You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation

You are to choose 2 websites, with different purposes, and review the websites based on the criteria listed below. 1. Starting Point a. Composition Matches Site Purpose b. Target Audience Apparent c. Composition Appropriate for Target Audience 2. Site design a. Consistency within site b. Consistency among pages 3. Visually Pleasing Composition 4. Visual Style in Web Design a. Consistency b. Distinctiveness 5. Focus and Emphasis a. What is emphasized? b. How is emphasis achieved? 6. Consistency a. Real World b. Internal 7. Navigation and Flow a. Home page identifiable throughout b. Location within site apparent c. Navigation consistent; rule-based; appropriate 8. Grouping a. Grouping with White Space b. Grouping with Borders c. Grouping with Backgrounds 9. Response time 10. Links a. Titled b. Incoming c. Outgoing d. Color 11. Detailed content a. Meaningful headings b. Plain language c. Page chunking d. Long blocks of text e. Scrolling f. Use of “within” page links 12. Articles a. Clear headings b. Plain language 13. Presenting Information Simply and Meaningfully a. Legibility b. Readability c. Information in Usable Form d. Visual Lines Clear 14. Legibility of content a. Font color b. Font size c. Font style d. Background color e. Background graphic 15. Documentation

http://www.physicsclassroom.com/ http://www.usa.gov/ 1.                  Starting Point a.       Composition Matches Site Purpose … Read More...
CEE 260 / MIE 273 Probability & Statistics Name: Final Exam, version D — 100 points (120 minutes) PLEASE READ QUESTIONS CAREFULLY and SHOW YOUR WORK! CALCULATORS PERMITTED – ABSOLUTELY NO REFERENCES! 1. Suppose the waiting time (in minutes) for your 911 SC Targa to reach operating temperature in the morning is uniformly distributed on [0,10], while the waiting time in the evening is uniformly distributed on [0,5] independent of morning waiting time. a. (5%) If you drive your Targa each morning and evening for a week (5 morning and 5 evening rides), what is the variance of your total waiting time? b. (5%) What is the expected value of the difference between morning and evening waiting time on a given day? 2. (10%) Find the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of ϴ when Xi ~ Exponential(ϴ) and you have observed X1, X2, X3, …, Xn. 2 3. The waiting time for delivery of a new Porsche 911 Carrera at the local dealership is distributed exponentially with a population mean of 3.55 months and population standard deviation of 1.1 months. Recently, in an effort to reduce the waiting time, the dealership has experimented with an online ordering system. A sample of 100 customers during a recent sales promotion generated a mean waiting time of 3.18 months using the new system. Assume that the population standard deviation of the waiting time has not changed from 1.1 months. (hint: the source distribution is irrelevant, but its parameters are relevant) a. (15%) What is the probability that the average wait time is between 3.2 and 6.4 months? (hint: draw a sketch for full credit) b. (10%) At the 0.05 level of significance, using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? c. (10%) At the 0.01 level of significance, using the p-value approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? 3 4. Porsche AG is a leading manufacturer of performance automobiles. The 911 Carrera model, Porsche’s premier sports car, reaches a top track speed of 180 miles per hour. Engineers claim the new advanced technology 911 GT2 automatically adjusts its top speed depending on the weather conditions. Suppose that in an effort to test this claim, Porsche selects a few 911 GT2 models to test drive on the company track in Stuttgart, Germany. The average top speed for the sample of 25 test drives is 182.36 mph, with a standard deviation of 7.24 mph. a. (5%) Without using complete sentences, what might be some problems with the sampling conducted above? Identify and explain at least 2. b. (15%) Using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing and a 0.10 level of significance, is there evidence that the mean top track speed is different for the 911 GT2? (hint: state the null and alternative hypotheses, draw a sketch, and show your work for full credit) c. (10%) Set up a 95% confidence interval estimate of the population mean top speed of the 911 GT2. d. (5%) Compare the results of (b) and (c). What conclusions do you reach about the top speed of the new 911 GT2? 4 5. (10%) Porsche USA believes that sales of the venerable 911 Carrera are a function of annual income (in thousands of dollars) and a risk tolerance index of the potential buyer. Determine the regression equation and provide a succinct analysis of Porsche’s conjecture using the following Excel results. SUMMARY OUTPUT Regression Stat istics Multiple R 0.805073 R Square 0.648142 Adjusted R Square 0.606747 Standard Error 7.76312 Observations 20 ANOVA df SS MS F Significance F Regression 2 1887.227445 943.6137225 15.65747206 0.000139355 Residual 17 1024.522555 60.26603265 Total 19 2911.75 Coefficients Standard Error t Stat P-value Lower 95% Upper 95% Intercept 23.50557 6.845545641 3.433702952 0.003167982 9.062731576 37.94840898 Income 0.613408 0.125421229 4.890786567 0.000137795 0.348792801 0.878024121 Risk Index -0.00126 0.004519817 -0.278357691 0.784095184 -0.010794106 0.008277854 BONUS (5 points) What is the probability that 2 or more students in our class of 22 have the same birthday?

