Many people believe that choosing a job and choosing a career are the same. You know my position; I believe a JOB is Just over Broke. What is your position? Explain the differences between a job and a career.

Many people believe that choosing a job and choosing a career are the same. You know my position; I believe a JOB is Just over Broke. What is your position? Explain the differences between a job and a career.

A job is essentially one thing an individual do to … Read More...
This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

MEMO       To: Ms. Sara From: Ethics Monitoring … Read More...
Consider the problem of implementing insertion sort using a doubly-linked list instead of array. Namely, each element a of the linked list has ?elds a.previous, a.next and a.value. You are giving a stating element s of the linked list (so that s.previous = nil, s.value = A[1], s.next.value = A[2], etc.) (a) Give a pseudocode implementation of this algorithm, and analyze its running time in the T(f(n)) notation. Explain how we do not have to “bump” elements in order to create room for the next inserted elements. Is this saving asymptotically signi?cant? (b) Can we speed up the time of the implementation to O(n log n) by utilizing binary search

Consider the problem of implementing insertion sort using a doubly-linked list instead of array. Namely, each element a of the linked list has ?elds a.previous, a.next and a.value. You are giving a stating element s of the linked list (so that s.previous = nil, s.value = A[1], s.next.value = A[2], etc.) (a) Give a pseudocode implementation of this algorithm, and analyze its running time in the T(f(n)) notation. Explain how we do not have to “bump” elements in order to create room for the next inserted elements. Is this saving asymptotically signi?cant? (b) Can we speed up the time of the implementation to O(n log n) by utilizing binary search

info@checkyourstudy.com
Write a contemporary version of Oedipus Rex. What sort of modern setting would make sense for this ancient story? How could you imagine that Oedipus’s errors would occur in a modern world?

Write a contemporary version of Oedipus Rex. What sort of modern setting would make sense for this ancient story? How could you imagine that Oedipus’s errors would occur in a modern world?

info@checkyourstudy.com Write a contemporary version of Oedipus Rex. What sort … Read More...
Homework 1 Create a Solution for a Decision-making Process. Scenario: You’re a manager for Super Joe’s Cars that operates car dealerships throughout Kansas. SJ’s just recently acquired/merged local dealerships and now needs to ‘normalize’ their employee salaries. SJ’s now employs 30 employees that are each labeled as one of the following: Sales Representative , Senior Sales Representative, and Sales Executive. Due to different dealerships paying different salaries, these salaries are all different. SJ’s merger was a success, and has $100,000 to distribute raises to employees in order to realign them and have them close as possible to the industry average. Top management would like you to design a solution that will distribute this money to employees, with the top priority of moving as many employees as possible closer to the industry average. They have provided you with the data below (yes, it’s limited data) in order to do this. They also request that each employee gets a raise of some sort. Problem: What’s the ‘best’ way to allocate these dollars to your employees? Task: Use the data to create a SPREADSHEET that distributes the $100,000 to current employees. It should be well presented (FORMAT), and automate the process – so if the $100,000 is changed, the spreadsheet updates automatically (FORMULAS). This spreadsheet should also show other important information such as: Total salaries, current average salary per rank, new salary per rank, current deviation from the industry average, new deviation from industry average (DATA). **MUST BE DONE IN MICROSOFT EXCEL!! Shane’s Tips and Tricks: Identify your goal. In this case, you are essentially coming up with a solution to ‘who gets the raise’. There are many ways to create the solution, just choose what you feel is the best way. Identify numbers! Use $ and % signs, etc. USE FORMULAS. It’s pointless to create a spreadsheet that doesn’t calculate. A good spreadsheet allows users to change the data points and test different scenarios. If you have trouble, check out Atomic Learning on the FHSU website to view tutorials if needed. Make it pretty! Your spreadsheet should be clean, concise, and formatted nicely. Ideally, I could copy your spreadsheet and present it to others without modification. Highlight important information so it can easily be found. Use an assumption table. Your formulas should not contain numbers, but instead references to cells. An assumption table holds key information that will be used in multiple areas. You should be able to make one formula, ‘pull it down or across’, and it will work for all items. Typically when you use a number from the assumption table, you want it to be an absolute reference (meaning it doesn’t change when the formula is dragged across multiple rows). To do this, simply hit the F4 key. An assumption table can be located anywhere in the spreadsheet, but should be separate from spreadsheet data. How you are graded: Refer to the rubric with the assignment for more information on how you will be graded. Data Company Sales Employee Ranks Industry Average Salary Sales Representative $50,000 Senior Sales Representative $60,000 Sales Executive $75,000 Sales Representatives Salary Davidson Kaye 55,000 Corovic,Jose 43,000 Lane, Brandon 62,000 Wei, Guang 35,000 Drew, Richard 50,000 Adams, James 33,000 Spenser, William 51,000 Ray, Tony 41,000 Ryan, Mark 38,000 Warrem, Jason 53,000 Senior Sales Representatives Salary Ashley, Jane 53,000 Corning,Sandra 46,000 Scott, Rex 56,000 Duong,Linda 52,000 Bosa, Victor 37,000 UTran,Diem Thi 45,000 Dixon, James T 53,000 Goston, Sayeh 48,000 Jordan, Matthew 38,000 Menstell,Lori Lee 65,000 Sales Executives Salary Ching, Kam Hoong 57,000 Collins,Giovanni 75,000 Dixon,Eleonor 65,000 Lee,Brandon 60,000 Lunden,Haley 55,000 Rikki, Nicole 75,000 Scott, Bryan 67,000 Angel, Kathy 88,000 Quigly, James 59,000 Pham,Mary 80,000

