STUDENT GRADER Total Score I am submitting my own work, and I understand penalties will be assessed if I submit work for credit that is not my own. Print Name ID Number Sign Name Date # Points Score 1 4 2 8 3 6 4 12 5 4 6 10 7 8 8 6 9 6 Weeks late Adjusted Score Estimated Work Hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Overall Weight Adjusted Score: Deduct 20% from score for each week late Problem 1. Sketch circuits for the following logic equations. Y <= (A and B and C) or not ((A and not B and C and not D) or not (B or D)); X <= (A xor (B and C) xor not D) or (not (B xor C) and not (C or D)) Problem 2. Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the following equations. F = m(1, 2, 6) F = M(0, 7) Problem 3. Write logic assignment statements for the following circuit. Problem 4: Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the truth tables below. Problem 5: Sketch POS circuits for the 2XOR and 2XNOR functions. Problem 6: Sketch the circuit described by the netlist shown, and complete the timing diagram for the stimulus shown to document the circuit’s response to the example stimulus. Use a 100ns vertical grid in your timing diagram, and show all inputs and outputs. Problem 7: Create a truth table that corresponds to the simulation shown below. Show all input and output values in the truth table, and sketch a logic circuit that could have been used to create the waveform. Problem 8. The Seattle Mariners haven’t had a stolen base in 6 months, and the manager decided it was because the other teams were reading his signals to the base runners. He came up with a new set of signals (pulling on his EAR, lifting one LEG, patting the top of his HEAD, and BOWing) to indicate when runners should attempt to steal a base. A runner should STEAL a base if and only if the manager pulls his EAR and BOWs while patting his HEAD, or if he lifts his LEG and pats his HEAD without BOWing, or anytime he pulls his EAR without lifting his LEG. Sketch a minimal circuit that could be used to indicate when a runner should steal a base. Problem 9. A room has four doors and four light switches (one by each door). Sketch a circuit that allows the four switches to control the light – each switch should be able to turn the light on if it is currently off, and off if it is currently on. Note that it will not be possible to associate a given switch position with “light on” or “light off” – simply moving any switch should modify the light’s status.

STUDENT GRADER Total Score I am submitting my own work, and I understand penalties will be assessed if I submit work for credit that is not my own. Print Name ID Number Sign Name Date # Points Score 1 4 2 8 3 6 4 12 5 4 6 10 7 8 8 6 9 6 Weeks late Adjusted Score Estimated Work Hours 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Overall Weight Adjusted Score: Deduct 20% from score for each week late Problem 1. Sketch circuits for the following logic equations. Y <= (A and B and C) or not ((A and not B and C and not D) or not (B or D)); X <= (A xor (B and C) xor not D) or (not (B xor C) and not (C or D)) Problem 2. Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the following equations. F = m(1, 2, 6) F = M(0, 7) Problem 3. Write logic assignment statements for the following circuit. Problem 4: Sketch circuits and write VHDL assignment statements for the truth tables below. Problem 5: Sketch POS circuits for the 2XOR and 2XNOR functions. Problem 6: Sketch the circuit described by the netlist shown, and complete the timing diagram for the stimulus shown to document the circuit’s response to the example stimulus. Use a 100ns vertical grid in your timing diagram, and show all inputs and outputs. Problem 7: Create a truth table that corresponds to the simulation shown below. Show all input and output values in the truth table, and sketch a logic circuit that could have been used to create the waveform. Problem 8. The Seattle Mariners haven’t had a stolen base in 6 months, and the manager decided it was because the other teams were reading his signals to the base runners. He came up with a new set of signals (pulling on his EAR, lifting one LEG, patting the top of his HEAD, and BOWing) to indicate when runners should attempt to steal a base. A runner should STEAL a base if and only if the manager pulls his EAR and BOWs while patting his HEAD, or if he lifts his LEG and pats his HEAD without BOWing, or anytime he pulls his EAR without lifting his LEG. Sketch a minimal circuit that could be used to indicate when a runner should steal a base. Problem 9. A room has four doors and four light switches (one by each door). Sketch a circuit that allows the four switches to control the light – each switch should be able to turn the light on if it is currently off, and off if it is currently on. Note that it will not be possible to associate a given switch position with “light on” or “light off” – simply moving any switch should modify the light’s status.

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Doppler Shift 73 Because of the Doppler Effect, light emitted by an object can appear to change wavelength due to its motion toward or away from an observer. When the observer and the source of light are moving toward each other, the light is shifted to shorter wavelengths (blueshifted). When the observer and the source of light are moving away from each other, the light is shifted to longer wavelengths (redshifted). Part I: Motion of Source Star is not . rnovrng r ABCD 1) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? 2) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to longer wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? . 74 Doppler Shift 3) In which of the srtuations shown (A—D) will theobserver receive light that Is not Doppler Shifted at all? Explain your reasoning. – 4) Imagine our solar system Is moving In the Milky Way toward a group of three stars. Star A is a blue star that is slightly closer to us than the other two. Star B is a red star that is farthest away from us. Star C is a yellow star that is halfway between Stars A end B. a) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. . / b) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be redshifted? Explain your reasoning. c) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to have no shift? Explain your reasoning. — 5) You overhear two students discussing the topic of Doppler Shift. Student 1: Since Betelgeuse is a red star, it must be going away from us, and since Rigel is a blue star it must be coming toward us. Student 2: 1 disagree, the color of the star does not tell you if it is moving. You have to look at the shift in wavelength of the lines in the star’s absorption spectrum to determine whether it’s moving toward or away from you. Do you agree or disagree with either or both of the students? Explain your reasoning. 5 Part II: Shift in Absorption Spectra When we study an astronomical object like a star or galaxy, we examine the spectrum of light it gives off. Since the lines of a spectrum occur at specific wavelengths we can determine that an object is moving when we see that the lines have been shifted to either longer or shorter wavelengths. For the absorption line spectra shown on the next page, short-wavelength light (the blue end of the spectrum) is shown on the left-hand side and long-wavelength light (the red end of the spectrum) is shown on the right-hand side. Doppler Shift 75 For the three absorption line spectra shown below (A, B, and C), one of the spectra corresponds to a star that is not moving relative to you, one of the spectra is from a star that is moving toward you, and one of the spectra is from a star that is moving away from you. A B Blue J___ ..‘ C 6) Which of the three spectra above corresponds with the star moving toward you? Explain your reasoning. If two sources of llght are moving relative to an observer, the light from the star that is moving faster will appear to undergo a greater Doppler Consider the four spectra at the right. The spectrum labeled F is an absorption line spectrum from a star that is at rest. Again, note that short-wavelength (blue) light is shown on the left-hand side of each spectrum and long-wavelength (red) light is shown on the right-hand side of each spectrum. 7) Which of the three spectra corresponds with the star moving away from you? Explain your reasoning. Part 111: Size of Shift and Speed Blue Red . – 76 Doppler Shift 8) Which of the four spectra would be from the star that is moving the fastest? Would this star be moving toward or away from the observer? 9) Of the stars that are moving, which spectra would be from the star that is moving the slowest? Describe the motion of this star, – (fJ 1O)An Important line In the absorption spectrum of stars occurs at a wavelength of 656 nm for stars at rest. Irna me that you observe five stars (H—L) from Earth and discover that this Important absorption line Is measured at the wavelength shown in the table below for each of the five stars, Star Wavelength of Absorption Line H 649nm I 660 nm J 656nrn K 658nrn L 647nm a) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears redshifted? Explain your reasoning. d) Which star is moving the fastest? Is it moving toward or away from the observer? Explain your reasoning. , . . c) Which star is giving off light that appears shifted by the greatest amount? Is this light shifted to longer or shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a) Which planets will receive a radio signal that Is redshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which planets wfll receive a radio signal that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a a . ii) The figure at right shows a spaceprobe and five planets. The motion of the spaceprobe is indicated by the arrow. The spaceprobe is continuously broadcasting a radio signal in all directions. 4 C E not to scale c) Will all the planets receive radio signals from the spaceprobe that are Doppler shifted? Explain your reasoning. d) How will the size of the Doppler Shift in the radio signals detected at Planets A and B compare? Explain your reasoning. Cats r , ‘, e) How Will the slz of 1h Dupler Shift in the radio signals deteed °lane E and B compare? Explain your reasoning. ‘

