AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Individual Written Assignment #1 Medical Ethics: Historical names, dates and ethical theories assignment As you read chapters 1 and 2 in the “Ethics and Basic Law for Medical Imaging Professionals” textbook you will be responsible for identifying and explaining each of the following items from the list below. You will respond in paragraph format with correct spelling and grammar expected for each paragraph. Feel free to have more than one paragraph for each item, although in most instances a single paragraph response is sufficient. If you reference material in addition to what is available in the textbook it must be appropriately cited in your work using either APA or MLA including a references cited page. The use of Wikipedia.com is not a recognized peer reviewed source so please do not use that as a reference. When responding about individuals it is necessary to indicate a year or time period that the person discussed/developed their particular ethical theory so that you can look at and appreciate the historical background to the development of ethical theories and decision making. Respond to the following sixteen items. (They are in random order from your reading) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Isaac Newton 3. Prima Facie Duties – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 4. Hippocrates 5. W.D. Ross – what do the initials stand for in his name and what was his contribution to the study of ethics? 6. Microallocation – define the term and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as microallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 7. Deontology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 8. Thomas Aquinas – 1) Discuss the ethical theory developed by Aquinas, 2) his religious affiliation, 3) why that was so important to his ethical premise and 4) discuss the type of ethical issues resolved to this day using this theory. 9. Macroallocation – define and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as macroallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 10. David Hume 11. Rodericus Castro 12. Plato and “The Republic” 13. Pythagoras 14. Teleology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 15. Core Values – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 16. Develop a timeline that reflects the ethical theories as developed by the INDIVIDUALS presented in this assignment. This assignment is due Saturday March 14th at NOON and is graded as a homework assignment. Grading: Paragraph Formation = 20% of grade (bulleted lists are acceptable for some answers) Answers inclusive of major material for answer = 40% of grade Creation of Timeline = 10% of grade Sentence structure, application of correct spelling and grammar = 20% of grade References (if utilized) = 10% of grade; references should be submitted on a separate references cited page. Otherwise this 10% of the assignment grade will be considered under the sentence structure component for 30% of the grade. It is expected that the finished assignment will be two – three pages of text, double spaced, using 12 font and standard page margins.

AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Individual Written Assignment #1 Medical Ethics: Historical names, dates and ethical theories assignment As you read chapters 1 and 2 in the “Ethics and Basic Law for Medical Imaging Professionals” textbook you will be responsible for identifying and explaining each of the following items from the list below. You will respond in paragraph format with correct spelling and grammar expected for each paragraph. Feel free to have more than one paragraph for each item, although in most instances a single paragraph response is sufficient. If you reference material in addition to what is available in the textbook it must be appropriately cited in your work using either APA or MLA including a references cited page. The use of Wikipedia.com is not a recognized peer reviewed source so please do not use that as a reference. When responding about individuals it is necessary to indicate a year or time period that the person discussed/developed their particular ethical theory so that you can look at and appreciate the historical background to the development of ethical theories and decision making. Respond to the following sixteen items. (They are in random order from your reading) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Isaac Newton 3. Prima Facie Duties – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 4. Hippocrates 5. W.D. Ross – what do the initials stand for in his name and what was his contribution to the study of ethics? 6. Microallocation – define the term and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as microallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 7. Deontology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 8. Thomas Aquinas – 1) Discuss the ethical theory developed by Aquinas, 2) his religious affiliation, 3) why that was so important to his ethical premise and 4) discuss the type of ethical issues resolved to this day using this theory. 9. Macroallocation – define and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as macroallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 10. David Hume 11. Rodericus Castro 12. Plato and “The Republic” 13. Pythagoras 14. Teleology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 15. Core Values – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 16. Develop a timeline that reflects the ethical theories as developed by the INDIVIDUALS presented in this assignment. This assignment is due Saturday March 14th at NOON and is graded as a homework assignment. Grading: Paragraph Formation = 20% of grade (bulleted lists are acceptable for some answers) Answers inclusive of major material for answer = 40% of grade Creation of Timeline = 10% of grade Sentence structure, application of correct spelling and grammar = 20% of grade References (if utilized) = 10% of grade; references should be submitted on a separate references cited page. Otherwise this 10% of the assignment grade will be considered under the sentence structure component for 30% of the grade. It is expected that the finished assignment will be two – three pages of text, double spaced, using 12 font and standard page margins.

