Course: PHYS 5426 — Quantum Statistical Physics Assignment #1 Instructor: Gennady Y. Chitov Date Assigned: January 15, 2014 Due Date: January 29, 2014 Problem 1. Prove [a; f(a†)] = @f(a†) @a† (1) [a†; f(a)] = −@f(a) @a (2) for arbitrary function f of operator which admits a series expansion. The Bose creation/ annihilation operators satisfy the standard commutation relations [a; a†] ≡ aa† − a†a = 1 (3) Hint: From Eqs.(1,2) one can figure out the corresponding commutation relations for the powers of creation/annihilation operators and then prove them by the method of mathematical induction. Note that for an arbitrary operator Aˆ: @A^n @A^ = nAˆn−1. Problem 2. In the presence of a constant external force acting on a one-dimensional oscillating particle its Hamiltonian becomes that of the so-called displaced oscillator, and the Schr¨odinger equation ˆH (q) = E (q) of the problem (cf. lecture notes) can be written in terms of dimensionless variables as ( − 1 2 d2 d2 + 1 2 2 − √ 2  ) () = ” () ; (4) where q = √ ~ m! and E = ~!”. a). Write the Schr¨odinger equation (4) in terms of the creation/annihilation operators of the harmonic oscillator ( = 0)  = √1 2 (a + a†) (5) d d = √1 2 (a − a†) (6) 1 Via a linear transformation to the new creation/annihilation operators ˜a†; ˜a preserving the bosonic commutation relations for ˜a†; ˜a map the problem (4) of the displaced oscillator onto that of a simple harmonic oscillator with new operators (˜a†; ˜a). b). Find the spectrum (eigenvalues) ” (E) of the displaced oscillator. c). Write the normalized eigenstates |n⟩ of the displaced Hamiltonian (4) via a† and the vacuum state |Θ◦⟩ of the new operators, i.e. ˜a|Θ◦⟩ = 0 (7) d). As follows from the completeness of the oscillator’s eigenstates, the vacuum state of the displaced oscillator |Θ◦⟩ can be related to the simple oscillator’s vacuum |0⟩ (i.e., a|0⟩ = 0) as |Θ◦⟩ = Ω(a†)|0⟩ (8) Find (up to a normalization factor) the operator function Ω(a†) relating two vacua. Hint: in working out Eqs.(7,8), employ Eqs.(1,2). Problem 3. Prove from the standard commutation relations ([ai; a † j ]∓ = ij , etc) that ⟨0|aiaja † ka † l |0⟩ = jkil ± ikjl (9) the sign depending on the statistics. Also calculate the vacuum expectation value ⟨0|ahaiaja † ka † l a† m |0⟩. Problem 4. In the formalism of second quantization the two-particle interaction term of the Hamiltonian for spinless fermions is given by ˆ V = 1 2 ∫ ∫ dxdy ˆ †(x) ˆ †(y)V(x; y) ˆ (y) ˆ (x) (10) For the short-ranged interaction V(x; y) = V(|x−y|) ≡ V(r) = e2 exp(−r)=r find ˆ V in the momentum representation. The field operators and the creation/annihilation operators in the momentum representation are related in the usual way, i.e., ˆ †(x) = ∫ dp (2)3 a†(p)e−ipx (11) Note that the limit  → 0 recovers the Coulomb (long-ranged) interaction V(r) = e2=r. What is the Fourier transform V(q) of the Coulomb interaction? 2 Problem 5. The matrix elements of a two-particle interaction from the previous problem can be written as ⟨k3k4|V|k1k2⟩ = (2)3(k1 + k2 − k3 − k4)V(q) (12) where q ≡ k3−k1 is the momentum transfer. Show that the diagonal part of the interaction operator ˆ V found on the previous problem in the k-representation, arises from momentum transfers q = 0 and q = k2−k1. Write down the two interaction terms and identify them as direct (q = 0) and exchange (q = k2 − k1) interactions. Draw the corresponding Feynman diagrams. Problem 6. Find the first correction to the temperature dependence of the chemical potential  of the degenerate ideal electron gas, assuming constant particle concentration ⟨N⟩=V . Express the result in terms of T and the zero-temperature chemical potential ◦. For the calculations the following formula (we set kB = 1) can be used: I ≡ ∫ ∞ 0 f(“)d” e(“−)=T + 1 = ∫  0 f(“)d” + 2 6 T2f′() + O(T4) (13) 3