Doppler Shift 73 Because of the Doppler Effect, light emitted by an object can appear to change wavelength due to its motion toward or away from an observer. When the observer and the source of light are moving toward each other, the light is shifted to shorter wavelengths (blueshifted). When the observer and the source of light are moving away from each other, the light is shifted to longer wavelengths (redshifted). Part I: Motion of Source Star is not . rnovrng r ABCD 1) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? 2) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to longer wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? . 74 Doppler Shift 3) In which of the srtuations shown (A—D) will theobserver receive light that Is not Doppler Shifted at all? Explain your reasoning. – 4) Imagine our solar system Is moving In the Milky Way toward a group of three stars. Star A is a blue star that is slightly closer to us than the other two. Star B is a red star that is farthest away from us. Star C is a yellow star that is halfway between Stars A end B. a) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. . / b) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be redshifted? Explain your reasoning. c) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to have no shift? Explain your reasoning. — 5) You overhear two students discussing the topic of Doppler Shift. Student 1: Since Betelgeuse is a red star, it must be going away from us, and since Rigel is a blue star it must be coming toward us. Student 2: 1 disagree, the color of the star does not tell you if it is moving. You have to look at the shift in wavelength of the lines in the star’s absorption spectrum to determine whether it’s moving toward or away from you. Do you agree or disagree with either or both of the students? Explain your reasoning. 5 Part II: Shift in Absorption Spectra When we study an astronomical object like a star or galaxy, we examine the spectrum of light it gives off. Since the lines of a spectrum occur at specific wavelengths we can determine that an object is moving when we see that the lines have been shifted to either longer or shorter wavelengths. For the absorption line spectra shown on the next page, short-wavelength light (the blue end of the spectrum) is shown on the left-hand side and long-wavelength light (the red end of the spectrum) is shown on the right-hand side. Doppler Shift 75 For the three absorption line spectra shown below (A, B, and C), one of the spectra corresponds to a star that is not moving relative to you, one of the spectra is from a star that is moving toward you, and one of the spectra is from a star that is moving away from you. A B Blue J___ ..‘ C 6) Which of the three spectra above corresponds with the star moving toward you? Explain your reasoning. If two sources of llght are moving relative to an observer, the light from the star that is moving faster will appear to undergo a greater Doppler Consider the four spectra at the right. The spectrum labeled F is an absorption line spectrum from a star that is at rest. Again, note that short-wavelength (blue) light is shown on the left-hand side of each spectrum and long-wavelength (red) light is shown on the right-hand side of each spectrum. 7) Which of the three spectra corresponds with the star moving away from you? Explain your reasoning. Part 111: Size of Shift and Speed Blue Red . – 76 Doppler Shift 8) Which of the four spectra would be from the star that is moving the fastest? Would this star be moving toward or away from the observer? 9) Of the stars that are moving, which spectra would be from the star that is moving the slowest? Describe the motion of this star, – (fJ 1O)An Important line In the absorption spectrum of stars occurs at a wavelength of 656 nm for stars at rest. Irna me that you observe five stars (H—L) from Earth and discover that this Important absorption line Is measured at the wavelength shown in the table below for each of the five stars, Star Wavelength of Absorption Line H 649nm I 660 nm J 656nrn K 658nrn L 647nm a) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears redshifted? Explain your reasoning. d) Which star is moving the fastest? Is it moving toward or away from the observer? Explain your reasoning. , . . c) Which star is giving off light that appears shifted by the greatest amount? Is this light shifted to longer or shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a) Which planets will receive a radio signal that Is redshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which planets wfll receive a radio signal that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a a . ii) The figure at right shows a spaceprobe and five planets. The motion of the spaceprobe is indicated by the arrow. The spaceprobe is continuously broadcasting a radio signal in all directions. 4 C E not to scale c) Will all the planets receive radio signals from the spaceprobe that are Doppler shifted? Explain your reasoning. d) How will the size of the Doppler Shift in the radio signals detected at Planets A and B compare? Explain your reasoning. Cats r , ‘, e) How Will the slz of 1h Dupler Shift in the radio signals deteed °lane E and B compare? Explain your reasoning. ‘