CEE 260 / MIE 273 Probability & Statistics Name: Final Exam, version D — 100 points (120 minutes) PLEASE READ QUESTIONS CAREFULLY and SHOW YOUR WORK! CALCULATORS PERMITTED – ABSOLUTELY NO REFERENCES! 1. Suppose the waiting time (in minutes) for your 911 SC Targa to reach operating temperature in the morning is uniformly distributed on [0,10], while the waiting time in the evening is uniformly distributed on [0,5] independent of morning waiting time. a. (5%) If you drive your Targa each morning and evening for a week (5 morning and 5 evening rides), what is the variance of your total waiting time? b. (5%) What is the expected value of the difference between morning and evening waiting time on a given day? 2. (10%) Find the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of ϴ when Xi ~ Exponential(ϴ) and you have observed X1, X2, X3, …, Xn. 2 3. The waiting time for delivery of a new Porsche 911 Carrera at the local dealership is distributed exponentially with a population mean of 3.55 months and population standard deviation of 1.1 months. Recently, in an effort to reduce the waiting time, the dealership has experimented with an online ordering system. A sample of 100 customers during a recent sales promotion generated a mean waiting time of 3.18 months using the new system. Assume that the population standard deviation of the waiting time has not changed from 1.1 months. (hint: the source distribution is irrelevant, but its parameters are relevant) a. (15%) What is the probability that the average wait time is between 3.2 and 6.4 months? (hint: draw a sketch for full credit) b. (10%) At the 0.05 level of significance, using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? c. (10%) At the 0.01 level of significance, using the p-value approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? 3 4. Porsche AG is a leading manufacturer of performance automobiles. The 911 Carrera model, Porsche’s premier sports car, reaches a top track speed of 180 miles per hour. Engineers claim the new advanced technology 911 GT2 automatically adjusts its top speed depending on the weather conditions. Suppose that in an effort to test this claim, Porsche selects a few 911 GT2 models to test drive on the company track in Stuttgart, Germany. The average top speed for the sample of 25 test drives is 182.36 mph, with a standard deviation of 7.24 mph. a. (5%) Without using complete sentences, what might be some problems with the sampling conducted above? Identify and explain at least 2. b. (15%) Using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing and a 0.10 level of significance, is there evidence that the mean top track speed is different for the 911 GT2? (hint: state the null and alternative hypotheses, draw a sketch, and show your work for full credit) c. (10%) Set up a 95% confidence interval estimate of the population mean top speed of the 911 GT2. d. (5%) Compare the results of (b) and (c). What conclusions do you reach about the top speed of the new 911 GT2? 4 5. (10%) Porsche USA believes that sales of the venerable 911 Carrera are a function of annual income (in thousands of dollars) and a risk tolerance index of the potential buyer. Determine the regression equation and provide a succinct analysis of Porsche’s conjecture using the following Excel results. SUMMARY OUTPUT Regression Stat istics Multiple R 0.805073 R Square 0.648142 Adjusted R Square 0.606747 Standard Error 7.76312 Observations 20 ANOVA df SS MS F Significance F Regression 2 1887.227445 943.6137225 15.65747206 0.000139355 Residual 17 1024.522555 60.26603265 Total 19 2911.75 Coefficients Standard Error t Stat P-value Lower 95% Upper 95% Intercept 23.50557 6.845545641 3.433702952 0.003167982 9.062731576 37.94840898 Income 0.613408 0.125421229 4.890786567 0.000137795 0.348792801 0.878024121 Risk Index -0.00126 0.004519817 -0.278357691 0.784095184 -0.010794106 0.008277854 BONUS (5 points) What is the probability that 2 or more students in our class of 22 have the same birthday?