Francis Bacon was a 16th century ethical theorist who was … Read More...
modeling and simulation APA style Please post an abstract for your white paper. with peer reviewed paper related to this subject The da Vinci® Surgical System I want to develop this robotic to make it as a doctor to send it to Infested places, or places where natural disasters or serious illnesses that arise to serve the work as real doctor and to control it remotely. In this way we protect the medical staff from any risks related to their lives, such as murder, kidnapping, or incidence of these diseases

modeling and simulation APA style Please post an abstract for your white paper. with peer reviewed paper related to this subject The da Vinci® Surgical System I want to develop this robotic to make it as a doctor to send it to Infested places, or places where natural disasters or serious illnesses that arise to serve the work as real doctor and to control it remotely. In this way we protect the medical staff from any risks related to their lives, such as murder, kidnapping, or incidence of these diseases

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– 1 – Fall 2015 EECS 338 Assignment 2 Due: Oct. 1st, 2015 G. Ozsoyoglu Concurrent Programming with Semaphores; 140 points (100 pts) 1. Priority-based Searchers/Inserters/Deleters Problem without starvation. Three types of processes, namely, searchers, inserters, and deleters share access to a singly linked list L, and perform search, insert, or delete operations, respectively. The list L does not have duplicate values. a) Searchers merely search the list L, and report success (i.e., item searched is in L) or no-success (i.e., item searched is not in L) to a log file. Hence they can execute concurrently with each other. b) Inserters add new items to the end of the list L, and report success (i.e., item is not in L, and successfully inserted into L) or no-success (i.e., item is already in L, and no insertion takes place) to a log file. Insertions must be mutually exclusive to preclude two inserters from inserting new items at about the same time. However, one insert can proceed in parallel with any number of searches. c) Deleters remove items from anywhere in the list, and report success (i.e., the item is found in L and deleted) or no-success (i.e., item is not in L, and could not be deleted) to a log file. At most one deleter can access the list L at a time, and the deletion must be mutually exclusive with searches and insertions. d) Initial start. Searcher, inserter, and deleter processes are initially launched as follows. A user process that needs a search/insertion/deletion operation to the list L first forks a process, and then, in the forked process, performs an execv into a searcher/ inserter/deleter process. e) Log maintenance. Upon start, each searcher/inserter/deleter writes to a log file, recording the time of insertion, process id, process type (i.e., searcher, inserter, or deleter), and the item that is being searched/inserted/deleted. f) Termination. Upon successful or unsuccessful completion, each searcher/inserter/deleter writes to the same log file, recording the time and the result of its execution. g) Priority-based service between three types. Searchers, inserters, and deleters perform their search, insert, delete operations, respectively, on a priority basis (not on a first-come-first-serve (FCFS) basis) between separate process types (i.e., searchers, inserters, deleters) as follows. Searchers search with the highest priority; inserters insert with the second highest priority (except that one inserter can proceed in parallel with any number of searchers), and deleters delete with the lowest priority. h) FCFS service within a single type. Processes of the same type are serviced FCFS. As an example, among multiple inserters, the order of insertions into L is FCFS. Similarly, among multiple deleters, the order of deletions into L is FCFS. Note that, among searchers, while the start of search among searchers is FCFS, due to concurrent searcher execution, the completions of multiple searchers may not be FCFS. i) Starvation avoidance. In addition to the above priority-based search/insert/delete operations, the following starvation-avoidance rule is enforced. o After 10 consecutive searchers search the list L, if there is at least one waiting inserter or deleter then newly arriving searchers are blocked until (a) all waiting inserters are first serviced FCFS, and, then (b) all waiting deleters are serviced FCFS. Then, both the standard priority-based service between process types and the FCFS service within a process type resume. You are to specify a semaphore-based algorithm to synchronize searcher, inserter and deleter processes. Note:  Explain your algorithm.  Make sure to state any assumptions you make in your solution.  Specify the initial states of your variables and semaphores.  Specify whether your semaphores are binary or nonbinary.  Do not bother specifying algorithms for sequential tasks: simply specify a well-defined function/procedure (i.e., one with well-defined input/output/functional specification). – 2 – (40 pts) 2. Four-of-a-Kind Problem is defined as follows.  There is a deck of 24 cards, split into 6 different kinds, 4 cards of each kind.  There are 4 players (i.e., processes) ??,0≤?≤3; each player can hold 4 cards.  Between each pair of adjacent (i.e., seated next to each other) players, there is a pile of cards.  The game begins by o someone dealing four cards to each player, and putting two cards on the pile between each pair of adjacent players, and o ?0 starting the game. If ?0 has four-of-a-kind, ?0 wins. Whoever gets four-of-a-kind first wins.  Players take turns to play clockwise. That is, ?0 plays, ?1 plays, ?2 plays, ?3 plays, ?0 plays, etc.  Each player behaves as follows. o So long as no one has won, keep playing. o If it is my turn and no one has won:  Check for Four-of-a-Kind. If yes, claim victory. Otherwise discard a card into the pile on the right; pick up a card from the pile on the left; and, check again: If Four-of-a-Kind, claim victory; otherwise revise turn so that the next player plays and wait for your turn.  There are no ties; when a player has claimed victory, all other players stop (when their turns to play come up). You are to specify a semaphore-based algorithm to the Four-of-a-Kind problem. Note:  Explain your algorithm.  Make sure to state any assumptions you make in your solution.  Specify the initial states of your variables and semaphores.  Specify whether your semaphores are binary or nonbinary.  Do not bother specifying algorithms for sequential tasks: simply specify a well-defined function/procedure (i.e., one with well-defined input/output/functional specification). P1 P0 P2 P3 pile 1 pile 2 pile 3 pile 0

