GEEN 160 Lab 3 Instructions: Please create two cpp files and having each of them containing one question’s solution. Please only submit the two cpp files onto Blackboard. Requirements: ? You need to put one comment on top of the main function. The comment should explain the general purpose of the main function. ? You need to make a comment whenever you define a variable (or variables). ? You need to make a comment whenever you make a computation (or computations). ? No comment is required for the code that displays something on the screen. However, the message that will be displayed on the screen must be self-explanatory. Question 1 (10 points) Write a program that uses a loop to display the characters for the ASCII codes 0 through 127. Display 16 characters on each line. Question 2 (10 points) Running on a particular treadmill you burn 3.9 calories per minute. Write a program that uses a loop to display the number of calories burned after 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes

GEEN 160 Lab 3 Instructions: Please create two cpp files and having each of them containing one question’s solution. Please only submit the two cpp files onto Blackboard. Requirements: ? You need to put one comment on top of the main function. The comment should explain the general purpose of the main function. ? You need to make a comment whenever you define a variable (or variables). ? You need to make a comment whenever you make a computation (or computations). ? No comment is required for the code that displays something on the screen. However, the message that will be displayed on the screen must be self-explanatory. Question 1 (10 points) Write a program that uses a loop to display the characters for the ASCII codes 0 through 127. Display 16 characters on each line. Question 2 (10 points) Running on a particular treadmill you burn 3.9 calories per minute. Write a program that uses a loop to display the number of calories burned after 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes

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WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT #5.5/EXAM REVIEW YOU 1. True/False Answers Probably want to think about them before you read the answers: (a) fy(a; b) = limh!b f(a;y)?f(a;b) y?b is True (b) There exists a function f with continuous second-order partial derivatives such that fx(x; y) = x + y2 and fy(x; y) = x ? y2. This is False. (c) fxy = @2f @x@y . This is False, because order of differentiation matters (d) Dkf(x; y; z) = fz(x; y; z). This is True. (e) If f(x; y) ! L as (x; y) ! (a; b) along every strait line through (a; b), then lim(x;y)!(a;b) f(x; y) = L. This is False, because there could be a non-strait path that gives a different answer. (f) If fx(a; b) and fy(a; b) both exist, the f is differentiable at (a; b). This is False, read theorem 8 in 14.4 (g) If f has a local minimum at (a; b) and f is differentiable at (a; b), then rf(a; b) = 0. This is True. (h) If f(x; y) = ln y, then rf(x; y) = 1=y. This is false, since gradient of f is a vector function. (i) If f is a function, then lim (x;y)!(2;5) f(x; y) = f(2; 5): This is false, since f may not be continuous. (j) If (2; 1) is a critical point of f and fxx(2; 1)fyy(2; 1) < fxy(2; 1)2 then f has a saddle point at (2; 1). This is True (k) if f(x; y) = sin x + sin y then ? p 2  Duf(x; y)  p 2: This is True since the gradient vector will always have length less than p 2. (l) If f(x; y) has two local maxima, then f must have a local minimum. This is False. It is true for single variable continuous functions, but even if the f(x; y) is continuous this is still not true. Think a bit about why and consider the example (x2 ? 1)2 ? (x2  y ? x ? 1)2. From the review section of chapter 14 (question and answers attached) Do as many as you have time for and pay particular attention to the following : 8-11, 13-17, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35-37, 43-47, 51-56, 59-63. These bolded ones haven’t been collected on any homework, so make sure you can do these especially. I know that is a lot to study and I’m not expecting most people to do them all, but do a bunch and you should be good. 1 Questions from the exam will include true false, only from the above problems. The rest of the questions will come directly (or with minor changes) from the homework and from the review questions listed above from the chapter 14 review. 2

