For Day 24 Homework Cover Sheet Name:_________________________________________________ 1. Read Pages from 364-371, or watch the videos listed below  Percentage, Ratio and Proportions Problems (11 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLoRCRXTYv4  Direct and Inverse Variation (5 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8x0rZklxLLE 2. Attempt problems from page 111 to 113 3. Write a summary and answer questions below from your reading or watching of the videos. a) What is a proportion? b) What is a direct variation? c) What is an inverse variation? List any parts of the video lecture (if there are any) that were unclear or you had trouble understanding. Please be specific and do not just say “All of it”. Questions you had difficulty with or felt stuck on- List the number for the ALEKS topics you were stuck on from the list at the end of the video logs-   ALEKS Topics Mastered Solving a linear equation with several occurrences of the variable: Fractional forms with binomial numerators Translating a sentence into a compound inequality U.S. Customary area unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values: Two-step conversion Using two steps to solve an equation with whole numbers Word problem involving multiple rates Word problem on combined variation Word problem on direct variation Word problem on inverse proportions Word problem on inverse variation Word problem on mixed number proportions Word problem on proportions: Problem type 1 Word problem on proportions: Problem type 2 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 1 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 2 Writing a direct variation equation Writing an equation that models variation Areas of rectangles with the same perimeter Circumference ratios Conversions involving measurements in feet and inches Finding an angle measure for a triangle with an extended side Finding an angle measure of a triangle given two angles Finding angle measures of a right or isosceles triangle given angles with variables Finding simple interest without a calculator Finding the missing length in a figure Finding the original price given the sale price and percent discount Finding the percentage increase or decrease: Advanced Finding the perimeter or area of a rectangle given one of these values Finding the radius or the diameter of a circle given its circumference Finding the sale price without a calculator given the original price and percent discount Finding the value for a new score that will yield a given mean Identifying and naming congruent triangles Identifying direct variation equations Identifying direct variation from ordered pairs and writing equations Identifying properties used to solve a linear equation Identifying similar or congruent shapes on a grid Identifying solutions to a linear equation in one variable: Two-step equations Identifying solutions to a linear inequality in one variable Perimeter of a piecewise rectangular figure Sides of polygons having the same perimeter Similar polygons Similar right triangles

For Day 24 Homework Cover Sheet Name:_________________________________________________ 1. Read Pages from 364-371, or watch the videos listed below  Percentage, Ratio and Proportions Problems (11 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLoRCRXTYv4  Direct and Inverse Variation (5 min) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8x0rZklxLLE 2. Attempt problems from page 111 to 113 3. Write a summary and answer questions below from your reading or watching of the videos. a) What is a proportion? b) What is a direct variation? c) What is an inverse variation? List any parts of the video lecture (if there are any) that were unclear or you had trouble understanding. Please be specific and do not just say “All of it”. Questions you had difficulty with or felt stuck on- List the number for the ALEKS topics you were stuck on from the list at the end of the video logs-   ALEKS Topics Mastered Solving a linear equation with several occurrences of the variable: Fractional forms with binomial numerators Translating a sentence into a compound inequality U.S. Customary area unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values U.S. Customary unit conversion with whole number values: Two-step conversion Using two steps to solve an equation with whole numbers Word problem involving multiple rates Word problem on combined variation Word problem on direct variation Word problem on inverse proportions Word problem on inverse variation Word problem on mixed number proportions Word problem on proportions: Problem type 1 Word problem on proportions: Problem type 2 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 1 Word problem with linear inequalities: Problem type 2 Writing a direct variation equation Writing an equation that models variation Areas of rectangles with the same perimeter Circumference ratios Conversions involving measurements in feet and inches Finding an angle measure for a triangle with an extended side Finding an angle measure of a triangle given two angles Finding angle measures of a right or isosceles triangle given angles with variables Finding simple interest without a calculator Finding the missing length in a figure Finding the original price given the sale price and percent discount Finding the percentage increase or decrease: Advanced Finding the perimeter or area of a rectangle given one of these values Finding the radius or the diameter of a circle given its circumference Finding the sale price without a calculator given the original price and percent discount Finding the value for a new score that will yield a given mean Identifying and naming congruent triangles Identifying direct variation equations Identifying direct variation from ordered pairs and writing equations Identifying properties used to solve a linear equation Identifying similar or congruent shapes on a grid Identifying solutions to a linear equation in one variable: Two-step equations Identifying solutions to a linear inequality in one variable Perimeter of a piecewise rectangular figure Sides of polygons having the same perimeter Similar polygons Similar right triangles

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Make sure to use quotes to support each answers! Double spaced! 1-compar Into Thin Air with Four Corners. How are the climbers from Mount Everest similar to Kira Salak? Different? 2- Compare the dynamic of the crew from the Kon-tiki with the dynamic of the climbers from Into Thin Air. How are they similar? Different? 3- Explain Jack Kerouac’s (Sal Paradise’s) statement ‘’ the road is life,’’ using events from the book to support your answer. 4- Apply Alain de Botton’s theory of the sublime to experiences of any of the other writers/book we read this semester. What does he mean? 5- Explain how Eric Lehman’s memoir of his life in Connecticut is also a travel story. How is it different or similar to a ‘’memoir’’ like Jack Keroauc’s On the Road? 6- Using Alain de Botton’s book and two others as examples, explain our motives for travel affects our experiences.

Make sure to use quotes to support each answers! Double spaced! 1-compar Into Thin Air with Four Corners. How are the climbers from Mount Everest similar to Kira Salak? Different? 2- Compare the dynamic of the crew from the Kon-tiki with the dynamic of the climbers from Into Thin Air. How are they similar? Different? 3- Explain Jack Kerouac’s (Sal Paradise’s) statement ‘’ the road is life,’’ using events from the book to support your answer. 4- Apply Alain de Botton’s theory of the sublime to experiences of any of the other writers/book we read this semester. What does he mean? 5- Explain how Eric Lehman’s memoir of his life in Connecticut is also a travel story. How is it different or similar to a ‘’memoir’’ like Jack Keroauc’s On the Road? 6- Using Alain de Botton’s book and two others as examples, explain our motives for travel affects our experiences.