– 1 – Fall 2015 EECS 338 Assignment 2 Due: Oct. 1st, 2015 G. Ozsoyoglu Concurrent Programming with Semaphores; 140 points (100 pts) 1. Priority-based Searchers/Inserters/Deleters Problem without starvation. Three types of processes, namely, searchers, inserters, and deleters share access to a singly linked list L, and perform search, insert, or delete operations, respectively. The list L does not have duplicate values. a) Searchers merely search the list L, and report success (i.e., item searched is in L) or no-success (i.e., item searched is not in L) to a log file. Hence they can execute concurrently with each other. b) Inserters add new items to the end of the list L, and report success (i.e., item is not in L, and successfully inserted into L) or no-success (i.e., item is already in L, and no insertion takes place) to a log file. Insertions must be mutually exclusive to preclude two inserters from inserting new items at about the same time. However, one insert can proceed in parallel with any number of searches. c) Deleters remove items from anywhere in the list, and report success (i.e., the item is found in L and deleted) or no-success (i.e., item is not in L, and could not be deleted) to a log file. At most one deleter can access the list L at a time, and the deletion must be mutually exclusive with searches and insertions. d) Initial start. Searcher, inserter, and deleter processes are initially launched as follows. A user process that needs a search/insertion/deletion operation to the list L first forks a process, and then, in the forked process, performs an execv into a searcher/ inserter/deleter process. e) Log maintenance. Upon start, each searcher/inserter/deleter writes to a log file, recording the time of insertion, process id, process type (i.e., searcher, inserter, or deleter), and the item that is being searched/inserted/deleted. f) Termination. Upon successful or unsuccessful completion, each searcher/inserter/deleter writes to the same log file, recording the time and the result of its execution. g) Priority-based service between three types. Searchers, inserters, and deleters perform their search, insert, delete operations, respectively, on a priority basis (not on a first-come-first-serve (FCFS) basis) between separate process types (i.e., searchers, inserters, deleters) as follows. Searchers search with the highest priority; inserters insert with the second highest priority (except that one inserter can proceed in parallel with any number of searchers), and deleters delete with the lowest priority. h) FCFS service within a single type. Processes of the same type are serviced FCFS. As an example, among multiple inserters, the order of insertions into L is FCFS. Similarly, among multiple deleters, the order of deletions into L is FCFS. Note that, among searchers, while the start of search among searchers is FCFS, due to concurrent searcher execution, the completions of multiple searchers may not be FCFS. i) Starvation avoidance. In addition to the above priority-based search/insert/delete operations, the following starvation-avoidance rule is enforced. o After 10 consecutive searchers search the list L, if there is at least one waiting inserter or deleter then newly arriving searchers are blocked until (a) all waiting inserters are first serviced FCFS, and, then (b) all waiting deleters are serviced FCFS. Then, both the standard priority-based service between process types and the FCFS service within a process type resume. You are to specify a semaphore-based algorithm to synchronize searcher, inserter and deleter processes. Note:  Explain your algorithm.  Make sure to state any assumptions you make in your solution.  Specify the initial states of your variables and semaphores.  Specify whether your semaphores are binary or nonbinary.  Do not bother specifying algorithms for sequential tasks: simply specify a well-defined function/procedure (i.e., one with well-defined input/output/functional specification). – 2 – (40 pts) 2. Four-of-a-Kind Problem is defined as follows.  There is a deck of 24 cards, split into 6 different kinds, 4 cards of each kind.  There are 4 players (i.e., processes) ??,0≤?≤3; each player can hold 4 cards.  Between each pair of adjacent (i.e., seated next to each other) players, there is a pile of cards.  The game begins by o someone dealing four cards to each player, and putting two cards on the pile between each pair of adjacent players, and o ?0 starting the game. If ?0 has four-of-a-kind, ?0 wins. Whoever gets four-of-a-kind first wins.  Players take turns to play clockwise. That is, ?0 plays, ?1 plays, ?2 plays, ?3 plays, ?0 plays, etc.  Each player behaves as follows. o So long as no one has won, keep playing. o If it is my turn and no one has won:  Check for Four-of-a-Kind. If yes, claim victory. Otherwise discard a card into the pile on the right; pick up a card from the pile on the left; and, check again: If Four-of-a-Kind, claim victory; otherwise revise turn so that the next player plays and wait for your turn.  There are no ties; when a player has claimed victory, all other players stop (when their turns to play come up). You are to specify a semaphore-based algorithm to the Four-of-a-Kind problem. Note:  Explain your algorithm.  Make sure to state any assumptions you make in your solution.  Specify the initial states of your variables and semaphores.  Specify whether your semaphores are binary or nonbinary.  Do not bother specifying algorithms for sequential tasks: simply specify a well-defined function/procedure (i.e., one with well-defined input/output/functional specification). P1 P0 P2 P3 pile 1 pile 2 pile 3 pile 0