WEEKLY ASSIGNMENT #5.5/EXAM REVIEW YOU 1. True/False Answers Probably want to think about them before you read the answers: (a) fy(a; b) = limh!b f(a;y)?f(a;b) y?b is True (b) There exists a function f with continuous second-order partial derivatives such that fx(x; y) = x + y2 and fy(x; y) = x ? y2. This is False. (c) fxy = @2f @x@y . This is False, because order of differentiation matters (d) Dkf(x; y; z) = fz(x; y; z). This is True. (e) If f(x; y) ! L as (x; y) ! (a; b) along every strait line through (a; b), then lim(x;y)!(a;b) f(x; y) = L. This is False, because there could be a non-strait path that gives a different answer. (f) If fx(a; b) and fy(a; b) both exist, the f is differentiable at (a; b). This is False, read theorem 8 in 14.4 (g) If f has a local minimum at (a; b) and f is differentiable at (a; b), then rf(a; b) = 0. This is True. (h) If f(x; y) = ln y, then rf(x; y) = 1=y. This is false, since gradient of f is a vector function. (i) If f is a function, then lim (x;y)!(2;5) f(x; y) = f(2; 5): This is false, since f may not be continuous. (j) If (2; 1) is a critical point of f and fxx(2; 1)fyy(2; 1) < fxy(2; 1)2 then f has a saddle point at (2; 1). This is True (k) if f(x; y) = sin x + sin y then ? p 2  Duf(x; y)  p 2: This is True since the gradient vector will always have length less than p 2. (l) If f(x; y) has two local maxima, then f must have a local minimum. This is False. It is true for single variable continuous functions, but even if the f(x; y) is continuous this is still not true. Think a bit about why and consider the example (x2 ? 1)2 ? (x2  y ? x ? 1)2. From the review section of chapter 14 (question and answers attached) Do as many as you have time for and pay particular attention to the following : 8-11, 13-17, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35-37, 43-47, 51-56, 59-63. These bolded ones haven’t been collected on any homework, so make sure you can do these especially. I know that is a lot to study and I’m not expecting most people to do them all, but do a bunch and you should be good. 1 Questions from the exam will include true false, only from the above problems. The rest of the questions will come directly (or with minor changes) from the homework and from the review questions listed above from the chapter 14 review. 2

CIV ENG 280 Computer-based Engineering Analysis Assignment for Lab 5 1. The number of annual precipitation days of one-half of the 50 largest U.S. cities is listed below. Find the mean, mode, median, range, standard deviation and variance of the data. 135 128 78 116 77 111 79 44 97 116 123 88 102 26 82 156 133 107 35 112 98 45 122 125 2. Please go through the steps described in the instruction manual (from page 112 to 136). Your lab report should include the following exercises in the manual. a) Binomial distribution (Page 112) b) Poisson distribution (page 119) c) Normal distribution (page 125) d) t distribution (page 132) 3. A math exam contains 10 multiple-choice questions, each with four choices. Since you have not spent any time preparing the exam, you decided to guess at each question by flipping a coin twice (i.e., two heads for A, head and tail for B, tail and head for C, two tails for D). Let X = the number of questions answered correctly. a) Plot the probability mass function (pmf) of the random variable X. (using the chart type “column”). b) If you have to get at least 5 questions answered correctly to pass the exam, what is the probability that you will pass.

CIV ENG 280 Computer-based Engineering Analysis Assignment for Lab 5 1. The number of annual precipitation days of one-half of the 50 largest U.S. cities is listed below. Find the mean, mode, median, range, standard deviation and variance of the data. 135 128 78 116 77 111 79 44 97 116 123 88 102 26 82 156 133 107 35 112 98 45 122 125 2. Please go through the steps described in the instruction manual (from page 112 to 136). Your lab report should include the following exercises in the manual. a) Binomial distribution (Page 112) b) Poisson distribution (page 119) c) Normal distribution (page 125) d) t distribution (page 132) 3. A math exam contains 10 multiple-choice questions, each with four choices. Since you have not spent any time preparing the exam, you decided to guess at each question by flipping a coin twice (i.e., two heads for A, head and tail for B, tail and head for C, two tails for D). Let X = the number of questions answered correctly. a) Plot the probability mass function (pmf) of the random variable X. (using the chart type “column”). b) If you have to get at least 5 questions answered correctly to pass the exam, what is the probability that you will pass.

