Discuss the differences in North Pole and the magnetic North Pole, and the South Pole and the magnetic South Pole in terms of dip angle and magnetic declination. Discuss the cause of northern lights

Discuss the differences in North Pole and the magnetic North Pole, and the South Pole and the magnetic South Pole in terms of dip angle and magnetic declination. Discuss the cause of northern lights

The South Pole of the Earth’s magnet is in the … Read More...
COMP 4440/5440 – Dr. Erdemir Mobile Robotics Project (DUE 12/02/2015) HONOR CODE I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received aid on this work. Do not sign until after you have completed your assignment. Name: Signature: 1. (Prerequisite) Given the asset package (it is in mytsu under assignments folder) download it, open a new project (don’t double click on the file, it won’t open), go to Assets/Import Package/Custom Package, select the asset package given to you (project.unitypackage). After the import is completed, you will see main scene in the assets folder of your project. Double click on it, and choose “Don’t Save” option if it asks for save. 2. Print this page and attach it to your code and your snapshot of your final scene (5 points) 3. After the class starts, instructor will come next to you and you are supposed to show him your code running (10 points) 4. When you run the code you will see, your robot (red cube that we used in the class) is trying to reach the targets but it can’t due to an obstacle between your robot and the targets. Write a code that makes this robot to avoid from the obstacles and reach the targets. Your code will read the collision and intelligently avoid from other moving robots and fixed obstacles and get the three targets. (50 points) 5. Maximum time is 2 minutes, your robot shall get the targets in 2 minutes (10 points) 6. Your robot shall escape from the blue robot and not collide them. (10 Points) 7. Anything extra (up to 20 points) ? Moving objects, new sensor, Artificial Intelligence or other techniques. 8. YOU CAN NOT USE TRANSLATE FUNCTION. USE ONLY AddRelativeForce FUNCTION IN THE FORWARD DIRECTION AS ALL THE MOBILE ROBOTS WORK.

COMP 4440/5440 – Dr. Erdemir Mobile Robotics Project (DUE 12/02/2015) HONOR CODE I pledge my honor that I have neither given nor received aid on this work. Do not sign until after you have completed your assignment. Name: Signature: 1. (Prerequisite) Given the asset package (it is in mytsu under assignments folder) download it, open a new project (don’t double click on the file, it won’t open), go to Assets/Import Package/Custom Package, select the asset package given to you (project.unitypackage). After the import is completed, you will see main scene in the assets folder of your project. Double click on it, and choose “Don’t Save” option if it asks for save. 2. Print this page and attach it to your code and your snapshot of your final scene (5 points) 3. After the class starts, instructor will come next to you and you are supposed to show him your code running (10 points) 4. When you run the code you will see, your robot (red cube that we used in the class) is trying to reach the targets but it can’t due to an obstacle between your robot and the targets. Write a code that makes this robot to avoid from the obstacles and reach the targets. Your code will read the collision and intelligently avoid from other moving robots and fixed obstacles and get the three targets. (50 points) 5. Maximum time is 2 minutes, your robot shall get the targets in 2 minutes (10 points) 6. Your robot shall escape from the blue robot and not collide them. (10 Points) 7. Anything extra (up to 20 points) ? Moving objects, new sensor, Artificial Intelligence or other techniques. 8. YOU CAN NOT USE TRANSLATE FUNCTION. USE ONLY AddRelativeForce FUNCTION IN THE FORWARD DIRECTION AS ALL THE MOBILE ROBOTS WORK.

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
Consider a test you have taken. Did it measure what it was supposed to measure? If you had taken a different test over the same material, do you think you would have gotten the same score?

Consider a test you have taken. Did it measure what it was supposed to measure? If you had taken a different test over the same material, do you think you would have gotten the same score?

The tests I have taken were not designed to measure … Read More...
Consider a test you have taken. Did it measure what it was supposed to measure? If you had taken a different test over the same material, do you think you would have gotten the same score?

Consider a test you have taken. Did it measure what it was supposed to measure? If you had taken a different test over the same material, do you think you would have gotten the same score?

Most of the test, I have given, does not measure … Read More...
1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

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Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic<br />21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic</br

Define: 41 Things Philosophy is: 1. Ignorant 2. Selfish 3. Ironic 4. Plain 5. Misunderstood 6. A failure 7. Poor 8. Unscientific 9. Unteachable 10. Foolish 11. Abnormal 12. Divine trickery 13. Egalitarian 14. A divine calling 15. Laborious 16. Countercultural 17. Uncomfortable 18. Virtuous 19. Dangerous 20. Simplistic
21. Polemical 22. Therapeutic 23. “conformist” 24. Embarrassi ng 25. Invulnerable 26. Annoying 27. Pneumatic 28. Apolitic al 29. Docile/teachable 30. Messianic 31. Pious 32. Impract ical 33. Happy 34. Necessary 35. Death-defying 36. Fallible 37. Immortal 38. Confident 39. Painful 40. agnostic