Homework 1 Create a Solution for a Decision-making Process. Scenario: You’re a manager for Super Joe’s Cars that operates car dealerships throughout Kansas. SJ’s just recently acquired/merged local dealerships and now needs to ‘normalize’ their employee salaries. SJ’s now employs 30 employees that are each labeled as one of the following: Sales Representative , Senior Sales Representative, and Sales Executive. Due to different dealerships paying different salaries, these salaries are all different. SJ’s merger was a success, and has $100,000 to distribute raises to employees in order to realign them and have them close as possible to the industry average. Top management would like you to design a solution that will distribute this money to employees, with the top priority of moving as many employees as possible closer to the industry average. They have provided you with the data below (yes, it’s limited data) in order to do this. They also request that each employee gets a raise of some sort. Problem: What’s the ‘best’ way to allocate these dollars to your employees? Task: Use the data to create a SPREADSHEET that distributes the $100,000 to current employees. It should be well presented (FORMAT), and automate the process – so if the $100,000 is changed, the spreadsheet updates automatically (FORMULAS). This spreadsheet should also show other important information such as: Total salaries, current average salary per rank, new salary per rank, current deviation from the industry average, new deviation from industry average (DATA). **MUST BE DONE IN MICROSOFT EXCEL!! Shane’s Tips and Tricks: Identify your goal. In this case, you are essentially coming up with a solution to ‘who gets the raise’. There are many ways to create the solution, just choose what you feel is the best way. Identify numbers! Use $ and % signs, etc. USE FORMULAS. It’s pointless to create a spreadsheet that doesn’t calculate. A good spreadsheet allows users to change the data points and test different scenarios. If you have trouble, check out Atomic Learning on the FHSU website to view tutorials if needed. Make it pretty! Your spreadsheet should be clean, concise, and formatted nicely. Ideally, I could copy your spreadsheet and present it to others without modification. Highlight important information so it can easily be found. Use an assumption table. Your formulas should not contain numbers, but instead references to cells. An assumption table holds key information that will be used in multiple areas. You should be able to make one formula, ‘pull it down or across’, and it will work for all items. Typically when you use a number from the assumption table, you want it to be an absolute reference (meaning it doesn’t change when the formula is dragged across multiple rows). To do this, simply hit the F4 key. An assumption table can be located anywhere in the spreadsheet, but should be separate from spreadsheet data. How you are graded: Refer to the rubric with the assignment for more information on how you will be graded. Data Company Sales Employee Ranks Industry Average Salary Sales Representative $50,000 Senior Sales Representative $60,000 Sales Executive $75,000 Sales Representatives Salary Davidson Kaye 55,000 Corovic,Jose 43,000 Lane, Brandon 62,000 Wei, Guang 35,000 Drew, Richard 50,000 Adams, James 33,000 Spenser, William 51,000 Ray, Tony 41,000 Ryan, Mark 38,000 Warrem, Jason 53,000 Senior Sales Representatives Salary Ashley, Jane 53,000 Corning,Sandra 46,000 Scott, Rex 56,000 Duong,Linda 52,000 Bosa, Victor 37,000 UTran,Diem Thi 45,000 Dixon, James T 53,000 Goston, Sayeh 48,000 Jordan, Matthew 38,000 Menstell,Lori Lee 65,000 Sales Executives Salary Ching, Kam Hoong 57,000 Collins,Giovanni 75,000 Dixon,Eleonor 65,000 Lee,Brandon 60,000 Lunden,Haley 55,000 Rikki, Nicole 75,000 Scott, Bryan 67,000 Angel, Kathy 88,000 Quigly, James 59,000 Pham,Mary 80,000