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Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.amnestyusa.org/research/reports/death-sentences-and-executions-2013>. D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2013/07/economist-explains-16>. Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/05/us-murder-rate-track-be-lowest-century>. Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. <http://lawstreetmedia.com/blogs/crime/safest-and-most-dangerous-states-2014/#slideshow>. Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. <http://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2013/04/17/remarkable-declines-in-global-poverty-but-major-challenges-remain>. Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. <http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304066504576345553135009870>.

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be punished. Even since childhood, a slap on the hand has prevented possible criminals from ever committing the same offense; whether it was successful or not depended on how much that child wanted that cookie. While a slap on the wrist might or might not be an effective deterrent, the same can be said about the death penalty. Every day, somewhere in the world, a criminal is stopped permanently from committing any future costs, but this is by the means of the death. While effective in stopping one person permanently, it does nothing about the crime world as a whole. While it is necessary to end the career of a criminal, no matter what his or her crime is, we must not end it by taking a life. Through this paper, the death penalty will be proven ineffective at deterring crime by use of other environmental factors. Definition: The death penalty is defined as the universal punishment of death as legally applied by a fair court system. It is important for it to be a fair legal system, as not to confuse it with genocide, mob mentality, or any other ruling without trial. Claim 1: Use of the death penalty is in decline Ground 1: According to the book The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective by Roger Hood and Carolyn Hoyle, published Dec. 8th, 2014, the Oxford professors in criminology say “As in most of the rest of the world, the death penalty in the US is in decline and distributed unevenly in frequency of use” even addressing that, as of April 2014, 18 states no longer have a death penalty, and even Oregon and Washington are considering removing their death penalty laws. Furthermore, in 2013, only 9 of these states still retaining the death penalty actually executed someone. Warrant 1: The death penalty can be reinstated at any time, but so far, it hasn’t been. At the same time, more states consider getting rid of it altogether. Therefore, it becomes clear that even states don’t want to be involved with this process showing that this is a disliked process. Claim 2: Even states with death penalty in effect still have high crime rates. Ground 2: With the reports gathered from fbi.gov, lawstreetmedia.com, a website based around political expertise and research determined the ranking of each state based on violent crime, published September 12th, 2014. Of the top ten most violent states, only three of which had the death penalty instituted (Maryland #9, New Mexico #4, Alaska #3). The other seven still had the system in place, and, despite it, still have a high amount of violent crime. On the opposite end of the spectrum, at the bottom ten most violent states, four of which, including the bottom-most states, do not have the death penalty in place. Warrant 2: With this ranking, it literally proves that the death penalty does not deter crime, or that there is a correlation between having the death penalty and having a decrease in the crime rate. Therefore, the idea of death penalty deterring crime is a null term in the sense that there is no, or a flawed connection. Claim 3: Violent crime is decreasing (but not because if the death penalty) Ground 3 A: According to an article published by The Economist, dated July 23rd, 2013, the rate of violent crime is in fact decreasing, but not because of the death penalty, but rather, because we have more police. From 1995 to 2010, policing has increased one-fifth, and with it, a decline in crime rate. In fact, in cities such as Detroit where policing has been cut, an opposite effect, an increase in crime, has been reported. Ground 3 B: An article from the Wall Street Journal, dated May 28th, 2011, also cites a decline in violent, only this time, citing the reason as a correlation with poverty levels. In 2009, at the start of the housing crisis, crime rates also dropped noticeably. Oddly enough, this article points out the belief that unemployment is often associated with crime; instead, the evidence