– 1 – Fall 2015 EECS 338 Assignment 2 Due: … Read More...
The role of the NCCIH is to: Question 2 options: 1) Serve as a clearinghouse for the quality of practitioners 2) Train practitioners in complementary medicine 3) Regulate alternative medicine practitioners 4) Fund research and disseminate information in CIH

The role of the NCCIH is to: Question 2 options: 1) Serve as a clearinghouse for the quality of practitioners 2) Train practitioners in complementary medicine 3) Regulate alternative medicine practitioners 4) Fund research and disseminate information in CIH

The role of the NCCIH is to: Question 2 options: … Read More...
Que 2: 2) _____ Coffee houses frequently serve coffee in a paper cup that has a corrugated jacket surrounding the cup. This corrugated jacket: a) Serves to keep the coffee hot. b) Increases the coffee-to-surroundings thermal resistance c) Lowers the temperature where the hand clasps the cup d) All of the above e) Only a and c

Que 2: 2) _____ Coffee houses frequently serve coffee in a paper cup that has a corrugated jacket surrounding the cup. This corrugated jacket: a) Serves to keep the coffee hot. b) Increases the coffee-to-surroundings thermal resistance c) Lowers the temperature where the hand clasps the cup d) All of the above e) Only a and c

Answer: coffee houses frequently serve coffee in a paper cup … Read More...
Basic information: The drive-through window of a coffee shop experiences an average arrival rate of 2 cars per minute;however,20% of the drivers are dismayed at the number of cars waiting in line and leave, rather than joining the waiting line.The coffee shop has two service windows available and each window has one barista (the server),along with a separate worker who processes the paymen while the barista makes the customer’s drink.You can ignore the time it takes to handle the payment, because each of those workers is very efficient and finishes their work while the drink is made. Also,then ext car in line,if one is waiting,can get to either service window if one is available;so,if a window is open,a car can get to it immediately. Each barista can serve a customer in 1minute. a) What is the capacity utilization of the drive-through system?

Basic information: The drive-through window of a coffee shop experiences an average arrival rate of 2 cars per minute;however,20% of the drivers are dismayed at the number of cars waiting in line and leave, rather than joining the waiting line.The coffee shop has two service windows available and each window has one barista (the server),along with a separate worker who processes the paymen while the barista makes the customer’s drink.You can ignore the time it takes to handle the payment, because each of those workers is very efficient and finishes their work while the drink is made. Also,then ext car in line,if one is waiting,can get to either service window if one is available;so,if a window is open,a car can get to it immediately. Each barista can serve a customer in 1minute. a) What is the capacity utilization of the drive-through system?

