What two pathways between personality and health need to be considered when evaluating the relationship between these variables? individual and social physical and psychological self-report and peer-report biological and behavioral

What two pathways between personality and health need to be considered when evaluating the relationship between these variables? individual and social physical and psychological self-report and peer-report biological and behavioral

What two pathways between personality and health need to be … Read More...
5 years hence the age of father will be one more than three times the age of son. write linear equation in two variables to represent this statement

5 years hence the age of father will be one more than three times the age of son. write linear equation in two variables to represent this statement

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277 5 years hence the age of father … Read More...
An economic modal should capture: A) the essential relationship that help to analyze the problem , B) only social value related variables., C) all possible variables that apply to the problem , D) all of the above

An economic modal should capture: A) the essential relationship that help to analyze the problem , B) only social value related variables., C) all possible variables that apply to the problem , D) all of the above

answer A
Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . = Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 1 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . = Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 2 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? = = Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 3 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , , and are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, , the equation may have two real valued 1. solutions if , 2. one real valued solution if , or 3. two complex valued solutions if . In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 4 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 5 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector is decomposed into component vectors and parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector , denoted and . TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value of the x component is the magnitude of the 1. component vector . The sign of is positive if points in the positive x direction; it is negative if points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 6 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Correct Part B What is the sign of the y component of vector shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, and , of vector shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. = 5 positive negative Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 7 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth’s gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, , is constant. 1. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by , is equal to 9.80 near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, , changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position and . Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is . Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time with velocity . Its position at this moment is denoted by or since it is at its maximum height. The other point, at time with velocity , corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is , also known as ( since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence . Part A , = -2,-5 , Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 8 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM How do the speeds , , and (at times ,

Extra Credit Due: 11:59pm on Thursday, May 15, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy A Man Running to Catch a Bus A man is running at speed (much less than the speed of light) to catch a bus already at a stop. At , when he is a distance from the door to the bus, the bus starts moving with the positive acceleration . Use a coordinate system with at the door of the stopped bus. Part A What is , the position of the man as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of the variables , , and . Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the man’s speed? Because the man’s speed is constant, you may use . ANSWER: Correct Part B What is , the position of the bus as a function of time? Answer symbolically in terms of and . = Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 1 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Hint 1. Which equation should you use for the bus’s acceleration? Because the bus has constant acceleration, you may use . Recall that . ANSWER: Correct Part C What condition is necessary for the man to catch the bus? Assume he catches it at time . Hint 1. How to approach this problem If the man is to catch the bus, then at some moment in time , the man must arrive at the position of the door of the bus. How would you express this condition mathematically? ANSWER: Correct Part D Inserting the formulas you found for and into the condition , you obtain the following: , or . Intuitively, the man will not catch the bus unless he is running fast enough. In mathematical terms, there is a constraint on the man’s speed so that the equation above gives a solution for that is a real positive number. Find , the minimum value of for which the man will catch the bus. Express the minimum value for the man’s speed in terms of and . = Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 2 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Hint 1. Consider the discriminant Use the quadratic equation to solve: . What is the discriminant (the part under the radical) of the solution for ? Hint 1. The quadratic formula Recall: If then ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the constraint? To get a real value for , the discriminant must be greater then or equal to zero. This condition yields a constraint that exceed . ANSWER: Correct Part E Assume that the man misses getting aboard when he first meets up with the bus. Does he get a second chance if he continues to run at the constant speed ? = = Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 3 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Hint 1. What is the general quadratic equation? The general quadratic equation is , where , , and are constants. Depending on the value of the discriminant, , the equation may have two real valued 1. solutions if , 2. one real valued solution if , or 3. two complex valued solutions if . In this case, every real valued solution corresponds to a time at which the man is at the same position as the door of the bus. ANSWER: Correct Adding and Subtracting Vectors Conceptual Question Six vectors (A to F) have the magnitudes and directions indicated in the figure. Part A Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) x component? Hint 1. Largest x component The two vectors with the largest x components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest x component. Keep in mind that positive x components are larger than negative x components. No; there is no chance he is going to get aboard. Yes; he will get a second chance Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 4 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Part B Which two vectors, when added, will have the largest (positive) y component? Hint 1. Largest y component The two vectors with the largest y components will, when combined, give the resultant with the largest y component. Keep in mind that positive y components are larger than negative y components. ANSWER: Correct Part C Which two vectors, when subtracted (i.e., when one vector is subtracted from the other), will have the largest magnitude? Hint 1. Subtracting vectors To subtract two vectors, add a vector with the same magnitude but opposite direction of one of the vectors to the other vector. ANSWER: C and E E and F A and F C and D B and D C and D A and F E and F A and B E and D Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 5 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Correct Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector Learning Goal: To practice Tactics Box 3.1 Determining the Components of a Vector. When a vector is decomposed into component vectors and parallel to the coordinate axes, we can describe each component vector with a single number (a scalar) called the component. This tactics box describes how to determine the x component and y component of vector , denoted and . TACTICS BOX 3.1 Determining the components of a vector The absolute value of the x component is the magnitude of the 1. component vector . The sign of is positive if points in the positive x direction; it is negative if points in the negative x direction. 2. 3. The y component is determined similarly. Part A What is the magnitude of the component vector shown in the figure? Express your answer in meters to one significant figure. ANSWER: A and F A and E D and B C and D E and F Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 6 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM Correct Part B What is the sign of the y component of vector shown in the figure? ANSWER: Correct Part C Now, combine the information given in the tactics box above to find the x and y components, and , of vector shown in the figure. Express your answers, separated by a comma, in meters to one significant figure. = 5 positive negative Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 7 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Problem about Projectile Motion Learning Goal: To understand projectile motion by considering horizontal constant velocity motion and vertical constant acceleration motion independently. Projectile motion refers to the motion of unpowered objects (called projectiles) such as balls or stones moving near the surface of the earth under the influence of the earth’s gravity alone. In this analysis we assume that air resistance can be neglected. An object undergoing projectile motion near the surface of the earth obeys the following rules: An object undergoing projectile motion travels horizontally at a constant rate. That is, the x component of its velocity, , is constant. 1. An object undergoing projectile motion moves vertically with a constant downward acceleration whose magnitude, denoted by , is equal to 9.80 near the surface of the earth. Hence, the y component of its velocity, , changes continuously. 2. An object undergoing projectile motion will undergo the horizontal and vertical motions described above from the instant it is launched until the instant it strikes the ground again. Even though the horizontal and vertical motions can be treated independently, they are related by the fact that they occur for exactly the same amount of time, namely the time the projectile is in the air. 3. The figure shows the trajectory (i.e., the path) of a ball undergoing projectile motion over level ground. The time corresponds to the moment just after the ball is launched from position and . Its launch velocity, also called the initial velocity, is . Two other points along the trajectory are indicated in the figure. One is the moment the ball reaches the peak of its trajectory, at time with velocity . Its position at this moment is denoted by or since it is at its maximum height. The other point, at time with velocity , corresponds to the moment just before the ball strikes the ground on the way back down. At this time its position is , also known as ( since it is at its maximum horizontal range. Projectile motion is symmetric about the peak, provided the object lands at the same vertical height from which is was launched, as is the case here. Hence . Part A , = -2,-5 , Extra Credit http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 8 of 57 5/9/2014 8:02 PM How do the speeds , , and (at times ,

