Give an example of when an analogy can be a really good advance organizer and an example of when an analogy can be a very poor advance organizer.

Give an example of when an analogy can be a really good advance organizer and an example of when an analogy can be a very poor advance organizer.

An ‘advance organizer is a cognitive instructional policy used to … Read More...
CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

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Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUF-T5JubDg#t=49 According to the video, which of the three scholars accepted the invasion of Iraq? A. Realists and liberals tended to reject it, but the constructivists thought it was a good idea. B. Realists tended to reject it, but the constructivists and liberals thought it was a good idea. C. Liberals tended to reject it, but the realists and constructivists thought it was a good idea. D. All of the scholars rejected it. E. None of the scholars rejected it. Which of the following was NOT given as a reason to be concerned about the war in Iraq? A. First and foremost, peace needed to prevail. B. The invasion was form of moralizing or crusading. C. The invasion undermined respect for International law. D. The invasion didn’t serve clear U.S. interests. E. The situation had the potential to become a quagmire. In the video, one of the topics under discussion concerns democratic governance. How much do their views conflict? A. Caleb Gallemore and J.D. Bowen disagree, because democracy is a social construct. B. Randall Schweller and J.D. Bowen disagree, because one side believes that democracy is impossible to spread while the other thinks it may be possible. C. Randall Schweller and Caleb Gallemore disagree with J.D. Bowen, because the first two view the attempt to spread democracy as a moralizing crusade. D. J.D. Bowen and Randall Schweller disagree with Caleb Gallemore, who doesn’t think that democracy can be spread successfully. E. All of the authors agree on the possibility of establishing democracy in Iraq. What sorts of things were on the minds of constructivists considering the war in Iraq? A. the history of colonialism, tensions between Islam and the West, and the United States’ perceived role as a world leader B. whether the war served U.S. interests C. whether the Coalition of the Willing would have forces sufficient to topple Saddam Hussein D. the likelihood that the war would result in a quagmire E. the importance of promoting human rights Professor Bowen says that liberals disagreed about invading Iraq but agreed on the form of government to be established there. What was that form of government? A. a loose confederacy of tribes B. a constitutional monarchy with negotiated rights for minorities C. a communist dictatorship with religious tolerance D. a democracy with respect for human rights E. a long-term military installation with UN forces overseeing government functions

Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XUF-T5JubDg#t=49 According to the video, which of the three scholars accepted the invasion of Iraq? A. Realists and liberals tended to reject it, but the constructivists thought it was a good idea. B. Realists tended to reject it, but the constructivists and liberals thought it was a good idea. C. Liberals tended to reject it, but the realists and constructivists thought it was a good idea. D. All of the scholars rejected it. E. None of the scholars rejected it. Which of the following was NOT given as a reason to be concerned about the war in Iraq? A. First and foremost, peace needed to prevail. B. The invasion was form of moralizing or crusading. C. The invasion undermined respect for International law. D. The invasion didn’t serve clear U.S. interests. E. The situation had the potential to become a quagmire. In the video, one of the topics under discussion concerns democratic governance. How much do their views conflict? A. Caleb Gallemore and J.D. Bowen disagree, because democracy is a social construct. B. Randall Schweller and J.D. Bowen disagree, because one side believes that democracy is impossible to spread while the other thinks it may be possible. C. Randall Schweller and Caleb Gallemore disagree with J.D. Bowen, because the first two view the attempt to spread democracy as a moralizing crusade. D. J.D. Bowen and Randall Schweller disagree with Caleb Gallemore, who doesn’t think that democracy can be spread successfully. E. All of the authors agree on the possibility of establishing democracy in Iraq. What sorts of things were on the minds of constructivists considering the war in Iraq? A. the history of colonialism, tensions between Islam and the West, and the United States’ perceived role as a world leader B. whether the war served U.S. interests C. whether the Coalition of the Willing would have forces sufficient to topple Saddam Hussein D. the likelihood that the war would result in a quagmire E. the importance of promoting human rights Professor Bowen says that liberals disagreed about invading Iraq but agreed on the form of government to be established there. What was that form of government? A. a loose confederacy of tribes B. a constitutional monarchy with negotiated rights for minorities C. a communist dictatorship with religious tolerance D. a democracy with respect for human rights E. a long-term military installation with UN forces overseeing government functions