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Select Case 1, 2, or 8 in the back of the textbook. After you have read the case, select at least one of the questions presented at the end.-If you select only one question, then you will need to elaborate with more examples and perspectives than if you select more than one, but the choice is yours. Fair warning: It is possible to fall into the trap of repeating oneself. To avoid that threat, think in advance of the different perspectives that you wish to explore. If you select more than one question, each answer will naturally be shorter. This may be a good approach if you discern that the questions lack strong potential to elicit in-depth answers. Remember to reply to the contributions of two other students in this exercise. This is a rule that we are only observing in the case analyses, given the relative complexity of the cases, compared to the chapter discussion questions. Always add value, from the textbook, news, personal experience, or all three. Indicate the case and question at the beginning, but avoid restating the question in your answer. In this respect, use the same method as in the chapter discussion questions, described in the Week 2 forum. Write at least 500 words (no minimum for replies, but do add value). Quoted passages do not contribute to the word count (so you will need to write more if you insert any quoted material). Post-edit your work carefully to catch errors. Avoid plagiarism at all cost. ——— Note on anomalous questions. Some questions will require you to work around selected details to fit the requisite discussion format. For example, Question 2 in Case 1 asks how your proposal will solve certain problems noted in answer to the previous question. If you have not actually answered Question 1, then you will have to assert one or more problems from the case, a proposed solution, and then an explanation of how your proposal may help. Question 3 is similar, in that you will need to identify a problem and a solution, followed by an argument about the budget. Although Alistair was expecting to hire a Project Engineer rather than a Quality Compliance Manager, the methods used to make the decision should be similar. The main difference in the Quality Compliance Manager position is that it is in a joint venture with a Hungarian government backed firm. International Joint Ventures (IJV) makes HRM practices more complicated because HRM practices and strategies are required for each IJV entity (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). HRM must address IJV in four stages, in which, each stage has an impact on the next. It is important for HRM to very thorough with each stage and communication through each stage is vital. To be successful, HRM must combine the IJV strategy along with the recruitment, selection, training, and development processes (Dowling et al., 2013). In light of the needs of the company and the new Quality Compliance Manager position, Alistair should choose the first candidate, Marie Erten-Loiseau. The fact that the job requires travel to France and Germany is a positive for Marie because she was born in France and was educated in France and Germany. The familiarity of these locations will help her as she meets with new business partners because she will have a good understanding of the policy and procedures required for companies in these two countries. Dowling et al., (2013), points out that the manager needs to be able to assess the desires of the stakeholders and be able to implement strategies based on their desires. Another reason for choosing Marie is that she has the most experience and has worked with Trianon for 13 years. The experience she has with the company is invaluable because she knows the goals of the company and strategies for implementing those goals. The last reason for choosing Marie is that she has been successful in her previous positions. She has lead two projects in two different countries and both were successful. This shows that she is able to adapt to the different practices of each country. There are many factors that Alistair should take into consideration to determine the correct choice for the Quality Compliance Manager position. The major factors that require consideration are the specificities of the entire situation, the reason for the assignment, and type of assignment. The four main specificities include context specificities, firm specific variables, local unit specificities, and IHRM practices (Dowling et al., 2013). The context specificities would include the differences in cultures between the assignment in Hungary and the base location for the Trianon, Marseilles. The firm specific variable includes any changes in the way operations in Hungary are conducted, whether it is strategy or HRM policies. The local unit specificities include the role of the joint venture in relation to Trianon and how this joint venture will fit into the long-term plan of the company. The company hopes that it will provide a good working relationship with the state supported airline, which will lead to more business in the future. The IHRM practices determine the employees that are hired and the training that is available to the employees. The reason for the assignment also is a major factor in determining the correct candidate. In the situation of Trianon, a joint venture with a Hungarian government back firm created a position that needed filling. The Quality Compliance Manager position allows Trianon to manage the joint venture operation, make sure it is successful, and build a strong relationship with Malev. The last major factor is the type of assignment. The Quality Compliance Manager assignment is long-term assignment because it is 3 years in duration. The joint venture is the first that the company has been involved in outside the UK so there is less familiarity on the administrative/compliance side. The candidate must act as an agent of direct control (Dowling et al., 2013) by assuring that compliance policies are followed and company strategy is implemented. Assessing whether a male or female would be the best fit for the position is also a factor that deserves consideration. The low number of female expatriates led Jessens, Cappellen, &Zanoni (2006) to research the following three myths: women have no desire to be in positions of authority in a foreign country, companies do not desire to place females in positions of authority while a foreign country, and women would be ineffective because of the views towards women in foreign countries. The research indicated that female expatriates do have conflict that arises related to their gender but the successful ones were able to turn the conflicts around based on the qualities that these women possess (Jessens et al., 2006). With all of these factors considered, I believe Marie Erten-Loiseau is the best candidate for the Quality Compliance Manager. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D. Sr. (2013). International Human Resource Management (6th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning Janssens, M., Cappellen, T., &Zanoni, P. (2006). Successful female expatriates as agents: Positioning oneself through gender, hierarchy, and culture. Journal of World Business, 1-16. doi:10.1016/j.jwb.2006.01.001 2.) Case 8 – Questions 1 & 4 Multinational firms are often faced with recruiting and staffing decisions that could ultimately enhance or diminish the firm’s ability to be successful in a competitive global market. Perlmutter identified four staffing approaches for MNEs to consider based on the primary attitudes of international executives that would lay the foundation for MNEs during the recruitment and hiring process (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). At one point or another throughout the MacDougall family journey Lachlan and Lisa have served in one of the four capacities as an ethnocentric, polycentric, geocentric, and regiocentric employee. The ability to encompass all four attitudes that Perlmutter set forth is something that the MacDougall family has managed to do extremely well. The possibility for a multinational firm to recruit a family of this caliber that has been exposed and has an understanding of the positive and negative aspects of each attitude is phenomenal. This would be resourceful for any multinational firm. The MacDougal family’s exposure to cross-cultural management is also valuable. The diverse cultural background that the family has encountered on their international journey is a rarity. Cultural diversity and cross-cultural management play a critical role in MNEs because it produces a work environment that can transform the workplace into a place of learning and give the firm the availability to create new ideas for a more productive and competitive advantage over other firms (Sultana, Rashid, Mohiuddin, &Mazumder, 2013). This is something that is easy for the MacDougall family to bring to the table with the family’s given history. The expatriate lifestyle that has become second nature to the MacDougall family is beneficial for multinational firms for multifarious reasons Being raised around different cultures and then choosing to work internationally and learn different cultures has attributed to Lachlan’s successful career. The family’s ability to communicate and blend in socially among diverse cultures is an important aspect for international firms that want to stay competitive and be successful. The family has acclimated fairly easy to all of the places they have been and this is something that can be favorable when firms are recruiting employees. The MacDougall family has an upper-hand in the international marketplace naturally due to previous experiences with other countries and cultures. The exceptional way that the family has managed to conform to a multitude of other cultures and flourish is not an easy task. Marriage is not easy and many families experience a greater challenge avoiding divorcees when international mobility is involved. Lachlan and Lisa have been able to move together and this is an important aspect to the success of their marriage. Based on the case study they have a common desire to travel and both are successful in their careers. Lisa’s devotion to her husband’s successful career has put some strain on the marriage as she has had times where she felt she did not have her own identity. Military spouses experience this type of stress during long deployments and times that they have to hold the household together on their own. Another example is with employers who are transferred internationally for a short period of time or travel often. Separation of spouses can strain any marriage, but Lisa and Lachlan have been fortunate to avoid separation for any extended length of time. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D.Sr.(2013). International Human Resource Management. (6thed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Sultana, M., Rashid, M., Mohiuddin, M. &Mazumder, M. (2013).Cross-cultural management and organizational performance.A Contnet analysis perspective.International Journal of Business and Management, 8(8), 133-146.

