There is a term called “hydrotherapy” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrotherapy), which states that cold water bath can reduce pain and improve health, especially immune function. Explain the possible benefits and possible problems of hydrotherapy with the information you learned.

There is a term called “hydrotherapy” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrotherapy), which states that cold water bath can reduce pain and improve health, especially immune function. Explain the possible benefits and possible problems of hydrotherapy with the information you learned.

Hydrotherapy is the use of water to treat a disease … Read More...
Question 38 1 / 1 point When seawater freezes Latent heat is released to the surrounding atmosphere/environment The surrounding water increases in salinity Both of the above are correct None of the above is correct

Question 38 1 / 1 point When seawater freezes Latent heat is released to the surrounding atmosphere/environment The surrounding water increases in salinity Both of the above are correct None of the above is correct

Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

Chapter 07 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy BioFlix Quiz: The Carbon Cycle Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. Part A An organism gets carbon by using carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to make sugar molecules. This organism is a Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct During photosynthesis, producers use carbon dioxide to make sugar molecules. Part B Which organisms play a role in returning carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: higher-level consumer. producer. primary consumer. decomposer. None of the above Consumers and decomposers, but not producers. Producers only. Decomposers only. Consumers only. Producers, consumers, and decomposers. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Producers, consumers, and decomposers all return carbon dioxide to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part C Every carbon atom in the organic molecules that make up your body MUST recently have been part of Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct You are a consumer, and all your carbon comes ultimately from plants and other producers. Part D Imagine following a single carbon atom through the carbon cycle. Which of the following is a possible path for the carbon atom to take? Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for The Carbon Cycle. ANSWER: Correct Carbon moves from the atmosphere into a producer (such as a plant), up the food chain, and then back to the atmosphere during cellular respiration. Part E Which process or processes return carbon to the atmosphere? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct Cellular respiration results in the release of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. a higher-level consumer. a primary consumer. a decomposer. a producer. a sugar molecule made in one of your chloroplasts. The atmosphere; a plant; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a plant; an herbivore; another plant; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere, a plant, a herbivore, a decomposer, then back to the atmosphere The atmosphere; a decomposer; a higher-level consumer; then back to the atmosphere. The atmosphere; a decomposer; then back to the atmosphere. Cellular respiration only Photosynthesis only Cellular respiration and photosynthesis Breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Cellular respiration and the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller organic molecules Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Activity: The Nitrogen Cycle Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Nitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Nitrifying bacteria convert ammonium to nitrites. Part B _____ removes nitrogen from the atmosphere. ANSWER: Correct Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen gas to a form that can be used by plants (and other organisms). Part C Assimilation is indicated by the letter(s) _____. nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrogen gas … nitrates ammonium … nitrites nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas Denitrification Nitrification Mineralization Nitrogen fixation Assimilation Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM ANSWER: Correct Assimilation is the uptake of nutrients into an organism. Part D Nitrogen-fixing bacteria is(are) indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: Correct Both of these pointers are indicating nitrogen-fixing bacteria. Nitrogen fixation is the conversion of nitrogen to a form that plants can use. Part E Nitrification is indicated by the letter(s) _____. ANSWER: C B A D and E C and D B and C A and B D and E C and D A Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Correct Nitrification is the conversion of organic nitrogen-containing compounds to nitrites and nitrates. Part F Denitrifying bacteria convert _____ to _____. ANSWER: Correct Denitrifying bacteria convert nitrates to nitrogen gas. Part G Which one of these is a nitrate? ANSWER: Correct NO3 – is a nitrate. Part H Which one of these is a nitrite? ANSWER: Correct This is a nitrite. GeoScience: Earth’s Water and the Hydrologic Cycle A B B and C D and E B and E nitrogen gas … nitrites nitrogen gas … ammonium nitrates … nitrogen gas ammonium … nitrogen gas nitrogen gas … nitrates NO2 – NH4 – NH2 SH NO3 – PO4 – NH2 NH4 – NO2 – NO3 – Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM When you have finished, answer the questions. Part A The largest percentage of fresh water today is located in: ANSWER: Correct Ice sheets and glaciers are the greatest single repository of fresh water: they contain 77.3% of all Earth’s fresh water and 99.357% of all Earth’s surface fresh water. Part B Earth’s oceans hold: ANSWER: Correct The oceans contain 97.22% of all water, comprising about 1.321 billion cubic kilometers of salt water. This leaves only 2.78% of all of Earth’s water as fresh water (non-oceanic). Part C Which of the following is true of the hydrologic cycle? ANSWER: Correct About 20% of the moisture evaporated from the ocean combines with 2% of land-derived moisture to produce 22% of all precipitation that falls over land. Clearly, the bulk of continental precipitation comes from the oceanic portion of the cycle. Concept Review: Eutrophication Can you sequence the steps in the eutrophication process that occurs in a body of water? Part A Drag each statement to the appropriate location in the flowchart of the eutrophication process. ANSWER: soil. ice sheets and glaciers. the rivers and lakes of the world. groundwater resources. about the same amount of water as all groundwater sources combined. most of the fresh water on Earth. the bulk of all of the water found on Earth. about the same amount of water as all Earth’s rivers and lakes combined. Atmospheric water and surface water do not mix. Most evaporation on Earth occurs over the continents. The bulk of the precipitation occurs over land. Most of the water that falls on the continents is derived from the oceans. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM Concept Review: Biogeochemical Cycles Can you sort the items by which biogeochemical cycle they apply to? Part A Drag each description to the appropriate bin. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 62.3%. You received 12.45 out of a possible total of 20 points. Chapter 07 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 7 5/21/2014 8:02 PM