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These two are also similar. However, their factored forms are different. Where is the difference in the trinomial and where is the difference in their factored forms? How do you remember which is which? x^2 – 8x + 16 x^2 + 8x + 16

These two are also similar. However, their factored forms are different. Where is the difference in the trinomial and where is the difference in their factored forms? How do you remember which is which? x^2 – 8x + 16 x^2 + 8x + 16

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PHSX 220 Homework 13 Paper – Due Online April 28 – 5:00 pm SHM and Wave the Equation Problem 1: A hanging mass system with a mass of 85 kg, spring constant of k= 490 N/m is realeased from rest from a distance of 10 meters below the systems equilibrium position (similar values to the bottom of a bungee jump). Calculate the following quantities in regards to this system after being released at t=0: a) The angular frequency of the system (radians/sec) b) The frequency of oscillations for the system (Hz) c) The period of oscillations for the system (seconds) d) The time it takes to get back to the equilibrium position of the system for the rst time Problem 2: A horizontal spring-mass system (mass of 2:21×10􀀀25 kg) with no friction has an ocsillation frequency of 9,192,631,770 cycles per second. (a second is de ned by 9,192,631,770 cycles of a Cs-133 atom)). Calculate the e ective spring constant of the system Problem 3: A swinging person, such as Tarzan, can be modeled after a simple pendulum with a mass of 85 kg and a length of 10 m. Consider the mass being released from rest at t=0 at an angle of +15 degrees from the vertical. Calculate the following quantities in regards to this system. You need to be in radians mode for this problem a) The angular frequency of the system (radians/sec) b) The frequency of oscillations for the system in (Hz) c) The period of oscillations of the system (seconds) d) Sketch plots of the angular position, angular velocity and angular acceleration of the system as a function of time. Hint: These will always help you with these time to it takes to a certain point in it’s cycle questions. e) The time it takes for the mass to get half way through its rst cycle (or to the other side of the swing if you were interested in timing say a rescue e ort or something along those lines) . f) The maximum angular velocity of the mass g) The maximum angular accleration of the mass h) The magnitude of the angular momentum of the mass at 3 seconds i) The magnitude of the torque acting on the mass at 3 seconds Problem 4: A wave has a wavenumber of 1 m-1, and an angular frequency of 2 radians per second, travels in the +x direction and has a maximum transverse amplitude of 0.1 m. At t=0, and x =0 the y position is equal to 0.0 m (y(0,0) = 0.0 m). a) Calculate the wavelength of the wave b) Calculate the period of oscillations for the wave c) Calculate the wave speed along the x axis d) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the transverse position of the wave at x=0.5 m and t = 8s e) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the transverse velocity of the wave at x=0.5 m and t = 8s f) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the transverse acceleration of the wave at x=0.5 m and t = 8s Problem 5-6: Chapter 16 Problem 10, 22 Additional Suggested Problems with Solutions Provided: Chapter 16 Problems 5, 9, 15, 45

PHSX 220 Homework 13 Paper – Due Online April 28 – 5:00 pm SHM and Wave the Equation Problem 1: A hanging mass system with a mass of 85 kg, spring constant of k= 490 N/m is realeased from rest from a distance of 10 meters below the systems equilibrium position (similar values to the bottom of a bungee jump). Calculate the following quantities in regards to this system after being released at t=0: a) The angular frequency of the system (radians/sec) b) The frequency of oscillations for the system (Hz) c) The period of oscillations for the system (seconds) d) The time it takes to get back to the equilibrium position of the system for the rst time Problem 2: A horizontal spring-mass system (mass of 2:21×10􀀀25 kg) with no friction has an ocsillation frequency of 9,192,631,770 cycles per second. (a second is de ned by 9,192,631,770 cycles of a Cs-133 atom)). Calculate the e ective spring constant of the system Problem 3: A swinging person, such as Tarzan, can be modeled after a simple pendulum with a mass of 85 kg and a length of 10 m. Consider the mass being released from rest at t=0 at an angle of +15 degrees from the vertical. Calculate the following quantities in regards to this system. You need to be in radians mode for this problem a) The angular frequency of the system (radians/sec) b) The frequency of oscillations for the system in (Hz) c) The period of oscillations of the system (seconds) d) Sketch plots of the angular position, angular velocity and angular acceleration of the system as a function of time. Hint: These will always help you with these time to it takes to a certain point in it’s cycle questions. e) The time it takes for the mass to get half way through its rst cycle (or to the other side of the swing if you were interested in timing say a rescue e ort or something along those lines) . f) The maximum angular velocity of the mass g) The maximum angular accleration of the mass h) The magnitude of the angular momentum of the mass at 3 seconds i) The magnitude of the torque acting on the mass at 3 seconds Problem 4: A wave has a wavenumber of 1 m-1, and an angular frequency of 2 radians per second, travels in the +x direction and has a maximum transverse amplitude of 0.1 m. At t=0, and x =0 the y position is equal to 0.0 m (y(0,0) = 0.0 m). a) Calculate the wavelength of the wave b) Calculate the period of oscillations for the wave c) Calculate the wave speed along the x axis d) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the transverse position of the wave at x=0.5 m and t = 8s e) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the transverse velocity of the wave at x=0.5 m and t = 8s f) Calculate the magnitude and direction of the transverse acceleration of the wave at x=0.5 m and t = 8s Problem 5-6: Chapter 16 Problem 10, 22 Additional Suggested Problems with Solutions Provided: Chapter 16 Problems 5, 9, 15, 45