For any additional help, please contact: info@checkyourstudy.com Call and Whatsapp … Read More...
1. Of all the skills in Bloom’s taxonomy, which are you most successful with in your own schooling? Which are more challenging for you?

1. Of all the skills in Bloom’s taxonomy, which are you most successful with in your own schooling? Which are more challenging for you?

Bloom’s Classification of Cognitive Skills Successful Category Definition Related Behaviors … Read More...
FSE 100 Extra Credit (20 points) Instructions: Read the description below and work through the design process to build an automated waste sorting system. Turn in the following deliverables in one document, typed: 1. Problem Statement – 1 point 2. Technical System Requirements (at least 3 complete sentences using “shall”) – 3 points 3. Judging Criteria (at least 3, explain why you chose them) – 2 points 4. AHP – 2 points 5. Summaries of your 3 design options (paragraph minimum for each option) – 3 points 6. Design Decision Matrix – 3 points 7. Orthographic Drawing of your final design (3 projections required) – 3 points 8. Activity Diagram of how your sorter functions – 3 points Description: The city of Tempe waste management has notified ASU that due to the exceptional effort the Sundevil students have made in the sustainability area, ASU has been contributing three times the amount of recyclable materials than what was predicted on a monthly basis. Unfortunately, due to the immense amount of materials being delivered, the city of Tempe waste management has asked for assistance from ASU prior to picking up the recyclable waste. They have requested that ASU implement an automated waste sorting system that would pre-filter all the materials so the city of Tempe can collect the materials based on one of three types and process the waste much faster. ASU has hired you to design an automated sorter, but due to the unexpected nature of this request, ASU prefers that this design be as simple and inexpensive to build as possible. The city of Tempe would like to have the waste categorized as either glass, plastic, or metal. Paper will not be considered in this design. Any glass that is sorted in your device needs to stay intact, and not break. Very few people will be able to monitor this device as it sorts, so it must be able to sort the items with no input from a user, as quickly as possible. This design cannot exceed 2m in length, width, or height, but the weight is unlimited. ASU is not giving any guidance as to the materials you can use, so you are free to shop for whatever you’d like, but keep in mind, the final cost of this device must be as inexpensive as possible. Submit through Blackboard or print out your document and turn it in to me no later than the date shown on Blackboard

