AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Individual Written Assignment #1 Medical Ethics: Historical names, dates and ethical theories assignment As you read chapters 1 and 2 in the “Ethics and Basic Law for Medical Imaging Professionals” textbook you will be responsible for identifying and explaining each of the following items from the list below. You will respond in paragraph format with correct spelling and grammar expected for each paragraph. Feel free to have more than one paragraph for each item, although in most instances a single paragraph response is sufficient. If you reference material in addition to what is available in the textbook it must be appropriately cited in your work using either APA or MLA including a references cited page. The use of Wikipedia.com is not a recognized peer reviewed source so please do not use that as a reference. When responding about individuals it is necessary to indicate a year or time period that the person discussed/developed their particular ethical theory so that you can look at and appreciate the historical background to the development of ethical theories and decision making. Respond to the following sixteen items. (They are in random order from your reading) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Isaac Newton 3. Prima Facie Duties – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 4. Hippocrates 5. W.D. Ross – what do the initials stand for in his name and what was his contribution to the study of ethics? 6. Microallocation – define the term and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as microallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 7. Deontology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 8. Thomas Aquinas – 1) Discuss the ethical theory developed by Aquinas, 2) his religious affiliation, 3) why that was so important to his ethical premise and 4) discuss the type of ethical issues resolved to this day using this theory. 9. Macroallocation – define and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as macroallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 10. David Hume 11. Rodericus Castro 12. Plato and “The Republic” 13. Pythagoras 14. Teleology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 15. Core Values – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 16. Develop a timeline that reflects the ethical theories as developed by the INDIVIDUALS presented in this assignment. This assignment is due Saturday March 14th at NOON and is graded as a homework assignment. Grading: Paragraph Formation = 20% of grade (bulleted lists are acceptable for some answers) Answers inclusive of major material for answer = 40% of grade Creation of Timeline = 10% of grade Sentence structure, application of correct spelling and grammar = 20% of grade References (if utilized) = 10% of grade; references should be submitted on a separate references cited page. Otherwise this 10% of the assignment grade will be considered under the sentence structure component for 30% of the grade. It is expected that the finished assignment will be two – three pages of text, double spaced, using 12 font and standard page margins.

AUCS 340: Ethics in the Professions Individual Written Assignment #1 Medical Ethics: Historical names, dates and ethical theories assignment As you read chapters 1 and 2 in the “Ethics and Basic Law for Medical Imaging Professionals” textbook you will be responsible for identifying and explaining each of the following items from the list below. You will respond in paragraph format with correct spelling and grammar expected for each paragraph. Feel free to have more than one paragraph for each item, although in most instances a single paragraph response is sufficient. If you reference material in addition to what is available in the textbook it must be appropriately cited in your work using either APA or MLA including a references cited page. The use of Wikipedia.com is not a recognized peer reviewed source so please do not use that as a reference. When responding about individuals it is necessary to indicate a year or time period that the person discussed/developed their particular ethical theory so that you can look at and appreciate the historical background to the development of ethical theories and decision making. Respond to the following sixteen items. (They are in random order from your reading) 1. Francis Bacon 2. Isaac Newton 3. Prima Facie Duties – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 4. Hippocrates 5. W.D. Ross – what do the initials stand for in his name and what was his contribution to the study of ethics? 6. Microallocation – define the term and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as microallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 7. Deontology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 8. Thomas Aquinas – 1) Discuss the ethical theory developed by Aquinas, 2) his religious affiliation, 3) why that was so important to his ethical premise and 4) discuss the type of ethical issues resolved to this day using this theory. 9. Macroallocation – define and provide an example separate from the book example (You should develop your own example rather than looking for an online example; this will use your critical thinking skills. Consider an application to your own profession as macroallocation is NOT limited to the medical field.) 10. David Hume 11. Rodericus Castro 12. Plato and “The Republic” 13. Pythagoras 14. Teleology – Discuss at length the basic types/concepts of this theory 15. Core Values – Why do they exist? LIST AND DEFINE ALL TERMS 16. Develop a timeline that reflects the ethical theories as developed by the INDIVIDUALS presented in this assignment. This assignment is due Saturday March 14th at NOON and is graded as a homework assignment. Grading: Paragraph Formation = 20% of grade (bulleted lists are acceptable for some answers) Answers inclusive of major material for answer = 40% of grade Creation of Timeline = 10% of grade Sentence structure, application of correct spelling and grammar = 20% of grade References (if utilized) = 10% of grade; references should be submitted on a separate references cited page. Otherwise this 10% of the assignment grade will be considered under the sentence structure component for 30% of the grade. It is expected that the finished assignment will be two – three pages of text, double spaced, using 12 font and standard page margins.