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An open vertical tube has water in it. A tuning fork vibrates over its mouth. As the water level is lowered in the tube, a resonance is heard when the water level is 37.5 cm below the top of the tube, and again after the water level is 62.5 cm below the top of the tube a resonance is heard. What is the frequency of the tuning fork? The speed of sound in air is 343 m/s.

An open vertical tube has water in it. A tuning fork vibrates over its mouth. As the water level is lowered in the tube, a resonance is heard when the water level is 37.5 cm below the top of the tube, and again after the water level is 62.5 cm below the top of the tube a resonance is heard. What is the frequency of the tuning fork? The speed of sound in air is 343 m/s.

What are the respective concentrations (M) of K+ and PO4 3- afforded by dissolving 0.800 mol K3PO4 in water and diluting to 1.63 L? A) 0.800 and 0.800 B) 0.491 and 0.491 C) 0.800 and 0.491 D) 1.44 and 0.491 E) 0.489 and 0.163

What are the respective concentrations (M) of K+ and PO4 3- afforded by dissolving 0.800 mol K3PO4 in water and diluting to 1.63 L? A) 0.800 and 0.800 B) 0.491 and 0.491 C) 0.800 and 0.491 D) 1.44 and 0.491 E) 0.489 and 0.163

D) 1.44 and 0.491
Name___________________________________ Period_____ Investigation: Making Waves PART I: Objectives: • Learn vocabulary describing waves • Calculate the speed of a wave • Understand how amplitude affects the speed of a wave • Understand how frequency and wavelength affect the speed of a wave Open this web site: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Wave_on_a_String You can click on Run Now! to run the simulation online, or Run Offline to save it to your desktop. It might run faster this way. Start by Wiggling the Wrench. Spend about 5 minutes experimenting with the Tension, Manual/Pulse/Oscillate, Fixed/Loose/No end, and changing the Amplitude, Frequency and Damping. Click on Show Rulers and Timer. Practice moving the rulers around and starting/resetting the timer. Click on the Pause/Play and Step buttons to see how they work. Use these settings: Pulse, Amplitude=50, Pulse Width=35, Damping=0, Tension at High and No End. NOTE that the amplitude is just a relative scale (not centimeters). Send a single pulse down the string. This is called a TRANSVERSE PULSE. Watch the motion of the green dots.  1. As the pulse goes by from left to right, in what direction does the string move? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  2. A definition of TRANSVERSE is “lying across”. Why is TRANSVERSE a good name for the wave you just observed? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Make another pulse, and then PAUSE the wave. Use the vertical ruler to measure the amplitude of the wave in centimeters. This is the distance from the dotted orange line to the crest of the wave. Record the amplitude in Table 1 in the first row. Now, measure the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm. To do this: • Reset the clock to 0:00 and reset the generator • Click Pause/Play—it should say PAUSED on the screen • Click Pulse • Click Pause/Play again to start a timed pulse. Pause again just as the crest (peak) of the pulse touches the window 100 cm away. Record the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm in Table 1. Run 3 time trials, and record in the table. Calculate the average time. Now, measure the amplitude and timing of pulses for two other amplitudes (one smaller than 50, one larger than 50). Do three trials at each amplitude and calculate the average times. Calculate the average wave speed for each of the three amplitudes. See below for a sample calculation. Table 1 Your measured amplitude, cm Time for pulse to travel 100 cm, seconds Average time, seconds Speed=length of string / average time Example of speed calculation: Speed = string length/ average time Speed = 100 cm/2 seconds = 50 cm/second  3. How does the amplitude of a wave affect the speed of a wave? ________________________________________________________________________ Use these settings: Oscillate, Fixed end. Try amplitude=20, frequency=51, damping=0. The result is called a periodic wave. 4. Describe the appearance of the wave you created. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ You should see waves that do not move along the string. You will also see points where the string does not move at all. These waves are called STANDING WAVES. The points where the wave doesn’t move are called NODES. Pause the simulation.  5. Draw the standing wave in the box below, labeling the AMPLITUDE, WAVELENGTH and NODES of a standing wave. Use these settings: Amplitude=20, Frequency=50, Damping=0, Oscillate, No End. Reset the clock. You can also measure the wave frequency. To do this, you should pair up with another student if possible. Watch the piston go up and down to make the wave. One up and down motion represents one wave. Use the clock to measure the time required for 10 complete cycles or waves. You will also need to PAUSE the wave to measure the wavelength of the wave in centimeters (cm). The frequency of the wave is calculated in the following way: Frequency = 10 waves/# seconds for 10 cycles For example, 10 waves/5 seconds = 2 cycles per second, or 2 Hertz. Make several waves by changing the wave frequency—use numbers over 30 on the scale. For each wave, measure the wavelength using the ruler. Now, calculate the frequency. See the example in the first row of Table 2. Record the wavelength and frequency of three waves with different wavelengths. Wavelength (cm) Frequency (cycles/second or Hertz) Speed (cm/s) = Wavelength x frequency 33 cm 10 waves/5.45 sec = 1.8 Hertz 33 cm x 1.8 Hertz = 59.4 cm/second Based on the equation used to calculate the speed of a wave, answer questions 6 and 7.  6. If you increase the wavelength of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  7. If you increase the frequency of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Part II: Objectives: • Interpret a 2D top view picture of a wave • Identify areas of constructive and destructive interference in 2D • Predict the behavior of water, sound, or light when you have two sources o What will happen in constructive areas o What will happen in destructive areas 1) Open the “Wave Interference” simulation from the PhET website (in Sound & Waves) 2) On the water simulation, what does the crest (peak) of the wave look like in the top view? What does the trough look like? 3) When you add two drips, what changes about the waves’ patterns? 4) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves constructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 5) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves destructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 6) Switch to the sound simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two speakers next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two speakers together) and tell me what happened. 7) Now switch to the light simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two light sources next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two light sources together) and tell me what happened. d. What happens when you use one light source and two slits? 8) What is similar about all three of these simulations (i.e. water, sound & light)? 9) How do I know that these things are waves and not particles? (Think about what would happen in the two slit experiment if they were particles).