FSE 100 Extra Credit (20 points) Instructions: Read the description below and work through the design process to build an automated waste sorting system. Turn in the following deliverables in one document, typed: 1. Problem Statement – 1 point 2. Technical System Requirements (at least 3 complete sentences using “shall”) – 3 points 3. Judging Criteria (at least 3, explain why you chose them) – 2 points 4. AHP – 2 points 5. Summaries of your 3 design options (paragraph minimum for each option) – 3 points 6. Design Decision Matrix – 3 points 7. Orthographic Drawing of your final design (3 projections required) – 3 points 8. Activity Diagram of how your sorter functions – 3 points Description: The city of Tempe waste management has notified ASU that due to the exceptional effort the Sundevil students have made in the sustainability area, ASU has been contributing three times the amount of recyclable materials than what was predicted on a monthly basis. Unfortunately, due to the immense amount of materials being delivered, the city of Tempe waste management has asked for assistance from ASU prior to picking up the recyclable waste. They have requested that ASU implement an automated waste sorting system that would pre-filter all the materials so the city of Tempe can collect the materials based on one of three types and process the waste much faster. ASU has hired you to design an automated sorter, but due to the unexpected nature of this request, ASU prefers that this design be as simple and inexpensive to build as possible. The city of Tempe would like to have the waste categorized as either glass, plastic, or metal. Paper will not be considered in this design. Any glass that is sorted in your device needs to stay intact, and not break. Very few people will be able to monitor this device as it sorts, so it must be able to sort the items with no input from a user, as quickly as possible. This design cannot exceed 2m in length, width, or height, but the weight is unlimited. ASU is not giving any guidance as to the materials you can use, so you are free to shop for whatever you’d like, but keep in mind, the final cost of this device must be as inexpensive as possible. Submit through Blackboard or print out your document and turn it in to me no later than the date shown on Blackboard

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
FSE 100 Extra Credit (20 points) Instructions: Read the description below and work through the design process to build an automated waste sorting system. Turn in the following deliverables in one document, typed: 1. Problem Statement – 1 point 2. Technical System Requirements (at least 3 complete sentences using “shall”) – 3 points 3. Judging Criteria (at least 3, explain why you chose them) – 2 points 4. AHP – 2 points 5. Summaries of your 3 design options (paragraph minimum for each option) – 3 points 6. Design Decision Matrix – 3 points 7. Orthographic Drawing of your final design (3 projections required) – 3 points 8. Activity Diagram of how your sorter functions – 3 points Description: The city of Tempe waste management has notified ASU that due to the exceptional effort the Sundevil students have made in the sustainability area, ASU has been contributing three times the amount of recyclable materials than what was predicted on a monthly basis. Unfortunately, due to the immense amount of materials being delivered, the city of Tempe waste management has asked for assistance from ASU prior to picking up the recyclable waste. They have requested that ASU implement an automated waste sorting system that would pre-filter all the materials so the city of Tempe can collect the materials based on one of three types and process the waste much faster. ASU has hired you to design an automated sorter, but due to the unexpected nature of this request, ASU prefers that this design be as simple and inexpensive to build as possible. The city of Tempe would like to have the waste categorized as either glass, plastic, or metal. Paper will not be considered in this design. Any glass that is sorted in your device needs to stay intact, and not break. Very few people will be able to monitor this device as it sorts, so it must be able to sort the items with no input from a user, as quickly as possible. This design cannot exceed 2m in length, width, or height, but the weight is unlimited. ASU is not giving any guidance as to the materials you can use, so you are free to shop for whatever you’d like, but keep in mind, the final cost of this device must be as inexpensive as possible. Submit through Blackboard or print out your document and turn it in to me no later than the date shown on Blackboard.