Select Case 1, 2, or 8 in the back of the textbook. After you have read the case, select at least one of the questions presented at the end.-If you select only one question, then you will need to elaborate with more examples and perspectives than if you select more than one, but the choice is yours. Fair warning: It is possible to fall into the trap of repeating oneself. To avoid that threat, think in advance of the different perspectives that you wish to explore. If you select more than one question, each answer will naturally be shorter. This may be a good approach if you discern that the questions lack strong potential to elicit in-depth answers. Remember to reply to the contributions of two other students in this exercise. This is a rule that we are only observing in the case analyses, given the relative complexity of the cases, compared to the chapter discussion questions. Always add value, from the textbook, news, personal experience, or all three. Indicate the case and question at the beginning, but avoid restating the question in your answer. In this respect, use the same method as in the chapter discussion questions, described in the Week 2 forum. Write at least 500 words (no minimum for replies, but do add value). Quoted passages do not contribute to the word count (so you will need to write more if you insert any quoted material). Post-edit your work carefully to catch errors. Avoid plagiarism at all cost. ——— Note on anomalous questions. Some questions will require you to work around selected details to fit the requisite discussion format. For example, Question 2 in Case 1 asks how your proposal will solve certain problems noted in answer to the previous question. If you have not actually answered Question 1, then you will have to assert one or more problems from the case, a proposed solution, and then an explanation of how your proposal may help. Question 3 is similar, in that you will need to identify a problem and a solution, followed by an argument about the budget. Although Alistair was expecting to hire a Project Engineer rather than a Quality Compliance Manager, the methods used to make the decision should be similar. The main difference in the Quality Compliance Manager position is that it is in a joint venture with a Hungarian government backed firm. International Joint Ventures (IJV) makes HRM practices more complicated because HRM practices and strategies are required for each IJV entity (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). HRM must address IJV in four stages, in which, each stage has an impact on the next. It is important for HRM to very thorough with each stage and communication through each stage is vital. To be successful, HRM must combine the IJV strategy along with the recruitment, selection, training, and development processes (Dowling et al., 2013). In light of the needs of the company and the new Quality Compliance Manager position, Alistair should choose the first candidate, Marie Erten-Loiseau. The fact that the job requires travel to France and Germany is a positive for Marie because she was born in France and was educated in France and Germany. The familiarity of these locations will help her as she meets with new business partners because she will have a good understanding of the policy and procedures required for companies in these two countries. Dowling et al., (2013), points out that the manager needs to be able to assess the desires of the stakeholders and be able to implement strategies based on their desires. Another reason for choosing Marie is that she has the most experience and has worked with Trianon for 13 years. The experience she has with the company is invaluable because she knows the goals of the company and strategies for implementing those goals. The last reason for choosing Marie is that she has been successful in her previous positions. She has lead two projects in two different countries and both were successful. This shows that she is able to adapt to the different practices of each country. There are many factors that Alistair should take into consideration to determine the correct choice for the Quality Compliance Manager position. The major factors that require consideration are the specificities of the entire situation, the reason for the assignment, and type of assignment. The four main specificities include context specificities, firm specific variables, local unit specificities, and IHRM practices (Dowling et al., 2013). The context specificities would include the differences in cultures between the assignment in Hungary and the base location for the Trianon, Marseilles. The firm specific variable includes any changes in the way operations in Hungary are conducted, whether it is strategy or HRM policies. The local unit specificities include the role of the joint venture in relation to Trianon and how this joint venture will fit into the long-term plan of the company. The company hopes that it will provide a good working relationship with the state supported airline, which will lead to more business in the future. The IHRM practices determine the employees that are hired and the training that is available to the employees. The reason for the assignment also is a major factor in determining the correct candidate. In the situation of Trianon, a joint venture with a Hungarian government back firm created a position that needed filling. The Quality Compliance Manager position allows Trianon to manage the joint venture operation, make sure it is successful, and build a strong