(b) Based on the lessons learned, best practices and any additional steps you came up with in part (a), what if project manager X then got a job at Bank of America. Would it be possible for him/her to implement lean in the banking industry based on experience from the previous positions held at the automotive plant and the pharmaceutical company? Please state yes or no and explain the logic clearly for the same. Also, explain the steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at Bank of America (in the service industry) [10 points] You can refer to your class notes and will also have to do research online for both parts (a) and (b). Please state all the references used for each question.

(b) Based on the lessons learned, best practices and any additional steps you came up with in part (a), what if project manager X then got a job at Bank of America. Would it be possible for him/her to implement lean in the banking industry based on experience from the previous positions held at the automotive plant and the pharmaceutical company? Please state yes or no and explain the logic clearly for the same. Also, explain the steps that project manager X could take to implement lean at Bank of America (in the service industry) [10 points] You can refer to your class notes and will also have to do research online for both parts (a) and (b). Please state all the references used for each question.

Yes, lean can be applied to the banking industry.   … Read More...
Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Standard based Curriculum In standard based curriculum, the initial point … Read More...
Write 2page papers on the current ATC privatization plans. Congressman Bill Schuster had written a plan last year to privatize Air Traffic Controllers. There are multiple articles online that discuss the current talk about moving forward with the privatization. Things to include in your research: -What are the main reasons some congressman and senators are wanting to make ATC a private entity? -What are the pros and cons of ATC privatization? -How will this affect the general flying public? -Do you see any concern that the private entity would be made of up a corporate board that would be made up of four people appointed by major airlines, two people appointed by the aircraft owners association, one person appointed by the airline pilots union, and one person appointed by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association? -What is NATCA’s (ATC union) view on ATC privatization? -After researching and reading articles, what is your personal opinion on ATC privatization? Provide a work cited page with your references. List a minimum of 3.

Write 2page papers on the current ATC privatization plans. Congressman Bill Schuster had written a plan last year to privatize Air Traffic Controllers. There are multiple articles online that discuss the current talk about moving forward with the privatization. Things to include in your research: -What are the main reasons some congressman and senators are wanting to make ATC a private entity? -What are the pros and cons of ATC privatization? -How will this affect the general flying public? -Do you see any concern that the private entity would be made of up a corporate board that would be made up of four people appointed by major airlines, two people appointed by the aircraft owners association, one person appointed by the airline pilots union, and one person appointed by the National Air Traffic Controllers Association? -What is NATCA’s (ATC union) view on ATC privatization? -After researching and reading articles, what is your personal opinion on ATC privatization? Provide a work cited page with your references. List a minimum of 3.

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Q3b.Explain the possible consequences if the above mentioned principles are not followed

Q3b.Explain the possible consequences if the above mentioned principles are not followed

Access Control is an important part of any company’s Security … Read More...
Greek Philosophies Wiki Each person has been assigned a philosophy. Tell us who were the most well-known proponents of the idea. Tell us when and where it originated. Then tell us what the basic ideas of the philosophy were. Also tell us how the ideas were received by the rest of society. Then tell us your personal view of these ideas. Do you agree in any way with the ideas of this philosophy? Might you have participated in this philosophy if you were alive in Hellenistic society? Is there any modern insight we can glean from these ideas? Should we embrace this philosophy today? Cynicism Skepticism Stoicism Epicureanism

Greek Philosophies Wiki Each person has been assigned a philosophy. Tell us who were the most well-known proponents of the idea. Tell us when and where it originated. Then tell us what the basic ideas of the philosophy were. Also tell us how the ideas were received by the rest of society. Then tell us your personal view of these ideas. Do you agree in any way with the ideas of this philosophy? Might you have participated in this philosophy if you were alive in Hellenistic society? Is there any modern insight we can glean from these ideas? Should we embrace this philosophy today? Cynicism Skepticism Stoicism Epicureanism

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Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 1 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Incorrect; Try Again Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen = 32 = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 2 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 3 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 4 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 5 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 6 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Clockwise Counterclockwise = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 7 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 8 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. = = rev Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 9 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 10 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). = N = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 11 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = N = s = N Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 12 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 13 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Problem 12.46 into the page out of the page Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 14 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 15 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1. Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 16 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 17 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 18 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 19 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 20 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 4.0%. You received 7.84 out of a possible total of 198 points. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?disp