info@checkyourstudy.com
Important Instructions for submitting this, and all subsequent projects: • Name your project .m file as follows: proj4fml.m where the “4” refers to the project number and fml are your first, middle, and last initials. • Inside the project.m file, you MUST have a comment section at the beginning with the following information: A short description of the project, your name, and Bengal ID number, and a listing of all the relevant variables (those that the user sees when using the project), and their meaning. • You will upload the proj4fml.m file to the provided link, on or before the due date and time. NOTE: The upload link will become inactive after the expiration of this due date and time, and you will NOT receive ANY credit for late submissions. Project 4 Instructions: Your program should allow the user to run it as many times as wished. Use an appropriate loop. Your program should implement the following tasks: 1) Display to the user the purpose of this program 2) In this program you will be converting temperature entered by the user in degree Fahrenheit to a) Degree Celsius b) Degree Kelvin c) Rankine or d) Réaumur 3) The formulae for conversion is as follows; Fahrenheit to Celsius C = (F – 32) / 1.8 Fahrenheit to Kelvin K = (F + 459.67) / 1.8 Fahrenheit to Rankine Ra = F + 459.67 Fahrenheit to Réaumur Re = (F – 32) / 2.25 4) You will create a main file which will call any one of the 4 functions. The name of the function files that you will create are as follows; F2C, F2K, F2Ra and F2Re where the actual calculation of the selected conversion will be computed. 5) Each of the function files will have temperature in Fahrenheit as the input argument and the corresponding conversion as its output argument. 6) The program is to run as many times as the user wishes. 7) At the end of the program display an output statement which has the user input (temperature) and the corresponding conversion.

Important Instructions for submitting this, and all subsequent projects: • Name your project .m file as follows: proj4fml.m where the “4” refers to the project number and fml are your first, middle, and last initials. • Inside the project.m file, you MUST have a comment section at the beginning with the following information: A short description of the project, your name, and Bengal ID number, and a listing of all the relevant variables (those that the user sees when using the project), and their meaning. • You will upload the proj4fml.m file to the provided link, on or before the due date and time. NOTE: The upload link will become inactive after the expiration of this due date and time, and you will NOT receive ANY credit for late submissions. Project 4 Instructions: Your program should allow the user to run it as many times as wished. Use an appropriate loop. Your program should implement the following tasks: 1) Display to the user the purpose of this program 2) In this program you will be converting temperature entered by the user in degree Fahrenheit to a) Degree Celsius b) Degree Kelvin c) Rankine or d) Réaumur 3) The formulae for conversion is as follows; Fahrenheit to Celsius C = (F – 32) / 1.8 Fahrenheit to Kelvin K = (F + 459.67) / 1.8 Fahrenheit to Rankine Ra = F + 459.67 Fahrenheit to Réaumur Re = (F – 32) / 2.25 4) You will create a main file which will call any one of the 4 functions. The name of the function files that you will create are as follows; F2C, F2K, F2Ra and F2Re where the actual calculation of the selected conversion will be computed. 5) Each of the function files will have temperature in Fahrenheit as the input argument and the corresponding conversion as its output argument. 6) The program is to run as many times as the user wishes. 7) At the end of the program display an output statement which has the user input (temperature) and the corresponding conversion.

