The first task : Seminar Topic 6 – Operation Information Systems Investigate teleworking and how teleworkers operate. From your findings identify the types of operations information systems that would be required to support and administer this type of operation within an organization

The first task : Seminar Topic 6 – Operation Information Systems Investigate teleworking and how teleworkers operate. From your findings identify the types of operations information systems that would be required to support and administer this type of operation within an organization

Now a day’s individuals and organizations uses information technology (IT) … Read More...
AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Homework Assignment: International and US Health Care Systems The following homework assignment will help you to discover some of the differences between the administration of health care in the United States and internationally. This is a research based assignment; remember the use of Wikipedia.com is not an acceptable reference site for this course. You must include a references cited page for this assignment; correctly formatted APA or MLA references are acceptable (simply stating s web address is NOT a complete reference). The answers should be presented in paragraph formation. Staple all pages together for presentation. The first question refers to a country other than the United States of America 1) Socialized Medicine – provide a definition of the term socialized medicine and discuss a country that currently has a socialized medicine system to cover all citizens; this discussion should include the types of services offered to the citizens of this country. When was this system first implemented in this country? What is the name of this country’s health insurance plan? Compare the ranking for the life expectancy for this country to that of the United States. Which is higher? Why? Compare the cost of financing healthcare in this country to the United States in comparison to the amount of annual funding in dollars and the percentage of gross domestic product spent on health care for each country. What rank does this country have in comparison to the United States for overall health of its citizens? (This portion of the assignment should be approximately one page in length and graphic data is acceptable to support some answers, however, graphic information should only be used to explain your written explanation not as the answer to the question.) Bonus: Is this country’s system currently financially stable? Why or why not? The following questions refer to the delivery of healthcare in the United States of America, as it was organized prior to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA is currently being phased into coverage. It is estimated that the answers to the following questions will result in an additional two to three pages of written text in addition to the page for question number one. 2) Medicare – when was it enacted? Who does it cover? Who was President when Medicare was originally passed? What do the specific portions Part A, Part B and Part D cover? When was Part D enacted? Who was President when Part D was enacted? Is the Medicare system currently financially stable? Why or why not. Compare the average life expectancy for males and females when Medicare was originally passed and the average life expectancy of males and females as of 2010; more recent data is acceptable. Bonus: What does Part C cover and when was it enacted? 3) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) – Define the term health maintenance organization. When did this type of health insurance plan become popular in the United States? How does this type of system provide medical care to the people enrolled? This answer should discuss in network versus out of network coverage. 4) Medicaid- when was it enacted? Who does it cover? Who was President when this insurance plan was enacted? Are the coverage benefits the same state to state? Why or why not? Is the system currently financially stable? Why or why not. What effect does passage of the ACA project to have on enrollment in the Medicaid system? Why? 5) Organ Transplants – What is the mechanism for placement of a patient’s name on the organ transplant list? What is the current length of time a patient must wait for a heart transplant? Explain at least one reason why transplants are considered an ethical issue. How are transplants financed? Give at least one example of how much any type of organ transplant would cost. 6) Health Insurance/Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) – When was it enacted? Who was President when this legislation as passed? What is the scope of this legislative for the medical community and the general community? (Hint: There are actually two reasons for HIPAA legislation; make sure to state both in your response) 7) Death with Dignity Act – what year was the Oregon Death with Dignity Act passed? What ethical issue is covered by the Death with Dignity Act? List the factors that must be met for a patient to use the Death with Dignity Act. List two additional states that have enacted Death with Dignity Acts and when was the legislation passed in these states? 8) Hospice – what is hospice care? When was it developed? What country was most instrumental in the development of hospice care? Do health insurance plans in the United States cover hospice care? What types of services are covered for hospice care? Grading: 1) Accuracy and completeness of responses = 60% of grade 2) Correct use of sentence structure, spelling and grammar = 30% of grade 3) Appropriate use of references and citations = 10% of grade Simply stating a web page is not an appropriate reference This assignment is due on the date published in the course syllabus.

AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Homework Assignment: International and US Health Care Systems The following homework assignment will help you to discover some of the differences between the administration of health care in the United States and internationally. This is a research based assignment; remember the use of Wikipedia.com is not an acceptable reference site for this course. You must include a references cited page for this assignment; correctly formatted APA or MLA references are acceptable (simply stating s web address is NOT a complete reference). The answers should be presented in paragraph formation. Staple all pages together for presentation. The first question refers to a country other than the United States of America 1) Socialized Medicine – provide a definition of the term socialized medicine and discuss a country that currently has a socialized medicine system to cover all citizens; this discussion should include the types of services offered to the citizens of this country. When was this system first implemented in this country? What is the name of this country’s health insurance plan? Compare the ranking for the life expectancy for this country to that of the United States. Which is higher? Why? Compare the cost of financing healthcare in this country to the United States in comparison to the amount of annual funding in dollars and the percentage of gross domestic product spent on health care for each country. What rank does this country have in comparison to the United States for overall health of its citizens? (This portion of the assignment should be approximately one page in length and graphic data is acceptable to support some answers, however, graphic information should only be used to explain your written explanation not as the answer to the question.) Bonus: Is this country’s system currently financially stable? Why or why not? The following questions refer to the delivery of healthcare in the United States of America, as it was organized prior to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The ACA is currently being phased into coverage. It is estimated that the answers to the following questions will result in an additional two to three pages of written text in addition to the page for question number one. 2) Medicare – when was it enacted? Who does it cover? Who was President when Medicare was originally passed? What do the specific portions Part A, Part B and Part D cover? When was Part D enacted? Who was President when Part D was enacted? Is the Medicare system currently financially stable? Why or why not. Compare the average life expectancy for males and females when Medicare was originally passed and the average life expectancy of males and females as of 2010; more recent data is acceptable. Bonus: What does Part C cover and when was it enacted? 3) Health Maintenance Organization (HMO) – Define the term health maintenance organization. When did this type of health insurance plan become popular in the United States? How does this type of system provide medical care to the people enrolled? This answer should discuss in network versus out of network coverage. 4) Medicaid- when was it enacted? Who does it cover? Who was President when this insurance plan was enacted? Are the coverage benefits the same state to state? Why or why not? Is the system currently financially stable? Why or why not. What effect does passage of the ACA project to have on enrollment in the Medicaid system? Why? 5) Organ Transplants – What is the mechanism for placement of a patient’s name on the organ transplant list? What is the current length of time a patient must wait for a heart transplant? Explain at least one reason why transplants are considered an ethical issue. How are transplants financed? Give at least one example of how much any type of organ transplant would cost. 6) Health Insurance/Information Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) – When was it enacted? Who was President when this legislation as passed? What is the scope of this legislative for the medical community and the general community? (Hint: There are actually two reasons for HIPAA legislation; make sure to state both in your response) 7) Death with Dignity Act – what year was the Oregon Death with Dignity Act passed? What ethical issue is covered by the Death with Dignity Act? List the factors that must be met for a patient to use the Death with Dignity Act. List two additional states that have enacted Death with Dignity Acts and when was the legislation passed in these states? 8) Hospice – what is hospice care? When was it developed? What country was most instrumental in the development of hospice care? Do health insurance plans in the United States cover hospice care? What types of services are covered for hospice care? Grading: 1) Accuracy and completeness of responses = 60% of grade 2) Correct use of sentence structure, spelling and grammar = 30% of grade 3) Appropriate use of references and citations = 10% of grade Simply stating a web page is not an appropriate reference This assignment is due on the date published in the course syllabus.

Capital Punishment For this paper, please read both the Ernest Van den Haag article and the Larry Tifft article. PICK A SIDE, either pro-capital punishment (death penalty) or abolitionist (anti-death penalty). This IS an ARGUMENTATIVE PAPER!!!!!!!!!!!! Using both the articles, your text book, (and a general source if you wish such as the Bible or dictionary), argue for your stance. You may also use the Marx/Durkheim handouts if you so wish, so long as there are SOCIOLOGY TERMS in your paper! You must: 1. Provide three points to back up your argument and include them in your thesis paragraph and explain them in the body of the paper; 2. Give voice to the opposing side. If you’re abolitionist, bring up any validity to Van den Haag, if you’re pro-capital punishment, bring up any validity to Tifft’s argument. 3. Use both a thesis opening paragraph and a solid conclusion paragraph. 4. Use SOCIOLOGY TERMS! 5. NO PERSONAL PRONOUNS! TECH requirements: • 12 point, Arial or Times Roman Numeral font. • 3 page long NOT including cover sheet and references page • Double spaced