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ELEC153 Circuit Theory II M2A4 Lab: AC Parallel Circuits Introduction In this experiment we work with AC parallel circuits. As we did in the AC series circuits lab, the results obtained through Transient Analysis in MultiSim will be verified by manual calculations. Procedure 1. Figure 1 is the circuit we want to analyze.The voltage source is 24 volts peak at 1000 Hz. Figure 1: AC parallel circuit used for analysis using MultiSim Unlike the series circuit, there is no resistor in series with the voltage source that allows us to plot the current by taking advantage of its in-phase relationship. So, in order to measure the current produced by the source (total current) add a 1 Ohm resistor in series with the source. This small resistor will not affect the calculations. Figure 2: Arrangement for analyzing the current waveforms 2. Run the simulations and with the oscilloscope measure both the source voltage and the voltage across the resistor. You should get a plot similar to the following graph: Figure 3: Source voltage (red) and source current (blue) waveforms 3. From the resulting analysis plot, determine the peak current. Record it here. Measured Peak Current 4. Determine the peak current by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured peak current? Explain. Calculated Peak Current 5. Calculate the phase-shift. Using the method presented in the last lab, measure the time difference at the zero-crossing of the two signals. Record it here. Time difference 6. From the resulting calculation, determine the phase shift by using the following formula Record it here. Measured Phase Shift 7. Determine the phase shift by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured phase shift? Explain. Calculated Phase Shift 8. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 9. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 10. Replace the capacitor with a 0.8 H inductor. Set the source frequency back to 1000 Hz. Perform Transient Analysis and measure the current amplitude and phase shift. Record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 11. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 12. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 13. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift Write-up and Submission In general, for each lab you do, you will be asked to setup certain circuits, simulate them, record the results, verify the results are correct by hand, and then discuss the solution. Your lab write-up should contain a one page, single spaced discussion of the lab experiment, what went right for you, what you had difficulty with, what you learned from the experiment, how it applies to our coursework, and any other comment you can think of. In addition, you should include screen shots from the MultiSim software and any other figure, table, or diagram as necessary.

ELEC153 Circuit Theory II M2A4 Lab: AC Parallel Circuits Introduction In this experiment we work with AC parallel circuits. As we did in the AC series circuits lab, the results obtained through Transient Analysis in MultiSim will be verified by manual calculations. Procedure 1. Figure 1 is the circuit we want to analyze.The voltage source is 24 volts peak at 1000 Hz. Figure 1: AC parallel circuit used for analysis using MultiSim Unlike the series circuit, there is no resistor in series with the voltage source that allows us to plot the current by taking advantage of its in-phase relationship. So, in order to measure the current produced by the source (total current) add a 1 Ohm resistor in series with the source. This small resistor will not affect the calculations. Figure 2: Arrangement for analyzing the current waveforms 2. Run the simulations and with the oscilloscope measure both the source voltage and the voltage across the resistor. You should get a plot similar to the following graph: Figure 3: Source voltage (red) and source current (blue) waveforms 3. From the resulting analysis plot, determine the peak current. Record it here. Measured Peak Current 4. Determine the peak current by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured peak current? Explain. Calculated Peak Current 5. Calculate the phase-shift. Using the method presented in the last lab, measure the time difference at the zero-crossing of the two signals. Record it here. Time difference 6. From the resulting calculation, determine the phase shift by using the following formula Record it here. Measured Phase Shift 7. Determine the phase shift by calculation. Record it here. Does it match the measured phase shift? Explain. Calculated Phase Shift 8. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 9. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 10. Replace the capacitor with a 0.8 H inductor. Set the source frequency back to 1000 Hz. Perform Transient Analysis and measure the current amplitude and phase shift. Record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 11. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift 12. Change the frequency of the voltage source to 5000 Hz. Re-simulate and perform a Transient Analysis to find the new circuit current and phase angle. Measure them and record them here: Measured Current Measured Phase Shift 13. Perform the manual calculations needed to find the circuit current and phase shift. Record the calculated values here. Do they match the measured values within reason? What has happened to the circuit with an increase in frequency? Calculated Current Calculated Phase Shift Write-up and Submission In general, for each lab you do, you will be asked to setup certain circuits, simulate them, record the results, verify the results are correct by hand, and then discuss the solution. Your lab write-up should contain a one page, single spaced discussion of the lab experiment, what went right for you, what you had difficulty with, what you learned from the experiment, how it applies to our coursework, and any other comment you can think of. In addition, you should include screen shots from the MultiSim software and any other figure, table, or diagram as necessary.