Solution available on request: Please get in touch with us … Read More...
Lab #02 Relationship between distance & illumination As engineers, we deal with the effects of light on many projects. The first key to working with light is understanding how the light waves propagate. Once we understand light waves, we will test a manufacturers claim that lower wattage fluorescent bulbs output the same quantity of light as incandescent bulbs. This experiment is designed for you to work as a class to collect data regarding a given light source and then, working within your individual group, attempt to determine the re-lationship(s) between the measured parameter (lux) and the distance (meter) from the source. Measure and record data, in the manner described below, as a class. Work on your so-lutions as a group of 2-3. Your first task is to develop a mathematical formula, or a simple relationship that predicts the amount of lux that can be expected at a given distance from the light source. Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to accomplish the following goals: • Gain experience collecting data in a controlled, systematic fashion. • Practice working as a group to infer relationships between variables from your collected data. • Use the data you collect to draw conclusions. In this case, to evaluate the hypothesis that the fluorescent and incandescent bulb output the same quantity of light. • Become accustomed to working in teams (note, teamwork often requires individual work as well). • Learn to balance workload across your team. (Individuals will be responsible for certain tasks, and ensure they are performed on time and to the desired quality level. • Demonstrate to me what your group’s attention to detail is, as well as your ability to construct a written explanation of work. Problem: What effect does distance have on the lux, intensity, emitted from a light source and are the 5 light bulbs producing the same intensity light? Use the rough protocol listed below and the data sheet provided to collect your data, then complete the assignment outlined below. 1. Set up a light source on one of the lab tables. 2. Using the illumination meter, measure the lux at 0.5 meter increments from the source back to 3 meters from the source. • Be sure the keep the meter perpendicular to the horizontal line from the source at all times! 3. Record your measurements on your data sheets. 4. Measurements should be taken in a random order 5. Repeat the experiment 3 times, using different people and a different order of collection and different colors. Assignment Requirements: 1. Create the appropriate graph(s) to express the data you have collected. Your report must, at the minimum, contain the following: a. An X-Y Scatter plot showing the data from both bulbs. The chart should follow all conventions taught in lecture, and display the equation for the trend-line you choose. b. A column or bar chart of your choosing showing the difference, if any, between the two bulbs. 2. Write an introduction, briefly explaining what you are accomplishing with this exper-iment. 3. Create a hierarchal outline that states, step by step, each activity that was performed to conduct the experiment and analyze the experimental data. 4. Anova analysis for data collected 5. Write a verbal explanation of what each of the charts from requirement #1 are showing. 6. Include, at the end of the document, a summary of all the tasks required to complete the assignment, including the 5 listed above, and which member or members of the group were principally responsible for completing those tasks. This should be in the form of a simple list. 7. Write at least 3 possible applications of the experiment with detailed explanation. DUE DATE: This assignment is to be completed and turned in at the beginning of your laboratory meeting during the week of 18th February Microsoft office package: Excel: Insert, page layout tab functions, Mean, standard deviation, graph functions

Lab #02 Relationship between distance & illumination As engineers, we deal with the effects of light on many projects. The first key to working with light is understanding how the light waves propagate. Once we understand light waves, we will test a manufacturers claim that lower wattage fluorescent bulbs output the same quantity of light as incandescent bulbs. This experiment is designed for you to work as a class to collect data regarding a given light source and then, working within your individual group, attempt to determine the re-lationship(s) between the measured parameter (lux) and the distance (meter) from the source. Measure and record data, in the manner described below, as a class. Work on your so-lutions as a group of 2-3. Your first task is to develop a mathematical formula, or a simple relationship that predicts the amount of lux that can be expected at a given distance from the light source. Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to accomplish the following goals: • Gain experience collecting data in a controlled, systematic fashion. • Practice working as a group to infer relationships between variables from your collected data. • Use the data you collect to draw conclusions. In this case, to evaluate the hypothesis that the fluorescent and incandescent bulb output the same quantity of light. • Become accustomed to working in teams (note, teamwork often requires individual work as well). • Learn to balance workload across your team. (Individuals will be responsible for certain tasks, and ensure they are performed on time and to the desired quality level. • Demonstrate to me what your group’s attention to detail is, as well as your ability to construct a written explanation of work. Problem: What effect does distance have on the lux, intensity, emitted from a light source and are the 5 light bulbs producing the same intensity light? Use the rough protocol listed below and the data sheet provided to collect your data, then complete the assignment outlined below. 1. Set up a light source on one of the lab tables. 2. Using the illumination meter, measure the lux at 0.5 meter increments from the source back to 3 meters from the source. • Be sure the keep the meter perpendicular to the horizontal line from the source at all times! 3. Record your measurements on your data sheets. 4. Measurements should be taken in a random order 5. Repeat the experiment 3 times, using different people and a different order of collection and different colors. Assignment Requirements: 1. Create the appropriate graph(s) to express the data you have collected. Your report must, at the minimum, contain the following: a. An X-Y Scatter plot showing the data from both bulbs. The chart should follow all conventions taught in lecture, and display the equation for the trend-line you choose. b. A column or bar chart of your choosing showing the difference, if any, between the two bulbs. 2. Write an introduction, briefly explaining what you are accomplishing with this exper-iment. 3. Create a hierarchal outline that states, step by step, each activity that was performed to conduct the experiment and analyze the experimental data. 4. Anova analysis for data collected 5. Write a verbal explanation of what each of the charts from requirement #1 are showing. 6. Include, at the end of the document, a summary of all the tasks required to complete the assignment, including the 5 listed above, and which member or members of the group were principally responsible for completing those tasks. This should be in the form of a simple list. 7. Write at least 3 possible applications of the experiment with detailed explanation. DUE DATE: This assignment is to be completed and turned in at the beginning of your laboratory meeting during the week of 18th February Microsoft office package: Excel: Insert, page layout tab functions, Mean, standard deviation, graph functions