  ANSWERS Part 1 1 C is the answer because … Read More...
1 Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3.1 Laboratory Objective The objective of this laboratory is to understand the basic properties of sinusoids and sinusoid measurements. 3.2 Educational Objectives After performing this experiment, students should be able to: 1. Understand the properties of sinusoids. 2. Understand sinusoidal manipulation 3. Use a function generator 4. Obtain measurements using an oscilloscope 3.3 Background Sinusoids are sine or cosine waveforms that can describe many engineering phenomena. Any oscillatory motion can be described using sinusoids. Many types of electrical signals such as square, triangle, and sawtooth waves are modeled using sinusoids. Their manipulation incurs the understanding of certain quantities that describe sinusoidal behavior. These quantities are described below. 3.3.1 Sinusoid Characteristics Amplitude The amplitude A of a sine wave describes the height of the hills and valleys of a sinusoid. It carries the physical units of what the sinusoid is describing (volts, amps, meters, etc.). Frequency There are two types of frequencies that can describe a sinusoid. The normal frequency f is how many times the sinusoid repeats per unit time. It has units of cycles per second (s-1) or Hertz (Hz). The angular frequency ω is how many radians pass per second. Consequently, ω has units of radians per second. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 2 Period The period T is how long a sinusoid takes to repeat one complete cycle. The period is measured in seconds. Phase The phase φ of a sinusoid causes a horizontal shift along the t-axis. The phase has units of radians. TimeShift The time shift ts of a sinusoid is a horizontal shift along the t-axis and is a time measurement of the phase. The time shift has units of seconds. NOTE: A sine wave and a cosine wave only differ by a phase shift of 90° or ?2 radians. In reality, they are the same waveform but with a different φ value. 3.3.2 Sinusoidal Relationships Figure 3.1: Sinusoid The general equation of a sinusoid is given below and refers to Figure 3.1. ?(?) = ????(?? +?) (3.1) The angular frequency is related to the normal frequency by Equation 3.2. ?= 2?? (3.2) The angular frequency is also related to the period by Equation 3.3. ?=2?? (3.3) By inspection, the normal frequency is related to the period by Equation 3.4. ? =1? (3.4) ?? Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3 The time shift is related to the phase (radians) and the frequency by Equation 3.5. ??= ∅2?? (3.5) 3.3.3 Equipment 3.3.3.1 Inductors Inductors are electrical components that resist a change in the flow of current passing through them. They are essentially coils of wire. Inductors are electromagnets too. They are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment (with or without exposed wire): Figure 3.2: Symbol and Physical Example for Inductors 3.3.3.2 Capacitors Capacitors are electrical components that store energy. This enables engineers to store electrical energy from an input source such as a battery. Some capacitors are polarized and therefore have a negative and positive plate. One plate is straight, representing the positive terminal on the device, and the other is curved, representing the negative one. Polarized capacitors are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment: Figure 3.3: Symbol and Physical Example for Capacitors 3.3.3.3 Function Generator A function generator is used to create different types of electrical waveforms over a wide range of frequencies. It generates standard sine, square, and triangle waveforms and uses the analog output channel. 3.3.3.5 Oscilloscope An oscilloscope is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying voltages, usually as a two-dimensional plot of one or more signals as a function of time. It displays voltage data over time for the analysis of one or two voltage measurements taken from the analog input channels of the Oscilloscope. The observed waveform can be analyzed for amplitude, frequency, time interval and more. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 4 3.4 Procedure Follow the steps outlined below after the instructor has explained how to use the laboratory equipment 3.4.1 Sinusoidal Measurements 1. Connect the output channel of the Function Generator to the channel one of the Oscilloscope. 2. Complete Table 3.1 using the given values for voltage and frequency. Table 3.1: Sinusoid Measurements Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Voltage Amplitude, A (V ) Frequency (Hz) 2*A (Vp−p ) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) T (sec) 2.5 1000 3 5000 3.4.2 Circuit Measurements 1. Connect the circuit in figure 3.4 below with the given resistor and capacitor NOTE: Vs from the circuit comes from the Function Generator using a BNC connector. Figure 3.4: RC Circuit Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 5 2. Using the alligator to BNC cables, connect channel one of the Oscilloscope across the capacitor and complete Table 3.2 Table 3.2: Capacitor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) Vc (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 3. Disconnect channel one and connect channel two of the oscilloscope across the resistor and complete table 3.3. Table 3.3: Resistor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) VR (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 4. Leaving channel two connected across the resistor, clip the positive lead to the positive side of the capacitor and complete table 3.4 Table 3.4: Phase Difference Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (volts) Frequency (Hz) Divisions Time/Div (sec) ts (sec) ɸ (rad) ɸ (degrees) 2.5 100 5. Using the data from Tables 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, plot the capacitor sinusoidal equation and the resistor sinusoidal equation on the same graph using MATLAB. HINT: Plot over one period. 6. Kirchoff’s Voltage Law states that ??(?)=??(?)+??(?). Calculate Vs by hand using the following equation and Tables 3.2 and 3.3 ??(?)=√??2+??2???(??−???−1(????)) Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 6 3.5 New MATLAB Commands hold on  This command allows multiple graphs to be placed on the same XY axis and is placed after the first plot statement. legend (’string 1’, ’string2’, ‘string3’)  This command adds a legend to the plot. Strings must be placed in the order as the plots were generated. plot (x, y, ‘line specifiers’)  This command plots the data and uses line specifiers to differentiate between different plots on the same XY axis. In this lab, only use different line styles from the table below. Table 3.5: Line specifiers for the plot() command sqrt(X)  This command produces the square root of the elements of X. NOTE: The “help” command in MATLAB can be used to find a description and example for functions such as input.  For example, type “help input” in the command window to learn more about the input function. NOTE: Refer to section the “MATLAB Commands” sections from prior labs for previously discussed material that you may also need in order to complete this assignment. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 7 3.6 Lab Report Requirements 1. Complete Tables 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 (5 points each) 2. Show hand calculations for all four tables. Insert after this page (5 points each) 3. Draw the two sinusoids by hand from table 3.1. Label amplitude, period, and phase. Insert after this page. (5 points) 4. Insert MATLAB plot of Vc and VR as obtained from data in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 after this page. (5 points each) 5. Show hand calculations for Vs(t). Insert after this page. (5 points) 6. Using the data from the Tables, write: (10 points) a) Vc(t) = b) VR(t) = 7. Also, ???(?)=2.5???(628?). Write your Vs below and give reasons why they are different. (10 points) a) Vs(t) = b) Reasons: 8. Write an executive summary for this lab describing what you have done, and learned. (20 points)