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Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
Chapter 4 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Advice for the Quarterback A quarterback is set up to throw the football to a receiver who is running with a constant velocity directly away from the quarterback and is now a distance away from the quarterback. The quarterback figures that the ball must be thrown at an angle to the horizontal and he estimates that the receiver must catch the ball a time interval after it is thrown to avoid having opposition players prevent the receiver from making the catch. In the following you may assume that the ball is thrown and caught at the same height above the level playing field. Assume that the y coordinate of the ball at the instant it is thrown or caught is and that the horizontal position of the quaterback is . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and use the pictured inertial coordinate system when solving the problem. Part A Find , the vertical component of the velocity of the ball when the quarterback releases it. Express in terms of and . Hint 1. Equation of motion in y direction What is the expression for , the height of the ball as a function of time? Answer in terms of , , and . v r D  tc y = 0 x = 0 g v0y v0y tc g y(t) t g v0y ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Hint 2. Height at which the ball is caught, Remember that after time the ball was caught at the same height as it had been released. That is, . ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B Find , the initial horizontal component of velocity of the ball. Express your answer for in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Receiver’s position Find , the receiver’s position before he catches the ball. Answer in terms of , , and . ANSWER: Football’s position y(t) = v0yt− g 1 2 t2 y(tc) tc y(tc) = y0 = 0 v0y = gtc 2 v0x v0x D tc vr xr D vr tc xr = D + vrtc Typesetting math: 100% Find , the horizontal distance that the ball travels before reaching the receiver. Answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Part C Find the speed with which the quarterback must throw the ball. Answer in terms of , , , and . Hint 1. How to approach the problem Remember that velocity is a vector; from solving Parts A and B you have the two components, from which you can find the magnitude of this vector. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part D xc v0x tc xc = v0xtc v0x = + D tc vr v0 D tc vr g v0 = ( + ) + D tc vr 2 ( ) gtc 2 2 −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% Assuming that the quarterback throws the ball with speed , find the angle above the horizontal at which he should throw it. Your solution should contain an inverse trig function (entered as asin, acos, or atan). Give your answer in terms of already known quantities, , , and . Hint 1. Find angle from and Think of velocity as a vector with Cartesian coordinates and . Find the angle that this vector would make with the x axis using the results of Parts A and B. ANSWER: Answer Requested Direction of Velocity at Various Times in Flight for Projectile Motion Conceptual Question For each of the motions described below, determine the algebraic sign (positive, negative, or zero) of the x component and y component of velocity of the object at the time specified. For all of the motions, the positive x axis points to the right and the positive y axis points upward. Alex, a mountaineer, must leap across a wide crevasse. The other side of the crevasse is below the point from which he leaps, as shown in the figure. Alex leaps horizontally and successfully makes the jump. v0  v0x v0y v0  v0x v0y v0xx^ v0yy^   = atan( ) v0y v0x Typesetting math: 100% Part A Determine the algebraic sign of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity at the instant he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Algebraic sign of velocity The algebraic sign of the velocity is determined solely by comparing the direction in which the object is moving with the direction that is defined to be positive. In this example, to the right is defined to be the positive x direction and upward the positive y direction. Therefore, any object moving to the right, whether speeding up, slowing down, or even simultaneously moving upward or downward, has a positive x velocity. Similarly, if the object is moving downward, regardless of any other aspect of its motion, its y velocity is negative. Hint 2. Sketch Alex’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant after he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. ANSWER: ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Part B Determine the algebraic signs of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity the instant before he lands at the end of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Sketch Alex’s final velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant before he safely lands on the other side of the crevasse. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: Answer Requested Typesetting math: 100% At the buzzer, a basketball player shoots a desperation shot. The ball goes in! Part C Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part D Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity at the ball’s maximum height. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s velocity at maximum height Typesetting math: 100% On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant it reaches its maximum height. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested PSS 4.1 Projectile Motion Problems Learning Goal: Typesetting math: 100% To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 4.1 for projectile motion problems. A rock thrown with speed 9.00 and launch angle 30.0 (above the horizontal) travels a horizontal distance of = 17.0 before hitting the ground. From what height was the rock thrown? Use the value = 9.810 for the free-fall acceleration. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 4.1 Projectile motion problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions, such as treating the object as a particle. Is it reasonable to ignore air resistance? VISUALIZE: Use a pictorial representation. Establish a coordinate system with the x axis horizontal and the y axis vertical. Show important points in the motion on a sketch. Define symbols, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The acceleration is known: and . Thus, the problem becomes one of two-dimensional kinematics. The kinematic equations are , . is the same for the horizontal and vertical components of the motion. Find from one component, and then use that value for the other component. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model Start by making simplifying assumptions: Model the rock as a particle in free fall. You can ignore air resistance because the rock is a relatively heavy object moving relatively slowly. Visualize Part A Which diagram represents an accurate sketch of the rock’s trajectory? Hint 1. The launch angle In a projectile’s motion, the angle of the initial velocity above the horizontal is called the launch angle. ANSWER: m/s  d m g m/s2 ax = 0 ay = −g xf = xi +vixt, yf = yi +viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfx = vix = constant, and vfy = viy − gt t t v i Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B As stated in the strategy, choose a coordinate system where the x axis is horizontal and the y axis is vertical. Note that in the strategy, the y component of the projectile’s acceleration, , is taken to be negative. This implies that the positive y axis is upward. Use the same convention for your y axis, and take the positive x axis to be to the right. Where you choose your origin doesn’t change the answer to the question, but choosing an origin can make a problem easier to solve (even if only a bit). Usually it is nice if the majority of the quantities you are given and the quantity you are trying to solve for take positive values relative to your chosen origin. Given this goal, what location for the origin of the coordinate system would make this problem easiest? ANSWER: ay At ground level below the point where the rock is launched At the point where the rock strikes the ground At the peak of the trajectory At the point where the rock is released At ground level below the peak of the trajectory Typesetting math: 100% Correct It’s best to place the origin of the coordinate system at ground level below the launching point because in this way all the points of interest (the launching point and the landing point) will have positive coordinates. (Based on your experience, you know that it’s generally easier to work with positive coordinates.