Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Look up a journal article in your field that addresses diversity and/or special education and briefly describe it in a paragraph.

Look up a journal article in your field that addresses diversity and/or special education and briefly describe it in a paragraph.

The force on culture variety and linguistic diversity in special … Read More...
Question 1 1. The ________________________ presents the movement in cash and bank balances over a period. 1 points Question 2 1. Which of the following departments is not a support center? marketing telecommunications guest transportation human resources 1 points Question 3 1. The distinction between operating and nonoperating income relates to: Continuity of income. Primary activities of the reporting entity. Consistency of income stream. Reliability of measurements. 1 points Question 4 1. Change statements include a: Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. Balance sheet, cash flow statement, and income statement. Cash flow statement, income statement, and retained earnings statement. Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and income statement. 1 points Question 5 1. Pro forma earnings: Could be considered management’s view of permanent earnings. Are needed for the correction of errors. Are standardized under generally accepted accounting principles Are useful to compare two different firms’ performance. 1 points Question 6 1. The purpose of the statement of retained earnings is to show: the lifetime earnings retained by the corporation. the lifetime cash flow. the lifetime sales. all of the above. 1 points Question 7 1. The study of an individual financial statement item over several accounting periods is called: Ratio analysis. Vertical analysis. Horizontal analysis. Time and motion analysis. 1 points Question 8 1. Which of the following is not an example of an internal user of a company’s financial statements? member of the board of directors department head stockholder top-level manager 1 points Question 9 1. The accounting principle that requires revenue to be reported when earned is the: Matching principle Revenue recognition principle Time period principle Accrual reporting principle Going-concern principle 1 points Question 10 1. Which of the following questions can not be answered by analyzing information presented on a monthly income statement? How profitable was the hospitality operation at the end of the month? How much was spent last month to market the operation’s services? How much cash was on hand at the end of the month? What was the cost of sales for the month? 1 points Question 11 1. The sources of hotel revenue might be: profits and sales. sales, interest income, and dividend income. net income. all of the above. 1 points Question 12 1. Vertical analysis is a tool to evaluate individual financial statement items or groups of items in terms of a specific base amount. True False 1 points Question 13 1. The following is a portion of a comparative analysis: This Year Change Cost of Sales $400,000 (30,000) The cost of sales last year was: $370,000. $430,000. $30,000. $60,000. 1 points Question 14 1. Since everyone knows what an income statement is, there is no need to put a heading on this report. True False 1 points Question 15 1. An analytical procedure in which each income statement amount is stated as a percentage of a base amount, in this case, net sales. 1 points Question 16 1. Groups outside the business who require accounting and financial information. This includes suppliers, bankers, stockholders, and investors. 1 points Question 17 1. Interpretation of data shown on a common-size income statement can be simplified by: zeroing out the income statement bookkeeping accounts. classifying dividends as a business expense. restating the percentages as a component of the sales dollar. redesigning the statement. 1 points Question 18 1. The following information is provided: Dividends paid this year $ 30,000 Dividends declared this year 40,000 Net income this year 100,000 Retained earnings, start of year 150,000 The retained earnings at the end of this year are: $180,000. $220,000. $210,000. $260,000. 1 points Question 19 1. Horizontal analysis is also known as: Liquidity analysis. Absolute analysis. Revenue analysis. Trend analysis. 1 points Question 20 1. At the end of Year 1, the income statement for the Roadside Inn showed net income at $50,000. At the end of Year 2, the income statement showed $100,000 in net income. A horizontal analysis of the income statements would show the relative difference between the two years as: $50,000. $20,000. 100%. 50%. 1 points Question 21 1. Financial statement analysis is the application of analytical tools to general-purpose financial statements and related data for making business decisions. True False 1 points Question 22 1. Following is a portion of an income statement: 20X8 20X7 Sales $180,000 $190,000 In a comparative analysis, the percentage change from 20X7 to 20X8 is: A 105% decrease. A 94.7% Decrease A 5.6% Decrease A 5.3% Decrease 1 points Question 23 1. A fiscal year consists of any twelve consecutive months. True False 1 points Question 24 1. Financial statements intended for internal users. These statements present detailed information on each responsibility area ant the hotel as a whole. 1 points Question 25 1. Financial statements are usually prepared at the end of each fiscal period. True False