relationship with Malev. The last major factor is the type of assignment. The Quality Compliance Manager assignment is long-term assignment because it is 3 years in duration. The joint venture is the first that the company has been involved in outside the UK so there is less familiarity on the administrative/compliance side. The candidate must act as an agent of direct control (Dowling et al., 2013) by assuring that compliance policies are followed and company strategy is implemented. Assessing whether a male or female would be the best fit for the position is also a factor that deserves consideration. The low number of female expatriates led Jessens, Cappellen, &Zanoni (2006) to research the following three myths: women have no desire to be in positions of authority in a foreign country, companies do not desire to place females in positions of authority while a foreign country, and women would be ineffective because of the views towards women in foreign countries. The research indicated that female expatriates do have conflict that arises related to their gender but the successful ones were able to turn the conflicts around based on the qualities that these women possess (Jessens et al., 2006). With all of these factors considered, I believe Marie Erten-Loiseau is the best candidate for the Quality Compliance Manager. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D. Sr. (2013). International Human Resource Management (6th ed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning Janssens, M., Cappellen, T., &Zanoni, P. (2006). Successful female expatriates as agents: Positioning oneself through gender, hierarchy, and culture. Journal of World Business, 1-16. doi:10.1016/j.jwb.2006.01.001 2.) Case 8 – Questions 1 & 4 Multinational firms are often faced with recruiting and staffing decisions that could ultimately enhance or diminish the firm’s ability to be successful in a competitive global market. Perlmutter identified four staffing approaches for MNEs to consider based on the primary attitudes of international executives that would lay the foundation for MNEs during the recruitment and hiring process (Dowling, Festing, & Engle, 2013). At one point or another throughout the MacDougall family journey Lachlan and Lisa have served in one of the four capacities as an ethnocentric, polycentric, geocentric, and regiocentric employee. The ability to encompass all four attitudes that Perlmutter set forth is something that the MacDougall family has managed to do extremely well. The possibility for a multinational firm to recruit a family of this caliber that has been exposed and has an understanding of the positive and negative aspects of each attitude is phenomenal. This would be resourceful for any multinational firm. The MacDougal family’s exposure to cross-cultural management is also valuable. The diverse cultural background that the family has encountered on their international journey is a rarity. Cultural diversity and cross-cultural management play a critical role in MNEs because it produces a work environment that can transform the workplace into a place of learning and give the firm the availability to create new ideas for a more productive and competitive advantage over other firms (Sultana, Rashid, Mohiuddin, &Mazumder, 2013). This is something that is easy for the MacDougall family to bring to the table with the family’s given history. The expatriate lifestyle that has become second nature to the MacDougall family is beneficial for multinational firms for multifarious reasons Being raised around different cultures and then choosing to work internationally and learn different cultures has attributed to Lachlan’s successful career. The family’s ability to communicate and blend in socially among diverse cultures is an important aspect for international firms that want to stay competitive and be successful. The family has acclimated fairly easy to all of the places they have been and this is something that can be favorable when firms are recruiting employees. The MacDougall family has an upper-hand in the international marketplace naturally due to previous experiences with other countries and cultures. The exceptional way that the family has managed to conform to a multitude of other cultures and flourish is not an easy task. Marriage is not easy and many families experience a greater challenge avoiding divorcees when international mobility is involved. Lachlan and Lisa have been able to move together and this is an important aspect to the success of their marriage. Based on the case study they have a common desire to travel and both are successful in their careers. Lisa’s devotion to her husband’s successful career has put some strain on the marriage as she has had times where she felt she did not have her own identity. Military spouses experience this type of stress during long deployments and times that they have to hold the household together on their own. Another example is with employers who are transferred internationally for a short period of time or travel often. Separation of spouses can strain any marriage, but Lisa and Lachlan have been fortunate to avoid separation for any extended length of time. References Dowling, P.J., Festing, M., & Engle, A.D.Sr.(2013). International Human Resource Management. (6thed.). Stamford, CT: Cengage Sultana, M., Rashid, M., Mohiuddin, M. &Mazumder, M. (2013).Cross-cultural management and organizational performance.A Contnet analysis perspective.International Journal of Business and Management, 8(8), 133-146.