Francis Bacon was a 16th century ethical theorist who was … Read More...
ENGL 122-Geist Drew Writing Assignment #3 Your first draft is due Monday, Oct. 26 with 3 copies. Conference days: Oct.30th and Nov. 2nd Your revised draft is due Wednesday, Nov. 4th Your Assignment: Type a 4 page essay about a quote you think should be added to the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall. This can be a quote from a human right’s activist, a well-known person from your country, or someone else in the world. The quote must be related to human rights! Make sure that the quote is not already on the AFHRMQW. Tell us about the person who said the quote, and when and why they said what they said. Help your reader understand what the person meant by what he/she said, and why it is important for other’s to remember. Finally, help your reader understand why this particular quote would be a good quote to include on the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall for people to read. If you include information from outside sources, make sure that you give full credit following the correct MLA format for in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Remember that Knight Cite might be a helpful tool. Here are some things to consider while you are brainstorming ideas for this assignment: Why is this person and what he/she said important to the whole world and not just his/her country? What is the significance of what this person said (did) to the rest of the world? How does this person serve as an example to others? What can we learn from this person? Do this person’s ideas/words transcend place and time? That means, is this person’s words and ideas still true TODAY and will they continue to be true in the FUTURE? How has this person and their words influenced or impacted you or your way of thinking? How are this person’s words related to human rights? Requirements: 1. Your essay must be 4-pages, typed, double-spaced and have 1-inch margins. 2. Use essay format: Name, Date, Assignment Name, Title, Essay 3. Your essay should be written in paragraph form with each paragraph indented. 4. Your essay should have an interesting title that catches the attention of the reader. 5. Think about your intended audience. Consider your writer’s voice based on your audience. Criteria for evaluating this essay: 1. You must choose a quote that you think should be added to the AFHRMQW. 2. You must have a clear main idea that includes your chosen quote and why it should be added to the AFH RMQW. 3. Your essay should include details, description and support from your experience and others. 4. Include your opinions about how this person and what they said/did has had an impact on you and your life. 5. Make sure that you have followed the correct MLA format for documenting in-text citations for summaries, quotes and other references. 6. Include a Works Cited page if you use sources other than your own ideas. REMEMBER THAT REVSION IS THE KEY! Please come and see me if you have any questions. Make Writing Center appointments early. This is a busy time!