info@checkyourstudy.com Lab #02 Relationship between distance & illumination As engineers, … Read More...
BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

BI 102 Lab 1 Writing Assignment How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? This assignment requires you to evaluate a hypothesis and communicate the results of your experiment on the rate of osmosis into sucrose solutions of varying concentrations. The questions below are meant to guide you to reporting the key findings of your experiment and help you think through how to explain the findings and draw conclusions from them in a scientific manner. ASSIGNMENT: Please respond to the following questions to complete your laboratory write up. For this assignment you will only focus on the osmosis of water into sucrose concentrations of varying concentration. Make sure that your write up is accurate, and clearly written so that it is easily readable. A grading rubric is provided on the second page of this assignment. To earn full points on your write up, you must provide answers that align to the “meets” column of your grading rubric as well as meeting all “Quality of Writing and Mechanics” elements described in the rubric. There are also some tips on pages 3-4 of this assignment to help you succeed. FORMAT: • Type your responses, using 1.5 or double spacing. • Include the section headings (Hypothesis, Results, Analysis) and question number (example: 1, 2, 3, etc) in your answers but do not rewrite the question. • Graphs may be made with a computer program (example: Microsoft excel, Mac numbers, etc) or may be neatly produced with a ruler on graphing paper. • Print out the cover sheet on page 2 of this assignment, read and sign the academic honesty statement, and submit it with your write up. Your instructor WILL NOT accept a write up without the signed cover sheet. DUE DATE: Your write up is due at the beginning of class next week. Late assignments will have 1 point deducted per day up to 5 days, at which point the assignment will be assigned 0 points. Hypothesis and Prediction – Part 1 of Rubric 1. What did you think was going to happen in this experiment and why? You may find it helpful to state your answers to these questions as an “if-then” hypothesis-prediction. Be sure you have included a biological rationale that explains WHY you made this hypothesis/prediction. (You worked on this in question 2 on page 10 of this lab activity) Results – Part 2 of Rubric 2. How did the different concentrations of sucrose impact osmotic rate? Answer this question by creating a line graph that shows the results of your experiment. If you need assistance building a graph, there is a Guide to Graphing resource available on your Moodle lab course site. Analysis- Part 3 of Rubric 3. Explain why you think that the results shown in your graph support or refute your hypothesis (remember we never “prove” anything in science). Consider all your data and the overall data pattern as you answer this question. Don’t ignore unusual data that may not seem to fit into a specific patterns (“outliers”). Explain what you think might be behind these unusual data points. 4. What is the biological significance of your results? What biological concepts explain completely why these events happened in the experiment? How do these results help you understand the biology of the cell and how materials move back and forth across the cell membrane? (A hint: refer back to questions 1A-1F on page 10 of this lab activity). Think about giving a specific example. References- Mechanics Checklist 5. Provide at least one full citation (make sure you include an in-text citation that pinpoints where you used this resource) for a resource you made use of in performing the experiment, understanding the concepts and writing this assignment. (Perhaps your lab manual? Your textbook? A website?) If you used more than one resource, you need to cite each one! If you need help with citations, a Guide to Citing References is available on your Moodle lab course site. Please print out and submit this cover sheet with your lab writeup! Lab Writeup Assignment (1) Assessment Rubric-­‐ 10 points total Name: ________________________________________ Element Misses (1 point) Approaches (2 points) Meets (3 points) Hypothesis Clarity/Specificity Testability Rationale ___Hypothesis is unclear and hardto- understand ___Hypothesis is not testable ___No biological rationale for hypothesis or rationale is fully inaccurate ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated, but not specific or lacks specific details __Hypothesis is testable, but not in a feasible way in this lab ___Some foundation for hypothesis, but based in part on biological inaccuracy ___Hypothesis included is clearly stated and very specific ___Hypothesis is testable and could be tested within lab parameters ___Rationale for hypothesis is grounded in accurate biological information Graph Title Axes Variables Key Graph clarity Data accuracy ___Graph lacks a title ___Axes are not labeled ___Variables not addressed in graph ___No key or way to tell data points apart ___Graph is hard to read and comparisons cannot be made: Inappropriate graph type or use of scale ___Data graphed is inaccurate or does not relate to experiment ___Graph has a title that is not very descriptive ___Axes are either unlabeled, or units are unclear or wrong ___Variables addressed in graph, but not on correct axes ___Key included, but is hard to understand ___Graph is somewhat readable, comparisons can be made with difficulty: Appropriate graph type, but not scaled well ___Data graphed is partially accurate; some data is missing ___Graph has a concise, descriptive title ___Axes are labeled, including clarification of units used ___Variables on correct axes ___A clear, easy-to-use key to data points is included ___Graph is clearly readable and comparisons between treatments are easy to make: Graph type and scale are appropriate to data ___Data graphed is accurate and includes all relevant data, including controls (if needed) Analysis Hypothesis Scientific language Data addressed Explanation ___Hypothesis is not addressed ___Hypothesis is described using language like proven, true, or right ___No explanations for data patterns observed in graph or data does not support conclusions. ___No biological explanation for data trends or explanations are completely inaccurate ___Hypothesis is mentioned, but not linked well to data ___Hypothesis is not consistently described as supported or refuted ___Some data considered in conclusions but other data is ignored. Any unusual “outliers” are ignored ___Explanations include minimal or some inaccurate biological concepts ___Hypothesis is evaluated based upon data ___Hypothesis is consistently described as supported or refuted ___All data collected is considered and addressed by conclusions, including presence of outliers, ___Explanations include relevant and accurate biological concepts Quality of Writing and Mechanics: Worth 1 point. Writeup should meet all of the following criteria! Yes No ☐ ☐ Write up includes your name, the date, and your lab section ☐ ☐ Write up is free from spelling and grammatical errors (make sure you proofread!!) ☐ ☐ Write up is clear and easy-to-understand ☐ ☐ Write up includes full citation for at least one reference with corresponding in-text citation ☐ ☐ All portions of write up are clearly labeled, and question numbers are included Plagiarism refers to the use of original work, ideas, or text that are not your own. This includes cut-and-paste from websites, copying directly from texts, and copying the work of others, including fellow students. Telling someone your answers to the questions (including telling someone how to make their graph, question #2), or asking for the answers to any question, is cheating. (Asking someone how to make the graph for this assignment is NOT the same as asking for help learning excel or some other software). All forms of cheating, including plagiarism and copying of work will result in an immediate zero for the exam, quiz, or assignment. In the case of copying, all parties involved in the unethical behavior will earn zeros. Cheating students will be referred to the Student Conduct Committee for further action. You also have the right to appeal to the Student Conduct Committee. I have read and understand the plagiarism statement. ____________________________________________________ Signature Guidelines for Good Quality Scientific Reports Hypothesis and Prediction: The hypothesis is a tentative explanation for the phenomenon. Remember that: • A good hypothesis and prediction is testable (and should be testable under the conditions of our lab environment; For example, if your hypothesis requires shooting a rocket into space, then its not really testable under our laboratory conditions). • Your explanation can be ruled out through testing, or falsified. • A good hypothesis and prediction is detailed and specific in what it is testing. • A good hypothesis provides a rationale or explanation for why you think your prediction is reasonable and this rationale is based on what we know about biology. • A good prediction is specific and can be tested with a specific experiment. Examples*: I think that diet soda will float and regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis misses the goal. It is not specific as we don’t know where the sodas are floating and sinking, and it does not provide any explanation to explain why the hypothesis makes sense} Because diet soda does not contain sugar and regular soda does, the diet soda will float in a bucket of water, while regular soda will sink. {This hypothesis approaches the goal. It is more specific about the conditions, and it provides a partial explanation about why the hypothesis makes sense, but the connection between sugar and sinking is unclear} If diet soda does not contain sugar, then its density (mass/volume) is lower than that of regular soda which does contain sugar, and so diet soda will float in a bucket of water while regular soda sinks. {This hypothesis meets the goal. It is specific and the rationale- sugar affects density and density is what determines floating or sinking in water- is clearly articulated} *Note that these examples are for different experiments and investigations and NOT about your osmosis lab. They are provided only to help you think about what you need to include in your write up. Graph: The graph is a visual representation of the data you gathered while testing your hypothesis. Remember that: • A graph needs a concise title that clearly describes the data that it is showing. • Data must be put on the correct axes of the graph. In general, the data you collected (representing what you are trying to find out about) goes on the vertical (Y) axis. The supporting data that that describes how, when or under what conditions you collected your data goes on the horizontal (X) axis. (For this reason time nearly always goes on the X-axis). • Axes must be labeled, including the units in which data were recorded • Data points should be clearly marked and identified; a key is helpful if more than one group of data is included in the graph. • The scale of a graph is important. It should be consistent (there should be no change in the units or increments on a single axis) and appropriate to the data you collected Examples: {This graph misses the goal. There is no title, nor is there a key to help distinguish what the data points mean. The scale is too large- from 0 to 100 with an increment of 50, when the maximum number in the graph is 25- and makes it hard to interpret this graph. The x-axis is labeled, but without units (the months) and the y-axis has units, but the label is incomplete- number of what?} {This graph meets the goal. There is a descriptive title, and all of the axes are clearly labeled with units. There is a key so that we can distinguish what each set of data points represent. The dependent variable (number of individuals) is correctly placed on the y-axis with the independent variable of time placed on the x-axis. The scale of 0-30 is appropriate to the data, with each line on the x-axis representing an increment of 5.} 0 50 100 Number Month 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 March April May June July Number of individuals Month (2011) Population size of three different madtom catiCish in the Marais de Cygnes River in Spring/Summer 2011 Brindled madtom Neosho madtom Slender madtom Analysis: You need to evaluate your hypothesis based on the data patterns shown by your graph. Remember that: • You use data to determine support or refute your hypothesis. It is only possible to support a hypothesis, not to “prove” one (that would require testing every possible permutation and combination of factors). Your evaluation of your hypothesis should not be contradicted by the pattern shown by your data. • Refer back to the prediction you made as part of your hypothesis and use your data to justify your decision to support or refute your hypothesis. • In the “if” part of your hypothesis you should have provided a rationale, or explanation for the prediction you made in your hypothesis (“then” part of hypothesis”). Use this to help you explain why you think you observed the specific pattern of data revealed in your graph. • You should consider all of the data you collected in examining the support (or lack of support for your hypothesis). If there are unusual data points or “outliers” that don’t seem to fit the general pattern in your graph, explain what you think those mean. Examples: I was right. Diet Pepsi floated and so did Apricot Nectar. Regular Pepsi sank. Obviously the regular Pepsi was heavier. This helps us understand the concept of density, which is a really important one. {This analysis misses the goal. The hypothesis isn’t actually mentioned and the data is only briefly described. There is no explanation of the importance of the Apricot Nectar results. Finally, there is no connection to how these results help understand density or why it is biologically important} I hypothesized that diet soda would float, and all three cans of diet Pepsi did float while the regular Pepsi sank. This supports my hypothesis. Both types of Pepsi were 8.5 fluid ounces in volume, but the regular Pepsi also contained 16 grams of sugar. This means that the regular Pepsi had 16 more grams of mass provided by the sugar in the same amount of volume. This would lead to an increase in density, which explains why the regular soda cans sank. When we put in a can of Apricot Nectar, which had 19 grams of sugar, it floated. This was unexpected, but I think it is explained by the fact that an Apricot Nectar can had a volume of 7 fluid ounces, but the dimensions of the can are the same as that of a Pepsi can. A same-sized can with less liquid probably has an air space that helped it float. The results of this experiment help us understand how the air bladder of a fish, which creates an air space inside the fish, helps it float in the water and also how seaweeds and other living things with air spaces or other factors that decrease their density keep from sinking to the bottom of the water. {This analysis meets the goal. It clearly ties the hypothesis to the results and outlines what they mean. It describes how the results support the hypothesis, but also explains a possible reason behind the unusual results of the Apricot Nectar. Finally, there is a link to how this experiment helps us understand biology}