Watch the video, and then answer the questions below. According … Read More...
Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Athlete’s high salaries: Should they be paid that amount or … Read More...
Relection I Question: How does the short movie “The Necktie” typify Marx’s theory of alienation found in Rinehart? Can you relate the situation in the Necktie to the behaviour experiments found the Dan Ariely presentation? Use the text and films to put forth an idea. Your piece should be approximately two pages long. You should use APA for your answer and it should be in essay format. I have posted a short APA guide as well. Links to short films: ! http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_ariely_what_makes_us_feel_good_about_our_ work?language=en#t-­‐167402 ! https://www.nfb.ca/film/necktie/

Relection I Question: How does the short movie “The Necktie” typify Marx’s theory of alienation found in Rinehart? Can you relate the situation in the Necktie to the behaviour experiments found the Dan Ariely presentation? Use the text and films to put forth an idea. Your piece should be approximately two pages long. You should use APA for your answer and it should be in essay format. I have posted a short APA guide as well. Links to short films: ! http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_ariely_what_makes_us_feel_good_about_our_ work?language=en#t-­‐167402 ! https://www.nfb.ca/film/necktie/

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Chapter 7 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Book on a Table A book weighing 5 N rests on top of a table. Part A A downward force of magnitude 5 N is exerted on the book by the force of ANSWER: Part B An upward force of magnitude _____ is exerted on the _____ by the table. the table gravity inertia . ANSWER: Part C Do the downward force in Part A and the upward force in Part B constitute a 3rd law pair? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The reaction to the force in Part A is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____ . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 6 N / table 5 N / table 5 N / book 6 N / book yes no Part E The reaction to the force in Part B is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____. ANSWER: Part F Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts A and B are equal and opposite? ANSWER: Part G Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts B and E are equal and opposite? ANSWER: 5 N / earth / book / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / book / earth / upward 5 N / earth / book / downward 5 N / table / book / upward 5 N / table / earth / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / table / book / downward 5 N / earth / book / downward Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law Blocks in an Elevator Ranking Task Three blocks are stacked on top of each other inside an elevator as shown in the figure. Answer the following questions with reference to the eight forces defined as follows. the force of the 3 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 3 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 1 block on the floor, , and the force of the floor on the 1 block, . Part A Assume the elevator is at rest. Rank the magnitude of the forces. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law kg kg F3 on 2 kg kg F2 on 3 kg kg F3 on 1 kg kg F1 on 3 kg kg F2 on 1 kg kg F1 on 2 kg F1 on floor kg Ffloor on 1 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Newton’s 3rd Law Discussed Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s 3rd law, which states that a physical interaction always generates a pair of forces on the two interacting bodies. In Principia, Newton wrote: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. (translation by Cajori) The phrase after the colon (often omitted from textbooks) makes it clear that this is a statement about the nature of force. The central idea is that physical interactions (e.g., due to gravity, bodies touching, or electric forces) cause forces to arise between pairs of bodies. Each pairwise interaction produces a pair of opposite forces, one acting on each body. In summary, each physical interaction between two bodies generates a pair of forces. Whatever the physical cause of the interaction, the force on body A from body B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force on body B from body A. Incidentally, Newton states that the word “action” denotes both (a) the force due to an interaction and (b) the changes in momentum that it imparts to the two interacting bodies. If you haven’t learned about momentum, don’t worry; for now this is just a statement about the origin of forces. Mark each of the following statements as true or false. If a statement refers to “two bodies” interacting via some force, you are not to assume that these two bodies have the same mass. Part A Every force has one and only one 3rd law pair force. ANSWER: Part B The two forces in each pair act in opposite directions. ANSWER: Part C The two forces in each pair can either both act on the same body or they can act on different bodies. ANSWER: true false true false Part D The two forces in each pair may have different physical origins (for instance, one of the forces could be due to gravity, and its pair force could be due to friction or electric charge). ANSWER: Part E The two forces of a 3rd law pair always act on different bodies. ANSWER: Part F Given that two bodies interact via some force, the accelerations of these two bodies have the same magnitude but opposite directions. (Assume no other forces act on either