Describe and discuss: your understanding of the issues facing students who are cultural and linguistically diverse

Describe and discuss: your understanding of the issues facing students who are cultural and linguistically diverse

Special education researchers can take a practical approach to assuring … Read More...
Describe and discuss: . the significance of teaching for social justice.

Describe and discuss: . the significance of teaching for social justice.

By accepting that diverse societies have dissimilar cultures, they appreciate … Read More...
1 MECE2320U-THERMODYNAMICS HOMEWORK # 5 Instructor: Dr. Ibrahim Dincer Assignment Date: Thursday, 22 October 2015 Assignment Type: Individual Due Date: Thursday, 29 October 2015 (3.00 pm latest, leave in dropbox 8) 1) As shown in figure, the inlet and outlet conditions of a steam turbine are given. The heat loss from turbine is 35 kJ per kg of steam. a) Show all the state points on T-v diagram b) Write mass and energy balance equations c) Calculate the turbine work 2) As shown in figure, refrigerant R134a enters to a compressor. Write both mass and energy balance equations. Calculate the compressor work and the mass flow rate of refrigerant. 3) As shown in figure, the heat exchanger uses the heat of hot exhaust gases to produce steam. Where, 15% of heat is lost to the surroundings. Exhaust gases enters the heat exchanger at 500°C. Water enters at 15°C as saturated liquid and exit at saturated vapor at 2 MPa. Mass flow rate of water is 0.025 kg/s, and for exhaust gases, it is 0.42 kg/s. The specific heat for exhaust gases is 1.045 kJ/kg K, which can be treated as ideal gas. 1 Turbine 2 ? 1 = 1 ??/? ?1 = 1 ??? ?1 = 300 ℃ ?1 = 40 ?/? ? ??? =? ????? = 35 ??/?? ?2 = 150 ??? ?2 = 0.9 ?2 = 180 ?/? 1 Compressor 2 ???? ???? = 1.3 ?3/??? ?1 = 100 ??? ?1 = −20 ℃ ? ?? =? ? ???? = 3 ?? ?2 = 800 ??? ?2 = 60 ℃ 2 a) Write mass and energy balance equations. b) Calculate the rate of heat transfer to the water. c) Calculate the exhaust gases exit temperature. 4) As shown in figure, two refrigerant R134a streams mix in a mixing chamber. If the mass flow rate of cold stream is twice that of the hot stream. a) Write mass and energy balance equations. b) Calculate the temperature of the mixture at the exit of the mixing chamber c) Calculate the quality at the exit of the mixing chamber 5) As shown in figure, an air conditioning system requires airflow at the main supply duct at a rate of 140 m3/min. The velocity inside circular duct is not to exceed 9 m/s. Assume that the fan converts 85% of electrical energy it consumes into kinetic energy of air. a) Write mass and energy balance equations. b) Calculate the size of electric motor require to drive the fan c) Calculate the diameter of the main duct ?2 = 1 ??? ?2 = 90 ℃ ?1 = 1 ??? ?1 = 30 ℃ ?3 =? ?3 =? 140 ?3/??? 9 ?/? Air Fan