info@checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277
Homework Assignment 7. Due March 19 1. Consider the differential equation: ?? ?? = − 1 2 ? sin? ? with initial condition given by ?(0) = 1 Solve this equation from t = 0 to t = 8π using the following methods: (a) Solve analytically by separating variables and integrating. (b) Solve using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method (write your own code for this, do not use the MATLAB provided ODE solvers) for the following two step sizes: I. Maximum step size for stability (don’t try and do this analytically – try out your code for different step sizes to find the stability limit). II. Maximum step size for a time-accurate solution. “Good” accuracy can be defined in several ways, but use the definition that the numerical solution remains within 2% of the true solution a t = nπ. (c) Solve using the MATLAB function ode45. 2. A car and its suspension system traveling over a bumpy road can be modeled as a mass/spring/damper system. In this model, ?? is the vertical motion of the wheel center of mass, ?? is the vertical motion of the car chassis, and ?? represents the displacement of the bottom of the tire due to the variation in the road surface. Applying Newton’s law to the two masses yields a system of second-order equations: ???̈? + ??(?̇? − ?̇?) + ??(?? − ??) + ???? = ???? ???̈? − ??(?̇? − ?̇?) − ??(?? − ??) + ???? = 0 (a) Convert the two second-order ODE’s into a system of 4 first-order ODE’s. Write them in standard “state-space” form. (b) Assume the car hits a large pothole at t = 0 so that ??(?) = ?−0.2 m 0 ≤ ? < 0.2 s 0 ? > 0.2 s Create a MATLAB function that returns the right hand sides of the state-space equations for an input t and an input state vector. (c) Solve the system on the time interval [0 60] seconds using the MATLAB function ode45. Find the displacement and velocity of the chassis and the wheel as a function of time. Use the following data: ?? = 100 kg, ?? = 1900 kg, ?? = 145 N/m, ?? = 25 N/m, ?? = 150 N-s/m 3. Write a MATLAB program to simulate the dynamics of a helicopter lifting a survivor. When lifting the survivor into the helicopter with a constant speed winch, the resulting dynamics are non-linear, and stability is dependent upon the winch speed. Using polar coordinates, we can find the equations of motion to be: −?? sin ? = ????̈ + 2?̇?̇? ?̇ = constant (negative) Notice that the mass of the survivor factors out and thus the solution is independent of the mass of the person being lifted. In these equations, r is the instantaneous length of the winch cable, g, is the gravitational constant, and θ is the angle of the swing. You may choose to use either your Runge-Kutta solver from problem 1 or ode45 to integrate the equations of motion. This problem is of particular interest to the survivor since an unstable condition can cause the angle of the swing to exceed 90⁰, essentially placing him/her in danger of being beheaded by the rotor blades of the rescue helicopter. Also, it is desirable to retrieve the survivor as fast as possible to get away from the danger. Use your program to determine the maximum winch speed for which the survivor will not swing above the helicopter attach point for a lift from the initial conditions: ?? = 0.1 ??? ?? ̇ = 0 ?? = 34 ? And ending when ? = 0.5 ?. The maximum lifting speed of the winch is 5 m/s. Present your results for the above problems in an appropriate fashion. For problem 1, be sure to include a comparison of the numerical methods with each other and with the true solution. Be sure to discuss your findings with respect to the notions of stability and accuracy of the numerical methods. For problem 2, ensure that your results are easily interpreted by a reader. Students receiving a score of 70% or above on these two problems will receive credit for outcome #5. For problem 3, if you receive at least 70% of the points, you will receive credit for outcome #4.