Assignment 10 Due: 11:59pm on Friday, April 18, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 12.3 Part A The figure shows three rotating disks, all of equal mass. Rank in order, from largest to smallest, their rotational kinetic energies to . Rank from largest to smallest. To rank items as equivalent, overlap them. ANSWER: Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 1 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Incorrect; Try Again Conceptual Question 12.6 You have two steel solid spheres. Sphere 2 has twice the radius of sphere 1. Part A By what factor does the moment of inertia of sphere 2 exceed the moment of inertia of sphere 1? ANSWER: Correct Problem 12.2 A high-speed drill reaches 2500 in 0.59 . Part A What is the drill’s angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B Through how many revolutions does it turn during this first 0.59 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Constant Angular Acceleration in the Kitchen = 32 = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 2 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Dario, a prep cook at an Italian restaurant, spins a salad spinner and observes that it rotates 20.0 times in 5.00 seconds and then stops spinning it. The salad spinner rotates 6.00 more times before it comes to rest. Assume that the spinner slows down with constant angular acceleration. Part A What is the angular acceleration of the salad spinner as it slows down? Express your answer numerically in degrees per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). ± A Spinning Electric Fan An electric fan is turned off, and its angular velocity decreases uniformly from 540 to 250 in a time interval of length 4.40 . Part A Find the angular acceleration in revolutions per second per second. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Find the number of revolutions made by the fan blades during the time that they are slowing down in Part A. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 3 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C How many more seconds are required for the fan to come to rest if the angular acceleration remains constant at the value calculated in Part A? You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.8 A 100 ball and a 230 ball are connected by a 34- -long, massless, rigid rod. The balls rotate about their center of mass at 130 . Part A What is the speed of the 100 ball? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.10 A thin, 60.0 disk with a diameter of 9.00 rotates about an axis through its center with 0.200 of kinetic energy. Part A What is the speed of a point on the rim? = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 4 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.12 A drum major twirls a 95- -long, 470 baton about its center of mass at 150 . Part A What is the baton’s rotational kinetic energy? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Net Torque on a Pulley The figure below shows two blocks suspended by a cord over a pulley. The mass of block B is twice the mass of block A, while the mass of the pulley is equal to the mass of block A. The blocks are let free to move and the cord moves on the pulley without slipping or stretching. There is no friction in the pulley axle, and the cord’s weight can be ignored. Part A Which of the following statements correctly describes the system shown in the figure? Check all that apply. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 5 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Problem 12.18 Part A In the figure , what is the magnitude of net torque about the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of net torque about the axle? ANSWER: The acceleration of the blocks is zero. The net torque on the pulley is zero. The angular acceleration of the pulley is nonzero. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 6 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.22 An athlete at the gym holds a 3.5 steel ball in his hand. His arm is 78 long and has a mass of 3.6 . Assume the center of mass of the arm is at the geometrical center of the arm. Part A What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight out to his side, parallel to the floor? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the torque about his shoulder if he holds his arm straight, but below horizontal? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Parallel Axis Theorem The parallel axis theorem relates , the moment of inertia of an object about an axis passing through its center of mass, to , the moment of inertia of the same object about a parallel axis passing through point p. The mathematical statement of the theorem is , where is the perpendicular distance from the center of mass to the axis that passes through point p, and is the mass of the object. Part A Suppose a uniform slender rod has length and mass . The moment of inertia of the rod about about an axis that is perpendicular to the rod and that passes through its center of mass is given by . Find , the moment of inertia of the rod with respect to a parallel axis through one end of the rod. Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. Clockwise Counterclockwise = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 7 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B Now consider a cube of mass with edges of length . The moment of inertia of the cube about an axis through its center of mass and perpendicular to one of its faces is given by . Find , the moment of inertia about an axis p through one of the edges of the cube Express in terms of and . Use fractions rather than decimal numbers in your answer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Problem 12.26 Starting from rest, a 12- -diameter compact disk takes 2.9 to reach its operating angular velocity of 2000 . Assume that the angular acceleration is constant. The disk’s moment of inertia is . Part A How much torque is applied to the disk? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 8 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Part B How many revolutions does it make before reaching full speed? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Problem 12.23 An object’s moment of inertia is 2.20 . Its angular velocity is increasing at the rate of 3.70 . Part A What is the total torque on the object? ANSWER: Problem 12.31 A 5.1 cat and a 2.5 bowl of tuna fish are at opposite ends of the 4.0- -long seesaw. = = rev Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 9 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A How far to the left of the pivot must a 3.8 cat stand to keep the seesaw balanced? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Static Equilibrium of the Arm You are able to hold out your arm in an outstretched horizontal position because of the action of the deltoid muscle. Assume the humerus bone has a mass , length and its center of mass is a distance from the scapula. (For this problem ignore the rest of the arm.) The deltoid muscle attaches to the humerus a distance from the scapula. The deltoid muscle makes an angle of with the horizontal, as shown. Use throughout the problem. Part A Find the tension in the deltoid muscle. Express the tension in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 10 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B Using the conditions for static equilibrium, find the magnitude of the vertical component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus (where the humerus attaches to the rest of the body). Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now find the magnitude of the horizontal component of the force exerted by the scapula on the humerus. Express your answer in newtons, to the nearest integer. ANSWER: ± Moments around a Rod A rod is bent into an L shape and attached at one point to a pivot. The rod sits on a frictionless table and the diagram is a view from above. This means that gravity can be ignored for this problem. There are three forces that are applied to the rod at different points and angles: , , and . Note that the dimensions of the bent rod are in centimeters in the figure, although the answers are requested in SI units (kilograms, meters, seconds). = N = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 11 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A If and , what does the magnitude of have to be for there to be rotational equilibrium? Answer numerically in newtons to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part B If the L-shaped rod has a moment of inertia , , , and again , how long a time would it take for the object to move through ( /4 radians)? Assume that as the object starts to move, each force moves with the object so as to retain its initial angle relative to the object. Express the time in seconds to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: Part C Now consider the situation in which and , but now a force with nonzero magnitude is acting on the rod. What does have to be to obtain equilibrium? Give a numerical answer, without trigonometric functions, in newtons, to two significant figures. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = N = s = N Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 12 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.32 A car tire is 55.0 in diameter. The car is traveling at a speed of 24.0 . Part A What is the tire’s rotation frequency, in rpm? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the speed of a point at the top edge of the tire? Express your answer to three significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C What is the speed of a point at the bottom edge of the tire? Express your answer as an integer and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.33 A 460 , 8.00-cm-diameter solid cylinder rolls across the floor at 1.30 . Part A What is the can’s kinetic energy? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 13 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM ANSWER: Problem 12.45 Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 780 rotating bar in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is the direction of the angular momentum of the bar ? ANSWER: Problem 12.46 into the page out of the page Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 14 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the angular momentum of the 2.20 , 4.60-cm-diameter rotating disk in the figure ? ANSWER: Part B What is its direction? ANSWER: Problem 12.60 A 3.0- -long ladder, as shown in the following figure, leans against a frictionless wall. The coefficient of static friction between the ladder and the floor is 0.46. x direction -x direction y direction -y direction z direction -z direction Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 15 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the minimum angle the ladder can make with the floor without slipping? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.61 The 3.0- -long, 90 rigid beam in the following figure is supported at each end. An 70 student stands 2.0 from support 1. Part A How much upward force does the support 1 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 16 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part B How much upward force does the support 2 exert on the beam? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Enhanced EOC: Problem 12.63 A 44 , 5.5- -long beam is supported, but not attached to, the two posts in the figure . A 22 boy starts walking along the beam. You may want to review ( pages 330 – 334) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: The Vector Cross Product Part A How close can he get to the right end of the beam without it falling over? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. You did not open hints for this part. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 17 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Problem 12.68 Flywheels are large, massive wheels used to store energy. They can be spun up slowly, then the wheel’s energy can be released quickly to accomplish a task that demands high power. An industrial flywheel has a 1.6 diameter and a mass of 270 . Its maximum angular velocity is 1500 . Part A A motor spins up the flywheel with a constant torque of 54 . How long does it take the flywheel to reach top speed? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B How much energy is stored in the flywheel? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part C The flywheel is disconnected from the motor and connected to a machine to which it will deliver energy. Half the energy stored in the flywheel is delivered in 2.2 . What is the average power delivered to the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 18 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part D How much torque does the flywheel exert on the machine? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.71 The 3.30 , 40.0-cm-diameter disk in the figure is spinning at 350 . Part A How much friction force must the brake apply to the rim to bring the disk to a halt in 2.10 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.74 A 5.0 , 60- -diameter cylinder rotates on an axle passing through one edge. The axle is parallel to the floor. The cylinder is held with the center of mass at the same height as the axle, then released. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 19 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Part A What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s initial angular acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Part B What is the magnitude of the cylinder’s angular velocity when it is directly below the axle? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Problem 12.82 A 45 figure skater is spinning on the toes of her skates at 0.90 . Her arms are outstretched as far as they will go. In this orientation, the skater can be modeled as a cylindrical torso (40 , 20 average diameter, 160 tall) plus two rod-like arms (2.5 each, 67 long) attached to the outside of the torso. The skater then raises her arms straight above her head, where she appears to be a 45 , 20- -diameter, 200- -tall cylinder. Part A What is her new rotation frequency, in revolutions per second? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: = = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?displayM… 20 of 21 4/11/2014 1:13 PM Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 4.0%. You received 7.84 out of a possible total of 198 points. = Assignment 10 http://session.masteringphysics.com/myct/assignmentPrintView?disp

