protection: Creating safe housing, food, and education for refugees. 6. Something else related to social justice?????? (See me if you have your own project idea). (animal welfare, women’s advocacy, housing, student loans and tuition affordability, etc.) Make a case for a donation of $2 million dollars to your cause by writing a funding request letter to the potential donor. This request is essentially a persuasive essay designed to convince your reader to support your cause. Below is a suggested format for organizing your letter, as well as guidelines for your work. I. The Basics Due: Tuesday, September 29, at Start of Class (Rough Draft). And Tuesday, October 6, at Start of Class (Final Draft) Length: 3-4 Pgs., double spaced in the correct format (see sample paper format template at the end of this document for format.) Font: Times New Roman, 12PT. Margins: 1 inch all around. See sample format at the end of this document for further formatting information. You are required to submit using this format. Check the sample on page five of this document carefully. Editing: Be sure to use the proofreading guide. In particular, avoid the big five errors. Revising: Read over your draft carefully several times. We will work toward revision together in class, but you will also need to revise on your own. Visit the Learning center if you need extra support. II. Organization and Content (Sample Outline Follows.) Use an organized format for your essay. The best way to ensure strong organization is to map out a plan for the content of your essay, using an outline, clustering, or other graphic representation of your key ideas. One potential format follows. Sample Method of Organizing Your Funding Letter: A. The Opening Paragraph 1. Start with some brief striking details to provide the initial background to your letter: facts, figures, brief description of one aspect of the problem- something compelling. 2. End your paragraph with a statement that briefly announces/introduces your organization without yet going into detail about your mission. State that you are requesting a donation and that your letter will describe the need for this donation. (Your Thesis) B. Body of the Letter: The Problem Make a stronger case for the problem your organization seeks to address by describing several aspects of it, using examples and details, as well as quotes from relevant class readings (be sure to cite these correctly). C. Body of the Letter: What Your Organization Will Do Describe some points of actions your group will take and ways that you will spend donor funds to address aspects of the problem you have already described. Choose three to five specific courses of action. Do not make these two extensive. They should be manageable and practical. D. Your Summary and Conclusion: Asking for Money 1. Briefly restate the problem and your organization’s goals using new wording when possible. 2. Connect the funds you need to your organization’s goals 3. Make your request for money. 4. End with a final compelling statement of why the donor should give. III. Strategies and Guidelines 1. Use the writing process steps to help you through your letter. 2. Use the proofreading guide to help you edit and the Learning Center on campus for support. 5. Cite all quotes with the author and page number. Create a works cited page at the end of your essay for the works you discuss. (See the MLA guide and sample student essays in your textbook for examples and step-by-step help with MLA. You may also pick up a guide at the campus writing center and ask them for extra help.) 6. This is NOT a research essay. Most background information should come from common knowledge, your own prior knowledge and experience, and the readings from class/the text. However, you may choose to include up one additional research source if necessary, provided this is a reliable source that you can cite correctly. Please visit OWL at Purdue University for a complete MLA citation guide. You text also has a chapter on MLA citation. 7. Follow the correct essay format for font, spacing, margins, heading, etc. (SEE sample in this document.) IV. Formatting: You are required to format your essay in the way that follows to receive full credit. • Page number in upper right-hand corner (Use “Insert” and “Pg. #”) • Times New Roman 12 Pt. font • Heading in left corner with title, student name, essay 1 (or 2, etc.), Eng 2, and date • Heading is single spaced • Skip two lines to start typing body of text • Body of text is double spaced • Margins remain at 1 inch all around. • DO NOT skip lines between paragraphs • Indent each paragraph five lines • Use MLA format for citation Continue to the next page for format sample. Title of Your Campaign Project (Choose something compelling.) Student Name Essay 1 English 1 Date Dear _______, Start typing your essay here, two lines down from heading. The body of your essay is double spaced, but the heading is only single spaced. Note the page number in the upper right-hand corner. Note the exact content of the heading. There is no title page for short essays, nor is there a title across the top. For short essays of just a few pages, this format is standard. The title goes at the top of the heading. All words in the title are capitalized except pronouns, prepositions, and articles. Do not make your margins greater that one inch. Make sure you use Times New Roman 12 Point font. Do not include graphics or images of any kind in most essays for this class (see me if you think you have an exception). When you reach the end of your paragraph, just hit return and continue typing. Do not skip lines between your paragraphs or over-indent your paragraphs; indent only five lines as marked in the ruler. Do not attempt to write less for your essay by enlarging the font, margins, or spacing. This paragraph demonstrates a good length for an introduction. You next paragraph should start here. This is the way your essay should look. You may use this template to help you format your essay by saving it to your desktop and keeping the settings. You will, of course, have two to three pages when you finish, but this is what the first page would look like roughly. If you include a quote, be sure to cite the author and page number and to include a works cited page at the end of your essay.