1 MECE2320U-THERMODYNAMICS HOMEWORK # 5 Instructor: Dr. Ibrahim Dincer Assignment Date: Thursday, 22 October 2015 Assignment Type: Individual Due Date: Thursday, 29 October 2015 (3.00 pm latest, leave in dropbox 8) 1) As shown in figure, the inlet and outlet conditions of a steam turbine are given. The heat loss from turbine is 35 kJ per kg of steam. a) Show all the state points on T-v diagram b) Write mass and energy balance equations c) Calculate the turbine work 2) As shown in figure, refrigerant R134a enters to a compressor. Write both mass and energy balance equations. Calculate the compressor work and the mass flow rate of refrigerant. 3) As shown in figure, the heat exchanger uses the heat of hot exhaust gases to produce steam. Where, 15% of heat is lost to the surroundings. Exhaust gases enters the heat exchanger at 500°C. Water enters at 15°C as saturated liquid and exit at saturated vapor at 2 MPa. Mass flow rate of water is 0.025 kg/s, and for exhaust gases, it is 0.42 kg/s. The specific heat for exhaust gases is 1.045 kJ/kg K, which can be treated as ideal gas. 1 Turbine 2 ? 1 = 1 ??/? ?1 = 1 ??? ?1 = 300 ℃ ?1 = 40 ?/? ? ??? =? ????? = 35 ??/?? ?2 = 150 ??? ?2 = 0.9 ?2 = 180 ?/? 1 Compressor 2 ???? ???? = 1.3 ?3/??? ?1 = 100 ??? ?1 = −20 ℃ ? ?? =? ? ???? = 3 ?? ?2 = 800 ??? ?2 = 60 ℃ 2 a) Write mass and energy balance equations. b) Calculate the rate of heat transfer to the water. c) Calculate the exhaust gases exit temperature. 4) As shown in figure, two refrigerant R134a streams mix in a mixing chamber. If the mass flow rate of cold stream is twice that of the hot stream. a) Write mass and energy balance equations. b) Calculate the temperature of the mixture at the exit of the mixing chamber c) Calculate the quality at the exit of the mixing chamber 5) As shown in figure, an air conditioning system requires airflow at the main supply duct at a rate of 140 m3/min. The velocity inside circular duct is not to exceed 9 m/s. Assume that the fan converts 85% of electrical energy it consumes into kinetic energy of air. a) Write mass and energy balance equations. b) Calculate the size of electric motor require to drive the fan c) Calculate the diameter of the main duct ?2 = 1 ??? ?2 = 90 ℃ ?1 = 1 ??? ?1 = 30 ℃ ?3 =? ?3 =? 140 ?3/??? 9 ?/? Air Fan