ENGL 122-Geist Drew Writing Assignment #3 Your first draft is due Monday, Oct. 26 with 3 copies. Conference days: Oct.30th and Nov. 2nd Your revised draft is due Wednesday, Nov. 4th Your Assignment: Type a 4 page essay about a quote you think should be added to the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall. This can be a quote from a human right’s activist, a well-known person from your country, or someone else in the world. The quote must be related to human rights! Make sure that the quote is not already on the AFHRMQW. Tell us about the person who said the quote, and when and why they said what they said. Help your reader understand what the person meant by what he/she said, and why it is important for other’s to remember. Finally, help your reader understand why this particular quote would be a good quote to include on the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall for people to read. If you include information from outside sources, make sure that you give full credit following the correct MLA format for in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Remember that Knight Cite might be a helpful tool. Here are some things to consider while you are brainstorming ideas for this assignment: Why is this person and what he/she said important to the whole world and not just his/her country? What is the significance of what this person said (did) to the rest of the world? How does this person serve as an example to others? What can we learn from this person? Do this person’s ideas/words transcend place and time? That means, is this person’s words and ideas still true TODAY and will they continue to be true in the FUTURE? How has this person and their words influenced or impacted you or your way of thinking? How are this person’s words related to human rights? Requirements: 1. Your essay must be 4-pages, typed, double-spaced and have 1-inch margins. 2. Use essay format: Name, Date, Assignment Name, Title, Essay 3. Your essay should be written in paragraph form with each paragraph indented. 4. Your essay should have an interesting title that catches the attention of the reader. 5. Think about your intended audience. Consider your writer’s voice based on your audience. Criteria for evaluating this essay: 1. You must choose a quote that you think should be added to the AFHRMQW. 2. You must have a clear main idea that includes your chosen quote and why it should be added to the AFH RMQW. 3. Your essay should include details, description and support from your experience and others. 4. Include your opinions about how this person and what they said/did has had an impact on you and your life. 5. Make sure that you have followed the correct MLA format for documenting in-text citations for summaries, quotes and other references. 6. Include a Works Cited page if you use sources other than your own ideas. REMEMBER THAT REVSION IS THE KEY! Please come and see me if you have any questions. Make Writing Center appointments early. This is a busy time!

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
(b) Based on the lessons learned, best practices and any additional steps you came up with in part (a), what if project manager X then got a job at Bank of America. Would it be possible for him/her to implement lean in the banking industry based on experience from the previous positions held at the automotive plant and the pharmaceutical company? Please state yes or no and explain the logic clearly for the same. Also, explain the steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at Bank of America (in the service industry) [10 points] You can refer to your class notes and will also have to do research online for both parts (a) and (b). Please state all the references used for each question.

(b) Based on the lessons learned, best practices and any additional steps you came up with in part (a), what if project manager X then got a job at Bank of America. Would it be possible for him/her to implement lean in the banking industry based on experience from the previous positions held at the automotive plant and the pharmaceutical company? Please state yes or no and explain the logic clearly for the same. Also, explain the steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at Bank of America (in the service industry) [10 points] You can refer to your class notes and will also have to do research online for both parts (a) and (b). Please state all the references used for each question.

Yes, lean can be applied to the banking industry.   … Read More...
HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