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an arbitrary choice. The correct solution of the problem will not depend on the location of the origin of your coordinate system. Now, define symbols representing initial and final position, velocity, and time. Your target variable is , the initial y coordinate of the rock. Your pictorial representation should be complete now, and similar to the picture below: Solve Part C Find the height from which the rock was launched. Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. yi yi Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem The time needed to move horizontally to the final position = 17.0 is the same time needed for the rock to rise from the initial position to the peak of its trajectory and then fall to the ground. Use the information you have about motion in the horizontal direction to solve for . Knowing this time will allow you to use the equations of motion for the vertical direction to solve for . Hint 2. Find the time spent in the air How long ( ) is the rock in the air? Express your answer in seconds to three significant figures. Hint 1. Determine which equation to use Which of the equations given in the strategy and shown below is the most appropriate to calculate the time the rock spent in the air? ANSWER: Hint 2. Find the x component of the initial velocity What is the x component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: t xf = d m yi t yi t t xf = xi + vixt yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt vix = 7.79 m/s Typesetting math: 100% Hint 3. Find the y component of the initial velocity What is the y component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Assess Part D A second rock is thrown straight upward with a speed 4.500 . If this rock takes 2.181 to fall to the ground, from what height was it released? Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. Hint 1. Identify the known variables What are the values of , , , and for the second rock? Take the positive y axis to be upward and the origin to be located on the ground where the rock lands. Express your answers to four significant figures in the units shown to the right, separated by commas. ANSWER: t = 2.18 s viy = 4.50 m/s yi = 13.5 m m/s s H yf viy t a Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Hint 2. Determine which equation to use to find the height Which equation should you use to find ? Keep in mind that if the positive y axis is upward and the origin is located on the ground, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Projectile motion is made up of two independent motions: uniform motion at constant velocity in the horizontal direction and free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Because both rocks were thrown with the same initial vertical velocity, 4.500 , and fell the same vertical distance of 13.5 , they were in the air for the same amount of time. This result was expected and helps to confirm that you did the calculation in Part C correctly. ± Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A , , , = 0,4.500,2.181,-yf viy t a 9.810 m, m/s, s, m/s2 H yi = H yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt = − 2g( − ) v2f y v2i y yf yi H = 13.5 m viy = m/s m  = 45 D = 220 m g = 9.8 m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Find , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Introduce the (unknown) variables and for the initial components of velocity. Then use kinematics to relate them and solve for . What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Find Find the horizontal component of the initial velocity. Express your answer symbolically in terms of and given symbolic quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Find What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of . ANSWER: ANSWER: ta vy0 vx0 ta vy0 ta D vx0 vx0 ta vx0 = D ta vy0 vy0 vx0 vy0 = vx0 vy0 = D ta Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. From the change in the vertical component of velocity, you should be able to find in terms of and . Give your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Find When applied to the y-component of velocity, in this problem the formula for with constant acceleration is What is , the vertical component of velocity when the arrow hits the tree? Answer symbolically in terms of only. ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Put the algebra together to find symbolically. If you have an expression for the initial vertical velocity component in terms in terms of and , and another in terms of and , you should be able to eliminate this initial component to find an expression for Express your answer symbolically in terms of given variables. ANSWER: ta vy0 g vy0 g vy(ta) v(t) −g vy(t) = vy0 − g t vy(ta ) vy0 vy(ta) = −vy0 ta = 2vy0 g ta D ta g ta ta2 t2 = a 2D g Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Answer Requested Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. When should the apple be dropped The apple should be dropped at the time equal to the total time it takes the arrow to reach the tree minus the time it takes the apple to fall 6.0 meters. Hint 2. Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters How long does it take an apple to fall 6.0 meters? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: ta = 6.7 s tf = 1.1 s td = 5.6 s Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Accelerating Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. Part A Consider the video you just watched. Suppose we replace the original launcher with one that fires the ball upward at twice the speed. We make no other changes. How far behind the cart will the ball land, compared to the distance in the original experiment? Hint 1. Determine how long the ball is in the air How will doubling the initial upward speed of the ball change the time the ball spends in the air? A kinematic equation may be helpful here. The time in the air will ANSWER: be cut in half. stay the same. double. quadruple. Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Determine the appropriate kinematic expression Which of the following kinematic equations correctly describes the horizontal distance between the ball and the cart at the moment the ball lands? The cart’s initial horizontal velocity is , its horizontal acceleration is , and is the time elapsed between launch and impact. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct The ball will spend twice as much time in the air ( , where is the ball’s initial upward velocity), so it will land four times farther behind the cart: (where is the cart’s horizontal acceleration). Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Moving Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. d v0x ax t d = v0x t d = 1 2 axv0x t2 d = v0x t+ 1 2 axt2 d = 1 2 axt2 the same distance twice as far half as far four times as far by a factor not listed above t = 2v0y/g v0y d = 1 2 axt2 ax Typesetting math: 100% Part A The crew of a cargo plane wishes to drop a crate of supplies on a target below. To hit the target, when should the crew drop the crate? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. How to approach the problem While the crate is on the plane, it shares the plane’s velocity. What is the crate’s velocity immediately after it is released? Hint 2. What affects the motion of the crate? Gravity will accelerate the crate downward. What, if anything, affects the crate’s horizontal motion? (Keep in mind that we are told to ignore air resistance, even though that’s not very realistic in this situation.) ANSWER: Correct At the moment it is released, the crate shares the plane’s horizontal velocity. In the absence of air resistance, the crate would remain directly below the plane as it fell. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. Before the plane is directly over the target After the plane has flown over the target When the plane is directly over the target Typesetting math: 100% You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Typesetting math: 100%