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GEOGRAPHY 325V – “Take Home Exam” 5 LIST/SHORT ANSWER – Worth 10 points each: 50 points. 1) List the 8 eras of New Mexico geography: name three Athabaskan Nations and three Pueblo Nations 2) List and briefly explain the 6 factors that made Spanish settlement in New Mexico successful 3) List and briefly explain 4 types of land grants given by Spain and Mexico: explain three ways land grants were lost during the American Period, and say how many acres of the original grants were retained. 4) Briefly explain how the Manhattan Project happened in New Mexico. In your view, was dropping the atomic bombs on Japan the right thing to do – explain your opinion using facts. How has this history affected New Mexico’s economy today? 5) List and briefly explain 6 landscape traits created by the Laws of the Indies 10 EXPANDED DEFINITIONS – Define and explain each term. 4 points each: 40 points. Chihuahuan Desert: where is it, what season does it rain, and what is a typical plant found here? Don Juan de Oñate: who was he, what year did he come to NM, and what was his significance in the history of New Mexico? El Camino Real: what was it and why was it important? Repartimento: what was this system and how did cause anger in the early Spanish colony? Pueblo Revolt: when and what was it, and what was its outcome? Santuario de Chimayo: write a paragraph explaining its history and religious importance Mayordomo: who is this and what is their importance in the New Mexico landscape? US/Mexico Border Fence/Wall: what are the arguments for and against this project. What is your view? La Llorona: what is this basic story and what is its importance in NM culture? Pancho Villa’s raid on Columbus: what was this, why did it occur, and what was its importance in U.S. military history? ONE ANALYSIS QUESTION: Explain why there was so much resistance in Washington, DC to New Mexico becoming a state. Use two quotes from politicians of the time who were against statehood. Do you think New Mexico is still viewed with suspicion in the USA? Explain why or why not? 10 points.