body.) You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false true false Part G According to Newton’s 3rd law, the force on the (smaller) moon due to the (larger) earth is ANSWER: Pulling Three Blocks Three identical blocks connected by ideal strings are being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a horizontal force . The magnitude of the tension in the string between blocks B and C is = 3.00 . Assume that each block has mass = 0.400 . true false greater in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. greater in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude but antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. F T N m kg Part A What is the magnitude of the force? Express your answer numerically in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the tension in the string between block A and block B? Express your answer numerically in newtons You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pulling Two Blocks In the situation shown in the figure, a person is pulling with a constant, nonzero force on string 1, which is attached to block A. Block A is also attached to block B via string 2, as shown. For this problem, assume that neither string stretches and that friction is negligible. Both blocks have finite (nonzero) mass. F F = N TAB TAB = N F Part A Which one of the following statements correctly descibes the relationship between the accelerations of blocks A and B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B How does the magnitude of the tension in string 1, , compare with the tension in string 2, ? You did not open hints for this part. Block A has a larger acceleration than block B. Block B has a larger acceleration than block A. Both blocks have the same acceleration. More information is needed to determine the relationship between the accelerations. T1 T2 ANSWER: Tension in a Massless Rope Learning Goal: To understand the concept of tension and the relationship between tension and force. This problem introduces the concept of tension. The example is a rope, oriented vertically, that is being pulled from both ends. Let and (with u for up and d for down) represent the magnitude of the forces acting on the top and bottom of the rope, respectively. Assume that the rope is massless, so that its weight is negligible compared with the tension. (This is not a ridiculous approximation–modern rope materials such as Kevlar can carry tensions thousands of times greater than the weight of tens of meters of such rope.) Consider the three sections of rope labeled a, b, and c in the figure. At point 1, a downward force of magnitude acts on section a. At point 1, an upward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 1, the tension in the rope is . At point 2, a downward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 2, an upward force of magnitude acts on section c. At point 2, the tension in the rope is . Assume, too, that the rope is at equilibrium. Part A What is the magnitude of the downward force on section a? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: More information is needed to determine the relationship between and . T1 > T2 T1 = T2 T1 < T2 T1 T2 Fu Fd Fad Fbu T1 Fbd Fcu T2 Fad T1 Part B What is the magnitude of the upward force on section b? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: Part C The magnitude of the upward force on c, , and the magnitude of the downward force on b, , are equal because of which of Newton's laws? ANSWER: Part D The magnitude of the force is ____ . ANSWER: Fad = Fbu T1 Fbu = Fcu Fbd 1st 2nd 3rd Fbu Fbd Part E Now consider the forces on the ends of the rope. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of these two forces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F The ends of a massless rope are attached to two stationary objects (e.g., two trees or two cars) so that the rope makes a straight line. For this situation, which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply. ANSWER: less than greater than equal to Fu > Fd Fu = Fd Fu < Fd The tension in the rope is everywhere the same. The magnitudes of the forces exerted on the two objects by the rope are the same. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in opposite directions. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in the direction of the rope. Two Hanging Masses Two blocks with masses and hang one under the other. For this problem, take the positive direction to be upward, and use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Case 1: Blocks at rest For Parts A and B assume the blocks are at rest. Part A Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M1 M2 g T2 M1 M2 g Part B Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Case 2: Accelerating blocks For Parts C and D the blocks are now accelerating upward (due to the tension in the strings) with acceleration of magnitude . Part C Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T2 = T1 M1 M2 g T1 = a T2 M1 M2 a g Part D Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Video Tutor: Suspended Balls: Which String Breaks? First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the question at right. You can watch the video again at any point. T2 = T1 M1 M2 a g T1 = Part A A heavy crate is attached to the wall by a light rope, as shown in the figure. Another rope hangs off the opposite edge of the box. If you slowly increase the force on the free rope by pulling on it in a horizontal direction, which rope will break? Ignore friction and the mass of the ropes. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The rope attached to the wall will break. The rope that you are pulling on will break. Both ropes are equally likely to break.