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CHM114: Exam #1 CHM 114, S2015 Exam #1, Version B Instructor: O. Graudejus Points: 100 Print Name Sign Name Student I.D. # 1. You are responsible for the information on this page. Please read it carefully. 2. If you enter your ASU ID incorrectly on the scantron, a 3 point penalty will be assessed. 3. Code your name and 10 digit affiliate identification number on the separate scantron answer sheet. Use only a #2 pencil 4. Do all calculations on the exam pages. Do not make any unnecessary marks on the answer sheet. 5. This exam consists of 25 multiple choice questions worth 4 points each and a periodic table. Make sure you have them all. 6. Choose the best answer to each of the questions and answer it on the computer-graded answer sheet. Read all responses before making a selection. 7. Read the directions carefully for each problem. 8. Avoid even casual glances at other students’ exams. 9. Stop writing and hand in your scantron answer sheet and your test promptly when instructed. LATE EXAMS MAY HAVE POINTS DEDUCTED. 10. You will have 50 minutes to complete the exam. 11. If you leave early, please do so quietly. 12. Work the easiest problems first. 13. A periodic table is attached as the last page to this exam. 14. Answers will be posted online this afternoon. Potentially useful information: K = ºC + 273.15 Avogadro’s Number = 6.022 × 1023 particles/mole 1amu = 1.66·10-24 g 1 cal=4.184 J \ -2- CHM 114: Exam #1 1) What volume (mL) of a concentrated solution of sodium hydroxide (6.00 M) must be diluted to 200.0 mL to make a 0.880 M solution of sodium hydroxide? A) 2.64 B) 176 C) 29.3 D) 26.4 E) 50.0 2) Sulfur and fluorine react in a combination reaction to produce sulfur hexafluoride: S (s) + 3 F2 (g)  SF6 (g) The maximum amount of SF6 that can be produced from the reaction of 3.5 g of sulfur with 4.5 g of fluorine is __________ g. A) 5.8 B) 3.2 C) 12 D) 16 E) 8.0 3) Of the reactions below, only __________ is not spontaneous. A) 2 2 Mg (s) 2HCl + (aq)®MgCl (aq) + H (g) B) 2 4 2 4 2 2Ni (s) + H SO (aq) ®Ni SO (aq) + H (g) C) 3 2 2Al (s) + 6HBr (aq)®2AlBr (aq) + 3H (g) D) 3 3 2 2Ag (s) + 2HNO (aq) ®2AgNO (aq) + H (g) E) 2 2 Zn (s) + 2HI (aq) ®ZnI (aq) + H (g) 4) Which solution has the same number of moles of NaOH as 40.00 mL of 0.100M solution of NaOH? A) 20.00 mL of 0.200M solution of NaOH B) 25.00 mL of 0.175M solution of NaOH C) 30.00 mL of 0.145M solution of NaOH D) 50.00 mL of 0.125M solution of NaOH E) 100.00 mL of 0.0500M solution of NaOH 5) What is the concentration (M) of a NaCl solution prepared by dissolving 9.3 g of NaCl in sufficient water to give 450 mL of solution? A) 0.35 B) 0.16 C) 0.45 D) 27 E) -2 2.7×10 -3- CHM 114: Exam #1 6) In which reaction does the oxidation number of hydrogen change? A) 2 HCl (aq) NaOH (+ aq)® NaCl (aq) + H O (l) B) 2 2 CaO (s) + H O (l) ®Ca(OH) (s) C) 4 3 4 2 2 2 2 HClO (aq) + CaCO (s) ® Ca(ClO ) (aq) + H O (l) +CO (g) D) 2 2 2 3 SO (g) + H O (l)®H SO (aq) E) 2 2 2 Na (s) + 2H O (l) ® 2 NaOH (aq) + H (g) 7) Which atom has the smallest number of neutrons? A) phosphorus-30 B) chlorine-37 C) potassium-39 D) argon-40 E) calcium-40 8) The change in the internal energy of a system that absorbs 2,500 J of heat and that has received 7,655 J of work by the surroundings is __________ J. A) -10,155 B) -5,155 C) 7 −1.91×10 D) 10,155 E) 5,155 9) When a metal and a nonmetal react, the __________ tends to lose electrons and the __________ tends to gain electrons. A) metal, metal B) nonmetal, nonmetal C) metal, nonmetal D) nonmetal, metal E) None of the above, these elements share electrons. 