English 1 Professor Nielsen Essay One Topic and Guidelines The Context You are a non-profit organization Director of Fundraising, and your goal is to convince a wealthy individual to make a substantial donation to your cause. Choose from one of the following projects derived from the social issues from the course readings below: 1. The Prison Project: Reducing the incarceration rate and numbers in the U.S. 2. Birth Control Advocacy and Access: Supporting a birth control education and free product distribution in the U.S and/or internationally. 3. LGBT Advocacy: Funding education, campaigning, and lobbying for LGBT rights in the U.S. 4. Equality in Education: Supporting funding and scholarships for schools and individuals from less advantaged populations. 5. Migrant Welfare and Protection: Creating safe housing, food, and education for refugees. 6. Something else related to social justice?????? (See me if you have your own project idea). (animal welfare, women’s advocacy, housing, student loans and tuition affordability, etc.) Make a case for a donation of $2 million dollars to your cause by writing a funding request letter to the potential donor. This request is essentially a persuasive essay designed to convince your reader to support your cause. Below is a suggested format for organizing your letter, as well as guidelines for your work. I. The Basics Due: Tuesday, September 29, at Start of Class (Rough Draft). And Tuesday, October 6, at Start of Class (Final Draft) Length: 3-4 Pgs., double spaced in the correct format (see sample paper format template at the end of this document for format.) Font: Times New Roman, 12PT. Margins: 1 inch all around. See sample format at the end of this document for further formatting information. You are required to submit using this format. Check the sample on page five of this document carefully. Editing: Be sure to use the proofreading guide. In particular, avoid the big five errors. Revising: Read over your draft carefully several times. We will work toward revision together in class, but you will also need to revise on your own. Visit the Learning center if you need extra support. II. Organization and Content (Sample Outline Follows.) Use an organized format for your essay. The best way to ensure strong organization is to map out a plan for the content of your essay, using an outline, clustering, or other graphic representation of your key ideas. One potential format follows. Sample Method of Organizing Your Funding Letter: A. The Opening Paragraph 1. Start with some brief striking details to provide the initial background to your letter: facts, figures, brief description of one aspect of the problem- something compelling. 2. End your paragraph with a statement that briefly announces/introduces your organization without yet going into detail about your mission. State that you are requesting a donation and that your letter will describe the need for this donation. (Your Thesis) B. Body of the Letter: The Problem Make a stronger case for the problem your organization seeks to address by describing several aspects of it, using examples and details, as well as quotes from relevant class readings (be sure to cite these correctly). C. Body of the Letter: What Your Organization Will Do Describe some points of actions your group will take and ways that you will spend donor funds to address aspects of the problem you have already described. Choose three to five specific courses of action. Do not make these two extensive. They should be manageable and practical. D. Your Summary and Conclusion: Asking for Money 1. Briefly restate the problem and your organization’s goals using new wording when possible. 2. Connect the funds you need to your organization’s goals 3. Make your request for money. 4. End with a final compelling statement of why the donor should give. III. Strategies and Guidelines 1. Use the writing process steps to help you through your letter. 2. Use the proofreading guide to help you edit and the Learning Center on campus for support. 5. Cite all quotes with the author and page number. Create a works cited page at the end of your essay for the works you discuss. (See the MLA guide and sample student essays in your textbook for examples and step-by-step help with MLA. You may also pick up a guide at the campus writing center and ask them for extra help.) 6. This is NOT a research essay. Most background information should come from common knowledge, your own prior knowledge and experience, and the readings from class/the text. However, you may choose to include up one additional research source if necessary, provided this is a reliable source that you can cite correctly. Please visit OWL at Purdue University for a complete MLA citation guide. You text also has a chapter on MLA citation. 7. Follow the correct essay format for font, spacing, margins, heading, etc. (SEE sample in this document.) IV. Formatting: You are required to format your essay in the way that follows to receive full credit. • Page number in upper right-hand corner (Use “Insert” and “Pg. #”) • Times New Roman 12 Pt. font • Heading in left corner with title, student name, essay 1 (or 2, etc.), Eng 2, and date • Heading is single spaced • Skip two lines to start typing body of text • Body of text is double spaced • Margins remain at 1 inch all around. • DO NOT skip lines between paragraphs • Indent each paragraph five lines • Use MLA format for citation Continue to the next page for format sample. Title of Your Campaign Project (Choose something compelling.) Student Name Essay 1 English 1 Date Dear _______, Start typing your essay here, two lines down from heading. The body of your essay is double spaced, but the heading is only single spaced. Note the page number in the upper right-hand corner. Note the exact content of the heading. There is no title page for short essays, nor is there a title across the top. For short essays of just a few pages, this format is standard. The title goes at the top of the heading. All words in the title are capitalized except pronouns, prepositions, and articles. Do not make your margins greater that one inch. Make sure you use Times New Roman 12 Point font. Do not include graphics or images of any kind in most essays for this class (see me if you think you have an exception). When you reach the end of your paragraph, just hit return and continue typing. Do not skip lines between your paragraphs or over-indent your paragraphs; indent only five lines as marked in the ruler. Do not attempt to write less for your essay by enlarging the font, margins, or spacing. This paragraph demonstrates a good length for an introduction. You next paragraph should start here. This is the way your essay should look. You may use this template to help you format your essay by saving it to your desktop and keeping the settings. You will, of course, have two to three pages when you finish, but this is what the first page would look like roughly. If you include a quote, be sure to cite the author and page number and to include a works cited page at the end of your essay.