Actual arrival rate = 16 cars/ 10 minutes = 96 … Read More...
1 15325 Pre-work assignment Preparing your conflict scenario (four copies of your scenario must be brought to the workshop) Dear Participant, This letter introduces some pre-course work that is essential for you to complete before arriving at the workshop for the subject Negotiations and Conflict Management: 15325 – in which you are enrolled. The workshop will combine theory and practice in a manner intended to use the wisdom in the room to bring together our thinking about enacting the practices you will learn about. You will bring with you a scenario to work through during the workshop. This letter explains how to write that. 1 The situation (you can give it a title if that helps to frame it for you) Your first task is to identify a situation that is (or in your opinion is) unresolved and has potential to escalate into a matter causing stress, tension, delay or confusion. This may be something at work or in a context where you have the power to take action. You will use fictional names and disguise other facts to ensure confidentiality, but it is essential that this is a real situation – not a hypothetical or fictional one. 2 The Details To enable others to understand the context you will need to describe the following – A The people. Describe each person using the following items – Name – Use a fictional name for each person and do not include more than four others apart from yourself. You can use your own name if you wish or also disguise that as well. General facts about each person – gender, age range, role title, marital status (if relevant) work/life location (if other than yours) Personal characteristics – select at least 5 key words/phrases chosen from the list at the end of this letter Relationship to others in the scenario – boss, subordinate, peer, family member, relative etc. B The context. Type of business or other relevant information to provide a general setting for the moment you will use to describe the unresolved issue. C The event (moment in time). This can be at least partly imagined in that you will need to summarise a lot of information and it might be easier to do so if you write it as conversation even if that has not happened. 2 A sample example written in this way follows. This is a real scenario written by a person who will not be attending the workshop. It took 40 minutes to write. That involved 10 minutes to collect thoughts, select words and frame the setting and then 30 minutes to put it into the words you are reading. The advice is to allow yourself at least this amount of time and also to find a quiet space and time to write your scenario. Example Case Study Title – Where is that space? Setting – a Sydney residential street, in a smallish inner city suburb. There is a main road at one end of the street and a large schoolyard at the other end. At the corner of the street and the main road is a temporary church site whose owners are seeking to extend and develop the site. On the opposite corner is a second hand car yard with the imaginative title of “Junk your Jalopy” (JyJ). Aside from a block of six flats next to the home Eva has lived in for 12 years, all the other residences are single storey homes most built in the first two decades of the 20th century. Most residents have at least one car – often two. Umberto works at JyJ and may be a part owner. He doesn’t live nearby. On a recent occasion Eva, who is reasonably laid back but can be forgetful, was moved to anger by the presence, in the street outside her front door, of a very old and battered panel van that she knew did not belong to any of the residents. It has been there for nearly two weeks and meant that she was parking her car out of sight in a side lane, on land owned by the church. This is not official parking for the street and is often blocked off by the church. Walking to the corner one morning she saw Umberto taking photos of a motorbike and went to raise the issue of the van with him. He is not particularly interested in others’ concerns about the lack of parking and merely wants to make a success of the business. If that means parking extra cars in the street and annoying a few residents he’s opportunistic enough to do so without compunction. Although she is usually fearful of conflict Eva was determined to do something to try and put a stop to JYJ’s habit of parking cars illegally in the residential area. She opened the conversation by asking if Umberto knew anything about the van. He denied all knowledge of it and became quite aggressive (or at least it seemed that way to Eva) about the matter of cars in the street, denying that any were from JyJ, suggesting she talk to the owners of the spare parts yard facing the main road. As Eva tried to ask him to consider the needs and rights of residents, Umberto became ever more inflexible disregarding her issue and suggesting she leave his premises. Although she is quite creative, and has worked for 30 years in a variety of roles Eva is not always able to speak her mind easily, and his denials were not helping. He even began whinging about having to ‘cop the s—t’ for the spare parts yard but resisted the idea of marking his cars so residents could see those parked illegally were not his. 3 As she walked away Eva heard herself say “well if you do nothing about it, then you’ll have to continue copping the s—t, and I hope it hurts”, realising as she did so that she would not be any better off for her efforts. When she got home that night the van was gone – but a different one had arrived within four days. The issue is unresolved. Words to describe the people in your scenario accurate inquisitive empire building adaptable knowledgeable erratic analytical logical fearful of conflict broad in outlook loyal forgetful calm & confident observant frightened of failure caring opportunistic fussy challenging original impatient clever outgoing impulsive competitive outspoken indecisive conscientious perfectionist inflexible conscious of priorities persistent insular consultative persuasive laid back 4 co-operative practical manipulative creative professionally dedicated not interested in others diplomatic Marking Criteria for the Case Study How to get the maximum marks for the case study! For 10 marks – the case study – Accurately uses more than the required number of suggested words to describe the people in the scenario. That is the words used to describe the people are descriptive and placed appropriately to ensure a reader is able to create an informative word picture of each person. The sequence of events is presented in a manner that ensures the current situation, and possible consequences of any future actions, are easily understood by a reader not familiar with the context. Includes enough information to ensure that a stranger does not need to ask additional questions to affirm understanding of the situation as described in the case study. For 8 – 9 marks – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. The words are used correctly. The sequence is reasonably ordered, but readers find they need to ask one or two questions about the actual context, order of events. There is less that a sufficient amount of information to ensure that a stranger will quickly understand the nature of issues that remain unresolved. For 5 – 7 – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. Not all words are used appropriately in the context, but a stranger is able to gain an impression of the people. The sequence of events – as presented in the case study text – needs some re-ordering in response to questions from other readers to enable them to understand the issues. Strangers will need to seek additional information before they feel able to understand the issue and/or the context. For F = less than 5 – the case study – Uses fewer than the set minimum number of words. They do not add to the information about the people. 5 The sequence of events is unclear and does not represent the issue/s in a manner that can be understood by a stranger. A good deal of additional information is required before a stranger can understand the nature of the issues and context.