1 Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3.1 Laboratory Objective The objective of this laboratory is to understand the basic properties of sinusoids and sinusoid measurements. 3.2 Educational Objectives After performing this experiment, students should be able to: 1. Understand the properties of sinusoids. 2. Understand sinusoidal manipulation 3. Use a function generator 4. Obtain measurements using an oscilloscope 3.3 Background Sinusoids are sine or cosine waveforms that can describe many engineering phenomena. Any oscillatory motion can be described using sinusoids. Many types of electrical signals such as square, triangle, and sawtooth waves are modeled using sinusoids. Their manipulation incurs the understanding of certain quantities that describe sinusoidal behavior. These quantities are described below. 3.3.1 Sinusoid Characteristics Amplitude The amplitude A of a sine wave describes the height of the hills and valleys of a sinusoid. It carries the physical units of what the sinusoid is describing (volts, amps, meters, etc.). Frequency There are two types of frequencies that can describe a sinusoid. The normal frequency f is how many times the sinusoid repeats per unit time. It has units of cycles per second (s-1) or Hertz (Hz). The angular frequency ω is how many radians pass per second. Consequently, ω has units of radians per second. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 2 Period The period T is how long a sinusoid takes to repeat one complete cycle. The period is measured in seconds. Phase The phase φ of a sinusoid causes a horizontal shift along the t-axis. The phase has units of radians. TimeShift The time shift ts of a sinusoid is a horizontal shift along the t-axis and is a time measurement of the phase. The time shift has units of seconds. NOTE: A sine wave and a cosine wave only differ by a phase shift of 90° or ?2 radians. In reality, they are the same waveform but with a different φ value. 3.3.2 Sinusoidal Relationships Figure 3.1: Sinusoid The general equation of a sinusoid is given below and refers to Figure 3.1. ?(?) = ????(?? +?) (3.1) The angular frequency is related to the normal frequency by Equation 3.2. ?= 2?? (3.2) The angular frequency is also related to the period by Equation 3.3. ?=2?? (3.3) By inspection, the normal frequency is related to the period by Equation 3.4. ? =1? (3.4) ?? Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 3 The time shift is related to the phase (radians) and the frequency by Equation 3.5. ??= ∅2?? (3.5) 3.3.3 Equipment 3.3.3.1 Inductors Inductors are electrical components that resist a change in the flow of current passing through them. They are essentially coils of wire. Inductors are electromagnets too. They are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment (with or without exposed wire): Figure 3.2: Symbol and Physical Example for Inductors 3.3.3.2 Capacitors Capacitors are electrical components that store energy. This enables engineers to store electrical energy from an input source such as a battery. Some capacitors are polarized and therefore have a negative and positive plate. One plate is straight, representing the positive terminal on the device, and the other is curved, representing the negative one. Polarized capacitors are represented in schematics using the following symbol and physically using the following equipment: Figure 3.3: Symbol and Physical Example for Capacitors 3.3.3.3 Function Generator A function generator is used to create different types of electrical waveforms over a wide range of frequencies. It generates standard sine, square, and triangle waveforms and uses the analog output channel. 3.3.3.5 Oscilloscope An oscilloscope is a type of electronic test instrument that allows observation of constantly varying voltages, usually as a two-dimensional plot of one or more signals as a function of time. It displays voltage data over time for the analysis of one or two voltage measurements taken from the analog input channels of the Oscilloscope. The observed waveform can be analyzed for amplitude, frequency, time interval and more. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 4 3.4 Procedure Follow the steps outlined below after the instructor has explained how to use the laboratory equipment 3.4.1 Sinusoidal Measurements 1. Connect the output channel of the Function Generator to the channel one of the Oscilloscope. 2. Complete Table 3.1 using the given values for voltage and frequency. Table 3.1: Sinusoid Measurements Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Voltage Amplitude, A (V ) Frequency (Hz) 2*A (Vp−p ) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) T (sec) 2.5 1000 3 5000 3.4.2 Circuit Measurements 1. Connect the circuit in figure 3.4 below with the given resistor and capacitor NOTE: Vs from the circuit comes from the Function Generator using a BNC connector. Figure 3.4: RC Circuit Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 5 2. Using the alligator to BNC cables, connect channel one of the Oscilloscope across the capacitor and complete Table 3.2 Table 3.2: Capacitor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) Vc (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 3. Disconnect channel one and connect channel two of the oscilloscope across the resistor and complete table 3.3. Table 3.3: Resistor Sinusoid Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (Volts) Frequency (Hz) VR (volts) f (Hz) T (sec) ω (rad/sec) 2.5 100 4. Leaving channel two connected across the resistor, clip the positive lead to the positive side of the capacitor and complete table 3.4 Table 3.4: Phase Difference Function Generator Oscilloscope (Measured) Calculated Vs (volts) Frequency (Hz) Divisions Time/Div (sec) ts (sec) ɸ (rad) ɸ (degrees) 2.5 100 5. Using the data from Tables 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, plot the capacitor sinusoidal equation and the resistor sinusoidal equation on the same graph using MATLAB. HINT: Plot over one period. 6. Kirchoff’s Voltage Law states that ??(?)=??(?)+??(?). Calculate Vs by hand using the following equation and Tables 3.2 and 3.3 ??(?)=√??2+??2???(??−???−1(????)) Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 6 3.5 New MATLAB Commands hold on  This command allows multiple graphs to be placed on the same XY axis and is placed after the first plot statement. legend (’string 1’, ’string2’, ‘string3’)  This command adds a legend to the plot. Strings must be placed in the order as the plots were generated. plot (x, y, ‘line specifiers’)  This command plots the data and uses line specifiers to differentiate between different plots on the same XY axis. In this lab, only use different line styles from the table below. Table 3.5: Line specifiers for the plot() command sqrt(X)  This command produces the square root of the elements of X. NOTE: The “help” command in MATLAB can be used to find a description and example for functions such as input.  For example, type “help input” in the command window to learn more about the input function. NOTE: Refer to section the “MATLAB Commands” sections from prior labs for previously discussed material that you may also need in order to complete this assignment. Laboratory 3 – Sinusoids in Engineering: Measurement and Analysis of Harmonic Signals 7 3.6 Lab Report Requirements 1. Complete Tables 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4 (5 points each) 2. Show hand calculations for all four tables. Insert after this page (5 points each) 3. Draw the two sinusoids by hand from table 3.1. Label amplitude, period, and phase. Insert after this page. (5 points) 4. Insert MATLAB plot of Vc and VR as obtained from data in Tables 3.2 and 3.3 after this page. (5 points each) 5. Show hand calculations for Vs(t). Insert after this page. (5 points) 6. Using the data from the Tables, write: (10 points) a) Vc(t) = b) VR(t) = 7. Also, ???(?)=2.5???(628?). Write your Vs below and give reasons why they are different. (10 points) a) Vs(t) = b) Reasons: 8. Write an executive summary for this lab describing what you have done, and learned. (20 points)