Course: PHYS 5426 — Quantum Statistical Physics Assignment #1 Instructor: Gennady Y. Chitov Date Assigned: January 15, 2014 Due Date: January 29, 2014 Problem 1. Prove [a; f(a†)] = @f(a†) @a† (1) [a†; f(a)] = −@f(a) @a (2) for arbitrary function f of operator which admits a series expansion. The Bose creation/ annihilation operators satisfy the standard commutation relations [a; a†] ≡ aa† − a†a = 1 (3) Hint: From Eqs.(1,2) one can figure out the corresponding commutation relations for the powers of creation/annihilation operators and then prove them by the method of mathematical induction. Note that for an arbitrary operator Aˆ: @A^n @A^ = nAˆn−1. Problem 2. In the presence of a constant external force acting on a one-dimensional oscillating particle its Hamiltonian becomes that of the so-called displaced oscillator, and the Schr¨odinger equation ˆH (q) = E (q) of the problem (cf. lecture notes) can be written in terms of dimensionless variables as ( − 1 2 d2 d2 + 1 2 2 − √ 2  ) () = ” () ; (4) where q = √ ~ m! and E = ~!”. a). Write the Schr¨odinger equation (4) in terms of the creation/annihilation operators of the harmonic oscillator ( = 0)  = √1 2 (a + a†) (5) d d = √1 2 (a − a†) (6) 1 Via a linear transformation to the new creation/annihilation operators ˜a†; ˜a preserving the bosonic commutation relations for ˜a†; ˜a map the problem (4) of the displaced oscillator onto that of a simple harmonic oscillator with new operators (˜a†; ˜a). b). Find the spectrum (eigenvalues) ” (E) of the displaced oscillator. c). Write the normalized eigenstates |n⟩ of the displaced Hamiltonian (4) via a† and the vacuum state |Θ◦⟩ of the new operators, i.e. ˜a|Θ◦⟩ = 0 (7) d). As follows from the completeness of the oscillator’s eigenstates, the vacuum state of the displaced oscillator |Θ◦⟩ can be related to the simple oscillator’s vacuum |0⟩ (i.e., a|0⟩ = 0) as |Θ◦⟩ = Ω(a†)|0⟩ (8) Find (up to a normalization factor) the operator function Ω(a†) relating two vacua. Hint: in working out Eqs.(7,8), employ Eqs.(1,2). Problem 3. Prove from the standard commutation relations ([ai; a † j ]∓ = ij , etc) that ⟨0|aiaja † ka † l |0⟩ = jkil ± ikjl (9) the sign depending on the statistics. Also calculate the vacuum expectation value ⟨0|ahaiaja † ka † l a† m |0⟩. Problem 4. In the formalism of second quantization the two-particle interaction term of the Hamiltonian for spinless fermions is given by ˆ V = 1 2 ∫ ∫ dxdy ˆ †(x) ˆ †(y)V(x; y) ˆ (y) ˆ (x) (10) For the short-ranged interaction V(x; y) = V(|x−y|) ≡ V(r) = e2 exp(−r)=r find ˆ V in the momentum representation. The field operators and the creation/annihilation operators in the momentum representation are related in the usual way, i.e., ˆ †(x) = ∫ dp (2)3 a†(p)e−ipx (11) Note that the limit  → 0 recovers the Coulomb (long-ranged) interaction V(r) = e2=r. What is the Fourier transform V(q) of the Coulomb interaction? 2 Problem 5. The matrix elements of a two-particle interaction from the previous problem can be written as ⟨k3k4|V|k1k2⟩ = (2)3(k1 + k2 − k3 − k4)V(q) (12) where q ≡ k3−k1 is the momentum transfer. Show that the diagonal part of the interaction operator ˆ V found on the previous problem in the k-representation, arises from momentum transfers q = 0 and q = k2−k1. Write down the two interaction terms and identify them as direct (q = 0) and exchange (q = k2 − k1) interactions. Draw the corresponding Feynman diagrams. Problem 6. Find the first correction to the temperature dependence of the chemical potential  of the degenerate ideal electron gas, assuming constant particle concentration ⟨N⟩=V . Express the result in terms of T and the zero-temperature chemical potential ◦. For the calculations the following formula (we set kB = 1) can be used: I ≡ ∫ ∞ 0 f(“)d” e(“−)=T + 1 = ∫  0 f(“)d” + 2 6 T2f′() + O(T4) (13) 3

