1. Develop a thought experiment that attempts to uncover hidden assumptions about human freedom. 2. Find a paragraph from a book, magazine, ect. First, tell whether there are claims in the paragraph. If there are, identify the types of claims (descriptive, normative, a priori, a posteriori) in the paragraph

1. Develop a thought experiment that attempts to uncover hidden assumptions about human freedom. 2. Find a paragraph from a book, magazine, ect. First, tell whether there are claims in the paragraph. If there are, identify the types of claims (descriptive, normative, a priori, a posteriori) in the paragraph

Let us think of a thought experiment that wants to … Read More...
1 REQUIREMENTS You will need to complete the following tasks and deliver your finding in a written report by August 6th. Research the six scenarios given below in option 1 for added capacity to uncover any additional costs/benefits to society these options might pose. Write a two page summary describing each scenario. Discuss the pros and cons of each scenario, including such items as renewable sources of fuel, environmental factors, etc. Give examples of each type of project by name and location and indicate the sources of your information. Please use either IEEE or APA style. Do an economic analysis of the six scenarios. Use a 20-year period and assume an inflation rate of 4 percent. Include your calculations and any assumptions in the report. Also answer the following questions: Which scenario is the best from an economic basis? Are there any other considerations, such as environmental/health/social issues, which should be considered? Which scenario have you selected based on the answers to a and b? What is the estimated timeframe to implement the different options? (base your timelines on existing projects of similar size if possible, use MS Project/Project Libre to generate the timelines) Make a recommendation regarding the best option for the utility. 2 Situations A utility company in one of the western states is considering the addition of 50 megawatts of generating capacity to meet expected demands for electrical energy by the year 2025. The three options that the utility has are: Add generating capacity. Constructing one of the scenarios below would do this. Purchase power from Canada under terms of a 20-year contract. Do neither of the above. This assumes that brownouts will occur during high demand periods. The utility presently has 200 megawatts of installed capacity and generates an average of 1.2 billion kilowatt-hours annually. Maximum generation capability is 1.3 billion kW-hours. By the year 2025, this reserve of 100,000,000 kW-hours will be used. 2.1 OPTION 1 – ADD GENERATING CAPACITY For this option there are six possible scenarios: Hydroelectric dam. Initial cost is $ 50 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 1.7 million. Project life is 30 years before a major rebuild is required. Wind farm. Initial cost is $ 28 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 2.5 million. Project life is 12 years. At this time new equipment will be required. Solar power. Initial cost is $ 32 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 1.1 million. Project life is 10 years. Natural gas turbines. Initial cost is $ 14 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $2.0 million. Project life is 12 years. Nuclear plant. Initial cost is $ 70 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 2.0 million. Project life is 25 years. Coal-fired turbines. Initial cost is $ 35 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 2.7 million. Project life is 28 years. 2.2 OPTION 2 – BUY POWER FROM CANADA The annual additional energy requirement is 350,000,000 kilowatt-hours. The cost of energy from Canada is 1.48 cents per kilowatt-hour for the first year. The price will be escalated at 4 percent annually for the 20-year contract period. 2.3 OPTION 3 – DO NOTHING Local municipalities are very opposed to this option since companies may have to close down for short periods of time. Also, it would be very difficult to attract new businesses. If nothing is done, by the year 2025 it is anticipated that some companies will be without power for short periods of time during the summer months. These are known as brownouts. It is estimated, based on historical data that these outages will occur once a week during July and August for periods of 6 hours.

1 REQUIREMENTS You will need to complete the following tasks and deliver your finding in a written report by August 6th. Research the six scenarios given below in option 1 for added capacity to uncover any additional costs/benefits to society these options might pose. Write a two page summary describing each scenario. Discuss the pros and cons of each scenario, including such items as renewable sources of fuel, environmental factors, etc. Give examples of each type of project by name and location and indicate the sources of your information. Please use either IEEE or APA style. Do an economic analysis of the six scenarios. Use a 20-year period and assume an inflation rate of 4 percent. Include your calculations and any assumptions in the report. Also answer the following questions: Which scenario is the best from an economic basis? Are there any other considerations, such as environmental/health/social issues, which should be considered? Which scenario have you selected based on the answers to a and b? What is the estimated timeframe to implement the different options? (base your timelines on existing projects of similar size if possible, use MS Project/Project Libre to generate the timelines) Make a recommendation regarding the best option for the utility. 2 Situations A utility company in one of the western states is considering the addition of 50 megawatts of generating capacity to meet expected demands for electrical energy by the year 2025. The three options that the utility has are: Add generating capacity. Constructing one of the scenarios below would do this. Purchase power from Canada under terms of a 20-year contract. Do neither of the above. This assumes that brownouts will occur during high demand periods. The utility presently has 200 megawatts of installed capacity and generates an average of 1.2 billion kilowatt-hours annually. Maximum generation capability is 1.3 billion kW-hours. By the year 2025, this reserve of 100,000,000 kW-hours will be used. 2.1 OPTION 1 – ADD GENERATING CAPACITY For this option there are six possible scenarios: Hydroelectric dam. Initial cost is $ 50 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 1.7 million. Project life is 30 years before a major rebuild is required. Wind farm. Initial cost is $ 28 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 2.5 million. Project life is 12 years. At this time new equipment will be required. Solar power. Initial cost is $ 32 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 1.1 million. Project life is 10 years. Natural gas turbines. Initial cost is $ 14 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $2.0 million. Project life is 12 years. Nuclear plant. Initial cost is $ 70 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 2.0 million. Project life is 25 years. Coal-fired turbines. Initial cost is $ 35 million. Annual operating and maintenance cost is $ 2.7 million. Project life is 28 years. 2.2 OPTION 2 – BUY POWER FROM CANADA The annual additional energy requirement is 350,000,000 kilowatt-hours. The cost of energy from Canada is 1.48 cents per kilowatt-hour for the first year. The price will be escalated at 4 percent annually for the 20-year contract period. 2.3 OPTION 3 – DO NOTHING Local municipalities are very opposed to this option since companies may have to close down for short periods of time. Also, it would be very difficult to attract new businesses. If nothing is done, by the year 2025 it is anticipated that some companies will be without power for short periods of time during the summer months. These are known as brownouts. It is estimated, based on historical data that these outages will occur once a week during July and August for periods of 6 hours.