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MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Homework 4 Problem 1: (Points: 25) The circuit shown in Fig. 1 is excited by an impulse of 0.015V. Assuming the capacitor is initially discharged, obtain an analytic expression of vO (t), and make a Matlab program that plots the system response to the impulse. Figure 1 Problem 2: Extra Credit (Points: 25) A winding oscillator consists of two steel spheres on each end of a long slender rod, as shown in Fig. 2. The rod is hung on a thin wire that can be twisted many revolutions without breaking. The device will be wound up 4000 degrees. Make a Matlab script that computes the system response and determine how long will it take until the motion decays to a swing of only 10 degrees? Assume that the thin wire has a rotational spring constant of 2  10?4Nm/rad and that the viscous friction coecient for the sphere in air is 2  10?4Nms/rad. Each sphere has a mass of 1Kg. Figure 2: Winding oscillator. Problem 3: (Points: 25) Find the equivalent transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) for the system shown in Fig. 3. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 1 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 3 Problem 4: (Points: 25) Reduce the block diagram shown in Fig. 4 to a single transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) . Figure 4 Problem 5: (Points: 25) Consider the rotational mechanical system shown in Fig. 5. Represent the system as a block diagram. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 2 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 5 Problem 6: (Points: 25) During ascent the space shuttle is steered by commands generated by the computer’s guidance calcu- lations. These commands are in the form of vehicle attitude, attitude rates, and attitude accelerations obtained through measurements made by the vehicle’s inertial measuring unit, rate gyro assembly, and accelerometer assembly, respectively. The ascent digital autopilot uses the errors between the actual and commanded attitude, rates, and accelerations to gimbal the space shuttle main engines (called thrust vectoring) and the solid rocket boosters to a ect the desired vehicle attitude. The space shut- tle’s attitude control system employs the same method in the pitch, roll, and yaw control systems. A simpli ed model of the pitch control system is shown in Fig. 6.  a) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch to commanded pitch. Assume all other inputs are zero.  b) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch rate to commanded pitch rate. Assume all other inputs are zero.  c) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch acceleration to commanded pitch acceleration. Assume all other inputs are zero. Figure 6: Space shuttle pitch control system (simpli ed). Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 3 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Problem 7: (Extra Credit Points: 25) Extenders are robot manipulators that extend (i.e. increase) the strength of the human arm in load- maneuvering tasks (see Fig. 7). The system is represented by the transfer function Y (s) U(s) = G(s) = 30 s2+4s+3 where U (s) is the force of the human hand applied to the robot manipulator, and Y (s) is the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load. Assuming that the force of the human hand that is applied is given by u (t) = 5 sin (!t), create a MATLAB code that will compute and plot the di erence in magnitude and phase between the applied human force and the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load, as a function of the frequency !. Use 100 values for ! in the range ! 2 [0:01; 100] rad s for your two plots. See Fig. 8 on how to de ne di erence in magnitude and phase between two signals. You need to include your code and the two resulted plots in your solution. Figure 7: Human extender. A B dt T: signal period magnitude difference phase difference B A Figure 8: Magnitude and phase di erence (deg) between two sinusoidal signals.

MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Homework 4 Problem 1: (Points: 25) The circuit shown in Fig. 1 is excited by an impulse of 0.015V. Assuming the capacitor is initially discharged, obtain an analytic expression of vO (t), and make a Matlab program that plots the system response to the impulse. Figure 1 Problem 2: Extra Credit (Points: 25) A winding oscillator consists of two steel spheres on each end of a long slender rod, as shown in Fig. 2. The rod is hung on a thin wire that can be twisted many revolutions without breaking. The device will be wound up 4000 degrees. Make a Matlab script that computes the system response and determine how long will it take until the motion decays to a swing of only 10 degrees? Assume that the thin wire has a rotational spring constant of 2  10?4Nm/rad and that the viscous friction coecient for the sphere in air is 2  10?4Nms/rad. Each sphere has a mass of 1Kg. Figure 2: Winding oscillator. Problem 3: (Points: 25) Find the equivalent transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) for the system shown in Fig. 3. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 1 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 3 Problem 4: (Points: 25) Reduce the block diagram shown in Fig. 4 to a single transfer function T (s) = C(s) R(s) . Figure 4 Problem 5: (Points: 25) Consider the rotational mechanical system shown in Fig. 5. Represent the system as a block diagram. Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 2 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Figure 5 Problem 6: (Points: 25) During ascent the space shuttle is steered by commands generated by the computer’s guidance calcu- lations. These commands are in the form of vehicle attitude, attitude rates, and attitude accelerations obtained through measurements made by the vehicle’s inertial measuring unit, rate gyro assembly, and accelerometer assembly, respectively. The ascent digital autopilot uses the errors between the actual and commanded attitude, rates, and accelerations to gimbal the space shuttle main engines (called thrust vectoring) and the solid rocket boosters to a ect the desired vehicle attitude. The space shut- tle’s attitude control system employs the same method in the pitch, roll, and yaw control systems. A simpli ed model of the pitch control system is shown in Fig. 6.  a) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch to commanded pitch. Assume all other inputs are zero.  b) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch rate to commanded pitch rate. Assume all other inputs are zero.  c) Find the closed-loop transfer function relating the actual pitch acceleration to commanded pitch acceleration. Assume all other inputs are zero. Figure 6: Space shuttle pitch control system (simpli ed). Arizona State University. Fall 2015. Class # 73024. MAE 318. Homework 4: Page 3 of 4 MAE 318: System Dynamics and Control Dr. Panagiotis K. Artemiadis Problem 7: (Extra Credit Points: 25) Extenders are robot manipulators that extend (i.e. increase) the strength of the human arm in load- maneuvering tasks (see Fig. 7). The system is represented by the transfer function Y (s) U(s) = G(s) = 30 s2+4s+3 where U (s) is the force of the human hand applied to the robot manipulator, and Y (s) is the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load. Assuming that the force of the human hand that is applied is given by u (t) = 5 sin (!t), create a MATLAB code that will compute and plot the di erence in magnitude and phase between the applied human force and the force of the robot manipulator applied to the load, as a function of the frequency !. Use 100 values for ! in the range ! 2 [0:01; 100] rad s for your two plots. See Fig. 8 on how to de ne di erence in magnitude and phase between two signals. You need to include your code and the two resulted plots in your solution. Figure 7: Human extender. A B dt T: signal period magnitude difference phase difference B A Figure 8: Magnitude and phase di erence (deg) between two sinusoidal signals.