Question 1 1. The ________________________ presents the movement in cash and bank balances over a period. 1 points Question 2 1. Which of the following departments is not a support center? marketing telecommunications guest transportation human resources 1 points Question 3 1. The distinction between operating and nonoperating income relates to: Continuity of income. Primary activities of the reporting entity. Consistency of income stream. Reliability of measurements. 1 points Question 4 1. Change statements include a: Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and cash flow statement. Balance sheet, cash flow statement, and income statement. Cash flow statement, income statement, and retained earnings statement. Retained earnings statement, balance sheet, and income statement. 1 points Question 5 1. Pro forma earnings: Could be considered management’s view of permanent earnings. Are needed for the correction of errors. Are standardized under generally accepted accounting principles Are useful to compare two different firms’ performance. 1 points Question 6 1. The purpose of the statement of retained earnings is to show: the lifetime earnings retained by the corporation. the lifetime cash flow. the lifetime sales. all of the above. 1 points Question 7 1. The study of an individual financial statement item over several accounting periods is called: Ratio analysis. Vertical analysis. Horizontal analysis. Time and motion analysis. 1 points Question 8 1. Which of the following is not an example of an internal user of a company’s financial statements? member of the board of directors department head stockholder top-level manager 1 points Question 9 1. The accounting principle that requires revenue to be reported when earned is the: Matching principle Revenue recognition principle Time period principle Accrual reporting principle Going-concern principle 1 points Question 10 1. Which of the following questions can not be answered by analyzing information presented on a monthly income statement? How profitable was the hospitality operation at the end of the month? How much was spent last month to market the operation’s services? How much cash was on hand at the end of the month? What was the cost of sales for the month? 1 points Question 11 1. The sources of hotel revenue might be: profits and sales. sales, interest income, and dividend income. net income. all of the above. 1 points Question 12 1. Vertical analysis is a tool to evaluate individual financial statement items or groups of items in terms of a specific base amount. True False 1 points Question 13 1. The following is a portion of a comparative analysis: This Year Change Cost of Sales $400,000 (30,000) The cost of sales last year was: $370,000. $430,000. $30,000. $60,000. 1 points Question 14 1. Since everyone knows what an income statement is, there is no need to put a heading on this report. True False 1 points Question 15 1. An analytical procedure in which each income statement amount is stated as a percentage of a base amount, in this case, net sales. 1 points Question 16 1. Groups outside the business who require accounting and financial information. This includes suppliers, bankers, stockholders, and investors. 1 points Question 17 1. Interpretation of data shown on a common-size income statement can be simplified by: zeroing out the income statement bookkeeping accounts. classifying dividends as a business expense. restating the percentages as a component of the sales dollar. redesigning the statement. 1 points Question 18 1. The following information is provided: Dividends paid this year $ 30,000 Dividends declared this year 40,000 Net income this year 100,000 Retained earnings, start of year 150,000 The retained earnings at the end of this year are: $180,000. $220,000. $210,000. $260,000. 1 points Question 19 1. Horizontal analysis is also known as: Liquidity analysis. Absolute analysis. Revenue analysis. Trend analysis. 1 points Question 20 1. At the end of Year 1, the income statement for the Roadside Inn showed net income at $50,000. At the end of Year 2, the income statement showed $100,000 in net income. A horizontal analysis of the income statements would show the relative difference between the two years as: $50,000. $20,000. 100%. 50%. 1 points Question 21 1. Financial statement analysis is the application of analytical tools to general-purpose financial statements and related data for making business decisions. True False 1 points Question 22 1. Following is a portion of an income statement: 20X8 20X7 Sales $180,000 $190,000 In a comparative analysis, the percentage change from 20X7 to 20X8 is: A 105% decrease. A 94.7% Decrease A 5.6% Decrease A 5.3% Decrease 1 points Question 23 1. A fiscal year consists of any twelve consecutive months. True False 1 points Question 24 1. Financial statements intended for internal users. These statements present detailed information on each responsibility area ant the hotel as a whole. 1 points Question 25 1. Financial statements are usually prepared at the end of each fiscal period. True False

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Make a 1 page summary of an 8 pages case study. (the case study will be provided to you) 2. After reading the case study, write an essay with your own words including the following. …Leadership and Motivation o Describe the kinds of leadership and motivational systems you plan to implement in light of your cultural profile. o Provide rationale relevant to the country you are entering. the essay Must be original, plagiarism free. (the company previously operated in USA and now is expanding to IRELAND) the due is in 12 hours or less.