GEOGRAPHY 325V – “Take Home Exam” 5 LIST/SHORT ANSWER – Worth 10 points each: 50 points. 1) List the 8 eras of New Mexico geography: name three Athabaskan Nations and three Pueblo Nations 2) List and briefly explain the 6 factors that made Spanish settlement in New Mexico successful 3) List and briefly explain 4 types of land grants given by Spain and Mexico: explain three ways land grants were lost during the American Period, and say how many acres of the original grants were retained. 4) Briefly explain how the Manhattan Project happened in New Mexico. In your view, was dropping the atomic bombs on Japan the right thing to do – explain your opinion using facts. How has this history affected New Mexico’s economy today? 5) List and briefly explain 6 landscape traits created by the Laws of the Indies 10 EXPANDED DEFINITIONS – Define and explain each term. 4 points each: 40 points. Chihuahuan Desert: where is it, what season does it rain, and what is a typical plant found here? Don Juan de Oñate: who was he, what year did he come to NM, and what was his significance in the history of New Mexico? El Camino Real: what was it and why was it important? Repartimento: what was this system and how did cause anger in the early Spanish colony? Pueblo Revolt: when and what was it, and what was its outcome? Santuario de Chimayo: write a paragraph explaining its history and religious importance Mayordomo: who is this and what is their importance in the New Mexico landscape? US/Mexico Border Fence/Wall: what are the arguments for and against this project. What is your view? La Llorona: what is this basic story and what is its importance in NM culture? Pancho Villa’s raid on Columbus: what was this, why did it occur, and what was its importance in U.S. military history? ONE ANALYSIS QUESTION: Explain why there was so much resistance in Washington, DC to New Mexico becoming a state. Use two quotes from politicians of the time who were against statehood. Do you think New Mexico is still viewed with suspicion in the USA? Explain why or why not? 10 points.