1 15325 Pre-work assignment Preparing your conflict scenario (four copies of your scenario must be brought to the workshop) Dear Participant, This letter introduces some pre-course work that is essential for you to complete before arriving at the workshop for the subject Negotiations and Conflict Management: 15325 – in which you are enrolled. The workshop will combine theory and practice in a manner intended to use the wisdom in the room to bring together our thinking about enacting the practices you will learn about. You will bring with you a scenario to work through during the workshop. This letter explains how to write that. 1 The situation (you can give it a title if that helps to frame it for you) Your first task is to identify a situation that is (or in your opinion is) unresolved and has potential to escalate into a matter causing stress, tension, delay or confusion. This may be something at work or in a context where you have the power to take action. You will use fictional names and disguise other facts to ensure confidentiality, but it is essential that this is a real situation – not a hypothetical or fictional one. 2 The Details To enable others to understand the context you will need to describe the following – A The people. Describe each person using the following items – Name – Use a fictional name for each person and do not include more than four others apart from yourself. You can use your own name if you wish or also disguise that as well. General facts about each person – gender, age range, role title, marital status (if relevant) work/life location (if other than yours) Personal characteristics – select at least 5 key words/phrases chosen from the list at the end of this letter Relationship to others in the scenario – boss, subordinate, peer, family member, relative etc. B The context. Type of business or other relevant information to provide a general setting for the moment you will use to describe the unresolved issue. C The event (moment in time). This can be at least partly imagined in that you will need to summarise a lot of information and it might be easier to do so if you write it as conversation even if that has not happened. 2 A sample example written in this way follows. This is a real scenario written by a person who will not be attending the workshop. It took 40 minutes to write. That involved 10 minutes to collect thoughts, select words and frame the setting and then 30 minutes to put it into the words you are reading. The advice is to allow yourself at least this amount of time and also to find a quiet space and time to write your scenario. Example Case Study Title – Where is that space? Setting – a Sydney residential street, in a smallish inner city suburb. There is a main road at one end of the street and a large schoolyard at the other end. At the corner of the street and the main road is a temporary church site whose owners are seeking to extend and develop the site. On the opposite corner is a second hand car yard with the imaginative title of “Junk your Jalopy” (JyJ). Aside from a block of six flats next to the home Eva has lived in for 12 years, all the other residences are single storey homes most built in the first two decades of the 20th century. Most residents have at least one car – often two. Umberto works at JyJ and may be a part owner. He doesn’t live nearby. On a recent occasion Eva, who is reasonably laid back but can be forgetful, was moved to anger by the presence, in the street outside her front door, of a very old and battered panel van that she knew did not belong to any of the residents. It has been there for nearly two weeks and meant that she was parking her car out of sight in a side lane, on land owned by the church. This is not official parking for the street and is often blocked off by the church. Walking to the corner one morning she saw Umberto taking photos of a motorbike and went to raise the issue of the van with him. He is not particularly interested in others’ concerns about the lack of parking and merely wants to make a success of the business. If that means parking extra cars in the street and annoying a few residents he’s opportunistic enough to do so without compunction. Although she is usually fearful of conflict Eva was determined to do something to try and put a stop to JYJ’s habit of parking cars illegally in the residential area. She opened the conversation by asking if Umberto knew anything about the van. He denied all knowledge of it and became quite aggressive (or at least it seemed that way to Eva) about the matter of cars in the street, denying that any were from JyJ, suggesting she talk to the owners of the spare parts yard facing the main road. As Eva tried to ask him to consider the needs and rights of residents, Umberto became ever more inflexible disregarding her issue and suggesting she leave his premises. Although she is quite creative, and has worked for 30 years in a variety of roles Eva is not always able to speak her mind easily, and his denials were not helping. He even began whinging about having to ‘cop the s—t’ for the spare parts yard but resisted the idea of marking his cars so residents could see those parked illegally were not his. 3 As she walked away Eva heard herself say “well if you do nothing about it, then you’ll have to continue copping the s—t, and I hope it hurts”, realising as she did so that she would not be any better off for her efforts. When she got home that night the van was gone – but a different one had arrived within four days. The issue is unresolved. Words to describe the people in your scenario accurate inquisitive empire building adaptable knowledgeable erratic analytical logical fearful of conflict broad in outlook loyal forgetful calm & confident observant frightened of failure caring opportunistic fussy challenging original impatient clever outgoing impulsive competitive outspoken indecisive conscientious perfectionist inflexible conscious of priorities persistent insular consultative persuasive laid back 4 co-operative practical manipulative creative professionally dedicated not interested in others diplomatic Marking Criteria for the Case Study How to get the maximum marks for the case study! For 10 marks – the case study – Accurately uses more than the required number of suggested words to describe the people in the scenario. That is the words used to describe the people are descriptive and placed appropriately to ensure a reader is able to create an informative word picture of each person. The sequence of events is presented in a manner that ensures the current situation, and possible consequences of any future actions, are easily understood by a reader not familiar with the context. Includes enough information to ensure that a stranger does not need to ask additional questions to affirm understanding of the situation as described in the case study. For 8 – 9 marks – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. The words are used correctly. The sequence is reasonably ordered, but readers find they need to ask one or two questions about the actual context, order of events. There is less that a sufficient amount of information to ensure that a stranger will quickly understand the nature of issues that remain unresolved. For 5 – 7 – the case study – Uses the set minimum number of words. Not all words are used appropriately in the context, but a stranger is able to gain an impression of the people. The sequence of events – as presented in the case study text – needs some re-ordering in response to questions from other readers to enable them to understand the issues. Strangers will need to seek additional information before they feel able to understand the issue and/or the context. For F = less than 5 – the case study – Uses fewer than the set minimum number of words. They do not add to the information about the people. 5 The sequence of events is unclear and does not represent the issue/s in a manner that can be understood by a stranger. A good deal of additional information is required before a stranger can understand the nature of the issues and context.