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1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

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Southwest Rafters Case 2:Case 1: Capital Budgeting Cash Flows and Capital Budgeting Techniques Create a data sheet (or section) and link calculations to the data so that if the data is updated the calculations automatically update. 1) Calculate the Initial Cash Outlay and Annual Capital Budgeting Cash Flow for years 1 thru 5 for both alternatives. 2) Discuss the ethical implications of this business. Might there be a difference between these two alternatives? 3) Calculate the Payback Period, Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return for both alternatives based on your Initial Cash Outlay and Capital Budgeting Cash Flows. 4) Calculate NPV and IRR if cash flows increase at an estimated 6% annual rate. 5) What discount rate would leave them indifferent between the two alternatives? 6) What does the discount rate in #5 imply about the growth rate needed to make the Buenaventura better than the Green? 7) What is the probability of negative NPV both in the case of perfect serial correlation and in the case of independence of cash flows for both alternatives? Assume no growth and a $5,000 standard deviation of annual cash flow for both alternatives. 8) Calculate Accounting (Profit) and Cash Breakeven Points (average number of clients per trip) and the Degree of Operating Leverage for both alternatives for year 1. Treat all revenue as variable. Treat all expenses as fixed except the client portion of transportation and food and the administrative cost. Include externalities. If you spreadsheet is functional BEP is easy! 9) Could either alternative have Multiple Internal Rates of Return? Explain 10) Discuss the option values associated with these alternatives. Is there a difference between them? 11) Which alternative do you recommend for Southwest Rafters? Defend your choice using the results from the other questions. Assume that the assumptions are reasonable.