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TEXT The sole text is Daniel Bonevac’s Today’s Moral Issues. This is an extremely accessible work that organizes the subject matter of ethics into well-structured units involving both general principles and focused ethical dilemmas. The instructor will guide the students through the pertinent readings and discussion topics. Exam #3: WAR ECONOMIC EQUALITY 1. Aquinas 5. Mill 2. Grotius 6. Hospers 3. Clausewitz 7. Anderson 4. Gandhi CONCERNING THE SHORT PAPER Choose one of our dilemma topics from our book as the focus of your short paper. If you have another topic in mind, please consult with me for permission. —length: 4 to 5 pages — format: typed —number of points: 10 — submission via Bb, under “Assignments” — Format: Microsoft Word — Line Spacing: Double-Spaced —Print: Black The following is merely a suggestion for the organization of the paper, but it might be useful as an indication of how it could look: a) Initial statement of your position concerning the moral dilemma; how to resolve it, how you plan to argue for/against it. b) Amplification of your position; your main points or position. c) Backup: some cited references and supporting evidence for your position. d) Your criticisms of alternative or contrary points of view. e) Your conclusion/summing up. Plagiarism is a serious breach of academic integrity. If you submit plagiarized materials you will receive a zero on the assignment. If you need an extension of the due date for the paper, please consult with me.

TEXT The sole text is Daniel Bonevac’s Today’s Moral Issues. This is an extremely accessible work that organizes the subject matter of ethics into well-structured units involving both general principles and focused ethical dilemmas. The instructor will guide the students through the pertinent readings and discussion topics. Exam #3: WAR ECONOMIC EQUALITY 1. Aquinas 5. Mill 2. Grotius 6. Hospers 3. Clausewitz 7. Anderson 4. Gandhi CONCERNING THE SHORT PAPER Choose one of our dilemma topics from our book as the focus of your short paper. If you have another topic in mind, please consult with me for permission. —length: 4 to 5 pages — format: typed —number of points: 10 — submission via Bb, under “Assignments” — Format: Microsoft Word — Line Spacing: Double-Spaced —Print: Black The following is merely a suggestion for the organization of the paper, but it might be useful as an indication of how it could look: a) Initial statement of your position concerning the moral dilemma; how to resolve it, how you plan to argue for/against it. b) Amplification of your position; your main points or position. c) Backup: some cited references and supporting evidence for your position. d) Your criticisms of alternative or contrary points of view. e) Your conclusion/summing up. Plagiarism is a serious breach of academic integrity. If you submit plagiarized materials you will receive a zero on the assignment. If you need an extension of the due date for the paper, please consult with me.

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CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