(Conflict scenario) Title – Who steal the gold?   Setting: … Read More...
Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0

Chapter 13 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 16, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Matter of Some Gravity Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s law of gravitation and the distinction between inertial and gravitational masses. In this problem, you will practice using Newton’s law of gravitation. According to that law, the magnitude of the gravitational force between two small particles of masses and , separated by a distance , is given by , where is the universal gravitational constant, whose numerical value (in SI units) is . This formula applies not only to small particles, but also to spherical objects. In fact, the gravitational force between two uniform spheres is the same as if we concentrated all the mass of each sphere at its center. Thus, by modeling the Earth and the Moon as uniform spheres, you can use the particle approximation when calculating the force of gravity between them. Be careful in using Newton’s law to choose the correct value for . To calculate the force of gravitational attraction between two uniform spheres, the distance in the equation for Newton’s law of gravitation is the distance between the centers of the spheres. For instance, if a small object such as an elephant is located on the surface of the Earth, the radius of the Earth would be used in the equation. Note that the force of gravity acting on an object located near the surface of a planet is often called weight. Also note that in situations involving satellites, you are often given the altitude of the satellite, that is, the distance from the satellite to the surface of the planet; this is not the distance to be used in the formula for the law of gravitation. There is a potentially confusing issue involving mass. Mass is defined as a measure of an object’s inertia, that is, its ability to resist acceleration. Newton’s second law demonstrates the relationship between mass, acceleration, and the net force acting on an object: . We can now refer to this measure of inertia more precisely as the inertial mass. On the other hand, the masses of the particles that appear in the expression for the law of gravity seem to have nothing to do with inertia: Rather, they serve as a measure of the strength of gravitational interactions. It would be reasonable to call such a property gravitational mass. Does this mean that every object has two different masses? Generally speaking, yes. However, the good news is that according to the latest, highly precise, measurements, the inertial and the gravitational mass of an object are, in fact, equal to each other; it is an established consensus among physicists that there is only one mass after all, which is a measure of both the object’s inertia and its ability to engage in gravitational interactions. Note that this consensus, like everything else in science, is open to possible amendments in the future. In this problem, you will answer several questions that require the use of Newton’s law of gravitation. Part A Two particles are separated by a certain distance. The force of gravitational interaction between them is . Now the separation between the particles is tripled. Find the new force of gravitational Fg m1 m2 r Fg = G m1m2 r2 G 6.67 × 10−11 N m2 kg2 r r rEarth F  = m net a F0

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Please answer questions and then submit them in the assignment. Put your name in the document’s title. Eight points for questions 1-10, ten points each for questions 11 and 12. 1. What were the crusades, how did they begin, and how were they justified? 2. Describe the 1348 plague in Europe and how it changed human behavior. 3. What other calamities besides the plague occurred during the 14th century? What were the results? 4. What inventions during the middle ages and the Renaissance had the biggest impact on human culture in Western Europe? 5. What was a pilgrimage? Why did people go on them? 6. Describe what is happening in this image? Who is the central figure? Where might this image be located? How does it exemplify the era in which it was made? 7. Why was Socrates condemned to death? How did he handle his death sentence? What was the impact of his death for Athenians and the Western Heritage? 8. Name three Western legacies from ancient Egypt. How did the ancient Egyptians have a lasting impact on Western civilization? 9. How did Themistocles and the Greeks keep the Persians under Xerxes from invading? How did the trireme help? 10. Compare these two buildings. Identify them and say how they are alike and different and why we might want to know what they are. Where are they located? When were they constructed? What purposes did they serve? (5 points) 11. Compare ancient Rome and the contemporary United States. In what ways are the two superpowers similar? What are the similarities between their military strength, their colonization, the division of wealth, and their ways of appeasing the masses? In what ways did the Romans assume that assimilation to the Roman way would work for everyone they colonized? Has the U.S. done the same thing? In what ways is the Roman history different from the U.S. history of revolution against the British? Is the United States doomed to fail in the way ancient Rome did? 12. Compare the work of art you viewed in a museum with a work of text that we read in class or a work if art or architecture in the textbook. In what ways do they inform one another? In what ways can you connect the image with the text?