Southwest Rafters Case 2:Case 1: Capital Budgeting Cash Flows and Capital Budgeting Techniques Create a data sheet (or section) and link calculations to the data so that if the data is updated the calculations automatically update. 1) Calculate the Initial Cash Outlay and Annual Capital Budgeting Cash Flow for years 1 thru 5 for both alternatives. 2) Discuss the ethical implications of this business. Might there be a difference between these two alternatives? 3) Calculate the Payback Period, Net Present Value and Internal Rate of Return for both alternatives based on your Initial Cash Outlay and Capital Budgeting Cash Flows. 4) Calculate NPV and IRR if cash flows increase at an estimated 6% annual rate. 5) What discount rate would leave them indifferent between the two alternatives? 6) What does the discount rate in #5 imply about the growth rate needed to make the Buenaventura better than the Green? 7) What is the probability of negative NPV both in the case of perfect serial correlation and in the case of independence of cash flows for both alternatives? Assume no growth and a $5,000 standard deviation of annual cash flow for both alternatives. 8) Calculate Accounting (Profit) and Cash Breakeven Points (average number of clients per trip) and the Degree of Operating Leverage for both alternatives for year 1. Treat all revenue as variable. Treat all expenses as fixed except the client portion of transportation and food and the administrative cost. Include externalities. If you spreadsheet is functional BEP is easy! 9) Could either alternative have Multiple Internal Rates of Return? Explain 10) Discuss the option values associated with these alternatives. Is there a difference between them? 11) Which alternative do you recommend for Southwest Rafters? Defend your choice using the results from the other questions. Assume that the assumptions are reasonable.

Case 1 The answer is in excel sheet no 1. … Read More...
Problem 5: Physical Fitness versus Weight. You may have noticed from your analysis in Problem 4 that height does not explain 100% of the variation that we have observed in students’ heights. Is it possible that the amount of time students devote to physical fitness each week may help us to better understand their weights? a. Question 12 of the survey asked students, “About how much time per week (on average) do you devote to physical fitness?” We have named this variable FITNESS. Create a suitable graph to display the distribution of FITNESS and insert it here. b. What is the mode of this distribution? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours c. Create side-by-side boxplots to display students’ weights for the different levels of FITNESS. (Go to Graph > Boxplot > One Y with Groups > OK. Select WEIGHT for the “Graph variables” slot and FITNESS for the “Categorical variables for grouping” slot.) Insert your graph here. d. Use Minitab to calculate the basic statistics of WEIGHT for each level of FITNESS. Copy and paste the output here. e. With regard to FITNESS levels, which group of students has the lowest mean weight? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours f. Discuss the results: Describe the distributions of WEIGHT for the different levels of FITNESS as well as draw comparisons (i.e., What do they have in common?) and contrasts (i.e., How are they different?) between these distributions. Are there any surprises in the results? Explain why you think so, or why not. Problem 6 (Even): If your E number ends in an even number (0, 2, 4, 6, or 8) then do this question. (Omit this page/problem if your E# ends with an odd number.) Gender and Nuclear Safety. Question 5 in the survey asked students “How safe would you feel if a nuclear energy plant were built near where you live?” (Students could choose one of these options: Extremely safe, Very Safe, Moderately safe, Slightly safe, or Not at all safe.) Is there a relationship between gender and students’ opinions about nuclear safety? a. Create an appropriate graph to display the relationship between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY. You don’t want to display information for students that didn’t answer both of these questions on the survey, so click on Data Options > Group Options and remove the checks in the boxes beside “Include missing as a group” and “Include empty cells.” Insert your graph here. b. Create an appropriate two-way table to summarize the data. Click on Options > Display missing values for… and put a dot in the circle beside “No variables.” Insert your table here. c. SUPPOSE WE SELECT ONE STUDENT AT RANDOM: (Calculate the following probabilities and show your work.) i. What is the probability that this student is a female and feels “very safe”? P = ii. What is the probability that this student is either a male or that he/she feels “very safe”? P = iii. What is the probability that this student feels “not at all safe” given that the student selected is a female? P = iv. What is the probability that this student is a male given that the student selected feels “not at all safe”? P = d. Do you think there may be an association between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY? Why or why not? Explain your reasoning based on what you see in your graph.