Chapter 4 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, February 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Advice for the Quarterback A quarterback is set up to throw the football to a receiver who is running with a constant velocity directly away from the quarterback and is now a distance away from the quarterback. The quarterback figures that the ball must be thrown at an angle to the horizontal and he estimates that the receiver must catch the ball a time interval after it is thrown to avoid having opposition players prevent the receiver from making the catch. In the following you may assume that the ball is thrown and caught at the same height above the level playing field. Assume that the y coordinate of the ball at the instant it is thrown or caught is and that the horizontal position of the quaterback is . Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity, and use the pictured inertial coordinate system when solving the problem. Part A Find , the vertical component of the velocity of the ball when the quarterback releases it. Express in terms of and . Hint 1. Equation of motion in y direction What is the expression for , the height of the ball as a function of time? Answer in terms of , , and . v r D  tc y = 0 x = 0 g v0y v0y tc g y(t) t g v0y ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Hint 2. Height at which the ball is caught, Remember that after time the ball was caught at the same height as it had been released. That is, . ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B Find , the initial horizontal component of velocity of the ball. Express your answer for in terms of , , and . Hint 1. Receiver’s position Find , the receiver’s position before he catches the ball. Answer in terms of , , and . ANSWER: Football’s position y(t) = v0yt− g 1 2 t2 y(tc) tc y(tc) = y0 = 0 v0y = gtc 2 v0x v0x D tc vr xr D vr tc xr = D + vrtc Typesetting math: 100% Find , the horizontal distance that the ball travels before reaching the receiver. Answer in terms of and . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Part C Find the speed with which the quarterback must throw the ball. Answer in terms of , , , and . Hint 1. How to approach the problem Remember that velocity is a vector; from solving Parts A and B you have the two components, from which you can find the magnitude of this vector. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part D xc v0x tc xc = v0xtc v0x = + D tc vr v0 D tc vr g v0 = ( + ) + D tc vr 2 ( ) gtc 2 2 −−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−−  Typesetting math: 100% Assuming that the quarterback throws the ball with speed , find the angle above the horizontal at which he should throw it. Your solution should contain an inverse trig function (entered as asin, acos, or atan). Give your answer in terms of already known quantities, , , and . Hint 1. Find angle from and Think of velocity as a vector with Cartesian coordinates and . Find the angle that this vector would make with the x axis using the results of Parts A and B. ANSWER: Answer Requested Direction of Velocity at Various Times in Flight for Projectile Motion Conceptual Question For each of the motions described below, determine the algebraic sign (positive, negative, or zero) of the x component and y component of velocity of the object at the time specified. For all of the motions, the positive x axis points to the right and the positive y axis points upward. Alex, a mountaineer, must leap across a wide crevasse. The other side of the crevasse is below the point from which he leaps, as shown in the figure. Alex leaps horizontally and successfully makes the jump. v0  v0x v0y v0  v0x v0y v0xx^ v0yy^   = atan( ) v0y v0x Typesetting math: 100% Part A Determine the algebraic sign of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity at the instant he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Algebraic sign of velocity The algebraic sign of the velocity is determined solely by comparing the direction in which the object is moving with the direction that is defined to be positive. In this example, to the right is defined to be the positive x direction and upward the positive y direction. Therefore, any object moving to the right, whether speeding up, slowing down, or even simultaneously moving upward or downward, has a positive x velocity. Similarly, if the object is moving downward, regardless of any other aspect of its motion, its y velocity is negative. Hint 2. Sketch Alex’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant after he leaves the ground at the beginning of the jump. ANSWER: ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Part B Determine the algebraic signs of Alex’s x velocity and y velocity the instant before he lands at the end of the jump. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. Sketch Alex’s final velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing Alex’s velocity the instant before he safely lands on the other side of the crevasse. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: Answer Requested Typesetting math: 100% At the buzzer, a basketball player shoots a desperation shot. The ball goes in! Part C Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s initial velocity On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant after it leaves the player’s hands. ANSWER: Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Correct Part D Determine the algebraic signs of the ball’s x velocity and y velocity at the ball’s maximum height. Type the algebraic signs of the x velocity and the y velocity separated by a comma (examples: +,- and 0,+). Hint 1. Sketch the basketball’s velocity at maximum height Typesetting math: 100% On the diagram below, sketch the vector representing the velocity of the basketball the instant it reaches its maximum height. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested PSS 4.1 Projectile Motion Problems Learning Goal: Typesetting math: 100% To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 4.1 for projectile motion problems. A rock thrown with speed 9.00 and launch angle 30.0 (above the horizontal) travels a horizontal distance of = 17.0 before hitting the ground. From what height was the rock thrown? Use the value = 9.810 for the free-fall acceleration. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 4.1 Projectile motion problems MODEL: Make simplifying assumptions, such as treating the object as a particle. Is it reasonable to ignore air resistance? VISUALIZE: Use a pictorial representation. Establish a coordinate system with the x axis horizontal and the y axis vertical. Show important points in the motion on a sketch. Define symbols, and identify what you are trying to find. SOLVE: The acceleration is known: and . Thus, the problem becomes one of two-dimensional kinematics. The kinematic equations are , . is the same for the horizontal and vertical components of the motion. Find from one component, and then use that value for the other component. ASSESS: Check that your result has the correct units, is reasonable, and answers the question. Model Start by making simplifying assumptions: Model the rock as a particle in free fall. You can ignore air resistance because the rock is a relatively heavy object moving relatively slowly. Visualize Part A Which diagram represents an accurate sketch of the rock’s trajectory? Hint 1. The launch angle In a projectile’s motion, the angle of the initial velocity above the horizontal is called the launch angle. ANSWER: m/s  d m g m/s2 ax = 0 ay = −g xf = xi +vixt, yf = yi +viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfx = vix = constant, and vfy = viy − gt t t v i Typesetting math: 100% Typesetting math: 100% Correct Part B As stated in the strategy, choose a coordinate system where the x axis is horizontal and the y axis is vertical. Note that in the strategy, the y component of the projectile’s acceleration, , is taken to be negative. This implies that the positive y axis is upward. Use the same convention for your y axis, and take the positive x axis to be to the right. Where you choose your origin doesn’t change the answer to the question, but choosing an origin can make a problem easier to solve (even if only a bit). Usually it is nice if the majority of the quantities you are given and the quantity you are trying to solve for take positive values relative to your chosen origin. Given this goal, what location for the origin of the coordinate system would make this problem easiest? ANSWER: ay At ground level below the point where the rock is launched At the point where the rock strikes the ground At the peak of the trajectory At the point where the rock is released At ground level below the peak of the trajectory Typesetting math: 100% Correct It’s best to place the origin of the coordinate system at ground level below the launching point because in this way all the points of interest (the launching point and the landing point) will have positive coordinates. (Based on your experience, you know that it’s generally easier to work with positive coordinates.) Keep in mind, however, that this is an arbitrary choice. The correct solution of the problem will not depend on the location of the origin of your coordinate system. Now, define symbols representing initial and final position, velocity, and time. Your target variable is , the initial y coordinate of the rock. Your pictorial representation should be complete now, and similar to the picture below: Solve Part C Find the height from which the rock was launched. Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. yi yi Typesetting math: 100% Hint 1. How to approach the problem The time needed to move horizontally to the final position = 17.0 is the same time needed for the rock to rise from the initial position to the peak of its trajectory and then fall to the ground. Use the information you have about motion in the horizontal direction to solve for . Knowing this time will allow you to use the equations of motion for the vertical direction to solve for . Hint 2. Find the time spent in the air How long ( ) is the rock in the air? Express your answer in seconds to three significant figures. Hint 1. Determine which equation to use Which of the equations given in the strategy and shown below is the most appropriate to calculate the time the rock spent in the air? ANSWER: Hint 2. Find the x component of the initial velocity What is the x component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: t xf = d m yi t yi t t xf = xi + vixt yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt vix = 7.79 m/s Typesetting math: 100% Hint 3. Find the y component of the initial velocity What is the y component of the rock’s initial velocity? Express your answer in meters per second to three significant figures. ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Assess Part D A second rock is thrown straight upward with a speed 4.500 . If this rock takes 2.181 to fall to the ground, from what height was it released? Express your answer in meters to three significant figures. Hint 1. Identify the known variables What are the values of , , , and for the second rock? Take the positive y axis to be upward and the origin to be located on the ground where the rock lands. Express your answers to four significant figures in the units shown to the right, separated by commas. ANSWER: t = 2.18 s viy = 4.50 m/s yi = 13.5 m m/s s H yf viy t a Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Hint 2. Determine which equation to use to find the height Which equation should you use to find ? Keep in mind that if the positive y axis is upward and the origin is located on the ground, . ANSWER: ANSWER: Answer Requested Projectile motion is made up of two independent motions: uniform motion at constant velocity in the horizontal direction and free-fall motion in the vertical direction. Because both rocks were thrown with the same initial vertical velocity, 4.500 , and fell the same vertical distance of 13.5 , they were in the air for the same amount of time. This result was expected and helps to confirm that you did the calculation in Part C correctly. ± Arrow Hits Apple An arrow is shot at an angle of above the horizontal. The arrow hits a tree a horizontal distance away, at the same height above the ground as it was shot. Use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Part A , , , = 0,4.500,2.181,-yf viy t a 9.810 m, m/s, s, m/s2 H yi = H yf = yi + viyt− g(t 1 2 )2 vfy = viy − gt = − 2g( − ) v2f y v2i y yf yi H = 13.5 m viy = m/s m  = 45 D = 220 m g = 9.8 m/s2 Typesetting math: 100% Find , the time that the arrow spends in the air. Answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. Find the initial upward component of velocity in terms of D. Introduce the (unknown) variables and for the initial components of velocity. Then use kinematics to relate them and solve for . What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of and . Hint 1. Find Find the horizontal component of the initial velocity. Express your answer symbolically in terms of and given symbolic quantities. ANSWER: Hint 2. Find What is the vertical component of the initial velocity? Express your answer symbolically in terms of . ANSWER: ANSWER: ta vy0 vx0 ta vy0 ta D vx0 vx0 ta vx0 = D ta vy0 vy0 vx0 vy0 = vx0 vy0 = D ta Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Find the time of flight in terms of the initial vertical component of velocity. From the change in the vertical component of velocity, you should be able to find in terms of and . Give your answer in terms of and . Hint 1. Find When applied to the y-component of velocity, in this problem the formula for with constant acceleration is What is , the vertical component of velocity when the arrow hits the tree? Answer symbolically in terms of only. ANSWER: ANSWER: Hint 3. Put the algebra together to find symbolically. If you have an expression for the initial vertical velocity component in terms in terms of and , and another in terms of and , you should be able to eliminate this initial component to find an expression for Express your answer symbolically in terms of given variables. ANSWER: ta vy0 g vy0 g vy(ta) v(t) −g vy(t) = vy0 − g t vy(ta ) vy0 vy(ta) = −vy0 ta = 2vy0 g ta D ta g ta ta2 t2 = a 2D g Typesetting math: 100% ANSWER: Answer Requested Suppose someone drops an apple from a vertical distance of 6.0 meters, directly above the point where the arrow hits the tree. Part B How long after the arrow was shot should the apple be dropped, in order for the arrow to pierce the apple as the arrow hits the tree? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. Hint 1. When should the apple be dropped The apple should be dropped at the time equal to the total time it takes the arrow to reach the tree minus the time it takes the apple to fall 6.0 meters. Hint 2. Find the time it takes for the apple to fall 6.0 meters How long does it take an apple to fall 6.0 meters? Express your answer numerically in seconds, to two significant figures. ANSWER: Answer Requested ANSWER: ta = 6.7 s tf = 1.1 s td = 5.6 s Typesetting math: 100% Answer Requested Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Accelerating Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. Part A Consider the video you just watched. Suppose we replace the original launcher with one that fires the ball upward at twice the speed. We make no other changes. How far behind the cart will the ball land, compared to the distance in the original experiment? Hint 1. Determine how long the ball is in the air How will doubling the initial upward speed of the ball change the time the ball spends in the air? A kinematic equation may be helpful here. The time in the air will ANSWER: be cut in half. stay the same. double. quadruple. Typesetting math: 100% Hint 2. Determine the appropriate kinematic expression Which of the following kinematic equations correctly describes the horizontal distance between the ball and the cart at the moment the ball lands? The cart’s initial horizontal velocity is , its horizontal acceleration is , and is the time elapsed between launch and impact. ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct The ball will spend twice as much time in the air ( , where is the ball’s initial upward velocity), so it will land four times farther behind the cart: (where is the cart’s horizontal acceleration). Video Tutor: Ball Fired Upward from Moving Cart First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the questions at right. You can watch the video again at any point. d v0x ax t d = v0x t d = 1 2 axv0x t2 d = v0x t+ 1 2 axt2 d = 1 2 axt2 the same distance twice as far half as far four times as far by a factor not listed above t = 2v0y/g v0y d = 1 2 axt2 ax Typesetting math: 100% Part A The crew of a cargo plane wishes to drop a crate of supplies on a target below. To hit the target, when should the crew drop the crate? Ignore air resistance. Hint 1. How to approach the problem While the crate is on the plane, it shares the plane’s velocity. What is the crate’s velocity immediately after it is released? Hint 2. What affects the motion of the crate? Gravity will accelerate the crate downward. What, if anything, affects the crate’s horizontal motion? (Keep in mind that we are told to ignore air resistance, even though that’s not very realistic in this situation.) ANSWER: Correct At the moment it is released, the crate shares the plane’s horizontal velocity. In the absence of air resistance, the crate would remain directly below the plane as it fell. Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. Before the plane is directly over the target After the plane has flown over the target When the plane is directly over the target Typesetting math: 100% You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Typesetting math: 100%

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Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 Assignment 4 – Noise and Correlation 1. If a signal is measured as 2.5 V and the noise is 28 mV (28 × 10−3 V), what is the SNR in dB? 2. A single sinusoidal signal is found with some noise. If the RMS value of the noise is 0.5 V and the SNR is 10 dB, what is the RMS amplitude of the sinusoid? 3. The file signal_noise.mat contains a variable x that consists of a 1.0-V peak sinusoidal signal buried in noise. What is the SNR for this signal and noise? Assume that the noise RMS is much greater than the signal RMS. Note: “signal_noise.mat” and other files used in these assignments can be downloaded from the content area of Brightspace, within the “Data Files for Exercises” folder. These files can be opened in Matlab by copying into the active folder and double-clicking on the file or using the Matlab load command using the format: load(‘signal_noise.mat’). To discover the variables within the files use the Matlab who command. 4. An 8-bit ADC converter that has an input range of ±5 V is used to convert a signal that ranges between ±2 V. What is the SNR of the input if the input noise equals the quantization noise of the converter? Hint: Refer to Equation below to find the quantization noise: 5. The file filter1.mat contains the spectrum of a fourth-order lowpass filter as variable x in dB. The file also contains the corresponding frequencies of x in variable freq. Plot the spectrum of this filter both as dB versus log frequency and as linear amplitude versus linear frequency. The frequency axis should range between 10 and 400 Hz in both plots. Hint: Use Equation below to convert: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 6. Generate one cycle of the square wave similar to the one shown below in a 500-point MATLAB array. Determine the RMS value of this waveform. [Hint: When you take the square of the data array, be sure to use a period before the up arrow so that MATLAB does the squaring point-by-point (i.e., x.^2).]. 7. A resistor produces 10 μV noise (i.e., 10 × 10−6 V noise) when the room temperature is 310 K and the bandwidth is 1 kHz (i.e., 1000 Hz). What current noise would be produced by this resistor? 8. A 3-ma current flows through both a diode (i.e., a semiconductor) and a 20,000-Ω (i.e., 20-kΩ) resistor. What is the net current noise, in? Assume a bandwidth of 1 kHz (i.e., 1 × 103 Hz). Which of the two components is responsible for producing the most noise? 9. Determine if the two signals, x and y, in file correl1.mat are correlated by checking the angle between them. 10. Modify the approach used in Practice Problem 3 to find the angle between short signals: Do not attempt to plot these vectors as it would require a 6-dimensional plot!

Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 Assignment 4 – Noise and Correlation 1. If a signal is measured as 2.5 V and the noise is 28 mV (28 × 10−3 V), what is the SNR in dB? 2. A single sinusoidal signal is found with some noise. If the RMS value of the noise is 0.5 V and the SNR is 10 dB, what is the RMS amplitude of the sinusoid? 3. The file signal_noise.mat contains a variable x that consists of a 1.0-V peak sinusoidal signal buried in noise. What is the SNR for this signal and noise? Assume that the noise RMS is much greater than the signal RMS. Note: “signal_noise.mat” and other files used in these assignments can be downloaded from the content area of Brightspace, within the “Data Files for Exercises” folder. These files can be opened in Matlab by copying into the active folder and double-clicking on the file or using the Matlab load command using the format: load(‘signal_noise.mat’). To discover the variables within the files use the Matlab who command. 4. An 8-bit ADC converter that has an input range of ±5 V is used to convert a signal that ranges between ±2 V. What is the SNR of the input if the input noise equals the quantization noise of the converter? Hint: Refer to Equation below to find the quantization noise: 5. The file filter1.mat contains the spectrum of a fourth-order lowpass filter as variable x in dB. The file also contains the corresponding frequencies of x in variable freq. Plot the spectrum of this filter both as dB versus log frequency and as linear amplitude versus linear frequency. The frequency axis should range between 10 and 400 Hz in both plots. Hint: Use Equation below to convert: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 6. Generate one cycle of the square wave similar to the one shown below in a 500-point MATLAB array. Determine the RMS value of this waveform. [Hint: When you take the square of the data array, be sure to use a period before the up arrow so that MATLAB does the squaring point-by-point (i.e., x.^2).]. 7. A resistor produces 10 μV noise (i.e., 10 × 10−6 V noise) when the room temperature is 310 K and the bandwidth is 1 kHz (i.e., 1000 Hz). What current noise would be produced by this resistor? 8. A 3-ma current flows through both a diode (i.e., a semiconductor) and a 20,000-Ω (i.e., 20-kΩ) resistor. What is the net current noise, in? Assume a bandwidth of 1 kHz (i.e., 1 × 103 Hz). Which of the two components is responsible for producing the most noise? 9. Determine if the two signals, x and y, in file correl1.mat are correlated by checking the angle between them. 10. Modify the approach used in Practice Problem 3 to find the angle between short signals: Do not attempt to plot these vectors as it would require a 6-dimensional plot!

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