AERN 45350 Avionics Name: _______________________________ 1 | P a g e Homework Set One (40 Points) Due: 25 September 2015 General Instructions: Answer the following questions, submitting your answers on Blackboard. SHOW YOUR WORK on any math problems. Consider the following voltage signal: V t 12sin377t 1. What is the peak voltage of the signal [Volts]? 2. What is the angular frequency [rad/sec]? 3. What is the frequency of the signal [Hz]? 4. What is the period of the signal [sec/cycle]? In a heterodyne receiver, the intermediate frequency of the receiver is 21.4 MHz. 5. What is the local oscillator frequency (f1) if the tuned frequency (f2) is 120.9 MHz? 6. If the local oscillator frequency (f1) is 145.7 MHz, what is the tuned frequency (f2)? The gain of a power amplifier is 5. 7. If 30W are coming in, what is the power going out? 8. What is the gain in decibels (dB)? The attenuation of a voltage attenuator is 10. 9. If 120V are coming in, what is the voltage going out? 10. What is the loss in decibels (dB)? 11. What is the component of the ILS that provides the extended centerline of the runway? 12. What is the component of the ILS that provides vertical guidance to the runway? 13. If the aircraft is on the correct trajectory, the airplane will arrive at the outer marker on the ILS corresponding to intercepting what? 14. If the aircraft is on the correct trajectory, the airplane will arrive at the middle marker on the ILS corresponding to reaching what? 15. All marker beacons transmit at what frequency? 16. Why doesn’t this cause problems (all marker beacons transmitting on the same frequency)? 17. What are the four components to an ILS? 18. What is the most common ILS category? 19. Which ILS category requires aircraft with the “auto-land” feature? 20. An attenuator leads to a power ratio of 0.5. What is that in decibels (dB)?

AERN 45350 Avionics Name: _______________________________ 1 | P a g e Homework Set One (40 Points) Due: 25 September 2015 General Instructions: Answer the following questions, submitting your answers on Blackboard. SHOW YOUR WORK on any math problems. Consider the following voltage signal: V t 12sin377t 1. What is the peak voltage of the signal [Volts]? 2. What is the angular frequency [rad/sec]? 3. What is the frequency of the signal [Hz]? 4. What is the period of the signal [sec/cycle]? In a heterodyne receiver, the intermediate frequency of the receiver is 21.4 MHz. 5. What is the local oscillator frequency (f1) if the tuned frequency (f2) is 120.9 MHz? 6. If the local oscillator frequency (f1) is 145.7 MHz, what is the tuned frequency (f2)? The gain of a power amplifier is 5. 7. If 30W are coming in, what is the power going out? 8. What is the gain in decibels (dB)? The attenuation of a voltage attenuator is 10. 9. If 120V are coming in, what is the voltage going out? 10. What is the loss in decibels (dB)? 11. What is the component of the ILS that provides the extended centerline of the runway? 12. What is the component of the ILS that provides vertical guidance to the runway? 13. If the aircraft is on the correct trajectory, the airplane will arrive at the outer marker on the ILS corresponding to intercepting what? 14. If the aircraft is on the correct trajectory, the airplane will arrive at the middle marker on the ILS corresponding to reaching what? 15. All marker beacons transmit at what frequency? 16. Why doesn’t this cause problems (all marker beacons transmitting on the same frequency)? 17. What are the four components to an ILS? 18. What is the most common ILS category? 19. Which ILS category requires aircraft with the “auto-land” feature? 20. An attenuator leads to a power ratio of 0.5. What is that in decibels (dB)?