Capital Punishment For this paper, please read both the Ernest Van den Haag article and the Larry Tifft article. PICK A SIDE, either pro-capital punishment (death penalty) or abolitionist (anti-death penalty). This IS an ARGUMENTATIVE PAPER!!!!!!!!!!!! Using both the articles, your text book, (and a general source if you wish such as the Bible or dictionary), argue for your stance. You may also use the Marx/Durkheim handouts if you so wish, so long as there are SOCIOLOGY TERMS in your paper! You must: 1. Provide three points to back up your argument and include them in your thesis paragraph and explain them in the body of the paper; 2. Give voice to the opposing side. If you’re abolitionist, bring up any validity to Van den Haag, if you’re pro-capital punishment, bring up any validity to Tifft’s argument. 3. Use both a thesis opening paragraph and a solid conclusion paragraph. 4. Use SOCIOLOGY TERMS! 5. NO PERSONAL PRONOUNS! TECH requirements: • 12 point, Arial or Times Roman Numeral font. • 3 page long NOT including cover sheet and references page • Double spaced

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

ENG 100 – Critique Assignment Sheet Rough Draft Due for Peer Response: Tuesday, September 29 First Draft Due (submit for feedback): Thursday, October 1 Final Draft with Outline Due: Thursday, October 8 Highlighting, Labeling, and Reflection: Thursday, October 8 Submit hard copies in class and upload to turnitin.com (Password: English, Class ID: 10423941) What is a Critique? A critique is a “formal evaluation [that offers your] judgment of a text—whether the reading was effective, ineffective, valuable, or trivial.” In a critique, “your goal is to convince readers to accept your judgments concerning the quality of the reading” based on specific criteria you have established (Wilhoit 87). Additionally, a critique is comprised of many integrated parts: introduction to the text, introduction to and brief background on the general topic, brief summary properly placed in the essay, a discussion of the criteria chosen for evaluation, a discussion of the criteria using specific examples/information from the text (this discussion should be the largest section of your essay by far!!), instances of personal response, and a conclusion. All of these items should relate to your overall evaluation/thesis of the text. The Assignment: Instead of a written essay, your “text” will be either a movie or a documentary. You will follow the same standards that you would use for a critique based off of an essay but you will adapt the integrated parts to fit a film critique. In order to effectively address this assignment, complete the following steps: STEP I: Choose either a movie or documentary • Base your choice on the strength of your feelings, whether hate, love, respect, etc., because you do not have to like the film in order to write a solid and coherent critique. You might have more to say about a film you dislike. Also choose a genre of film that you understand (i.e. romantic comedy, drama, indie-film, comedy, documentary). • Think about the important components for this specific genre. STEP II: Watch and Annotate the film • Note the major points within the film, how you felt while watching it, and what made you feel that way. • Keep in mind the film’s genre and whether or not your chosen film fits any of those criteria. STEP III: Analyze (break the film into parts) • Break the film down into your genre-driven criteria. • Choose 4-5 criteria and then determine what sections/components of the film either represent effectiveness or ineffectiveness. STEP IV: Evaluate the film (using the criteria and your personal standards) • Evaluate the film according to the criteria list we will generate in class. • To help create your thesis claim, determine whether the film, based on your criteria and standards, is an excellent, mediocre, terrible, etc. representation of your chosen genre. • For example: While the costume and design are fantastic and interesting, the film 300 is a mediocre example of historical drama because the history of Greece and Asia is inaccurate and the female characters are weak. STEP V: Find outside sources—one should agree with you and one should disagree • Check out a review website, such as imdb.com, and locate a few reviews of your film. In your critique, you will be expected to reference other film reviewers to develop and support your own arguments. Please note that those reviews must be cited properly, both in-text citations and the Works Cited page entries. The basic structure of the critique is as follows: • An introduction that o Introduces the film and provides an adequate amount of background information, including the intended audience, to give the reader context (i.e. a cartoon might not be meant for college-age viewers) o Includes a thesis statement that presents the film as either an excellent, mediocre, or terrible representation of your chosen genre o Explains at least three-four different criteria as the basis for your thesis/argument • A summary that is o Brief, neutral and comprehensive o No more than one paragraph in length • Body Paragraphs including o Support of your thesis using specific examples from the film o More than one example to support your argument o Either direct quotes or paraphrased information from the source text, reviews, outside information (websites, blogs, credible sources) or a combination of all three to support your argument • A counter-claim o Based on an outside review/blog/article disagreeing with your opinion or one criteria o Includes either a refutation or concession of the reviewer’s opinion • A conclusion including o A restatement of your main points and thesis o A final recommendation • A Work Cited page that o Includes all referenced materials including the source text The bulk of your critique should consist of your qualified opinion of the film – unlike the summary, your opinion matters here. In the body of your paper, you will need about three to five main points to support your thesis statement. You will develop each of these points in a section of your essay, each section consisting of about three paragraphs. You will make claims in your topic sentences, provide examples from the text, and then explain your reasons, using source support where possible. Evaluation A successful critique will contain all of the following: • Creative and clearly stated criteria • A debatable thesis statement • A brief background and summary of the film • 80% of the essay is located within the body paragraphs • Topic sentences that transition from one criteria to the next • Body paragraphs clearly and accurately reflecting your criteria and opinion • Body paragraphs that include more than one example as support • Conclusion including a summation and thoughtful recommendation • Correct MLA documentation including signal phrases and in-text citations • A Work Cited page including all sources referenced • Correct grammar and mechanics • Effective and meaningful transitions • Meaningful and descriptive word choices • Literary present tense and grammatical 3rd person • Length of 3-5 pages • Follows the basic structure for a critique Possible Points (25 % of final grade): • Outline 5 % • Peer Response Workshop with Rough Draft 5 % • Highlighted Revisions, & Reflection 10 % • Final Draft: 80 % Upload to Turnitin.com, using Password: English and Class ID: 10423941. Your grade will not be finalized until you have done this.