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Question 1, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points The compound eyes of bees and other insects are highly sensitive to light in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, particularly light with frequencies between 7.5 × 1014 Hz and 1.0 × 1015 Hz. The speed of light is 3 × 108 m/s. What is the largest wavelength to which these frequencies correspond? Question 3, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 3 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 4, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 3 10 points Find the period of the wave. Question 2, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points What is the smallest wavelength? Question 5, chap 33, sect 3. part 3 of 3 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 N/C. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 6, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 8, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 1 10 points The magnetic field amplitude of an electromagnetic wave is 9.9 × 10−6 T. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s . Calculate the amplitude of the electric field if the wave is traveling in free space. Question 7, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 V/m. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 9, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity ρ, length ℓ and radius a, using the expression ~S = 1 μ0 ~E × ~B . Question 10, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points In 1965 Penzias and Wilson discovered the cosmic microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang expansion of the universe. The energy density of this radiation is 7.64 × 10−14 J/m3. The speed of light 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4π × 10−7 N/A2. Determine the corresponding electric field amplQuestion 11, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 5 10 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the x direction. At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric field has an instantaneous value of 998 V/m in the positive y-direction. The wave is traveling in the positive x-direction. x y z E wave propagation The speed of light is 2.99792×108 m/s, the permeability of free space is 4π×10−7 T ・ N/A and the permittivity of free space 8.85419 × 10−12 C2/N ・ m2. Compute the instantaneous magnitude of the magnetic field at the same point and time.itude. Question 12, chap 33, sect 5. part 2 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Question 13, chap 33, sect 5. part 3 of 5 10 points What are the directions of the instantaneous magnetic field and theQuestion 14, chap 33, sect 5. part 4 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the electric field? Question 16, chap 33, sect 6. part 1 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 104 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 π × 10−7 T・m/A. What is its maximum electric field? What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the magnetic field? Question 17, chap 33, sect 6. part 2 of 4 10 points What is the the maximum magnetic field? Question 19, chap 33, sect 6. part 4 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the figure below. Question 18, chap 33, sect 6. part 3 of 4 10 points What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reflective? Question 20, chap 33, sect 8. part 1 of 1 10 points A coin is at the bottom of a beaker. The beaker is filled with 1.6 cm of water (n1 = 1.33) covered by 2.1 cm of liquid (n2 = 1.4) floating on the water. How deep does the coin appear to be from the upper surface of the liquid (near the top of the beaker)? An cylindrical opaque drinking glass has a diameter 3 cm and height h, as shown in the figure. An observer’s eye is placed as shown (the observer is just barely looking over the rim of the glass). When empty, the observer can just barely see the edge of the bottom of the glass. When filled to the brim with a transparent liquid, the observer can just barely see the center of the bottom of the glass. The liquid in the drinking glass has an index of refraction of 1.4 . θi h d θr eye Calculate the angle θr . Question 22, chap 33, sect 8. part 2 of 2 10 points Calculate the height h of the glass.