Make a 1 page summary of an 8 pages case study. (the case study will be provided to you) 2. After reading the case study, write an essay with your own words including the following. …Leadership and Motivation o Describe the kinds of leadership and motivational systems you plan to implement in light of your cultural profile. o Provide rationale relevant to the country you are entering. the essay Must be original, plagiarism free. (the company previously operated in USA and now is expanding to IRELAND) the due is in 12 hours or less.

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Chapter 1 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Curved Motion Diagram The motion diagram shown in the figure represents a pendulum released from rest at an angle of 45 from the vertical. The dots in the motion diagram represent the positions of the pendulum bob at eleven moments separated by equal time intervals. The green arrows represent the average velocity between adjacent dots. Also given is a “compass rose” in which directions are labeled with the letters of the alphabet.  Part A What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moment 5? Enter the letter of the arrow with this direction from the compass rose in the figure. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part B What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moments 0 and 10? Enter the letters corresponding to the arrows with these directions from the compass rose in the figure, separated by commas. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again PSS 1.1 Motion Diagrams Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 1.1 for motion diagram problems. A car is traveling with constant velocity along a highway. The driver notices he is late for work, so he stomps down on the gas pedal and the car begins to speed up. The car has just achieved double its directions at time step 0, time step 10 = initial velocity when the driver spots a police officer behind him and applies the brakes. The car then slows down, coming to rest at a stoplight ahead. Draw a complete motion diagram for this situation. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 1.1 Motion diagrams MODEL: Represent the moving object as a particle. Make simplifying assumptions when interpreting the problem statement. VISUALIZE: A complete motion diagram consists of: The position of the object in each frame of the film, shown as a dot. Use five or six dots to make the motion clear but without overcrowding the picture. More complex motions may need more dots. The average velocity vectors, found by connecting each dot in the motion diagram to the next with a vector arrow. There is one velocity vector linking each set of two position dots. Label the row of velocity vectors . The average acceleration vectors, found using Tactics Box 1.3. There is one acceleration vector linking each set of two velocity vectors. Each acceleration vector is drawn at the dot between the two velocity vectors it links. Use to indicate a point at which the acceleration is zero. Label the row of acceleration vectors . Model It is appropriate to use the particle model for the car. You should also make some simplifying assumptions. v 0 a Part A The car’s motion can be divided into three different stages: its motion before the driver realizes he’s late, its motion after the driver hits the gas (but before he sees the police car), and its motion after the driver sees the police car. Which of the following simplifying assumptions is it reasonable to make in this problem? During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant A. acceleration. B. During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant velocity. C. The highway is straight (i.e., there are no curves). D. The highway is level (i.e., there are no hills or valleys). Enter all the correct answers in alphabetical order without commas. For example, if statements C and D are correct, enter CD. ANSWER: Correct In addition to the assumptions listed above, in the rest of this problem assume that the car is moving in a straight line to the right. Visualize Part B In the three diagrams shown to the left, the position of the car at five subsequent instants of time is represented by black dots, and the car’s average velocity is represented by green arrows. Which of these diagrams best describes the position and the velocity of the car before the driver notices he is late? ANSWER: Correct Part C Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver hits the gas, but before he notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct A B C A B C Part D Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the diagrams shown below most accurately depicts the average acceleration vectors of the car during the events described in the problem introduction? ANSWER: A B C Correct You can now draw a complete motion diagram for the situation described in this problem. Your diagram should look like this: Measurements in SI Units Familiarity with SI units will