Ignorant- A person is said to be ignorant if he … Read More...
Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

Sex, Gender, and Popular Culture Spring 2015 Look through popular magazines, and see if you can find advertisements that objectify women in order to sell a product. Alternately, you may use an advertisement on television (but make sure to provide a link to the ad so I can see it!). Study these images then write a paper about objectification that deals with all or some of the following: • What effect(s), if any, do you think the objectification of women’s bodies has on our culture? • Jean Kilbourne states “turning a human being into a thing is almost always the first step toward justifying violence against that person.” What do you think she means by this? Do you agree with her reasoning? Why or why not? • Some people would argue that depicting a woman’s body as an object is a form of art. What is your opinion of this point of view? Explain your reasoning. • Why do you think that women are objectified more often than men are? • How does sexualization and objectification play out differently across racial lines? • Kilbourne explains that the consequences of being objectified are different – and more serious – for women than for men. Do you agree? How is the world different for women than it is for men? How do objectified images of women interact with those in our culture differently from the way images of men do? Why is it important to look at images in the context of the culture? • What is the difference between sexual objectification and sexual subjectification? (Ros Gill ) • How do ads construct violent white masculinity and how does that vision of masculinity hurt both men and women? Throughout your written analysis, be sure to make clear and specific reference to the images you selected, and please submit these images with your paper. Make sure you engage with and reference to at least 4 of the following authors: Kilbourne, Bordo, Hunter & Soto, Rose, Durham, Gill, Katz, Schuchardt, Ono and Buescher. Guidelines:  Keep your content focused on structural, systemic, institutional factors rather than the individual: BE ANALYTICAL NOT ANECDOTAL.  Avoid using the first person or including personal stories/reactions. You must make sure to actively engage with your readings: these essays need to be informed and framed by the theoretical material you have been reading this semester.  Keep within the 4-6 page limit; use 12-point font, double spacing and 1-inch margins.  Use formal writing conventions (introduction/thesis statement, body, conclusion) and correct grammar. Resources may be cited within the text of your paper, i.e. (Walters, 2013).

The objectification of women has been a very controversial topic … Read More...
5. Provide a brief discussion with supporting evidence to the following inquiry: With the responsibility of overseeing career development processes, how does management equip employees with skills that impact their performance in an efficient and effective manner?

5. Provide a brief discussion with supporting evidence to the following inquiry: With the responsibility of overseeing career development processes, how does management equip employees with skills that impact their performance in an efficient and effective manner?

Career development can facilitate we attain superior contentment and accomplishment. … Read More...
This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