Question 1, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points The compound eyes of bees and other insects are highly sensitive to light in the ultraviolet portion of the spectrum, particularly light with frequencies between 7.5 × 1014 Hz and 1.0 × 1015 Hz. The speed of light is 3 × 108 m/s. What is the largest wavelength to which these frequencies correspond? Question 3, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 3 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 4, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 3 10 points Find the period of the wave. Question 2, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points What is the smallest wavelength? Question 5, chap 33, sect 3. part 3 of 3 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 N/C. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 6, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 2 10 points A plane electromagnetic sinusoidal wave of frequency 10.7 MHz travels in free space. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s. Determine the wavelength of the wave. Question 8, chap 33, sect 3. part 1 of 1 10 points The magnetic field amplitude of an electromagnetic wave is 9.9 × 10−6 T. The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s . Calculate the amplitude of the electric field if the wave is traveling in free space. Question 7, chap 33, sect 3. part 2 of 2 10 points At some point and some instant, the electric field has has a value of 998 V/m. Calculate the magnitude of the magnetic field at this point and this instant. Question 9, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points The cable is carrying the current I(t). at the surface of a long transmission cable of resistivity ρ, length ℓ and radius a, using the expression ~S = 1 μ0 ~E × ~B . Question 10, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 1 10 points In 1965 Penzias and Wilson discovered the cosmic microwave radiation left over from the Big Bang expansion of the universe. The energy density of this radiation is 7.64 × 10−14 J/m3. The speed of light 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4π × 10−7 N/A2. Determine the corresponding electric field amplQuestion 11, chap 33, sect 5. part 1 of 5 10 points Consider a monochromatic electromagnetic plane wave propagating in the x direction. At a particular point in space, the magnitude of the electric field has an instantaneous value of 998 V/m in the positive y-direction. The wave is traveling in the positive x-direction. x y z E wave propagation The speed of light is 2.99792×108 m/s, the permeability of free space is 4π×10−7 T ・ N/A and the permittivity of free space 8.85419 × 10−12 C2/N ・ m2. Compute the instantaneous magnitude of the magnetic field at the same point and time.itude. Question 12, chap 33, sect 5. part 2 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous magnitude of the Poynting vector at the same point and time? Question 13, chap 33, sect 5. part 3 of 5 10 points What are the directions of the instantaneous magnetic field and theQuestion 14, chap 33, sect 5. part 4 of 5 10 points What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the electric field? Question 16, chap 33, sect 6. part 1 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic plane wave with time average intensity 104 W/m2 . The speed of light is 2.99792 × 108 m/s and the permeability of free space is 4 π × 10−7 T・m/A. What is its maximum electric field? What is the instantaneous value of the energy density of the magnetic field? Question 17, chap 33, sect 6. part 2 of 4 10 points What is the the maximum magnetic field? Question 19, chap 33, sect 6. part 4 of 4 10 points Consider an electromagnetic wave pattern as shown in the figure below. Question 18, chap 33, sect 6. part 3 of 4 10 points What is the pressure on a surface which is perpendicular to the beam and is totally reflective? Question 20, chap 33, sect 8. part 1 of 1 10 points A coin is at the bottom of a beaker. The beaker is filled with 1.6 cm of water (n1 = 1.33) covered by 2.1 cm of liquid (n2 = 1.4) floating on the water. How deep does the coin appear to be from the upper surface of the liquid (near the top of the beaker)? An cylindrical opaque drinking glass has a diameter 3 cm and height h, as shown in the figure. An observer’s eye is placed as shown (the observer is just barely looking over the rim of the glass). When empty, the observer can just barely see the edge of the bottom of the glass. When filled to the brim with a transparent liquid, the observer can just barely see the center of the bottom of the glass. The liquid in the drinking glass has an index of refraction of 1.4 . θi h d θr eye Calculate the angle θr . Question 22, chap 33, sect 8. part 2 of 2 10 points Calculate the height h of the glass.

Devise a general method for determining the fractional abundances of two or more isotopes from a mass spectrum. Your method must include some means of measuring the signals. You must state the type of measuring device that you will need to apply your method. You must also indiacate how you will use the measurments to obtain the fractional abundances

Devise a general method for determining the fractional abundances of two or more isotopes from a mass spectrum. Your method must include some means of measuring the signals. You must state the type of measuring device that you will need to apply your method. You must also indiacate how you will use the measurments to obtain the fractional abundances

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Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Check here if you want your paper returned Chapter 3 – Section 3.1-3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Dr. Bragg Printed Last Name: First Name: WKUID: 1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: a. Hypothesis b. Law c. Theory d. Conservation e. Proportion f. Radioactive g. Atomic Number h. Mass Number i. Isotope j. Spectrum k. Ground State l. Excited State m. Quantum n. Valence o. Shell p. Subshell q. Orbital 2. Briefly describe the main points of Dalton’s Atomic Theory. On Time: Complete: Questions: Total Score: 3. Who experimentally verified the Law of Conservation of Matter? 4. Who experimentally verified the Law of Definite Proportions? 5. What are the three most important subatomic particles, and what is the charge on each? 6. Who discovered natural radioactivity? 7. What are the three main radioactive ‘particles,’ and what is the charge on each? 8. Who was the student that set up the experiments and made the observations that lead to the discovery of the nucleus of the atom? 9. Considering atomic numbers and mass numbers, which is the same among a set of isotopes and which is different? 10. What is the difference between a continuous spectrum and a line spectrum? 11. Who proposed the Shell Model of the hydrogen atom based on small energy steps between adjacent levels for electrons? 12. Which end of the electromagnetic spectrum is higher in ENERGY, ı-rays or radio waves? 13. Who proposed the mathematical wave theory that explained the existence of orbitals? 14. Give the general subshell filling order for electrons in ground state atoms. Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Dr. Bragg Chapter 3 – Sections 3.1 – 3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Page 2

Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Check here if you want your paper returned Chapter 3 – Section 3.1-3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Dr. Bragg Printed Last Name: First Name: WKUID: 1. Express in your own words the meaning of these terms: a. Hypothesis b. Law c. Theory d. Conservation e. Proportion f. Radioactive g. Atomic Number h. Mass Number i. Isotope j. Spectrum k. Ground State l. Excited State m. Quantum n. Valence o. Shell p. Subshell q. Orbital 2. Briefly describe the main points of Dalton’s Atomic Theory. On Time: Complete: Questions: Total Score: 3. Who experimentally verified the Law of Conservation of Matter? 4. Who experimentally verified the Law of Definite Proportions? 5. What are the three most important subatomic particles, and what is the charge on each? 6. Who discovered natural radioactivity? 7. What are the three main radioactive ‘particles,’ and what is the charge on each? 8. Who was the student that set up the experiments and made the observations that lead to the discovery of the nucleus of the atom? 9. Considering atomic numbers and mass numbers, which is the same among a set of isotopes and which is different? 10. What is the difference between a continuous spectrum and a line spectrum? 11. Who proposed the Shell Model of the hydrogen atom based on small energy steps between adjacent levels for electrons? 12. Which end of the electromagnetic spectrum is higher in ENERGY, ı-rays or radio waves? 13. Who proposed the mathematical wave theory that explained the existence of orbitals? 14. Give the general subshell filling order for electrons in ground state atoms. Reading Guide 3 CHEM 101 Dr. Bragg Chapter 3 – Sections 3.1 – 3.4 Introduction to Chemistry Page 2