10) What is the oxidation number of nitrogen in HNO2? A) -5 B) -3 C) 0 D) +3 E) +5 -4- CHM 114: Exam #1 11) Elements in Group 7A are known as the __________. A) chalcogens B) alkaline earth metals C) alkali metals D) halogens E) noble gases 12) The concentration of iodide ions in a 0.193 M solution of sodium iodide is __________. A) 0.193 M B) 0.386 M C) 0.0965 M D) 0.579 M E) 0.0643 M 13) Lithium and nitrogen react to produce lithium nitride: 6Li (s) + N2 (g)  2Li3N (s) How many moles of N2 are needed to react with 1.422 mol of lithium? A) 4.26 B) 0.710 C) 0.237 D) 2.13 E) 0.118 14) The balanced equation for the decomposition of sodium azide is __________. A) 2NaN3 (s)  Na2 (s) + 3 N2 (g) B) NaN3 (s)  Na (s) + N2 (g) C) 2NaN3 (s)  2Na (s) + 3 N2 (g) D) NaN3 (s)  Na (s) + N2 (g) + N (g) E) 2NaN3 (s)  2Na (s) + 2 N2 (g) 15) A sample of CH2F2 with a mass of 9.5 g contains __________ atoms of F. A) 2.2 × 1023 B) 38 C) 3.3 × 1024 D) 4.4 × 1023 E) 9.5 -5- CHM 114: Exam #1 16) An unknown element is found to have three naturally occurring isotopes with atomic masses of 35.9675 (0.337%), 37.9627 (0.063%), and 39.9624 (99.600%). Which of the following is the unknown element? A) Ar B) K C) Cl D) Ca E) None of the above could be the unknown element. 17) The value of DH° for the reaction below is -482 kJ. Calculate the heat (kJ) released to the surroundings when 24.0 g of CO (g) reacts completely. 2 2 2CO(g) +O (g)®2CO (g) A) 3 2.89×10 B) 207 C) 103 D) 65.7 E) -482 18) Lead (II) carbonate decomposes to give lead (II) oxide and carbon dioxide: PbCO3 (s)  PbO (s) + CO2 (g) __________ grams of carbondioxide will be produced by the decomposition of 7.50 g of lead (II) carbonate? A) 1.23 B) 2.50 C) 0.00936 D) 6.26 E) 7.83 19) Combining aqueous solutions of BaCl2 and K2SO4 affords a precipitate of 4 BaSO . Which ion(s) is/are spectator ions in the reaction? A) 2 Ba only + B) K+ only C) 2 2 Ba and SO4 + − D) SO4 2- and Cl- E) K+ and Cl- 20) Which combination will produce a precipitate? A) Pb(NO3)2 (aq) and HCl (aq) B) Cu(NO3)2 (aq) and KCl (aq) C) KOH (aq) and HNO3 (aq) D) AgNO3 (aq) and HNO3 (aq) E) NaOH (aq) and Sr(NO3)2 (aq) -6- CHM 114: Exam #1 21) There are __________ sulfur atoms in 50 molecules of C4H4S2. A) 1.5 × 1025 B) 100 C) 3.0 × 1025 D) 50 E) 6.02 × 1023 22) A compound contains 38.7% K, 13.9% N, and 47.4% O by mass. What is the empirical formula of the compound? A) K2N2O3 B) KNO2 C) KNO3 D) K2NO3 E) K4NO5 23) Predict the empirical formula of the ionic compound that forms from sodium and fluorine. A) 2 Na F B) 2 NaF C) 2 3 Na F D) NaF E) 3 2 Na F 24) The mass % of Krypton in the binary compound KrF2 is __________. A) 18.48 B) 45.38 C) 68.80 D) 81.52 E) 31.20 25) The correct name for K2SO3 is __________. A) potassium sulfate B) potassium disulfide C) potassium sulfite D) potassium sulfide E) dipotassium sulfate -7- CHM 114: Exam #1