Chapter 7 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Friday, March 14, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Book on a Table A book weighing 5 N rests on top of a table. Part A A downward force of magnitude 5 N is exerted on the book by the force of ANSWER: Part B An upward force of magnitude _____ is exerted on the _____ by the table. the table gravity inertia . ANSWER: Part C Do the downward force in Part A and the upward force in Part B constitute a 3rd law pair? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part D The reaction to the force in Part A is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____ . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: 6 N / table 5 N / table 5 N / book 6 N / book yes no Part E The reaction to the force in Part B is a force of magnitude _____, exerted on the _____ by the _____. Its direction is _____. ANSWER: Part F Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts A and B are equal and opposite? ANSWER: Part G Which of Newton’s laws dictates that the forces in Parts B and E are equal and opposite? ANSWER: 5 N / earth / book / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / book / earth / upward 5 N / earth / book / downward 5 N / table / book / upward 5 N / table / earth / upward 5 N / book / table / upward 5 N / table / book / downward 5 N / earth / book / downward Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law Blocks in an Elevator Ranking Task Three blocks are stacked on top of each other inside an elevator as shown in the figure. Answer the following questions with reference to the eight forces defined as follows. the force of the 3 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 3 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 3 block, , the force of the 2 block on the 1 block, , the force of the 1 block on the 2 block, , the force of the 1 block on the floor, , and the force of the floor on the 1 block, . Part A Assume the elevator is at rest. Rank the magnitude of the forces. Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Newton’s 1st or 2nd law Newton’s 3rd law kg kg F3 on 2 kg kg F2 on 3 kg kg F3 on 1 kg kg F1 on 3 kg kg F2 on 1 kg kg F1 on 2 kg F1 on floor kg Ffloor on 1 Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Newton’s 3rd Law Discussed Learning Goal: To understand Newton’s 3rd law, which states that a physical interaction always generates a pair of forces on the two interacting bodies. In Principia, Newton wrote: To every action there is always opposed an equal reaction: or, the mutual actions of two bodies upon each other are always equal, and directed to contrary parts. (translation by Cajori) The phrase after the colon (often omitted from textbooks) makes it clear that this is a statement about the nature of force. The central idea is that physical interactions (e.g., due to gravity, bodies touching, or electric forces) cause forces to arise between pairs of bodies. Each pairwise interaction produces a pair of opposite forces, one acting on each body. In summary, each physical interaction between two bodies generates a pair of forces. Whatever the physical cause of the interaction, the force on body A from body B is equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the force on body B from body A. Incidentally, Newton states that the word “action” denotes both (a) the force due to an interaction and (b) the changes in momentum that it imparts to the two interacting bodies. If you haven’t learned about momentum, don’t worry; for now this is just a statement about the origin of forces. Mark each of the following statements as true or false. If a statement refers to “two bodies” interacting via some force, you are not to assume that these two bodies have the same mass. Part A Every force has one and only one 3rd law pair force. ANSWER: Part B The two forces in each pair act in opposite directions. ANSWER: Part C The two forces in each pair can either both act on the same body or they can act on different bodies. ANSWER: true false true false Part D The two forces in each pair may have different physical origins (for instance, one of the forces could be due to gravity, and its pair force could be due to friction or electric charge). ANSWER: Part E The two forces of a 3rd law pair always act on different bodies. ANSWER: Part F Given that two bodies interact via some force, the accelerations of these two bodies have the same magnitude but opposite directions. (Assume no other forces act on either body.) You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: true false true false true false Part G According to Newton’s 3rd law, the force on the (smaller) moon due to the (larger) earth is ANSWER: Pulling Three Blocks Three identical blocks connected by ideal strings are being pulled along a horizontal frictionless surface by a horizontal force . The magnitude of the tension in the string between blocks B and C is = 3.00 . Assume that each block has mass = 0.400 . true false greater in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. greater in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude but antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. equal in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and antiparallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. smaller in magnitude and parallel to the force on the earth due to the moon. F T N m kg Part A What is the magnitude of the force? Express your answer numerically in newtons. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B What is the tension in the string between block A and block B? Express your answer numerically in newtons You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Pulling Two Blocks In the situation shown in the figure, a person is pulling with a constant, nonzero force on string 1, which is attached to block A. Block A is also attached to block B via string 2, as shown. For this problem, assume that neither string stretches and that friction is negligible. Both blocks have finite (nonzero) mass. F F = N TAB TAB = N F Part A Which one of the following statements correctly descibes the relationship between the accelerations of blocks A and B? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B How does the magnitude of the tension in string 1, , compare with the tension in string 2, ? You did not open hints for this part. Block A has a larger acceleration than block B. Block B has a larger acceleration than block A. Both blocks have the same acceleration. More information is needed to determine the relationship between the accelerations. T1 T2 ANSWER: Tension in a Massless Rope Learning Goal: To understand the concept of tension and the relationship between tension and force. This problem introduces the concept of tension. The example is a rope, oriented vertically, that is being pulled from both ends. Let and (with u for up and d for down) represent the magnitude of the forces acting on the top and bottom of the rope, respectively. Assume that the rope is massless, so that its weight is negligible compared with the tension. (This is not a ridiculous approximation–modern rope materials such as Kevlar can carry tensions thousands of times greater than the weight of tens of meters of such rope.) Consider the three sections of rope labeled a, b, and c in the figure. At point 1, a downward force of magnitude acts on section a. At point 1, an upward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 1, the tension in the rope is . At point 2, a downward force of magnitude acts on section b. At point 2, an upward force of magnitude acts on section c. At point 2, the tension in the rope is . Assume, too, that the rope is at equilibrium. Part A What is the magnitude of the downward force on section a? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: More information is needed to determine the relationship between and . T1 > T2 T1 = T2 T1 < T2 T1 T2 Fu Fd Fad Fbu T1 Fbd Fcu T2 Fad T1 Part B What is the magnitude of the upward force on section b? Express your answer in terms of the tension . ANSWER: Part C The magnitude of the upward force on c, , and the magnitude of the downward force on b, , are equal because of which of Newton's laws? ANSWER: Part D The magnitude of the force is ____ . ANSWER: Fad = Fbu T1 Fbu = Fcu Fbd 1st 2nd 3rd Fbu Fbd Part E Now consider the forces on the ends of the rope. What is the relationship between the magnitudes of these two forces? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part F The ends of a massless rope are attached to two stationary objects (e.g., two trees or two cars) so that the rope makes a straight line. For this situation, which of the following statements are true? Check all that apply. ANSWER: less than greater than equal to Fu > Fd Fu = Fd Fu < Fd The tension in the rope is everywhere the same. The magnitudes of the forces exerted on the two objects by the rope are the same. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in opposite directions. The forces exerted on the two objects by the rope must be in the direction of the rope. Two Hanging Masses Two blocks with masses and hang one under the other. For this problem, take the positive direction to be upward, and use for the magnitude of the acceleration due to gravity. Case 1: Blocks at rest For Parts A and B assume the blocks are at rest. Part A Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: M1 M2 g T2 M1 M2 g Part B Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Case 2: Accelerating blocks For Parts C and D the blocks are now accelerating upward (due to the tension in the strings) with acceleration of magnitude . Part C Find , the tension in the lower rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: T2 = T1 M1 M2 g T1 = a T2 M1 M2 a g Part D Find , the tension in the upper rope. Express your answer in terms of some or all of the variables , , , and . You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Video Tutor: Suspended Balls: Which String Breaks? First, launch the video below. You will be asked to use your knowledge of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. Then, close the video window and answer the question at right. You can watch the video again at any point. T2 = T1 M1 M2 a g T1 = Part A A heavy crate is attached to the wall by a light rope, as shown in the figure. Another rope hangs off the opposite edge of the box. If you slowly increase the force on the free rope by pulling on it in a horizontal direction, which rope will break? Ignore friction and the mass of the ropes. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. The rope attached to the wall will break. The rope that you are pulling on will break. Both ropes are equally likely to break.

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. External Marketing Environment factors: “Describe a time or situation when you felt like your world was changing. What feelings were you experiencing?”

. External Marketing Environment factors: “Describe a time or situation when you felt like your world was changing. What feelings were you experiencing?”

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Recalling a situation from a recent or past experience in which you were called upon or felt the need to persuade someone or some group to do something they didn’t have to do, describe how you went about it, what result you achieved, and what having reviewed some ‘rules of the road’ for effective persuasion, you might have included in your persuasive communication. (You may have ‘instinctively’ or naturally used many of the concepts we’ve reviewed-you can cite them as well)

Recalling a situation from a recent or past experience in which you were called upon or felt the need to persuade someone or some group to do something they didn’t have to do, describe how you went about it, what result you achieved, and what having reviewed some ‘rules of the road’ for effective persuasion, you might have included in your persuasive communication. (You may have ‘instinctively’ or naturally used many of the concepts we’ve reviewed-you can cite them as well)

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