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Doppler Shift 73 Because of the Doppler Effect, light emitted by an object can appear to change wavelength due to its motion toward or away from an observer. When the observer and the source of light are moving toward each other, the light is shifted to shorter wavelengths (blueshifted). When the observer and the source of light are moving away from each other, the light is shifted to longer wavelengths (redshifted). Part I: Motion of Source Star is not . rnovrng r ABCD 1) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? 2) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to longer wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? . 74 Doppler Shift 3) In which of the srtuations shown (A—D) will theobserver receive light that Is not Doppler Shifted at all? Explain your reasoning. – 4) Imagine our solar system Is moving In the Milky Way toward a group of three stars. Star A is a blue star that is slightly closer to us than the other two. Star B is a red star that is farthest away from us. Star C is a yellow star that is halfway between Stars A end B. a) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. . / b) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be redshifted? Explain your reasoning. c) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to have no shift? Explain your reasoning. — 5) You overhear two students discussing the topic of Doppler Shift. Student 1: Since Betelgeuse is a red star, it must be going away from us, and since Rigel is a blue star it must be coming toward us. Student 2: 1 disagree, the color of the star does not tell you if it is moving. You have to look at the shift in wavelength of the lines in the star’s absorption spectrum to determine whether it’s moving toward or away from you. Do you agree or disagree with either or both of the students? Explain your reasoning. 5 Part II: Shift in Absorption Spectra When we study an astronomical object like a star or galaxy, we examine the spectrum of light it gives off. Since the lines of a spectrum occur at specific wavelengths we can determine that an object is moving when we see that the lines have been shifted to either longer or shorter wavelengths. For the absorption line spectra shown on the next page, short-wavelength light (the blue end of the spectrum) is shown on the left-hand side and long-wavelength light (the red end of the spectrum) is shown on the right-hand side. Doppler Shift 75 For the three absorption line spectra shown below (A, B, and C), one of the spectra corresponds to a star that is not moving relative to you, one of the spectra is from a star that is moving toward you, and one of the spectra is from a star that is moving away from you. A B Blue J___ ..‘ C 6) Which of the three spectra above corresponds with the star moving toward you? Explain your reasoning. If two sources of llght are moving relative to an observer, the light from the star that is moving faster will appear to undergo a greater Doppler Consider the four spectra at the right. The spectrum labeled F is an absorption line spectrum from a star that is at rest. Again, note that short-wavelength (blue) light is shown on the left-hand side of each spectrum and long-wavelength (red) light is shown on the right-hand side of each spectrum. 7) Which of the three spectra corresponds with the star moving away from you? Explain your reasoning. Part 111: Size of Shift and Speed Blue Red . – 76 Doppler Shift 8) Which of the four spectra would be from the star that is moving the fastest? Would this star be moving toward or away from the observer? 9) Of the stars that are moving, which spectra would be from the star that is moving the slowest? Describe the motion of this star, – (fJ 1O)An Important line In the absorption spectrum of stars occurs at a wavelength of 656 nm for stars at rest. Irna me that you observe five stars (H—L) from Earth and discover that this Important absorption line Is measured at the wavelength shown in the table below for each of the five stars, Star Wavelength of Absorption Line H 649nm I 660 nm J 656nrn K 658nrn L 647nm a) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears redshifted? Explain your reasoning. d) Which star is moving the fastest? Is it moving toward or away from the observer? Explain your reasoning. , . . c) Which star is giving off light that appears shifted by the greatest amount? Is this light shifted to longer or shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a) Which planets will receive a radio signal that Is redshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which planets wfll receive a radio signal that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a a . ii) The figure at right shows a spaceprobe and five planets. The motion of the spaceprobe is indicated by the arrow. The spaceprobe is continuously broadcasting a radio signal in all directions. 4 C E not to scale c) Will all the planets receive radio signals from the spaceprobe that are Doppler shifted? Explain your reasoning. d) How will the size of the Doppler Shift in the radio signals detected at Planets A and B compare? Explain your reasoning. Cats r , ‘, e) How Will the slz of 1h Dupler Shift in the radio signals deteed °lane E and B compare? Explain your reasoning. ‘