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In the article, “The Moral Person” it talks about Lawrence Kohlberg’s stages of moral development. Briefly explain the 3 Conventional levels (pre-conventional, conventional, and post-conventional). How may these stages impact one’s ethics? Think about how culture or the social environment affects our framework for coming up with any moral or ethical answer. (Hei Lam Kwan) In the article, they talked about a push for a “global ethic” or “one world”. Do you think this is possible? Besides the Golden Rule are there any other examples of shared ethics around the world? (Nicole Thompson) The article explained that often people know the distinction between right and wrong, but still do the wrong thing. If people know what is morally right, why do they act in ways that are morally wrong? (Nicole Thompson) In McLaren’s reading, he gives us a description on an idea of personhood to help us understand a moral person. He mentions a quote from the philosopher, Sarvepalli Rhadakrishnan that caught my interest. He says, “The self is not an object which we can find in knowledge, for it is the very condition of knowledge. It is different from all objects, the body, the senses, the empirical self itself (36)”. In your opinion, what exactly does he mean by stating that? Does thinking of yourself this way help you morally? (Maggy Ergun) Video: In the video, Damon Horowitz talks about the different approaches to figuring out what is right and what is wrong. Some of them included Plato, who believed that he could uncover the “truths about Justice”, Aristotle, who thought that people should use their current knowledge to make the right decision of here and now to their best ability, and Utilitarianism, who thought it was about measuring out the options to see which one had the most benefit for the greatest amount of people. Which approach do you think is best? Would you suggest another approach? (Nicole Thompson) Damon Horowitz explains the huge power we have and that is knowledge and data we receive from technology. With all this power in our hands, you can have any information you would like to obtain whether it’s on an object or human being. And as technology keeps rising, the more advanced it keeps getting. When it comes to privacy and dignity, do you think it is fair for one another to have this huge power on us? Will this be better for our future or worse? (Maggy Ergun) Horowitz describes how we rely more on our smart devices then actual moral thinking. (Mobile operating system then moral operating system) If we were to create a moral operating system, do you think that will help provoke people from making bad/evil decisions and guide us to better? Or do those bad decisions just come instantly without much thought? (Maggy Ergun) In the video it states, “what we need is a moral operating system.” What are the possible flaws in relying on a machine/software for answering ethical problems? Discuss and list at least one problem we may encounter from relying on such a system for an ethical solution. (Hei Lam Kwan) Reviewing the answers to the previous questions given, do you think there is only one right answer to any ethical question and why? (Hei Lam Kwan) http://www.ted.com/talks/damon_horowitz?language=en this is the video

In the article, “The Moral Person” it talks about Lawrence Kohlberg’s stages of moral development. Briefly explain the 3 Conventional levels (pre-conventional, conventional, and post-conventional). How may these stages impact one’s ethics? Think about how culture or the social environment affects our framework for coming up with any moral or ethical answer. (Hei Lam Kwan) In the article, they talked about a push for a “global ethic” or “one world”. Do you think this is possible? Besides the Golden Rule are there any other examples of shared ethics around the world? (Nicole Thompson) The article explained that often people know the distinction between right and wrong, but still do the wrong thing. If people know what is morally right, why do they act in ways that are morally wrong? (Nicole Thompson) In McLaren’s reading, he gives us a description on an idea of personhood to help us understand a moral person. He mentions a quote from the philosopher, Sarvepalli Rhadakrishnan that caught my interest. He says, “The self is not an object which we can find in knowledge, for it is the very condition of knowledge. It is different from all objects, the body, the senses, the empirical self itself (36)”. In your opinion, what exactly does he mean by stating that? Does thinking of yourself this way help you morally? (Maggy Ergun) Video: In the video, Damon Horowitz talks about the different approaches to figuring out what is right and what is wrong. Some of them included Plato, who believed that he could uncover the “truths about Justice”, Aristotle, who thought that people should use their current knowledge to make the right decision of here and now to their best ability, and Utilitarianism, who thought it was about measuring out the options to see which one had the most benefit for the greatest amount of people. Which approach do you think is best? Would you suggest another approach? (Nicole Thompson) Damon Horowitz explains the huge power we have and that is knowledge and data we receive from technology. With all this power in our hands, you can have any information you would like to obtain whether it’s on an object or human being. And as technology keeps rising, the more advanced it keeps getting. When it comes to privacy and dignity, do you think it is fair for one another to have this huge power on us? Will this be better for our future or worse? (Maggy Ergun) Horowitz describes how we rely more on our smart devices then actual moral thinking. (Mobile operating system then moral operating system) If we were to create a moral operating system, do you think that will help provoke people from making bad/evil decisions and guide us to better? Or do those bad decisions just come instantly without much thought? (Maggy Ergun) In the video it states, “what we need is a moral operating system.” What are the possible flaws in relying on a machine/software for answering ethical problems? Discuss and list at least one problem we may encounter from relying on such a system for an ethical solution. (Hei Lam Kwan) Reviewing the answers to the previous questions given, do you think there is only one right answer to any ethical question and why? (Hei Lam Kwan) http://www.ted.com/talks/damon_horowitz?language=en this is the video

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