presented is environmental in nature. Warrant 3: Crime rate isn’t deterred by death penalty, but rather, our surroundings. Seeing as how conditions have improved, so has the state of peace. Therefore, it becomes clear that the death penalty is ineffective at deterring crime because other key factors present more possibility for improvement of society. Claim 4: The death penalty is a historically flawed system. Ground 4A: According to the book The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs by Scott Vollum, published in 2005, addresses how the case of the death penalty emerged to where it is today. While the book is now a decade old, it is used for historical context, particularly, in describing the first execution that took place in 1608. While it is true that most of these executions weren’t as well-grounded as the modern ones that take place now, they still had no effect in deterring crime. Why? Because even after America was established and more sane, the death penalty still had to be used because criminals still had violent behaviors. Ground 4B: According to data from Mother Jones, published May 17th, 2013, the reason why the crime rate was so high in the past could possibly be due to yet another environmental factor (affected by change over time), exposure to lead. Since the removal of lead from paint started over a hundred years ago, there has been a decline in homicide. Why is this important? Lead poisoning in child’s brain, if not lethal, can affect development and lead to mental disability, lower IQ, and lack of reasoning. Warrant 4: By examining history as a whole, there is a greater correlation between other factors that have resulted in a decline in violent crime. The decline in the crime rate has been an ongoing process, but has shown a faster decline due to other environmental factors, rather than the instatement of the death penalty. Claim 5: The world’s violent crime rate is changing, but not due to the death penalty. Ground 5A: According to article published by Amnesty USA in March of 2014, the number of executions under the death penalty reported in 2013 had increased by 15%. However, the rate of violent crime in the world has decreased significantly in the last decade. But, Latvia, for example, has permanently banned the death penalty since 2012. In 2014, the country was viewed overall as safe and low in violent crime rate. Ground 5B: However, while it is true that there is a decline in violent crime rate worldwide, The World Bank, April 17, 2013, reports that the rate of global poverty is decreasing. In a similar vein to the US, because wealth is being distributed better and conditions are improving overall, there is a steady decline in crime rate. Warrant 5: By examining the world as a whole, it becomes clear that it doesn’t matter if the death penalty is in place, violent crime will still exist. However, mirroring the US, as simple conditions improve, so does lifestyle. The death penalty does not deter crime in the world, rather a better quality of life is responsible for that. Works Cited “Death Sentences and Executions 2013.” Amnesty International USA. Amnesty USA, 26 Mar. 2014. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . D. K. “Why Is Crime Falling?” The Economist. The Economist Newspaper, 23 July 2013. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Drum, Kevin. “The US Murder Rate Is on Track to Be Lowest in a Century.”Mother Jones. Mother Jones, 17 May 2013. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. . Hood, Roger, and Carolyn Hoyle. The Death Penalty: A Worldwide Perspective. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002. 45. Print. Rizzo, Kevin. “Slideshow: America’s Safest and Most Dangerous States 2014.”Law Street Media. Law Street TM, 12 Sept. 2014. Web. 12 Mar. 2015. . Vollum, Scott. The Death Penalty: Constitutional Issues, Commentaries, and Case Briefs. Newark, NJ: LexisNexis, 2005. 2. Print. Theis, David. “Remarkable Declines in Global Poverty, But Major Challenges Remain.” The World Bank. The World Bank, 17 Apr. 2013. Web. 15 Mar. 2015. . Wilson, James Q. “Hard Times, Fewer Crimes.” WSJ. The Wall Street Journal, 28 May 2011. Web. 13 Mar. 2015. .

Fact Debate Brief Introduction Crime doesn’t pay; it should be … Read More...
Make a 1 page summary of an 8 pages case study. (the case study will be provided to you) 2. After reading the case study, write an essay with your own words including the following. …Leadership and Motivation o Describe the kinds of leadership and motivational systems you plan to implement in light of your cultural profile. o Provide rationale relevant to the country you are entering. the essay Must be original, plagiarism free. (the company previously operated in USA and now is expanding to IRELAND) the due is in 12 hours or less.