Doppler Shift 73 Because of the Doppler Effect, light emitted by an object can appear to change wavelength due to its motion toward or away from an observer. When the observer and the source of light are moving toward each other, the light is shifted to shorter wavelengths (blueshifted). When the observer and the source of light are moving away from each other, the light is shifted to longer wavelengths (redshifted). Part I: Motion of Source Star is not . rnovrng r ABCD 1) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? 2) Consider the situations shown (A—D). a) In which situation will the observer receive light that is shifted to longer wavelengths? b) Will this light be blueshifted or redshifted for this case? c) What direction is the star moving relative to the observer for this case? . 74 Doppler Shift 3) In which of the srtuations shown (A—D) will theobserver receive light that Is not Doppler Shifted at all? Explain your reasoning. – 4) Imagine our solar system Is moving In the Milky Way toward a group of three stars. Star A is a blue star that is slightly closer to us than the other two. Star B is a red star that is farthest away from us. Star C is a yellow star that is halfway between Stars A end B. a) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. . / b) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to be redshifted? Explain your reasoning. c) Which of these three stars, if any, will give off light that appears to have no shift? Explain your reasoning. — 5) You overhear two students discussing the topic of Doppler Shift. Student 1: Since Betelgeuse is a red star, it must be going away from us, and since Rigel is a blue star it must be coming toward us. Student 2: 1 disagree, the color of the star does not tell you if it is moving. You have to look at the shift in wavelength of the lines in the star’s absorption spectrum to determine whether it’s moving toward or away from you. Do you agree or disagree with either or both of the students? Explain your reasoning. 5 Part II: Shift in Absorption Spectra When we study an astronomical object like a star or galaxy, we examine the spectrum of light it gives off. Since the lines of a spectrum occur at specific wavelengths we can determine that an object is moving when we see that the lines have been shifted to either longer or shorter wavelengths. For the absorption line spectra shown on the next page, short-wavelength light (the blue end of the spectrum) is shown on the left-hand side and long-wavelength light (the red end of the spectrum) is shown on the right-hand side. Doppler Shift 75 For the three absorption line spectra shown below (A, B, and C), one of the spectra corresponds to a star that is not moving relative to you, one of the spectra is from a star that is moving toward you, and one of the spectra is from a star that is moving away from you. A B Blue J___ ..‘ C 6) Which of the three spectra above corresponds with the star moving toward you? Explain your reasoning. If two sources of llght are moving relative to an observer, the light from the star that is moving faster will appear to undergo a greater Doppler Consider the four spectra at the right. The spectrum labeled F is an absorption line spectrum from a star that is at rest. Again, note that short-wavelength (blue) light is shown on the left-hand side of each spectrum and long-wavelength (red) light is shown on the right-hand side of each spectrum. 7) Which of the three spectra corresponds with the star moving away from you? Explain your reasoning. Part 111: Size of Shift and Speed Blue Red . – 76 Doppler Shift 8) Which of the four spectra would be from the star that is moving the fastest? Would this star be moving toward or away from the observer? 9) Of the stars that are moving, which spectra would be from the star that is moving the slowest? Describe the motion of this star, – (fJ 1O)An Important line In the absorption spectrum of stars occurs at a wavelength of 656 nm for stars at rest. Irna me that you observe five stars (H—L) from Earth and discover that this Important absorption line Is measured at the wavelength shown in the table below for each of the five stars, Star Wavelength of Absorption Line H 649nm I 660 nm J 656nrn K 658nrn L 647nm a) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears blueshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which of the stars are gMng off light that appears redshifted? Explain your reasoning. d) Which star is moving the fastest? Is it moving toward or away from the observer? Explain your reasoning. , . . c) Which star is giving off light that appears shifted by the greatest amount? Is this light shifted to longer or shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a) Which planets will receive a radio signal that Is redshifted? Explain your reasoning. b) Which planets wfll receive a radio signal that is shifted to shorter wavelengths? Explain your reasoning. a a . ii) The figure at right shows a spaceprobe and five planets. The motion of the spaceprobe is indicated by the arrow. The spaceprobe is continuously broadcasting a radio signal in all directions. 4 C E not to scale c) Will all the planets receive radio signals from the spaceprobe that are Doppler shifted? Explain your reasoning. d) How will the size of the Doppler Shift in the radio signals detected at Planets A and B compare? Explain your reasoning. Cats r , ‘, e) How Will the slz of 1h Dupler Shift in the radio signals deteed °lane E and B compare? Explain your reasoning. ‘

  ANSWERS Part 1 1 C is the answer because … Read More...
Q the diagram show the absorption spectrum for an unknown mixture of gases. Blow that all the emission spectra for several known gases. Determine which of the known element is in the sample. support your answer.

Q the diagram show the absorption spectrum for an unknown mixture of gases. Blow that all the emission spectra for several known gases. Determine which of the known element is in the sample. support your answer.

A hydrogen lamp emits several lines in the visible region of the spectrum. One of these lines has a wavelength of 6.56 times 10^-5 cm. What are the color and frequency of this radiation?

A hydrogen lamp emits several lines in the visible region of the spectrum. One of these lines has a wavelength of 6.56 times 10^-5 cm. What are the color and frequency of this radiation?

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Autism (Autism Spectrum Disorder) •What is autism? •How is autism diagnosed? •What is Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorder? •What treatments are available for people with autism? •What causes autism? •What do SLPs do when working with individuals with autism? •What resources are available about autism?

Autism (Autism Spectrum Disorder) •What is autism? •How is autism diagnosed? •What is Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorder? •What treatments are available for people with autism? •What causes autism? •What do SLPs do when working with individuals with autism? •What resources are available about autism?