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Lab Description: Follow the instructions in the lab tasks below to complete Problems 1 through 4. These problems will guide you in observing signal delays and timing hazards of logic circuits (both Sum-of-Products (SOP) and Product-of-Sums (POS) circuits). These problems will also guide you in adding circuitry to eliminate a timing hazard. Use VHDL to design the circuits. Carefully follow the directions provided in the lab tasks below. Write your answers to the questions asked by the problems. Do not print out the VHDL code and waveforms as asked by the problems, instead include these on the cover sheet for this lab and print this out when you are done. Do not worry about annotating or putting arrows/notes on the waveforms–just make sure any signals or transitions of interest are shown in your screenshot. For each problem, use VHDL assignment statements for each gate of the Boolean expression. You must add delay for each gate and inverter as described by the problem. Do this by using the “after” statement: Z <= (A and B) after 1 ns; Refer to Digilent Real Digital Module 8 for more information about the "after" statement. Lab Tasks: 1. Complete Problem 1 of Project 8. Simulate all input combinations for this SOP (Sum-of-Products) expression. However, be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. The problem states that you will need to observe the output when B and C are both high (logic 1) and A transitions from high to low to high (logic 1 to 0, then back to 1). 2. Complete Problem 4 of Project 8. Increase the delay of the OR gate as specified and re-simulate to answer the questions. 3. Complete Problem 2 of Project 8. Change the delay of the OR gate back to the 1 ns that you used for Problem 1. Add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for the SOP expression and re-simulate to answer the questions. 4. Complete Problem 3 of Project 8. You may create any POS (Product-of-Sums) expression for this problem, however, not all POS expressions will have a timing hazard (so spend some time thinking about how a timing hazard can be generated with a POS expression). Once again, simulate all input combinations for your POS expression but be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. For this problem, you will also add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for your POS expression in order to eliminate the timing hazard; you will need to re-simulate with this additional logic gate in order to answer the questions. Problem 1. Implement the function Y = A’.B + A.C in the VHDL tool. Define the INV, OR and two AND operations separately, and give each operation a 1ns delay. Simulate the circuit with all possible combinations of inputs. Watch all circuit nets (inputs, outputs, and intermediate nets) during the simulation. Answer the questions below. Observe the outputs of the AND gates and the overall circuit output when B and C are both high, and A transitions from H to L and then from L to H (you may want to create another simulation to focus on this behavior). What output behavior do you notice when A transitions? What happens when A transitions and B or C are held a ‘0’? How long is the output glitch? _______ Is it positive ( ) or negative ( ) (circle one)? Change the delay through the inverter to 2ns, and resimulate. Now how long is output glitch? ______ What can you say about the relationship between the inverter gate delay and the length of the timing glitch? Based on this simple experiment, an SOP circuit can exhibit positive/negative glitches (circle one) when an input that arrives at one AND gate in a complemented form and another AND gate in uncomplemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Problem 2. Enter the logic equation from problem 1 in the K-map below, and loop the equation with redundant term included. Add the redundant term to the Xilinx circuit, re-simulate, and answer the questions. B C A 00 01 11 10 0 1 F Did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Problem 3. Create a three-input POS circuit to illustrate the formation of a glitch. Drive the simulator to illustrate a glitch in the POS circuit, and answer the questions below. A POS circuit can exhibit a positive/negative glitch (circle one) when an input that arrives at one OR gate in a complemented form and another OR gate in un-complemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Write the POS equation you used to show the glitch: Enter the equation in the K-map below, loop the original equation with the redundant term, add the redundant gate to your Xilinx circuit, and resimulate. How did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Print and submit the circuits and simulation output, label the output glitches in the simulation output, and draw arrows on the simulation output between the events that caused the glitches (i.e., a transition in an input signal) and the glitches themselves. Problem 4. Copy the SOP circuit above to a new VHDL file, and increase the delay of the output OR gate. Simulate the circuit and answer the questions below. How did adding delay to the output gate change the output transition? Does adding delay to the output gate change the circuit’s glitch behavior in any way? Name: Signal Delays Date: Designing with VHDL Grade Item Grade Five segments of VHDL Code for Problems 1-4: /10 Five simulation screenshots for Problems 1-4: /10 Questions from Problems 1-4: /16 Total Grade: /36 VHDL Code: Copy-paste your VHDL design code (just the code you wrote) for: • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshots: Use the “Print Screen” button to capture your screenshot (it should show the entire screen, not just the window of the program). • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshot Tips: (you can delete this once you capture your screenshot) 1. Make the “Wave” window large by clicking the “+” button near the upper-right of the window 2. Click the “Zoom Full” button (looks like a blue/green-filled magnifying glass) to enlarge your waveforms 3. In order to not print a lot of black, change the color scheme of the “Wave” window: 3.1. Click ToolsEdit Preferences… 3.2. The “By Window” tab should be selected, then click Wave Windows in the “Window List” to the left 3.3. Scroll to the bottom of the “Wave Windows Color Scheme” list and click waveBackground. Then click white in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4. Now color the waveforms and text black: 3.4.1. Click LOGIC_0 in the “Wave Windows Color Scheme.” Then click black in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4.2. Repeat this for LOGIC_1, timeColor, and cursorColor (if you have a cursor you want to print) 3.5. Once you have captured your screenshot, you can click the Reset Defaults button to restore the “Wave” window to its original color scheme Questions: (Please use this cover sheet to type and print your responses) 1. List the references you used for this lab assignment (e.g. sources/websites used or students with whom you discussed this assignment) 2. Do you have any comments or suggestions for this lab exercise?