CHM114: Exam #1 CHM 114, S2015 Exam #1, Version B Instructor: O. Graudejus Points: 100 Print Name Sign Name Student I.D. # 1. You are responsible for the information on this page. Please read it carefully. 2. If you enter your ASU ID incorrectly on the scantron, a 3 point penalty will be assessed. 3. Code your name and 10 digit affiliate identification number on the separate scantron answer sheet. Use only a #2 pencil 4. Do all calculations on the exam pages. Do not make any unnecessary marks on the answer sheet. 5. This exam consists of 25 multiple choice questions worth 4 points each and a periodic table. Make sure you have them all. 6. Choose the best answer to each of the questions and answer it on the computer-graded answer sheet. Read all responses before making a selection. 7. Read the directions carefully for each problem. 8. Avoid even casual glances at other students’ exams. 9. Stop writing and hand in your scantron answer sheet and your test promptly when instructed. LATE EXAMS MAY HAVE POINTS DEDUCTED. 10. You will have 50 minutes to complete the exam. 11. If you leave early, please do so quietly. 12. Work the easiest problems first. 13. A periodic table is attached as the last page to this exam. 14. Answers will be posted online this afternoon. Potentially useful information: K = ºC + 273.15 Avogadro’s Number = 6.022 × 1023 particles/mole 1amu = 1.66·10-24 g 1 cal=4.184 J \ -2- CHM 114: Exam #1 1) What volume (mL) of a concentrated solution of sodium hydroxide (6.00 M) must be diluted to 200.0 mL to make a 0.880 M solution of sodium hydroxide? A) 2.64 B) 176 C) 29.3 D) 26.4 E) 50.0 2) Sulfur and fluorine react in a combination reaction to produce sulfur hexafluoride: S (s) + 3 F2 (g)  SF6 (g) The maximum amount of SF6 that can be produced from the reaction of 3.5 g of sulfur with 4.5 g of fluorine is __________ g. A) 5.8 B) 3.2 C) 12 D) 16 E) 8.0 3) Of the reactions below, only __________ is not spontaneous. A) 2 2 Mg (s) 2HCl + (aq)®MgCl (aq) + H (g) B) 2 4 2 4 2 2Ni (s) + H SO (aq) ®Ni SO (aq) + H (g) C) 3 2 2Al (s) + 6HBr (aq)®2AlBr (aq) + 3H (g) D) 3 3 2 2Ag (s) + 2HNO (aq) ®2AgNO (aq) + H (g) E) 2 2 Zn (s) + 2HI (aq) ®ZnI (aq) + H (g) 4) Which solution has the same number of moles of NaOH as 40.00 mL of 0.100M solution of NaOH? A) 20.00 mL of 0.200M solution of NaOH B) 25.00 mL of 0.175M solution of NaOH C) 30.00 mL of 0.145M solution of NaOH D) 50.00 mL of 0.125M solution of NaOH E) 100.00 mL of 0.0500M solution of NaOH 5) What is the concentration (M) of a NaCl solution prepared by dissolving 9.3 g of NaCl in sufficient water to give 450 mL of solution? A) 0.35 B) 0.16 C) 0.45 D) 27 E) -2 2.7×10 -3- CHM 114: Exam #1 6) In which reaction does the oxidation number of hydrogen change? A) 2 HCl (aq) NaOH (+ aq)® NaCl (aq) + H O (l) B) 2 2 CaO (s) + H O (l) ®Ca(OH) (s) C) 4 3 4 2 2 2 2 HClO (aq) + CaCO (s) ® Ca(ClO ) (aq) + H O (l) +CO (g) D) 2 2 2 3 SO (g) + H O (l)®H SO (aq) E) 2 2 2 Na (s) + 2H O (l) ® 2 NaOH (aq) + H (g) 7) Which atom has the smallest number of neutrons? A) phosphorus-30 B) chlorine-37 C) potassium-39 D) argon-40 E) calcium-40 8) The change in the internal energy of a system that absorbs 2,500 J of heat and that has received 7,655 J of work by the surroundings is __________ J. A) -10,155 B) -5,155 C) 7 −1.91×10 D) 10,155 E) 5,155 9) When a metal and a nonmetal react, the __________ tends to lose electrons and the __________ tends to gain electrons. A) metal, metal B) nonmetal, nonmetal C) metal, nonmetal D) nonmetal, metal E) None of the above, these elements share electrons. 10) What is the oxidation number of nitrogen in HNO2? A) -5 B) -3 C) 0 D) +3 E) +5 -4- CHM 114: Exam #1 11) Elements in Group 7A are known as the __________. A) chalcogens B) alkaline earth metals C) alkali metals D) halogens E) noble gases 12) The concentration of iodide ions in a 0.193 M solution of sodium iodide is __________. A) 0.193 M B) 0.386 M C) 0.0965 M D) 0.579 M E) 0.0643 M 13) Lithium and nitrogen react to produce lithium nitride: 6Li (s) + N2 (g)  2Li3N (s) How many moles of N2 are needed to react with 1.422 mol of lithium? A) 4.26 B) 0.710 C) 0.237 D) 2.13 E) 0.118 14) The balanced equation for the decomposition of sodium azide is __________. A) 2NaN3 (s)  Na2 (s) + 3 N2 (g) B) NaN3 (s)  Na (s) + N2 (g) C) 2NaN3 (s)  2Na (s) + 3 N2 (g) D) NaN3 (s)  Na (s) + N2 (g) + N (g) E) 2NaN3 (s)  2Na (s) + 2 N2 (g) 15) A sample of CH2F2 with a mass of 9.5 g contains __________ atoms of F. A) 2.2 × 1023 B) 38 C) 3.3 × 1024 D) 4.4 × 1023 E) 9.5 -5- CHM 114: Exam #1 16) An unknown element is found to have three naturally occurring isotopes with atomic masses of 35.9675 (0.337%), 37.9627 (0.063%), and 39.9624 (99.600%). Which of the following is the unknown element? A) Ar B) K C) Cl D) Ca E) None of the above could be the unknown element. 17) The value of DH° for the reaction below is -482 kJ. Calculate the heat (kJ) released to the surroundings when 24.0 g of CO (g) reacts completely. 2 2 2CO(g) +O (g)®2CO (g) A) 3 2.89×10 B) 207 C) 103 D) 65.7 E) -482 18) Lead (II) carbonate decomposes to give lead (II) oxide and carbon dioxide: PbCO3 (s)  PbO (s) + CO2 (g) __________ grams of carbondioxide will be produced by the decomposition of 7.50 g of lead (II) carbonate? A) 1.23 B) 2.50 C) 0.00936 D) 6.26 E) 7.83 19) Combining aqueous solutions of BaCl2 and K2SO4 affords a precipitate of 4 BaSO . Which ion(s) is/are spectator ions in the reaction? A) 2 Ba only + B) K+ only C) 2 2 Ba and SO4 + − D) SO4 2- and Cl- E) K+ and Cl- 20) Which combination will produce a precipitate? A) Pb(NO3)2 (aq) and HCl (aq) B) Cu(NO3)2 (aq) and KCl (aq) C) KOH (aq) and HNO3 (aq) D) AgNO3 (aq) and HNO3 (aq) E) NaOH (aq) and Sr(NO3)2 (aq) -6- CHM 114: Exam #1 21) There are __________ sulfur atoms in 50 molecules of C4H4S2. A) 1.5 × 1025 B) 100 C) 3.0 × 1025 D) 50 E) 6.02 × 1023 22) A compound contains 38.7% K, 13.9% N, and 47.4% O by mass. What is the empirical formula of the compound? A) K2N2O3 B) KNO2 C) KNO3 D) K2NO3 E) K4NO5 23) Predict the empirical formula of the ionic compound that forms from sodium and fluorine. A) 2 Na F B) 2 NaF C) 2 3 Na F D) NaF E) 3 2 Na F 24) The mass % of Krypton in the binary compound KrF2 is __________. A) 18.48 B) 45.38 C) 68.80 D) 81.52 E) 31.20 25) The correct name for K2SO3 is __________. A) potassium sulfate B) potassium disulfide C) potassium sulfite D) potassium sulfide E) dipotassium sulfate -7- CHM 114: Exam #1