HST 102: Paper 7 Formal essay, due in class on the day of the debate No late papers will be accepted. Answer the following inquiry in a typed (and stapled) 2 page essay in the five-paragraph format. Present and describe three of your arguments that you will use to defend your position concerning eugenics. Each argument must be unique (don’t describe the same argument twice from a different angle). Each argument must include at least one quotation from the texts to support your position (a minimum of 3 total). You may discuss your positions and arguments with other people on your side (but not your opponents); however, each student must write their own essay in their own words. Do not copy sentences or paragraphs from another student’s paper, this is plagiarism and will result in a failing grade for the assignment. HST 102: Debate 4 Eugenics For or Against? Basics of the debate: The term ‘Eugenics’ was derived from two Greek words and literally means ‘good genes’. Eugenics is the social philosophy or practice of engineering society based on genes, or promoting the reproduction of good genes while reducing (or prohibiting) the reproduction of bad genes. Your group will argue either for or against the adoption of eugenic policies in your society. Key Terms: Eugenics – The study of or belief in the possibility of improving the qualities of the human species or a human population, especially by such means as discouraging reproduction by persons having genetic defects or presumed to have inheritable undesirable traits (negative eugenics) or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have inheritable desirable traits (positive eugenics). Darwinism – The Darwinian theory that species originate by descent, with variation, from parent forms, through the natural selection of those individuals best adapted for the reproductive success of their kind. Social Darwinism – A 19th-century theory, inspired by Darwinism, by which the social order is accounted as the product of natural selection of those persons best suited to existing living conditions. Mendelian Inheritance – Theory proposed by Gregor Johann Mendal in 1865 that became the first theory of genetic inheritance derived from experiments with peas. Birth Control – Any means to artificially prevent biological conception. Euthanasia – A policy of ending the life of an individual for their betterment (for example, because of excessive pain, brain dead, etc.) or society’s benefit. Genocide – A policy of murdering all members of a specific group of people who share a common characteristic. Deductive Logic – Deriving a specific conclusion based on a set of general definitions. Inductive Logic – Deriving a general conclusion based on a number of specific examples. Brief Historical Background: Eugenics was first proposed by Francis Galton in his 1883 work, Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development. Galton was a cousin of Charles Darwin and an early supporter of Darwin’s theories of natural selection and evolution. Galton defined eugenics as the study of all agencies under human control which can improve or impair the racial quality of future generations. Galton’s work utilized a number of other scientific pursuits at the time including the study of heredity, genes, chromosomes, evolution, social Darwinism, zoology, birth control, sociology, psychology, chemistry, atomic theory and electrodynamics. The number of significant scientific advances was accelerating throughout the 19th century altering what science was and what its role in society could and should be. Galton’s work had a significant influence throughout all areas of society, from scientific communities to politics, culture and literature. A number of organizations were created to explore the science of eugenics and its possible applications to society. Ultimately, eugenics became a means by which to improve society through policies based on scientific study. Most of these policies related to reproductive practices within a society, specifically who could or should not reproduce. Throughout the late 1800s and early 1900s a number of policies were enacted at various levels throughout Europe and the United States aimed at controlling procreation. Some specific policies included compulsory sterilization laws (usually concerning criminals and the mentally ill) as well as banning interracial marriages to prevent ‘cross-racial’ breeding. In the United States a number of individuals and foundations supported the exploration of eugenics as a means to positively influence society, including: the Rockefeller Foundation, the Carnegie Institution, the Race Betterment Foundation of Battle Creek, MI, the Eugenics Record Office, the American Breeders Association, the Euthanasia Society of America; and individuals such as Charles Davenport, Madison Grant, Alexander Graham Bell, Irving Fisher, John D. Rockefeller, Margaret Sanger, Marie Stopes, David Starr Jordan, Vernon Kellogg, H. G. Wells (though he later changed sides) Winston Churchill, George Bernard Shaw, John Maynard Keynes, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes and Presidents Woodrow Wilson, Herbert Hoover and Theodore Roosevelt. Some early critics of eugenics included: Dr. John Haycroft, Halliday Sutherland, Lancelot Hogben, Franz Boaz, Lester Ward, G. K. Chesterton, J. B. S. Haldane, and R. A. Fisher. In 1911 the Carnegie Institute recommended constructing gas chambers around the country to euthanize certain elements of the American population (primarily the poor and criminals) considered to be harmful to the future of society as a possible eugenic solution. President Woodrow Wilson signed the first Sterilization Act in US history. In the 1920s and 30s, 30 states passed various eugenics laws, some of which were overturned by the Supreme Court. Eugenics of various forms was a founding principle of the Progressive Party, strongly supported by the first progressive president Theodore Roosevelt, and would continue to play an important part in influencing progressive policies into at least the 1940s. Many American individuals and societies supported German research on eugenics that would eventually be used to develop and justify the policies utilized by the NAZI party against minority groups including Jews, Africans, gypsies and others that ultimately led to programs of genocide and the holocaust. Following WWII and worldwide exposure of the holocaust eugenics generally fell out of favor among the public, though various lesser forms of eugenics are still advocated for today by such individuals as Dottie Lamm, Geoffrey Miller, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg, John Glad and Richard Dawson. Eugenics still influences many modern debates including: capital punishment, over-population, global warming, medicine (disease control and genetic disorders), birth control, abortion, artificial insemination, evolution, social engineering, and education. Key Points to discuss during the debate: • Individual rights vs. collective rights • The pros and cons of genetically engineering society • The practicality of genetically engineering society • Methods used to determine ‘good traits’ and ‘bad traits’ • Who determines which people are ‘fit’ or ‘unfit’ for future society • The role of science in society • Methods used to derive scientific conclusions • Ability of scientists to determine the future hereditary conditions of individuals • The value/accuracy of scientific conclusions • The role of the government to implement eugenic policies • Some possible eugenic political policies or laws • The ways these policies may be used effectively or abused • The relationship between eugenics and individual rights • The role of ethics in science and eugenics Strategies: 1. Use this guide to help you (particularly the key points). 2. Read all of the texts. 3. If needed, read secondary analysis concerning eugenics. 4. Identify key quotations as you read each text. Perhaps make a list of them to print out and/or group quotes by topic or point. 5. Develop multiple arguments to defend your position. 6. Prioritize your arguments from most persuasive to least persuasive and from most evidence to least evidence. 7. Anticipate the arguments of your opponents and develop counter-arguments for them. 8. Anticipate counter-arguments to your own arguments and develop responses to them.