Lab Description: Follow the instructions in the lab tasks below to complete Problems 1 through 4. These problems will guide you in observing signal delays and timing hazards of logic circuits (both Sum-of-Products (SOP) and Product-of-Sums (POS) circuits). These problems will also guide you in adding circuitry to eliminate a timing hazard. Use VHDL to design the circuits. Carefully follow the directions provided in the lab tasks below. Write your answers to the questions asked by the problems. Do not print out the VHDL code and waveforms as asked by the problems, instead include these on the cover sheet for this lab and print this out when you are done. Do not worry about annotating or putting arrows/notes on the waveforms–just make sure any signals or transitions of interest are shown in your screenshot. For each problem, use VHDL assignment statements for each gate of the Boolean expression. You must add delay for each gate and inverter as described by the problem. Do this by using the “after” statement: Z <= (A and B) after 1 ns; Refer to Digilent Real Digital Module 8 for more information about the "after" statement. Lab Tasks: 1. Complete Problem 1 of Project 8. Simulate all input combinations for this SOP (Sum-of-Products) expression. However, be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. The problem states that you will need to observe the output when B and C are both high (logic 1) and A transitions from high to low to high (logic 1 to 0, then back to 1). 2. Complete Problem 4 of Project 8. Increase the delay of the OR gate as specified and re-simulate to answer the questions. 3. Complete Problem 2 of Project 8. Change the delay of the OR gate back to the 1 ns that you used for Problem 1. Add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for the SOP expression and re-simulate to answer the questions. 4. Complete Problem 3 of Project 8. You may create any POS (Product-of-Sums) expression for this problem, however, not all POS expressions will have a timing hazard (so spend some time thinking about how a timing hazard can be generated with a POS expression). Once again, simulate all input combinations for your POS expression but be aware that specific input sequences are required to observe a timing hazard. For this problem, you will also add the new logic gate (with delay) to your VHDL for your POS expression in order to eliminate the timing hazard; you will need to re-simulate with this additional logic gate in order to answer the questions. Problem 1. Implement the function Y = A’.B + A.C in the VHDL tool. Define the INV, OR and two AND operations separately, and give each operation a 1ns delay. Simulate the circuit with all possible combinations of inputs. Watch all circuit nets (inputs, outputs, and intermediate nets) during the simulation. Answer the questions below. Observe the outputs of the AND gates and the overall circuit output when B and C are both high, and A transitions from H to L and then from L to H (you may want to create another simulation to focus on this behavior). What output behavior do you notice when A transitions? What happens when A transitions and B or C are held a ‘0’? How long is the output glitch? _______ Is it positive ( ) or negative ( ) (circle one)? Change the delay through the inverter to 2ns, and resimulate. Now how long is output glitch? ______ What can you say about the relationship between the inverter gate delay and the length of the timing glitch? Based on this simple experiment, an SOP circuit can exhibit positive/negative glitches (circle one) when an input that arrives at one AND gate in a complemented form and another AND gate in uncomplemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Problem 2. Enter the logic equation from problem 1 in the K-map below, and loop the equation with redundant term included. Add the redundant term to the Xilinx circuit, re-simulate, and answer the questions. B C A 00 01 11 10 0 1 F Did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Problem 3. Create a three-input POS circuit to illustrate the formation of a glitch. Drive the simulator to illustrate a glitch in the POS circuit, and answer the questions below. A POS circuit can exhibit a positive/negative glitch (circle one) when an input that arrives at one OR gate in a complemented form and another OR gate in un-complemented form transitions from a _____ to a _____. Write the POS equation you used to show the glitch: Enter the equation in the K-map below, loop the original equation with the redundant term, add the redundant gate to your Xilinx circuit, and resimulate. How did adding the new gate to the circuit change the logical behavior of the circuit? What effect did the new gate have on the output, particularly when A changes and B and C are both held high? Print and submit the circuits and simulation output, label the output glitches in the simulation output, and draw arrows on the simulation output between the events that caused the glitches (i.e., a transition in an input signal) and the glitches themselves. Problem 4. Copy the SOP circuit above to a new VHDL file, and increase the delay of the output OR gate. Simulate the circuit and answer the questions below. How did adding delay to the output gate change the output transition? Does adding delay to the output gate change the circuit’s glitch behavior in any way? Name: Signal Delays Date: Designing with VHDL Grade Item Grade Five segments of VHDL Code for Problems 1-4: /10 Five simulation screenshots for Problems 1-4: /10 Questions from Problems 1-4: /16 Total Grade: /36 VHDL Code: Copy-paste your VHDL design code (just the code you wrote) for: • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshots: Use the “Print Screen” button to capture your screenshot (it should show the entire screen, not just the window of the program). • The SOP expression with the timing hazard (Problem 1, Project 8): • The SOP expression with increased OR gate delay (Problem 4, Project 8): • The SOP expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 2, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): • Your POS expression with the extra logic gate in order to eliminate the timing hazard (Problem 3, Project 8): Simulation Screenshot Tips: (you can delete this once you capture your screenshot) 1. Make the “Wave” window large by clicking the “+” button near the upper-right of the window 2. Click the “Zoom Full” button (looks like a blue/green-filled magnifying glass) to enlarge your waveforms 3. In order to not print a lot of black, change the color scheme of the “Wave” window: 3.1. Click ToolsEdit Preferences… 3.2. The “By Window” tab should be selected, then click Wave Windows in the “Window List” to the left 3.3. Scroll to the bottom of the “Wave Windows Color Scheme” list and click waveBackground. Then click white in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4. Now color the waveforms and text black: 3.4.1. Click LOGIC_0 in the “Wave Windows Color Scheme.” Then click black in the color “Palette” at the right of the screen. 3.4.2. Repeat this for LOGIC_1, timeColor, and cursorColor (if you have a cursor you want to print) 3.5. Once you have captured your screenshot, you can click the Reset Defaults button to restore the “Wave” window to its original color scheme Questions: (Please use this cover sheet to type and print your responses) 1. List the references you used for this lab assignment (e.g. sources/websites used or students with whom you discussed this assignment) 2. Do you have any comments or suggestions for this lab exercise?

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Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 Assignment 4 – Noise and Correlation 1. If a signal is measured as 2.5 V and the noise is 28 mV (28 × 10−3 V), what is the SNR in dB? 2. A single sinusoidal signal is found with some noise. If the RMS value of the noise is 0.5 V and the SNR is 10 dB, what is the RMS amplitude of the sinusoid? 3. The file signal_noise.mat contains a variable x that consists of a 1.0-V peak sinusoidal signal buried in noise. What is the SNR for this signal and noise? Assume that the noise RMS is much greater than the signal RMS. Note: “signal_noise.mat” and other files used in these assignments can be downloaded from the content area of Brightspace, within the “Data Files for Exercises” folder. These files can be opened in Matlab by copying into the active folder and double-clicking on the file or using the Matlab load command using the format: load(‘signal_noise.mat’). To discover the variables within the files use the Matlab who command. 4. An 8-bit ADC converter that has an input range of ±5 V is used to convert a signal that ranges between ±2 V. What is the SNR of the input if the input noise equals the quantization noise of the converter? Hint: Refer to Equation below to find the quantization noise: 5. The file filter1.mat contains the spectrum of a fourth-order lowpass filter as variable x in dB. The file also contains the corresponding frequencies of x in variable freq. Plot the spectrum of this filter both as dB versus log frequency and as linear amplitude versus linear frequency. The frequency axis should range between 10 and 400 Hz in both plots. Hint: Use Equation below to convert: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 6. Generate one cycle of the square wave similar to the one shown below in a 500-point MATLAB array. Determine the RMS value of this waveform. [Hint: When you take the square of the data array, be sure to use a period before the up arrow so that MATLAB does the squaring point-by-point (i.e., x.^2).]. 7. A resistor produces 10 μV noise (i.e., 10 × 10−6 V noise) when the room temperature is 310 K and the bandwidth is 1 kHz (i.e., 1000 Hz). What current noise would be produced by this resistor? 8. A 3-ma current flows through both a diode (i.e., a semiconductor) and a 20,000-Ω (i.e., 20-kΩ) resistor. What is the net current noise, in? Assume a bandwidth of 1 kHz (i.e., 1 × 103 Hz). Which of the two components is responsible for producing the most noise? 9. Determine if the two signals, x and y, in file correl1.mat are correlated by checking the angle between them. 10. Modify the approach used in Practice Problem 3 to find the angle between short signals: Do not attempt to plot these vectors as it would require a 6-dimensional plot!

Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 Assignment 4 – Noise and Correlation 1. If a signal is measured as 2.5 V and the noise is 28 mV (28 × 10−3 V), what is the SNR in dB? 2. A single sinusoidal signal is found with some noise. If the RMS value of the noise is 0.5 V and the SNR is 10 dB, what is the RMS amplitude of the sinusoid? 3. The file signal_noise.mat contains a variable x that consists of a 1.0-V peak sinusoidal signal buried in noise. What is the SNR for this signal and noise? Assume that the noise RMS is much greater than the signal RMS. Note: “signal_noise.mat” and other files used in these assignments can be downloaded from the content area of Brightspace, within the “Data Files for Exercises” folder. These files can be opened in Matlab by copying into the active folder and double-clicking on the file or using the Matlab load command using the format: load(‘signal_noise.mat’). To discover the variables within the files use the Matlab who command. 4. An 8-bit ADC converter that has an input range of ±5 V is used to convert a signal that ranges between ±2 V. What is the SNR of the input if the input noise equals the quantization noise of the converter? Hint: Refer to Equation below to find the quantization noise: 5. The file filter1.mat contains the spectrum of a fourth-order lowpass filter as variable x in dB. The file also contains the corresponding frequencies of x in variable freq. Plot the spectrum of this filter both as dB versus log frequency and as linear amplitude versus linear frequency. The frequency axis should range between 10 and 400 Hz in both plots. Hint: Use Equation below to convert: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 6. Generate one cycle of the square wave similar to the one shown below in a 500-point MATLAB array. Determine the RMS value of this waveform. [Hint: When you take the square of the data array, be sure to use a period before the up arrow so that MATLAB does the squaring point-by-point (i.e., x.^2).]. 7. A resistor produces 10 μV noise (i.e., 10 × 10−6 V noise) when the room temperature is 310 K and the bandwidth is 1 kHz (i.e., 1000 Hz). What current noise would be produced by this resistor? 8. A 3-ma current flows through both a diode (i.e., a semiconductor) and a 20,000-Ω (i.e., 20-kΩ) resistor. What is the net current noise, in? Assume a bandwidth of 1 kHz (i.e., 1 × 103 Hz). Which of the two components is responsible for producing the most noise? 9. Determine if the two signals, x and y, in file correl1.mat are correlated by checking the angle between them. 10. Modify the approach used in Practice Problem 3 to find the angle between short signals: Do not attempt to plot these vectors as it would require a 6-dimensional plot!