Please answer questions and then submit them in the assignment. Put your name in the document’s title. Eight points for questions 1-10, ten points each for questions 11 and 12. 1. What were the crusades, how did they begin, and how were they justified? 2. Describe the 1348 plague in Europe and how it changed human behavior. 3. What other calamities besides the plague occurred during the 14th century? What were the results? 4. What inventions during the middle ages and the Renaissance had the biggest impact on human culture in Western Europe? 5. What was a pilgrimage? Why did people go on them? 6. Describe what is happening in this image? Who is the central figure? Where might this image be located? How does it exemplify the era in which it was made? 7. Why was Socrates condemned to death? How did he handle his death sentence? What was the impact of his death for Athenians and the Western Heritage? 8. Name three Western legacies from ancient Egypt. How did the ancient Egyptians have a lasting impact on Western civilization? 9. How did Themistocles and the Greeks keep the Persians under Xerxes from invading? How did the trireme help? 10. Compare these two buildings. Identify them and say how they are alike and different and why we might want to know what they are. Where are they located? When were they constructed? What purposes did they serve? (5 points) 11. Compare ancient Rome and the contemporary United States. In what ways are the two superpowers similar? What are the similarities between their military strength, their colonization, the division of wealth, and their ways of appeasing the masses? In what ways did the Romans assume that assimilation to the Roman way would work for everyone they colonized? Has the U.S. done the same thing? In what ways is the Roman history different from the U.S. history of revolution against the British? Is the United States doomed to fail in the way ancient Rome did? 12. Compare the work of art you viewed in a museum with a work of text that we read in class or a work if art or architecture in the textbook. In what ways do they inform one another? In what ways can you connect the image with the text?

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Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUF-T5JubDg#t=49 According to the video, which of the three scholars accepted the invasion of Iraq? A. Realists and liberals tended to reject it, but the constructivists thought it was a good idea. B. Realists tended to reject it, but the constructivists and liberals thought it was a good idea. C. Liberals tended to reject it, but the realists and constructivists thought it was a good idea. D. All of the scholars rejected it. E. None of the scholars rejected it. Which of the following was NOT given as a reason to be concerned about the war in Iraq? A. First and foremost, peace needed to prevail. B. The invasion was form of moralizing or crusading. C. The invasion undermined respect for International law. D. The invasion didn’t serve clear U.S. interests. E. The situation had the potential to become a quagmire. In the video, one of the topics under discussion concerns democratic governance. How much do their views conflict? A. Caleb Gallemore and J.D. Bowen disagree, because democracy is a social construct. B. Randall Schweller and J.D. Bowen disagree, because one side believes that democracy is impossible to spread while the other thinks it may be possible. C. Randall Schweller and Caleb Gallemore disagree with J.D. Bowen, because the first two view the attempt to spread democracy as a moralizing crusade. D. J.D. Bowen and Randall Schweller disagree with Caleb Gallemore, who doesn’t think that democracy can be spread successfully. E. All of the authors agree on the possibility of establishing democracy in Iraq. What sorts of things were on the minds of constructivists considering the war in Iraq? A. the history of colonialism, tensions between Islam and the West, and the United States’ perceived role as a world leader B. whether the war served U.S. interests C. whether the Coalition of the Willing would have forces sufficient to topple Saddam Hussein D. the likelihood that the war would result in a quagmire E. the importance of promoting human rights Professor Bowen says that liberals disagreed about invading Iraq but agreed on the form of government to be established there. What was that form of government? A. a loose confederacy of tribes B. a constitutional monarchy with negotiated rights for minorities C. a communist dictatorship with religious tolerance D. a democracy with respect for human rights E. a long-term military installation with UN forces overseeing government functions

Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUF-T5JubDg#t=49 According to the video, which of the three scholars accepted the invasion of Iraq? A. Realists and liberals tended to reject it, but the constructivists thought it was a good idea. B. Realists tended to reject it, but the constructivists and liberals thought it was a good idea. C. Liberals tended to reject it, but the realists and constructivists thought it was a good idea. D. All of the scholars rejected it. E. None of the scholars rejected it. Which of the following was NOT given as a reason to be concerned about the war in Iraq? A. First and foremost, peace needed to prevail. B. The invasion was form of moralizing or crusading. C. The invasion undermined respect for International law. D. The invasion didn’t serve clear U.S. interests. E. The situation had the potential to become a quagmire. In the video, one of the topics under discussion concerns democratic governance. How much do their views conflict? A. Caleb Gallemore and J.D. Bowen disagree, because democracy is a social construct. B. Randall Schweller and J.D. Bowen disagree, because one side believes that democracy is impossible to spread while the other thinks it may be possible. C. Randall Schweller and Caleb Gallemore disagree with J.D. Bowen, because the first two view the attempt to spread democracy as a moralizing crusade. D. J.D. Bowen and Randall Schweller disagree with Caleb Gallemore, who doesn’t think that democracy can be spread successfully. E. All of the authors agree on the possibility of establishing democracy in Iraq. What sorts of things were on the minds of constructivists considering the war in Iraq? A. the history of colonialism, tensions between Islam and the West, and the United States’ perceived role as a world leader B. whether the war served U.S. interests C. whether the Coalition of the Willing would have forces sufficient to topple Saddam Hussein D. the likelihood that the war would result in a quagmire E. the importance of promoting human rights Professor Bowen says that liberals disagreed about invading Iraq but agreed on the form of government to be established there. What was that form of government? A. a loose confederacy of tribes B. a constitutional monarchy with negotiated rights for minorities C. a communist dictatorship with religious tolerance D. a democracy with respect for human rights E. a long-term military installation with UN forces overseeing government functions

Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According … Read More...