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Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 Assignment 4 – Noise and Correlation 1. If a signal is measured as 2.5 V and the noise is 28 mV (28 × 10−3 V), what is the SNR in dB? 2. A single sinusoidal signal is found with some noise. If the RMS value of the noise is 0.5 V and the SNR is 10 dB, what is the RMS amplitude of the sinusoid? 3. The file signal_noise.mat contains a variable x that consists of a 1.0-V peak sinusoidal signal buried in noise. What is the SNR for this signal and noise? Assume that the noise RMS is much greater than the signal RMS. Note: “signal_noise.mat” and other files used in these assignments can be downloaded from the content area of Brightspace, within the “Data Files for Exercises” folder. These files can be opened in Matlab by copying into the active folder and double-clicking on the file or using the Matlab load command using the format: load(‘signal_noise.mat’). To discover the variables within the files use the Matlab who command. 4. An 8-bit ADC converter that has an input range of ±5 V is used to convert a signal that ranges between ±2 V. What is the SNR of the input if the input noise equals the quantization noise of the converter? Hint: Refer to Equation below to find the quantization noise: 5. The file filter1.mat contains the spectrum of a fourth-order lowpass filter as variable x in dB. The file also contains the corresponding frequencies of x in variable freq. Plot the spectrum of this filter both as dB versus log frequency and as linear amplitude versus linear frequency. The frequency axis should range between 10 and 400 Hz in both plots. Hint: Use Equation below to convert: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 6. Generate one cycle of the square wave similar to the one shown below in a 500-point MATLAB array. Determine the RMS value of this waveform. [Hint: When you take the square of the data array, be sure to use a period before the up arrow so that MATLAB does the squaring point-by-point (i.e., x.^2).]. 7. A resistor produces 10 μV noise (i.e., 10 × 10−6 V noise) when the room temperature is 310 K and the bandwidth is 1 kHz (i.e., 1000 Hz). What current noise would be produced by this resistor? 8. A 3-ma current flows through both a diode (i.e., a semiconductor) and a 20,000-Ω (i.e., 20-kΩ) resistor. What is the net current noise, in? Assume a bandwidth of 1 kHz (i.e., 1 × 103 Hz). Which of the two components is responsible for producing the most noise? 9. Determine if the two signals, x and y, in file correl1.mat are correlated by checking the angle between them. 10. Modify the approach used in Practice Problem 3 to find the angle between short signals: Do not attempt to plot these vectors as it would require a 6-dimensional plot!

Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 Assignment 4 – Noise and Correlation 1. If a signal is measured as 2.5 V and the noise is 28 mV (28 × 10−3 V), what is the SNR in dB? 2. A single sinusoidal signal is found with some noise. If the RMS value of the noise is 0.5 V and the SNR is 10 dB, what is the RMS amplitude of the sinusoid? 3. The file signal_noise.mat contains a variable x that consists of a 1.0-V peak sinusoidal signal buried in noise. What is the SNR for this signal and noise? Assume that the noise RMS is much greater than the signal RMS. Note: “signal_noise.mat” and other files used in these assignments can be downloaded from the content area of Brightspace, within the “Data Files for Exercises” folder. These files can be opened in Matlab by copying into the active folder and double-clicking on the file or using the Matlab load command using the format: load(‘signal_noise.mat’). To discover the variables within the files use the Matlab who command. 4. An 8-bit ADC converter that has an input range of ±5 V is used to convert a signal that ranges between ±2 V. What is the SNR of the input if the input noise equals the quantization noise of the converter? Hint: Refer to Equation below to find the quantization noise: 5. The file filter1.mat contains the spectrum of a fourth-order lowpass filter as variable x in dB. The file also contains the corresponding frequencies of x in variable freq. Plot the spectrum of this filter both as dB versus log frequency and as linear amplitude versus linear frequency. The frequency axis should range between 10 and 400 Hz in both plots. Hint: Use Equation below to convert: Biomedical Signal and Image Processing (4800_420_001) Assigned on September 12th, 2017 6. Generate one cycle of the square wave similar to the one shown below in a 500-point MATLAB array. Determine the RMS value of this waveform. [Hint: When you take the square of the data array, be sure to use a period before the up arrow so that MATLAB does the squaring point-by-point (i.e., x.^2).]. 7. A resistor produces 10 μV noise (i.e., 10 × 10−6 V noise) when the room temperature is 310 K and the bandwidth is 1 kHz (i.e., 1000 Hz). What current noise would be produced by this resistor? 8. A 3-ma current flows through both a diode (i.e., a semiconductor) and a 20,000-Ω (i.e., 20-kΩ) resistor. What is the net current noise, in? Assume a bandwidth of 1 kHz (i.e., 1 × 103 Hz). Which of the two components is responsible for producing the most noise? 9. Determine if the two signals, x and y, in file correl1.mat are correlated by checking the angle between them. 10. Modify the approach used in Practice Problem 3 to find the angle between short signals: Do not attempt to plot these vectors as it would require a 6-dimensional plot!

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