This assignment provides you the opportunity to reflect on the topics ethics and how one might experience ethical challenges early in one’s career. The attached scenario is based on actual events and used with permission of ASCE. Using the attached scenario and American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) code of ethics, develop a response to the questions that are included within the scenario. Your deliverable must be in the form of a memorandum, which could be used as a reference or guideline when discussing the importance of ethics colleagues. When answering the questions you should be specific in identifying the components of the code of ethics you use to reflect on the questions posed and how they would be used to assist someone facing the same scenario. Ethics Scenario and Questions: Last month, Sara was reported to her State’s Engineer’s Board for a possible ethics violation. Tomorrow morning she would meet with the Board and though she felt she had done nothing unethical, Sara’s eyes had been opened to the complexity and gravity of ethical dilemmas in engineering practice. She wished she had sought and/or received better guidance regarding ethical issues earlier in her career. Sara reflected on how she got to this point in her career. When Sara had been a senior Civil Engineering student in an ABET-accredited program at the State University, she immersed herself in her course work. Graduating at the top of her class assured Sara that she would have some choice in her career direction. Knowing that she wanted to become a licensed engineer, Sara took and passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam during her senior year and after graduation, went to work as an Engineer Intern (EI) for a company that would allow her to achieve that goal. Sara was excited about her new job — she worked diligently for four years under licensed engineers and was assigned increasing responsibilities. She was now ready to take the Professional Engineer (PE) exam and become licensed. Just before taking the PE licensing exam, Sara’s firm was retained to investigate the structural integrity of an apartment complex that the firm’s client planned to sell. Sara’s supervisor informed her in no uncertain terms that the client required that the structural report remain confidential. Later, the client informed Sara that he planned to sell the occupied property “as is.” During Sara’s investigation she found no significant structural problems with the apartment complex. However, she did observe some electrical deficiencies that she believed violated city codes and could pose a safety hazard to the occupants. Realizing that electrical matters were, in a manner of speaking, not her direct area of expertise, Sara discussed possible approaches with her colleague and friend, Tom. Also an Engineer Intern, Tom had been an officer in the student chapter of ASCE during their college years. During their conversation, Tom commented that based on the ASCE Code of Ethics, he believed Sara had an ethical obligation to disclose this health-safety problem. Sara felt Tom did not appreciate the fact that she had been clearly instructed to keep such information confidential, and she certainly did not want to damage the client relationship. Nevertheless, with reluctance, Sara verbally informed the client about the problem and made an oblique reference to the electrical deficiencies in her report, which her supervisor signed and sealed. Several weeks later, Sara learned that her client did not inform either the residents of the apartment complex or the prospective buyer about her concerns. Although Sara felt confident and pleased with her work on the project, the situation about the electrical deficiencies continued to bother her. She wondered if she had an ethical obligation to do more than just tell the client and state her concerns in her report. The thought of informing the proper authorities occurred to her, especially since the client was not disclosing the potential safety concerns to either the occupants or the buyer. She toyed with the idea of discussing the situation with her immediate supervisor but since everyone seemed satisfied, Sara moved onto other projects and eventually put it out of her mind. Questions to consider (What were the main issues Sara was wrestling with in this situation? ; Do you think Sara had a “right” or an “obligation” to report the deficiency to the proper authorities? ;Who might Sara have spoken with about the dilemma? ; Who should be responsible for what happened – Sara, Sara’s employer, the client, or someone else? ; How does this situation conflict with Sara’s obligation to be faithful to her client? ; Is it wise practice to ignore “gut feelings” that arise? These and other questions will surface again later and most will be considered at that point, but let’s continue for now with Sara’s story. During her first few years with the company, and under the supervision of several managers, Sara was encouraged to become active in technical and professional societies (which was the policy of the company). But then she found her involvement with those groups diminishing as her current supervisor opposed Sara’s participation in meetings and conferences unless she used vacation time. Sara was very frustrated but did not really know how to rectify the situation. In the course of time, Sara attended a meeting with the CEO on a different matter and she took the opportunity to inquire about attending technical and professional society meetings. The CEO reaffirmed that the company thought it important and that he wanted Sara to participate in such meetings. Sara informed her supervisor and though he did begin approving Sara’s requests for leave to participate in society meetings, their relationship was strained. Questions to consider: What might Sara have done differently to seek a remedy and yet preserve her relationship with her supervisor? ; Where could Sara have found guidance in the ASCE Code of Ethics, appropriate to this situation? The story continues….. As Christmas approached the following year, Sara discovered a gift bag on her desk. Inside the gift bag was an expensive honey-glazed spiral cut ham and a Christmas greeting card from a vendor who called on Sara from time to time. This concerned Sara as she felt it might cast doubt on the integrity of their business relationship. She asked around and found that several others received gifts from the vendor as well. After sleeping on it, Sara sent a polite note to the vendor returning the ham. Questions to consider: Was Sara really obligated to return the ham? Or was this taking ethics too far? ; On the other hand, could Sara be obligated to pursue the matter further than just returning the gift she had received? A few years later, friends and colleagues urged Sara, now a highly successful principal in a respected engineering firm, to run for public office. Sara carefully considered this step, realizing it would be a challenge to juggle work, family, and such intense community involvement. Ultimately, she agreed to run and soon found herself immersed in the campaign. A draft political advertisement was prepared that included her photograph, her engineering seal, and the following text: “Vote for Sara! We need an engineer on the City Council. That is simple common sense, isn’t it? Sara is an experienced licensed engineer with years of rich accomplishments, who disdains delays and takes action now!” Questions to consider: Should Sara’s engineering seal be included in the advertisement? ; Should she ask someone in ASCE his or her opinion before deciding? As fate would have it, a few days later, just after announcing her candidacy for City Council, the matter of Sara’s investigation of the apartment complex so many years ago resurfaced. Sara learned that the apartment complex caught on fire, and people had been seriously injured. During the investigation of the cause of the fire, Sara’s report was reviewed, and somehow the cause of the fire was traced to the electrical deficiencies, which she had briefly mentioned. Immediately this hit the local newspapers, attorneys became involved, and subsequently the Licensing Board was asked to look into the ethical responsibilities related to the report. Now, sitting alone by the shore of the lake, Sara pondered her situation. Legally, she felt she might claim some immunity since she was not a licensed engineer at the time of her work on the apartment complex. But professionally, she keenly felt she had let the public down, and she could not get this, or those who had been hurt in the fire, out of her mind. Question to consider: Occasionally, are some elements of the code in conflict with other elements In the backseat of the taxi on the way to the airport, Sara thumbed through her hometown newspaper that she had purchased at a newsstand. She stopped when she saw an editorial about her City Council campaign. The article claimed that, as a result of the allegations against her, she was no longer fit for public office. Could this be true? Question to consider: How should she respond to such claims?

MEMO       To: Ms. Sara From: Ethics Monitoring … Read More...