info@checkyourstudy.com
Now that you’ve almost completed the course, you are asked to reflect on your contributions to community health. In 3 double spaced pages ( 3 x 350 words = 1050 ) using 12-point font, discuss what steps you’ll still need to take to be a competent community health professional. Please answer the following questions: 1. What do you still need to learn? 2. Do your values and beliefs need to change? 3. Do you need further experience? 4. How can you be the best professional possible when working with community health? If you use the text material and other materials from class to support your answers, please cite your sources.

Now that you’ve almost completed the course, you are asked to reflect on your contributions to community health. In 3 double spaced pages ( 3 x 350 words = 1050 ) using 12-point font, discuss what steps you’ll still need to take to be a competent community health professional. Please answer the following questions: 1. What do you still need to learn? 2. Do your values and beliefs need to change? 3. Do you need further experience? 4. How can you be the best professional possible when working with community health? If you use the text material and other materials from class to support your answers, please cite your sources.

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
Applications of Regular Expressions

Applications of Regular Expressions

A regular expression is a picture of the patter which … Read More...
HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

Annotated Bibliography Annotated Bibliography. For each of the tasks which are undertaken as part of this portfolio you will normally be expected to “read round” the subject area. It isn’t really sufficient just to read the relevant chapter in the textbook; you will also find information in periodicals, magazines, quality newspapers etc etc and certainly by searching the Internet. Just as in any other assignment in UWBS you are expected to identify your sources in a bibliography using Harvard referencing. An annotated bibliography is the same as a conventional bibliography but includes comments on what you found particularly useful in each of the texts that you cite. On this page you will present your annotated bibliography. You can either write the assignment here or upload it as a word document. Some of you may be using Endnote in preparation your dissertation, and in that case you could create a new endnote library for this assignment and then upload the bibliography from that endnote library. During the briefing sessions you will be shown how to upload a file and create a link. You can also find help if you click on the large ? on the Pebble beach opening page. Once you have finished, delete the red text.

Annotated Bibliography Annotated Bibliography. For each of the tasks which are undertaken as part of this portfolio you will normally be expected to “read round” the subject area. It isn’t really sufficient just to read the relevant chapter in the textbook; you will also find information in periodicals, magazines, quality newspapers etc etc and certainly by searching the Internet. Just as in any other assignment in UWBS you are expected to identify your sources in a bibliography using Harvard referencing. An annotated bibliography is the same as a conventional bibliography but includes comments on what you found particularly useful in each of the texts that you cite. On this page you will present your annotated bibliography. You can either write the assignment here or upload it as a word document. Some of you may be using Endnote in preparation your dissertation, and in that case you could create a new endnote library for this assignment and then upload the bibliography from that endnote library. During the briefing sessions you will be shown how to upload a file and create a link. You can also find help if you click on the large ? on the Pebble beach opening page. Once you have finished, delete the red text.

Annotated Bibliography:   Mayaavi.com, (2015). Strategy, Innovation and Entrepreneurship: : … Read More...