CAUSAL ANALYSIS GUIDELINES: According to John J. Ruskiewicz and Jay T. Dolmage, “We all analyze and explain things daily. Someone asks, ‘Why?’ We reply, ‘Because . . .’ and then offer reasons and rationales” (138). This type of thinking is at the core of the causal analysis. You will write a causal analysis which explores, through carefully examined research and logical analysis, certain causes or factors which contribute to an issue or problematic situation, based on the topic you choose to write on. Your causal analysis should explore more than one type of cause, such as necessary causes, sufficient causes, precipitating causes, proximate causes, remote causes, reciprocal causes, contributing factors, and chains of causes, as outlined in our course text in the chapter devoted to Causal Analyses. Your project should also reflect significant critical thinking skills. In addition to the actual causal analysis essay, you will be also create an annotated bibliography. These process elements will help you organize and focus your ideas and research in a beneficial way. The following is an organizational structure that outlines the chronology and content of your Causal Analysis: I. Introduction: In one (or at the most two) paragraph(s) introduce your topic. Give a brief overview of your topic and thesis in a few sentences. your evaluative claim and your causal claim. It should be specific, logical, and clear. II. History/Background to Current Situation: This section should take as much space as needed—a few to several paragraphs. Discuss the significant and relevant history of your topic up to the current situation and how it came to be. Use research as needed to give precise and accurate background for context in making your later causal argument. Comment on your research as well, so that you don’t lose your voice. As you explore other points of view, your own point of view will evolve in significant ways. III. Evaluative Claim: Once you have given a brief history/background of the current situation, evaluate the situation, the topic, as it is at present. Again, use research as appropriate to support your judgments. While this section of your essay could run anywhere from one to three paragraphs, typically one paragraph is the norm, as you are basically passing judgment on the situation, arguing evaluatively. This is an argument of pathos and logos, predominantly. IV. Causal Argument: This is the longest portion of your essay, the “meat,” the heart of your work. Once you have detailed the history/background to current situation and evaluated the current situation, you are ready to present your causal analysis. Demonstrate a link between the current situation and the causes for its negative condition. Of course, you will use current significant and relevant research to support your causal claim, and you will want to find the most dominant and pervasive logical causes, utilizing research, for the current situation as possible. These will connect forward as well to your proposal. Remember to use specific supporting detail/examples, and to analyze all of your research causally, thoroughly, and with clarity. NOTE: SECTIONS THREE AND FOUR ABOVE ARE INTERCHANGEABLE. IN OTHER WORDS, IF YOU FEEL YOU CAN PRESENT A BETTER ARGUMENT BY SHOWING CAUSES FIRST AND THEN EVALUATING THE CURRENT SITUATION, THAT CAN WORK JUST AS WELL AS THE ORDER OUTLINED ABOVE. I WILL LEAVE IT UP TO YOU AS THE WRITER TO ESTABLISH WHICH ORDER WORKS MOST EFFECTIVELY. V. Counterargument/Conditions of Rebuttal and Rebuttal: There will be those who disagree with you so you will want to acknowledge their points of view. What are their assumptions about this topic? What questions do they raise for consideration? Acknowledging other points of view gives your essay credibility and shows that you have been fair and broad in your inquiry and presentation. (You will need at least one credible source to represent at least one counterargument.) Then explain how you have considered this counterargument, but still find your own analysis to be more logical and accurate; this is your rebuttal. VI. Conclusion: Summarize the meaningful conclusions you have drawn clearly and precisely, remembering to resummarize your thesis. Give your specific proposal here as well. This will become your transition paragraph between the causal analysis and the proposal, so you must state your proposal precisely to pave the way for the proposal argument in full to come. Keep in mind these critical thinking outcomes: • Pursue the best information via reliable research (no Internet web sites should be used—Use the library electronic databases, such as ____, for academic research. • Engage in broad and deep inquiry • Analyze different points of view • Examine and challenge your own underlying assumptions as you undergo this exciting journey in scholarship. Please also reflect on these questions as you progress through your research and project work: About yourself: • What assumptions (beliefs) did you have about this topic coming into the project? • Have some of those assumptions been challenged? Have some been validated? • What questions do you still have about your issue? • What questions have you been able to answer through your research? About your audience: • What questions might your audience have about your topic? What points of view do they represent? • What information do you want to provide to help answer those questions? • How can you address a diverse audience so that its members will be moved to see your own point of view as significant and worth consideration? • How has pursuing the best information in a fair and honest, ethical, and logical manner allowed you to show respect for your audience as well as yourself as a thinker? Documentation Style: MLA format for paper format, in-text citations, works cited page, and annotated bibliography format. Paper Length: 6-8 double-spaced pages. Annotated Bibliography: At least 4 sources, formatted in MLA style. List of Sources Page: At least 5-8 sources used; formatted in MLA style. Warning: Plagiarism is punishable with an “F,” so be sure to document your research carefully. Causal Analysis Topics Choose one: • Causes of bullying • Causes of gun violence in schools • Causes of obesity in children • Causes of lying / Reasons why people lie • Causes of the fear of darkness Write in the 3rd-person point of view (using pronouns such as he, she, they, etc.). Do not write in the 1st- person (I, me, etc.) or 2nd-person (you, your) point of view.

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