1- Which of the following is not a basic role of managers? Interpersonal Entrepreneurial Informational Decisional 2- A company’s IT architecture includes all of the following except: Hardware and software Networks Database management systems The members of the IT staff How IT decisions will be made 3- Which of the following is NOT one of the three objectives that the IT strategic plan must meet to allow an organization to achieve its goals? Alignment with the strategic plan Clearly defined IT steering committee IS development resources allocated Seamless IT architecture 4- In the _____ phase of the decision-making process, managers examine a situation and identify and define the problem. implementation choice design intelligence consideration 5- Which of the following systems acquisition methods can result in a company’s acquiring software that is controlled by another company, may be difficult to enhance or modify, and may not support the desired business processes? Systems development life cycle Prototyping End-user development Buy option Component-based development 6- Which of the following systems acquisition methods requires staff to systematically go through every step in the development process and has a lower probability of missing important user requirements? Systems development life cycle Prototyping End-user development External acquisition Object-oriented development 7- Which of the following is NOT an advantage of the buy option for acquiring IS applications? Few types of off-the-shelf software are available, thus limiting confusion. The software can be tried out. The buy option saves time. The company will know what it is getting. All of these 8- Evaluating the benefits of IT projects is more complex than evaluating their costs for all of the following reasons except: Benefits are harder than costs to quantify. Benefits tend to be more tangible than costs. IT can be used for several different purposes. The probability of obtaining a return from an IT investment is based on the probability of implementation success. The proposed system may be “cutting edge.” 9- Decisions today are becoming _____ complex due to _____ uncertainty in the decision environment. less, decreased more, decreased less, increased more, increased neither more nor less, decreased 10- Which of the following is/are disadvantages of the buy option for acquiring IS applications? The software may not exactly meet the company’s needs. The software may be impossible to modify. The company will not have control over software improvements. The software may not integrate with existing systems. All of these

1- Which of the following is not a basic role of managers? Interpersonal Entrepreneurial Informational Decisional 2- A company’s IT architecture includes all of the following except: Hardware and software Networks Database management systems The members of the IT staff How IT decisions will be made 3- Which of the following is NOT one of the three objectives that the IT strategic plan must meet to allow an organization to achieve its goals? Alignment with the strategic plan Clearly defined IT steering committee IS development resources allocated Seamless IT architecture 4- In the _____ phase of the decision-making process, managers examine a situation and identify and define the problem. implementation choice design intelligence consideration 5- Which of the following systems acquisition methods can result in a company’s acquiring software that is controlled by another company, may be difficult to enhance or modify, and may not support the desired business processes? Systems development life cycle Prototyping End-user development Buy option Component-based development 6- Which of the following systems acquisition methods requires staff to systematically go through every step in the development process and has a lower probability of missing important user requirements? Systems development life cycle Prototyping End-user development External acquisition Object-oriented development 7- Which of the following is NOT an advantage of the buy option for acquiring IS applications? Few types of off-the-shelf software are available, thus limiting confusion. The software can be tried out. The buy option saves time. The company will know what it is getting. All of these 8- Evaluating the benefits of IT projects is more complex than evaluating their costs for all of the following reasons except: Benefits are harder than costs to quantify. Benefits tend to be more tangible than costs. IT can be used for several different purposes. The probability of obtaining a return from an IT investment is based on the probability of implementation success. The proposed system may be “cutting edge.” 9- Decisions today are becoming _____ complex due to _____ uncertainty in the decision environment. less, decreased more, decreased less, increased more, increased neither more nor less, decreased 10- Which of the following is/are disadvantages of the buy option for acquiring IS applications? The software may not exactly meet the company’s needs. The software may be impossible to modify. The company will not have control over software improvements. The software may not integrate with existing systems. All of these