aid your study of physics and all other sciences. Part A What is the approximate height of the average adult in centimeters? Hint 1. Converting between feet and centimeters The distance from your elbow to your fingertips is typically about 50 . A B C cm ANSWER: Correct If you’re not familiar with metric units of length, you can use your body to develop intuition for them. The average height of an adult is 5 6.4 . The distance from elbow to fingertips on the average adult is about 50 . Ten (1 ) is about the width of this adult’s little finger and 10 is about the width of the average hand. Part B Approximately what is the mass of the average adult in kilograms? Hint 1. Converting between pounds and kilograms Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . ANSWER: Correct Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . This is a useful conversion to keep in mind! ± A Trip to Europe 100 200 300 cm cm cm feet inches cm mm cm cm pound 1 kg 2 80 500 1200 kg kg kg pound (1/2) kg Learning Goal: To understand how to use dimensional analysis to solve problems. Dimensional analysis is a useful tool for solving problems that involve unit conversions. Since unit conversion is not limited to physics problems but is part of our everyday life, correct use of conversion factors is essential to working through problems of practical importance. For example, dimensional analysis could be used in problems involving currency exchange. Say you want to calculate how many euros you get if you exchange 3600 ( ), given the exchange rate , that is, 1 to 1.20 . Begin by writing down the starting value, 3600 . This can also be written as a fraction: . Next, convert dollars to euros. This conversion involves multiplying by a simple conversion factor derived from the exchange rate: . Note that the “dollar” unit, , should appear on the bottom of this conversion factor, since appears on the top of the starting value. Finally, since dollars are divided by dollars, the units can be canceled and the final result is . Currency exchange is only one example of many practical situations where dimensional analysis may help you to work through problems. Remember that dimensional analysis involves multiplying a given value by a conversion factor, resulting in a value in the new units. The conversion factor can be the ratio of any two quantities, as long as the ratio is equal to one. You and your friends are organizing a trip to Europe. Your plan is to rent a car and drive through the major European capitals. By consulting a map you estimate that you will cover a total distance of 5000 . Consider the euro-dollar exchange rate given in the introduction and use dimensional analysis to work through these simple problems. Part A You select a rental package that includes a car with an average consumption of 6.00 of fuel per 100 . Considering that in Europe the average fuel cost is 1.063 , how much (in US dollars) will you spend in fuel on your trip? Express your answer numerically in US dollars to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: US dollars USD 1 EUR = 1.20 USD euro US dollars USD 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD USD USD ( )( ) = 3000 EUR 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD km liters km euros/liter Part B How many gallons of fuel would the rental car consume per mile? Express your answer numerically in gallons per mile to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Cost of fuel = USD gallons/mile

Chapter 1 Practice Problems (Practice – no credit) Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Curved Motion Diagram The motion diagram shown in the figure represents a pendulum released from rest at an angle of 45 from the vertical. The dots in the motion diagram represent the positions of the pendulum bob at eleven moments separated by equal time intervals. The green arrows represent the average velocity between adjacent dots. Also given is a “compass rose” in which directions are labeled with the letters of the alphabet.  Part A What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moment 5? Enter the letter of the arrow with this direction from the compass rose in the figure. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again Part B What is the direction of the acceleration of the object at moments 0 and 10? Enter the letters corresponding to the arrows with these directions from the compass rose in the figure, separated by commas. Type Z if the acceleration vector has zero length. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Incorrect; Try Again PSS 1.1 Motion Diagrams Learning Goal: To practice Problem-Solving Strategy 1.1 for motion diagram problems. A car is traveling with constant velocity along a highway. The driver notices he is late for work, so he stomps down on the gas pedal and the car begins to speed up. The car has just achieved double its directions at time step 0, time step 10 = initial velocity when the driver spots a police officer behind him and applies the brakes. The car then slows down, coming to rest at a stoplight ahead. Draw a complete motion diagram for this situation. PROBLEM-SOLVING STRATEGY 1.1 Motion diagrams MODEL: Represent the moving object as a particle. Make simplifying assumptions when interpreting the problem statement. VISUALIZE: A complete motion diagram consists of: The position of the object in each frame of the film, shown as a dot. Use five or six dots to make the motion clear but without overcrowding the picture. More complex motions may need more dots. The average velocity vectors, found by connecting each dot in the motion diagram to the next with a vector arrow. There is one velocity vector linking each set of two position dots. Label the row of velocity vectors . The average acceleration vectors, found using Tactics Box 1.3. There is one acceleration vector linking each set of two velocity vectors. Each acceleration vector is drawn at the dot between the two velocity vectors it links. Use to indicate a point at which the acceleration is zero. Label the row of acceleration vectors . Model It is appropriate to use the particle model for the car. You should also make some simplifying assumptions. v 0 a Part A The car’s motion can be divided into three different stages: its motion before the driver realizes he’s late, its motion after the driver hits the gas (but before he sees the police car), and its motion after the driver sees the police car. Which of the following simplifying assumptions is it reasonable to make in this problem? During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant A. acceleration. B. During each of the three different stages of its motion, the car is moving with constant velocity. C. The highway is straight (i.e., there are no curves). D. The highway is level (i.e., there are no hills or valleys). Enter all the correct answers in alphabetical order without commas. For example, if statements C and D are correct, enter CD. ANSWER: Correct In addition to the assumptions listed above, in the rest of this problem assume that the car is moving in a straight line to the right. Visualize Part B In the three diagrams shown to the left, the position of the car at five subsequent instants of time is represented by black dots, and the car’s average velocity is represented by green arrows. Which of these diagrams best describes the position and the velocity of the car before the driver notices he is late? ANSWER: Correct Part C Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver hits the gas, but before he notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct A B C A B C Part D Which of the diagrams shown to the left best describes the position and the velocity of the car after the driver notices the police officer? ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the diagrams shown below most accurately depicts the average acceleration vectors of the car during the events described in the problem introduction? ANSWER: A B C Correct You can now draw a complete motion diagram for the situation described in this problem. Your diagram should look like this: Measurements in SI Units Familiarity with SI units will aid your study of physics and all other sciences. Part A What is the approximate height of the average adult in centimeters? Hint 1. Converting between feet and centimeters The distance from your elbow to your fingertips is typically about 50 . A B C cm ANSWER: Correct If you’re not familiar with metric units of length, you can use your body to develop intuition for them. The average height of an adult is 5 6.4 . The distance from elbow to fingertips on the average adult is about 50 . Ten (1 ) is about the width of this adult’s little finger and 10 is about the width of the average hand. Part B Approximately what is the mass of the average adult in kilograms? Hint 1. Converting between pounds and kilograms Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . ANSWER: Correct Something that weighs 1 has a mass of about . This is a useful conversion to keep in mind! ± A Trip to Europe 100 200 300 cm cm cm feet inches cm mm cm cm pound 1 kg 2 80 500 1200 kg kg kg pound (1/2) kg Learning Goal: To understand how to use dimensional analysis to solve problems. Dimensional analysis is a useful tool for solving problems that involve unit conversions. Since unit conversion is not limited to physics problems but is part of our everyday life, correct use of conversion factors is essential to working through problems of practical importance. For example, dimensional analysis could be used in problems involving currency exchange. Say you want to calculate how many euros you get if you exchange 3600 ( ), given the exchange rate , that is, 1 to 1.20 . Begin by writing down the starting value, 3600 . This can also be written as a fraction: . Next, convert dollars to euros. This conversion involves multiplying by a simple conversion factor derived from the exchange rate: . Note that the “dollar” unit, , should appear on the bottom of this conversion factor, since appears on the