Homework Assignment 7. Due March 19 1. Consider the differential equation: ?? ?? = − 1 2 ? sin? ? with initial condition given by ?(0) = 1 Solve this equation from t = 0 to t = 8π using the following methods: (a) Solve analytically by separating variables and integrating. (b) Solve using the 4th-order Runge-Kutta method (write your own code for this, do not use the MATLAB provided ODE solvers) for the following two step sizes: I. Maximum step size for stability (don’t try and do this analytically – try out your code for different step sizes to find the stability limit). II. Maximum step size for a time-accurate solution. “Good” accuracy can be defined in several ways, but use the definition that the numerical solution remains within 2% of the true solution a t = nπ. (c) Solve using the MATLAB function ode45. 2. A car and its suspension system traveling over a bumpy road can be modeled as a mass/spring/damper system. In this model, ?? is the vertical motion of the wheel center of mass, ?? is the vertical motion of the car chassis, and ?? represents the displacement of the bottom of the tire due to the variation in the road surface. Applying Newton’s law to the two masses yields a system of second-order equations: ???̈? + ??(?̇? − ?̇?) + ??(?? − ??) + ???? = ???? ???̈? − ??(?̇? − ?̇?) − ??(?? − ??) + ???? = 0 (a) Convert the two second-order ODE’s into a system of 4 first-order ODE’s. Write them in standard “state-space” form. (b) Assume the car hits a large pothole at t = 0 so that ??(?) = ?−0.2 m 0 ≤ ? < 0.2 s 0 ? > 0.2 s Create a MATLAB function that returns the right hand sides of the state-space equations for an input t and an input state vector. (c) Solve the system on the time interval [0 60] seconds using the MATLAB function ode45. Find the displacement and velocity of the chassis and the wheel as a function of time. Use the following data: ?? = 100 kg, ?? = 1900 kg, ?? = 145 N/m, ?? = 25 N/m, ?? = 150 N-s/m 3. Write a MATLAB program to simulate the dynamics of a helicopter lifting a survivor. When lifting the survivor into the helicopter with a constant speed winch, the resulting dynamics are non-linear, and stability is dependent upon the winch speed. Using polar coordinates, we can find the equations of motion to be: −?? sin ? = ????̈ + 2?̇?̇? ?̇ = constant (negative) Notice that the mass of the survivor factors out and thus the solution is independent of the mass of the person being lifted. In these equations, r is the instantaneous length of the winch cable, g, is the gravitational constant, and θ is the angle of the swing. You may choose to use either your Runge-Kutta solver from problem 1 or ode45 to integrate the equations of motion. This problem is of particular interest to the survivor since an unstable condition can cause the angle of the swing to exceed 90⁰, essentially placing him/her in danger of being beheaded by the rotor blades of the rescue helicopter. Also, it is desirable to retrieve the survivor as fast as possible to get away from the danger. Use your program to determine the maximum winch speed for which the survivor will not swing above the helicopter attach point for a lift from the initial conditions: ?? = 0.1 ??? ?? ̇ = 0 ?? = 34 ? And ending when ? = 0.5 ?. The maximum lifting speed of the winch is 5 m/s. Present your results for the above problems in an appropriate fashion. For problem 1, be sure to include a comparison of the numerical methods with each other and with the true solution. Be sure to discuss your findings with respect to the notions of stability and accuracy of the numerical methods. For problem 2, ensure that your results are easily interpreted by a reader. Students receiving a score of 70% or above on these two problems will receive credit for outcome #5. For problem 3, if you receive at least 70% of the points, you will receive credit for outcome #4.

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...
1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