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Overview The human body can regulate its function responding to the change of its environment. Temperature is one of the factors which can modulate the body function. Refer to the related lectures and other resources; answer the followed questions (question 1-5 need at least 400 words together): Q1 In case of cold weather how does human body detect the coldness? Explain the signal detection, delivery, processing and involved cells, tissues and organs.

Overview The human body can regulate its function responding to the change of its environment. Temperature is one of the factors which can modulate the body function. Refer to the related lectures and other resources; answer the followed questions (question 1-5 need at least 400 words together): Q1 In case of cold weather how does human body detect the coldness? Explain the signal detection, delivery, processing and involved cells, tissues and organs.

  The chief brain mechanisms for heat regulation are established … Read More...
1. A biological psychologist would be most interested in conducting research on the relationship between A) neurotransmitters and depression. B) bone density and body size. C) self-esteem and popularity. D) genetics and eye color. 2. The function of dendrites is to A) receive incoming signals from other neurons. B) release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons. C) coordinate the activation of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. D) control pain through the release of opiate-like chemicals into the brain. 3. Sensory neurons are located in the A) thalamus. B) reticular formation. C) peripheral nervous system. D) sensory cortex. 4. The part of the brainstem that controls heartbeat and breathing is called the A) cerebellum. B) medulla. C) amygdala. D) thalamus. 5. After flying from California to New York, Arthur experienced a restless, sleepless night. His problem was most likely caused by a disruption of his normal A) change blindness. B) circadian rhythm. C) hypnagogic sensations. D) sleep paralysis. 6. Mr. Oates always sleeps restlessly, snorting and gasping throughout the night. It is most likely that Mr. Oates suffers from A) sleep apnea. B) narcolepsy. C) night terrors. D) insomnia. 7. A condition in which a person can respond to a visual stimulus without consciously experiencing it is known as A) narcolepsy. B) change blindness. C) REM rebound. D) blindsight. 8. Consciousness is to unconsciousness as ________ is to ________. A) tolerance; withdrawal B) sequential processing; parallel processing C) latent content; manifest content D) delta wave; alpha wave 9. Auditory stimulation is first processed in the ________ lobes. A) occipital B) temporal C) frontal D) parietal 10. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that A) causes sleepiness. B) lessens physical pain. C) reduces depressed moods. D) triggers muscle contractions. 11. Which of the following is not one of the phases of the general adaptation syndrome: A) attention B) alarm reaction C) resistance D) exhaustion 12. People with Type B personality A) Are at a greater risk for heart disease B) Tend to be more easy-going than those with Type A personality C) Are at a greater risk for depression D) Tend to be more motivated to do well than those with Type A personality 13. Which is an example of problem-focused coping A) Studying harder for an exam after you got a bad grade on the first one B) Trying not to think about how angry you are C) Distracting yourself by watching a funny movie D) Talking about how upset you are with your friend 14. People with an external locus of think that A) events are largely outside of their control B) too much personal freedom decreases life satisfaction. C) individuals can influence their own outcomes in life. D) self-control gets permanently weaker with age 15. Which of the following is a benefit of social support A) improved immune system functioning B) decreased blood pressure C) improved health D) all of the above

1. A biological psychologist would be most interested in conducting research on the relationship between A) neurotransmitters and depression. B) bone density and body size. C) self-esteem and popularity. D) genetics and eye color. 2. The function of dendrites is to A) receive incoming signals from other neurons. B) release neurotransmitters into the spatial junctions between neurons. C) coordinate the activation of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous systems. D) control pain through the release of opiate-like chemicals into the brain. 3. Sensory neurons are located in the A) thalamus. B) reticular formation. C) peripheral nervous system. D) sensory cortex. 4. The part of the brainstem that controls heartbeat and breathing is called the A) cerebellum. B) medulla. C) amygdala. D) thalamus. 5. After flying from California to New York, Arthur experienced a restless, sleepless night. His problem was most likely caused by a disruption of his normal A) change blindness. B) circadian rhythm. C) hypnagogic sensations. D) sleep paralysis. 6. Mr. Oates always sleeps restlessly, snorting and gasping throughout the night. It is most likely that Mr. Oates suffers from A) sleep apnea. B) narcolepsy. C) night terrors. D) insomnia. 7. A condition in which a person can respond to a visual stimulus without consciously experiencing it is known as A) narcolepsy. B) change blindness. C) REM rebound. D) blindsight. 8. Consciousness is to unconsciousness as ________ is to ________. A) tolerance; withdrawal B) sequential processing; parallel processing C) latent content; manifest content D) delta wave; alpha wave 9. Auditory stimulation is first processed in the ________ lobes. A) occipital B) temporal C) frontal D) parietal 10. Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that A) causes sleepiness. B) lessens physical pain. C) reduces depressed moods. D) triggers muscle contractions. 11. Which of the following is not one of the phases of the general adaptation syndrome: A) attention B) alarm reaction C) resistance D) exhaustion 12. People with Type B personality A) Are at a greater risk for heart disease B) Tend to be more easy-going than those with Type A personality C) Are at a greater risk for depression D) Tend to be more motivated to do well than those with Type A personality 13. Which is an example of problem-focused coping A) Studying harder for an exam after you got a bad grade on the first one B) Trying not to think about how angry you are C) Distracting yourself by watching a funny movie D) Talking about how upset you are with your friend 14. People with an external locus of think that A) events are largely outside of their control B) too much personal freedom decreases life satisfaction. C) individuals can influence their own outcomes in life. D) self-control gets permanently weaker with age 15. Which of the following is a benefit of social support A) improved immune system functioning B) decreased blood pressure C) improved health D) all of the above

The correct answer has an “*” in front of it. … Read More...