top of the starting value. Finally, since dollars are divided by dollars, the units can be canceled and the final result is . Currency exchange is only one example of many practical situations where dimensional analysis may help you to work through problems. Remember that dimensional analysis involves multiplying a given value by a conversion factor, resulting in a value in the new units. The conversion factor can be the ratio of any two quantities, as long as the ratio is equal to one. You and your friends are organizing a trip to Europe. Your plan is to rent a car and drive through the major European capitals. By consulting a map you estimate that you will cover a total distance of 5000 . Consider the euro-dollar exchange rate given in the introduction and use dimensional analysis to work through these simple problems. Part A You select a rental package that includes a car with an average consumption of 6.00 of fuel per 100 . Considering that in Europe the average fuel cost is 1.063 , how much (in US dollars) will you spend in fuel on your trip? Express your answer numerically in US dollars to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: US dollars USD 1 EUR = 1.20 USD euro US dollars USD 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD USD USD ( )( ) = 3000 EUR 3600 USD 1 1.00 EUR 1.20 USD km liters km euros/liter Part B How many gallons of fuel would the rental car consume per mile? Express your answer numerically in gallons per mile to three significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 0 points. Cost of fuel = USD gallons/mile

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. which of the following predictions appear(s) to follow from a model based on the assumption that rational, self-interested individuals respond to incentives? (See pages 6–7.) a. For every 10 exam points Myrna must earn in order to pass her economics course and meet her graduation requirements, she will study one additional hour for her economics test next week. b. A coin toss will best predict Leonardo’s decision about whether to purchase an expensive business suit or an inexpensive casual outfit to wear next week when he interviews for a high-paying job he is seeking. c. Celeste, who uses earnings from her regularly scheduled hours of part-time work to pay for her room and board at college, will decide to purchase and download a newly released video this week only if

. which of the following predictions appear(s) to follow from a model based on the assumption that rational, self-interested individuals respond to incentives? (See pages 6–7.) a. For every 10 exam points Myrna must earn in order to pass her economics course and meet her graduation requirements, she will study one additional hour for her economics test next week. b. A coin toss will best predict Leonardo’s decision about whether to purchase an expensive business suit or an inexpensive casual outfit to wear next week when he interviews for a high-paying job he is seeking. c. Celeste, who uses earnings from her regularly scheduled hours of part-time work to pay for her room and board at college, will decide to purchase and download a newly released video this week only if

Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

Engineering Risk Management Special topic: Beer Game Copyright Old Dominion University, 2017 All rights reserved Revised Class Schedule Lac-Megantic Case Study Part 1: Timeline of events Part 2: Timeline + causal chain of events Part 3: Instructions Evaluate your causal-chain (network) Which are the root causes? Which events have the most causes? What are the relationship of the causes? Which causes have the most influence? Part 4: Instructions Consider these recommendations from TSB Which nodes in your causal chain will be addressed by which of these recommendations? Recap How would you summarize the steps in conducting post-event analysis of an accident? Beer Game Case Study The beer game was developed at MIT in the 1960s. It is an experiential learning business simulation game created by a group of professors at MIT Sloan School of Management in early 1960s to demonstrate a number of key principles of supply chain management. The game is played by teams of four players, often in heated competition, and takes at least one hour to complete.  Beer Game Case Study Beer Game Case Study A truck driver delivers beer once each week to the retailer. Then the retailer places an order with the trucker who returns the order to the wholesaler. There’s a four week lag between ordering and receiving the beer. The retailer and wholesaler do not communicate directly. The retailer sells hundreds of products and the wholesaler distributes many products to a large number of customers. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 1: Lover’s Beer is not very popular but the retailer sells four cases per week on average. Because the lead time is four weeks, the retailer attempts to keep twelve cases in the store by ordering four cases each Monday when the trucker makes a delivery. Week 2: The retailer’s sales of Lover’s beer doubles to eight cases, so on Monday, he orders 8 cases. Week 3: The retailer sells 8 cases. The trucker delivers four cases. To be safe, the retailer decides to order 12 cases of Lover’s beer. Week 4: The retailer learns from some of his younger customers that a music video appearing on TV shows a group singing “I’ll take on last sip of Lover’s beer and run into the sun.” The retailer assumes that this explains the increased demand for the product. The trucker delivers 5 cases. The retailer is nearly sold out, so he orders 16 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Retailer Week 5: The retailer sells the last case, but receives 7 cases. All 7 cases are sold by the end of the week. So again on Monday the retailer orders 16 cases. Week 6: Customers are looking for Lover’s beer. Some put their names on a list to be called when the beer comes in. The trucker delivers only 6 cases and all are sold by the weekend. The retailer orders another 16 cases. Week 7: The trucker delivers 7 cases. The retailer is frustrated, but orders another 16 cases. Week 8: The trucker delivers 5 cases and tells the retailer the beer is backlogged. The retailer is really getting irritated with the wholesaler, but orders 24 cases. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler The wholesaler distributes many brands of beer to a large number of retailers, but he is the only distributor of Lover’s beer. The wholesaler orders 4 truckloads from the brewery truck driver each week and receives the beer after a 4 week lag. The wholesaler’s policy is to keep 12 truckloads in inventory on a continuous basis. Week 6: By week 6 the wholesaler is out of Lover’s beer and responds by ordering 30 truckloads from the brewery. Week 8: By the 8th week most stores are ordering 3 or 4 times more Lovers’ beer than their regular amounts. Week 9: The wholesaler orders more Lover’s beer, but gets only 6 truckloads. Week 10: Only 8 truckloads are delivered, so the wholesaler orders 40. Week 11: Only 12 truckloads are received, and there are 77 truckloads in backlog, so the wholesaler orders 40 more truckloads. Beer Game Case Study The Wholesaler Week 12: The wholesaler orders 60 more truckloads of Lover’s beer. It appears that the beer is becoming more popular from week to week. Week 13: There is still a huge backlog. Weeks 14-15: The wholesaler receives larger shipments from the brewery, but orders from retailers begin to drop off. Week 16: The trucker delivers 55 truckloads from the brewery, but the wholesaler gets zero orders from retailers. So he stops ordering from the brewery. Week 17: The wholesaler receives another 60 truckloads. Retailers order zero. The wholesaler orders zero. The brewery keeps sending beer. Beer Game Case Study The Brewery The brewery is small but has a reputation for producing high quality beer. Lover’s beer is only one of several products produced at the brewery. Week 6: New orders come in for 40 gross. It takes two weeks to brew the beer. Week 14: Orders continue to come in and the brewery has not been able to catch up on the backlogged orders. The marketing manager begins to wonder how much bonus he will get for increasing sales so dramatically. Week 16: The brewery catches up on the backlog, but orders begin to drop off. Week 18: By week 18 there are no new orders for Lover’s beer. Week 19: The brewery has 100 gross of Lover’s beer in stock, but no orders. So the brewery stops producing Lover’s beer. Weeks 20-23. No orders. Beer Game Case Study At this point all the players blame each other for the excess inventory. Conversations with wholesale and retailer reveal an inventory of 93 cases at the retailer and 220 truckloads at the wholesaler. The marketing manager figures it will take the wholesaler a year to sell the Lover’s beer he has in stock. The retailers must be the problem. The retailer explains that demand increased from 4 cases per week to 8 cases. The wholesaler and marketing manager think demand mushroomed after that, and then fell off, but the retailer explains that didn’t happen. Demand stayed at 8 cases per week. Since he didn’t get the beer he ordered, he kept ordering more in an attempt to keep up with the demand. The marketing manager plans his resignation. Homework 4 Read the case and answer 1+6 questions. 0th What should go right? 1st What can go wrong? 2nd What are the causes and consequences? 3rd What is the likelihood of occurrence? 4rd What can be done to detect, control, and manage them? 5th What are the alternatives? 6th What are the effects beyond this particular time? Homework 4 In 500 words or less, summarize lessons learned in this beer game as it relates to supply chain risk management. Apply one of the tools (CCA, HAZOP, FMEA, etc.) to the case. Work individually and submit before Monday midnight (Feb. 20th). No class on Monday (Feb. 20th).

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Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...