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RMU Professional Workplace Communication/Talerico Questions for LA Reading 1: “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198 Please read the two articles—“Simplicity” and “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences, typed and double-spaced (every line); use 12-point type. The answers are due in class on Tuesday, September 8, when we will discuss them. “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 1. What document or set of instructions have you read that you found wordy and difficult to read? How did you handle the situation? 2. What does Zinsser mean when he writes, “Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important” (201)? Why is writing often like this? 3. What does the author say is the secret of good writing? Why is this secret important? 4. How can we, according to Zinsser, write clearly and simply? 5. Why is clear writing so important to today’s readers? 6. What two questions must the writer always ask? How might asking these questions during your writing—and when you are finished writing—improve your drafts? “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198.
 7. Murray lists many qualities of professional writers. What are three of them? 8. Why would science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury put away for one year a manuscript he has written, and then reread it “as a stranger” (195)? What would be the value of this? 9. For each of the following quotes by professional writers, write one sentence that summarizes the main point the writer is making: a) Nancy Hale: A writer “should be critical of everything that seems to him most delightful in his style. He should excise what he most admires because he wouldn’t thus admire it if he weren’t…in a sense protecting it from criticism” (195). b) John Ciardi: “The last act of the writing must be to become one’s own reader. It is, I suppose, a schizophrenic process, to begin passionately and to end critically, to begin hot and to end cold; and more important to be passion-hot and critic-cold at the same time” (195) c) Eleanor Estes: “The writer must survey his work critically, coolly, as though he were a stranger to it. He must be willing to prune, expertly and hard-heartedly. At the end of each revision, a manuscript may look…worked over, torn apart, pinned together, added to, deleted from, words changed and words changed back. Yet the book must maintain its orginal freshness and spontaneity” (195). d) Roald Dahl: “Good writing is essentially rewriting” (196). 10. Why do most readers, as Murray states, “underestimate the amount of rewriting it usually takes to produce spontaneous reading” (195)? Do you fit into this category? 11. List the 8 things the author says writers look for in creating their drafts. For each item on your list, write one sentence explaining what it means. 12. What are some of the things Murray says writers begin to learn by writing? Have you ever experienced any of these things when you were writing? Explain your answer. 13. What does Murray means when he states, “A piece of writing is never finished” (198)?

RMU Professional Workplace Communication/Talerico Questions for LA Reading 1: “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198 Please read the two articles—“Simplicity” and “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts.” Then, answer the following questions in complete sentences, typed and double-spaced (every line); use 12-point type. The answers are due in class on Tuesday, September 8, when we will discuss them. “Simplicity,” William Zinsser, 201-206 1. What document or set of instructions have you read that you found wordy and difficult to read? How did you handle the situation? 2. What does Zinsser mean when he writes, “Our national tendency is to inflate and thereby sound important” (201)? Why is writing often like this? 3. What does the author say is the secret of good writing? Why is this secret important? 4. How can we, according to Zinsser, write clearly and simply? 5. Why is clear writing so important to today’s readers? 6. What two questions must the writer always ask? How might asking these questions during your writing—and when you are finished writing—improve your drafts? “The Maker’s Eye: Revising Your Own Manuscripts,” Donald M. Murray, 194-198.
 7. Murray lists many qualities of professional writers. What are three of them? 8. Why would science-fiction writer Ray Bradbury put away for one year a manuscript he has written, and then reread it “as a stranger” (195)? What would be the value of this? 9. For each of the following quotes by professional writers, write one sentence that summarizes the main point the writer is making: a) Nancy Hale: A writer “should be critical of everything that seems to him most delightful in his style. He should excise what he most admires because he wouldn’t thus admire it if he weren’t…in a sense protecting it from criticism” (195). b) John Ciardi: “The last act of the writing must be to become one’s own reader. It is, I suppose, a schizophrenic process, to begin passionately and to end critically, to begin hot and to end cold; and more important to be passion-hot and critic-cold at the same time” (195) c) Eleanor Estes: “The writer must survey his work critically, coolly, as though he were a stranger to it. He must be willing to prune, expertly and hard-heartedly. At the end of each revision, a manuscript may look…worked over, torn apart, pinned together, added to, deleted from, words changed and words changed back. Yet the book must maintain its orginal freshness and spontaneity” (195). d) Roald Dahl: “Good writing is essentially rewriting” (196). 10. Why do most readers, as Murray states, “underestimate the amount of rewriting it usually takes to produce spontaneous reading” (195)? Do you fit into this category? 11. List the 8 things the author says writers look for in creating their drafts. For each item on your list, write one sentence explaining what it means. 12. What are some of the things Murray says writers begin to learn by writing? Have you ever experienced any of these things when you were writing? Explain your answer. 13. What does Murray means when he states, “A piece of writing is never finished” (198)?

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