The change in the internal energy of a system that releases 2,500 J of heat and that does 7,655 J of work on the surroundings is __________ J. A) -10,155 B) -5,155 C) 7 −1.91×10 D) 10,155 E) 5,155

The change in the internal energy of a system that releases 2,500 J of heat and that does 7,655 J of work on the surroundings is __________ J. A) -10,155 B) -5,155 C) 7 −1.91×10 D) 10,155 E) 5,155

A) -10,155
The change in the internal energy of a system that absorbs 2,500 J of heat and that has received 7,655 J of work by the surroundings is __________ J. A) -10,155 B) -5,155 C) 7 −1.91×10 D) 10,155 E) 5,155

The change in the internal energy of a system that absorbs 2,500 J of heat and that has received 7,655 J of work by the surroundings is __________ J. A) -10,155 B) -5,155 C) 7 −1.91×10 D) 10,155 E) 5,155

D) 10,155
Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
Why does the primary somatosensory area have a larger section dedicated to the fingers and hand, than to the feet and toes? Select one: a. the fingers and hand are how we take in more sensory information from our surroundings than the feet and toes b. the fingers and hand are above the spinal cord termination while the feet and toes are below it c. the feet and toes require more motor area so they get less somatosensory area d. the feet and toes are not innervated e. the fingers and hand do not have motor area sections, so they are controlled by the somatosensory area

Why does the primary somatosensory area have a larger section dedicated to the fingers and hand, than to the feet and toes? Select one: a. the fingers and hand are how we take in more sensory information from our surroundings than the feet and toes b. the fingers and hand are above the spinal cord termination while the feet and toes are below it c. the feet and toes require more motor area so they get less somatosensory area d. the feet and toes are not innervated e. the fingers and hand do not have motor area sections, so they are controlled by the somatosensory area

Info@checkyourstudy.com                                                                                                                                                                                       : the fingers and hand are how we take … Read More...