Make a 1 page summary of an 8 pages case study. (the case study will be provided to you) 2. After reading the case study, write an essay with your own words including the following. …Leadership and Motivation o Describe the kinds of leadership and motivational systems you plan to implement in light of your cultural profile. o Provide rationale relevant to the country you are entering. the essay Must be original, plagiarism free. (the company previously operated in USA and now is expanding to IRELAND) the due is in 12 hours or less.

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GEOGRAPHY 325V – “Take Home Exam” 5 LIST/SHORT ANSWER – Worth 10 points each: 50 points. 1) List the 8 eras of New Mexico geography: name three Athabaskan Nations and three Pueblo Nations 2) List and briefly explain the 6 factors that made Spanish settlement in New Mexico successful 3) List and briefly explain 4 types of land grants given by Spain and Mexico: explain three ways land grants were lost during the American Period, and say how many acres of the original grants were retained. 4) Briefly explain how the Manhattan Project happened in New Mexico. In your view, was dropping the atomic bombs on Japan the right thing to do – explain your opinion using facts. How has this history affected New Mexico’s economy today? 5) List and briefly explain 6 landscape traits created by the Laws of the Indies 10 EXPANDED DEFINITIONS – Define and explain each term. 4 points each: 40 points. Chihuahuan Desert: where is it, what season does it rain, and what is a typical plant found here? Don Juan de Oñate: who was he, what year did he come to NM, and what was his significance in the history of New Mexico? El Camino Real: what was it and why was it important? Repartimento: what was this system and how did cause anger in the early Spanish colony? Pueblo Revolt: when and what was it, and what was its outcome? Santuario de Chimayo: write a paragraph explaining its history and religious importance Mayordomo: who is this and what is their importance in the New Mexico landscape? US/Mexico Border Fence/Wall: what are the arguments for and against this project. What is your view? La Llorona: what is this basic story and what is its importance in NM culture? Pancho Villa’s raid on Columbus: what was this, why did it occur, and what was its importance in U.S. military history? ONE ANALYSIS QUESTION: Explain why there was so much resistance in Washington, DC to New Mexico becoming a state. Use two quotes from politicians of the time who were against statehood. Do you think New Mexico is still viewed with suspicion in the USA? Explain why or why not? 10 points.

GEOGRAPHY 325V – “Take Home Exam” 5 LIST/SHORT ANSWER – Worth 10 points each: 50 points. 1) List the 8 eras of New Mexico geography: name three Athabaskan Nations and three Pueblo Nations 2) List and briefly explain the 6 factors that made Spanish settlement in New Mexico successful 3) List and briefly explain 4 types of land grants given by Spain and Mexico: explain three ways land grants were lost during the American Period, and say how many acres of the original grants were retained. 4) Briefly explain how the Manhattan Project happened in New Mexico. In your view, was dropping the atomic bombs on Japan the right thing to do – explain your opinion using facts. How has this history affected New Mexico’s economy today? 5) List and briefly explain 6 landscape traits created by the Laws of the Indies 10 EXPANDED DEFINITIONS – Define and explain each term. 4 points each: 40 points. Chihuahuan Desert: where is it, what season does it rain, and what is a typical plant found here? Don Juan de Oñate: who was he, what year did he come to NM, and what was his significance in the history of New Mexico? El Camino Real: what was it and why was it important? Repartimento: what was this system and how did cause anger in the early Spanish colony? Pueblo Revolt: when and what was it, and what was its outcome? Santuario de Chimayo: write a paragraph explaining its history and religious importance Mayordomo: who is this and what is their importance in the New Mexico landscape? US/Mexico Border Fence/Wall: what are the arguments for and against this project. What is your view? La Llorona: what is this basic story and what is its importance in NM culture? Pancho Villa’s raid on Columbus: what was this, why did it occur, and what was its importance in U.S. military history? ONE ANALYSIS QUESTION: Explain why there was so much resistance in Washington, DC to New Mexico becoming a state. Use two quotes from politicians of the time who were against statehood. Do you think New Mexico is still viewed with suspicion in the USA? Explain why or why not? 10 points.

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