FSE 100 Extra Credit (20 points) Instructions: Read the description below and work through the design process to build an automated waste sorting system. Turn in the following deliverables in one document, typed: 1. Problem Statement – 1 point 2. Technical System Requirements (at least 3 complete sentences using “shall”) – 3 points 3. Judging Criteria (at least 3, explain why you chose them) – 2 points 4. AHP – 2 points 5. Summaries of your 3 design options (paragraph minimum for each option) – 3 points 6. Design Decision Matrix – 3 points 7. Orthographic Drawing of your final design (3 projections required) – 3 points 8. Activity Diagram of how your sorter functions – 3 points Description: The city of Tempe waste management has notified ASU that due to the exceptional effort the Sundevil students have made in the sustainability area, ASU has been contributing three times the amount of recyclable materials than what was predicted on a monthly basis. Unfortunately, due to the immense amount of materials being delivered, the city of Tempe waste management has asked for assistance from ASU prior to picking up the recyclable waste. They have requested that ASU implement an automated waste sorting system that would pre-filter all the materials so the city of Tempe can collect the materials based on one of three types and process the waste much faster. ASU has hired you to design an automated sorter, but due to the unexpected nature of this request, ASU prefers that this design be as simple and inexpensive to build as possible. The city of Tempe would like to have the waste categorized as either glass, plastic, or metal. Paper will not be considered in this design. Any glass that is sorted in your device needs to stay intact, and not break. Very few people will be able to monitor this device as it sorts, so it must be able to sort the items with no input from a user, as quickly as possible. This design cannot exceed 2m in length, width, or height, but the weight is unlimited. ASU is not giving any guidance as to the materials you can use, so you are free to shop for whatever you’d like, but keep in mind, the final cost of this device must be as inexpensive as possible. Submit through Blackboard or print out your document and turn it in to me no later than the date shown on Blackboard.

  Problem statement      ASU has been contributing three … Read More...
Initial Data Collection After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.) After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Module 2 – Data Collection, Part 2 Module 2 continues to examine the data you are collecting with respect to issues of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and sufficiency. Please continue to collect data relevant to your inquiry and begin to think about how you will code this data into meaningful organizing principles. Be sure to continuously write memos about your process as a sort of idea journal that you can continually draw from when writing your assignments. Required Readings: Dana, N. F. & Yendol-Hoppey, D. – Revisit Chapter 6 Assignments: For assignment details refer to the “Assignments for the Course” section in this syllabus or the submission link within Blackboard. Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.)

Initial Data Collection After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.) After implementing your intervention/innovation, you may have noted that data collection isn’t exactly a linear process. Sometimes you need to go back and get more information, and sometimes you find yourself asking additional questions (that’s ok). In Chapter 6, Fichtman Dana and Yendol-Hoppey provide four steps to data analysis: 1. providing a description of the data; 2. making sense of what you have (and don’t have); 3. interpreting your data by creating statements about how the data informs an answer to the original question; 4. implications of the data. For this assignment, please develop responses to the first two steps using the following points as your guide: ● Please describe the data you’ve collected. ○ What did you see as you inquired? What was happening? ○ What are your initial insights into the data? ● Next, please explain how you have organized your data (“chronologically, by key events, or some combination of organizing units?”). ○ Have you provided the reader with evidence that you’ve looked at your inquiry from a number of angles and have collected trustworthy data? ○ Have you provided evidence of data triangulation? ○ What further questions do you have after your initial data collection? ○ How will you collect more information to satisfy your next questions? Module 2 – Data Collection, Part 2 Module 2 continues to examine the data you are collecting with respect to issues of validity, reliability, trustworthiness, and sufficiency. Please continue to collect data relevant to your inquiry and begin to think about how you will code this data into meaningful organizing principles. Be sure to continuously write memos about your process as a sort of idea journal that you can continually draw from when writing your assignments. Required Readings: Dana, N. F. & Yendol-Hoppey, D. – Revisit Chapter 6 Assignments: For assignment details refer to the “Assignments for the Course” section in this syllabus or the submission link within Blackboard. Assignment: Initial Data Collection (Due Week 2 Sunday, 11:59 p.m.)

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277