for solution please contact at info@checkyourstudy.com
1) During the late 19th century, the nature of work changed for Americans and has never been the same since. Facets of work which we take for granted today such as working long hours and working by the clock, working with machines, and feeling like a very small part of a very large company or corporation, were alien to workers of the late 19th century. Scholars have long debated this transition in the workplace, and have attempted to assess whether the change was beneficial or not for the worker. Using your own personal experience if you wish, but also using specific historical examples discussed in the text and lesson, do you feel the changes the American worker experienced in the 19th century were beneficial or not? Would you rather work in a pre-industrial workplace, not governed by the clock, or has the advent of machines and machinery allowed American workers more freedom? Or has it made them robots? Also, why do you think we don’t have violent labor conflicts in this country like there were in the 19th century? Are workers happier? Or just used to a system now that they have no choice but to accept?

1) During the late 19th century, the nature of work changed for Americans and has never been the same since. Facets of work which we take for granted today such as working long hours and working by the clock, working with machines, and feeling like a very small part of a very large company or corporation, were alien to workers of the late 19th century. Scholars have long debated this transition in the workplace, and have attempted to assess whether the change was beneficial or not for the worker. Using your own personal experience if you wish, but also using specific historical examples discussed in the text and lesson, do you feel the changes the American worker experienced in the 19th century were beneficial or not? Would you rather work in a pre-industrial workplace, not governed by the clock, or has the advent of machines and machinery allowed American workers more freedom? Or has it made them robots? Also, why do you think we don’t have violent labor conflicts in this country like there were in the 19th century? Are workers happier? Or just used to a system now that they have no choice but to accept?

Planned labor has always been of paramount importance as supporting … Read More...
What research methods did they employ? Would all of these methods be acceptable today? Consider standards set by the Institutional Review Board (IRB).

What research methods did they employ? Would all of these methods be acceptable today? Consider standards set by the Institutional Review Board (IRB).

Kinsey’s investigation went ahead of hypothesis and discussion to include … Read More...
ePortfolio Reflection Questions: Planning & Scheduling 1. Did you find it was easy or hard to divide up the amount of work amongst each other? 2. Did you create tasks that would be easy to status regularly if your customer wanted to know how far along you were? Do you suspect any tasks will be too difficult to status? 3. Did you leave yourselves any buffer time for any tasks that may run long? 4. Was it difficult trying to create a list of materials to use in your design before you had time to do any hands-on design? Why or why not? 5. Did you leave yourselves any contingency (extra money) in case you have unexpected expenses? How much? 6. What skills do you think you acquired this week that will help you in the future of your career? Where else in your daily life can you apply the skills you learned today?

ePortfolio Reflection Questions: Planning & Scheduling 1. Did you find it was easy or hard to divide up the amount of work amongst each other? 2. Did you create tasks that would be easy to status regularly if your customer wanted to know how far along you were? Do you suspect any tasks will be too difficult to status? 3. Did you leave yourselves any buffer time for any tasks that may run long? 4. Was it difficult trying to create a list of materials to use in your design before you had time to do any hands-on design? Why or why not? 5. Did you leave yourselves any contingency (extra money) in case you have unexpected expenses? How much? 6. What skills do you think you acquired this week that will help you in the future of your career? Where else in your daily life can you apply the skills you learned today?

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919711743277
Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

info@checkyourstudy.com