1 IN2009: Language Processors Coursework Part 3: The Interpreter Introduction This is the 3rd and final part of the coursework. In the second part of the coursework you created a parser for the Moopl grammar which, given a syntactically correct Moopl program as input, builds an AST representation of the program. In Part 3 you will develop an interpreter which executes Moopl programs by visiting their AST representations. For this part of the coursework we provide functional code (with limitations, see below) for parsing, building a symbol table, type checking and variable allocation. Marks This part of the coursework is worth 12 of the 30 coursework marks for the Language Processors module. This part of the coursework is marked out of 12. Submission deadline This part of the coursework should be handed in before 5pm on Sunday 9th April 2017. In line with school policy, late submissions will be awarded no marks. Return & Feedback Marks and feedback will be available as soon as possible, certainly on or before Wed 3rd May 2017. Plagiarism If you copy the work of others (either that of fellow students or of a third party), with or without their permission, you will score no marks and further disciplinary action will be taken against you. Group working You will be working in the same groups as for the previous parts of the coursework except where group changes have already been approved. Submission: Submit a zip archive (not a rar file) of all your source code (the src folder of your project). We do not want the other parts of your NetBeans project, only the source code. Note 1: Submissions which do not compile will get zero marks. Note 2: You must not change the names or types of any of the existing packages, classes or public methods. 2 Getting started Download either moopl-interp.zip or moopl-interp.tgz from Moodle and extract all files. Key contents to be aware of: • A fully implemented Moopl parser (also implements a parser for the interpreter command language; see below). • A partially implemented Moopl type checker. • Test harnesses for the type checker and interpreter. • A directory of a few example Moopl programs (see Testing below). • Folder interp containing prototype interpreter code. The type-checker is only partially implemented but a more complete implementation will be provided following Session 6. That version is still not fully complete because it doesn’t support inheritance. Part d) below asks you to remove this restriction. The VarAllocator visitor in the interp package uses a simple implementation which only works for methods in which all parameter and local variable names are different. Part e) below asks you to remove this restriction. The three parts below should be attempted in sequence. When you have completed one part you should make a back-up copy of the work and keep it safe, in case you break it in your attempt at the next part. Be sure to test old functionality as well as new (regression testing). We will not assess multiple versions so, if your attempt at part d) or e) breaks previously working code, you may gain a better mark by submitting the earlier version for assessment. c) [8 marks] The Basic Interpreter: complete the implementation of the Interpreter visitor in the interp package. d) [2 marks] Inheritance: extend the type-checker, variable allocator and interpreter to support inheritance. e) [2 marks] Variable Allocation: extend the variable allocator to fully support blockstructure and lexical scoping, removing the requirement that all parameter and local variable names are different. Aim to minimise the number of local variable slots allocated in a stack frame. Note: variable and parameter names declared at the same scope level are still required to be different from each other (a method cannot have two different parameters called x, for example) and this is enforced by the existing typechecking code. But variables declared in different blocks (even when nested) can have the same name. Exceptions Your interpreter will only ever be run on Moopl code which is type-correct (and free from uninitialised local variables). But it is still possible that the Moopl code contains logical errors which may cause runtime errors (such as null-reference or array-bound errors). Your interpreter should throw a MooplRunTimeException with an appropriate error message in these cases. The only kind of exception your interpreter should ever throw is a MooplRunTimeException. 3 Testing The examples folder does not contain a comprehensive test-suite. You need to invent and run your own tests. The document Moopl compared with Java gives a concise summary of how Moopl programs are supposed to behave. You can (and should) also compare the behaviour of your interpreter with that of the online tool: https://smcse.city.ac.uk/student/sj353/langproc/Moopl.html (Note: the online tool checks for uninitialised local variables. Your implementation is not expected to do this.) To test your work, run the top-level Interpret harness, providing the name of a Moopl source file as a command-line argument. When run on a type-correct Moopl source file, Interpret will pretty-print the Moopl program then display a command prompt (>) at which you can enter one of the following commands: :quit This will quit the interpreter. :call main() This will call the top-level proc main, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program. (Any top-level proc can be called this way). :eval Exp ; This will evaluate expression Exp, interpreted in the context defined by the Moopl program, and print the result. Note the required terminating semi-colon. Testing your Expression visitors To unit-test your Exp visit methods, run the top-level Interpret harness on a complete Moopl program (though it can be trivial) and use the :eval command. For example, to test your visit methods for the Boolean-literals (ExpTrue and ExpFalse), you would enter the commands > :eval true ; > :eval false ; which should output 1 and 0, respectively. For the most basic cases, the Moopl program is essentially irrelevant (a single top-level proc with empty body may be sufficient). For other cases you will need to write programs containing class definitions (in order, for example, to test object creation and method call). Testing your Statement visitors To unit-test your Stm visit methods, write very simple Moopl programs, each with a top-level proc main() containing just a few lines of code. Run the top-level Interpret harness on these simple programs and enter the command > :call main() You will find a few examples to get you started in the folder examples/unittests. As for the Exp tests, simple cases can be tested using Moopl programs with just a main proc but for the more complex tests you will need to write Moopl programs containing class definitions. 4 Grading criteria Solutions will be graded according to their functional correctness, and the elegance of their implementation. Below are criteria that guide the award of marks. 70 – 100 [1st class] Work that meets all the requirements in full, constructed and presented to a professional standard. Showing evidence of independent reading, thinking and analysis. 60 – 69 [2:1] Work that makes a good attempt to address the requirements, realising all to some extent and most well. Well-structured and well presented. 50 – 59 [2:2] Work that attempts to address requirements realising all to some extent and some well but perhaps also including irrelevant or underdeveloped material. Structure and presentation may not always be clear. 40 – 49 [3rd class] Work that attempts to address the requirements but only realises them to some extent and may not include important elements or be completely accurate. Structure and presentation may lack clarity. 0 – 39 [fail] Unsatisfactory work that does not adequately address the requirements. Structure and presentation may be confused or incoherent.

checkyourstudy.com Whatsapp +919911743277