Problem 5: Physical Fitness versus Weight. You may have noticed from your analysis in Problem 4 that height does not explain 100% of the variation that we have observed in students’ heights. Is it possible that the amount of time students devote to physical fitness each week may help us to better understand their weights? a. Question 12 of the survey asked students, “About how much time per week (on average) do you devote to physical fitness?” We have named this variable FITNESS. Create a suitable graph to display the distribution of FITNESS and insert it here. b. What is the mode of this distribution? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours c. Create side-by-side boxplots to display students’ weights for the different levels of FITNESS. (Go to Graph > Boxplot > One Y with Groups > OK. Select WEIGHT for the “Graph variables” slot and FITNESS for the “Categorical variables for grouping” slot.) Insert your graph here. d. Use Minitab to calculate the basic statistics of WEIGHT for each level of FITNESS. Copy and paste the output here. e. With regard to FITNESS levels, which group of students has the lowest mean weight? (Please underline one option.) Between 0 & 2 hours Between 2 & 5 hours Between 5 & 9 hours Between 9 & 15 hours Over 15 hours f. Discuss the results: Describe the distributions of WEIGHT for the different levels of FITNESS as well as draw comparisons (i.e., What do they have in common?) and contrasts (i.e., How are they different?) between these distributions. Are there any surprises in the results? Explain why you think so, or why not. Problem 6 (Even): If your E number ends in an even number (0, 2, 4, 6, or 8) then do this question. (Omit this page/problem if your E# ends with an odd number.) Gender and Nuclear Safety. Question 5 in the survey asked students “How safe would you feel if a nuclear energy plant were built near where you live?” (Students could choose one of these options: Extremely safe, Very Safe, Moderately safe, Slightly safe, or Not at all safe.) Is there a relationship between gender and students’ opinions about nuclear safety? a. Create an appropriate graph to display the relationship between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY. You don’t want to display information for students that didn’t answer both of these questions on the survey, so click on Data Options > Group Options and remove the checks in the boxes beside “Include missing as a group” and “Include empty cells.” Insert your graph here. b. Create an appropriate two-way table to summarize the data. Click on Options > Display missing values for… and put a dot in the circle beside “No variables.” Insert your table here. c. SUPPOSE WE SELECT ONE STUDENT AT RANDOM: (Calculate the following probabilities and show your work.) i. What is the probability that this student is a female and feels “very safe”? P = ii. What is the probability that this student is either a male or that he/she feels “very safe”? P = iii. What is the probability that this student feels “not at all safe” given that the student selected is a female? P = iv. What is the probability that this student is a male given that the student selected feels “not at all safe”? P = d. Do you think there may be an association between GENDER and NUCLEAR SAFETY? Why or why not? Explain your reasoning based on what you see in your graph.

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According to Lamarck which variable would have the greatest influence on the evolution of an organism? Select one: the environment the genetics of the individual both the environment and genetics are equally responsible for the evolution of an organism neither the environment nor the genetics of an organism play a role in its evolution a creator would determine the evolution of an organism

According to Lamarck which variable would have the greatest influence on the evolution of an organism? Select one: the environment the genetics of the individual both the environment and genetics are equally responsible for the evolution of an organism neither the environment nor the genetics of an organism play a role in its evolution a creator would determine the evolution of an organism

According to Lamarck which variable would have the greatest influence … Read More...