Name___________________________________ Period_____ Investigation: Making Waves PART I: Objectives: • Learn vocabulary describing waves • Calculate the speed of a wave • Understand how amplitude affects the speed of a wave • Understand how frequency and wavelength affect the speed of a wave Open this web site: http://phet.colorado.edu/new/simulations/sims.php?sim=Wave_on_a_String You can click on Run Now! to run the simulation online, or Run Offline to save it to your desktop. It might run faster this way. Start by Wiggling the Wrench. Spend about 5 minutes experimenting with the Tension, Manual/Pulse/Oscillate, Fixed/Loose/No end, and changing the Amplitude, Frequency and Damping. Click on Show Rulers and Timer. Practice moving the rulers around and starting/resetting the timer. Click on the Pause/Play and Step buttons to see how they work. Use these settings: Pulse, Amplitude=50, Pulse Width=35, Damping=0, Tension at High and No End. NOTE that the amplitude is just a relative scale (not centimeters). Send a single pulse down the string. This is called a TRANSVERSE PULSE. Watch the motion of the green dots.  1. As the pulse goes by from left to right, in what direction does the string move? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  2. A definition of TRANSVERSE is “lying across”. Why is TRANSVERSE a good name for the wave you just observed? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Make another pulse, and then PAUSE the wave. Use the vertical ruler to measure the amplitude of the wave in centimeters. This is the distance from the dotted orange line to the crest of the wave. Record the amplitude in Table 1 in the first row. Now, measure the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm. To do this: • Reset the clock to 0:00 and reset the generator • Click Pause/Play—it should say PAUSED on the screen • Click Pulse • Click Pause/Play again to start a timed pulse. Pause again just as the crest (peak) of the pulse touches the window 100 cm away. Record the time for a pulse to travel 100 cm in Table 1. Run 3 time trials, and record in the table. Calculate the average time. Now, measure the amplitude and timing of pulses for two other amplitudes (one smaller than 50, one larger than 50). Do three trials at each amplitude and calculate the average times. Calculate the average wave speed for each of the three amplitudes. See below for a sample calculation. Table 1 Your measured amplitude, cm Time for pulse to travel 100 cm, seconds Average time, seconds Speed=length of string / average time Example of speed calculation: Speed = string length/ average time Speed = 100 cm/2 seconds = 50 cm/second  3. How does the amplitude of a wave affect the speed of a wave? ________________________________________________________________________ Use these settings: Oscillate, Fixed end. Try amplitude=20, frequency=51, damping=0. The result is called a periodic wave. 4. Describe the appearance of the wave you created. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ You should see waves that do not move along the string. You will also see points where the string does not move at all. These waves are called STANDING WAVES. The points where the wave doesn’t move are called NODES. Pause the simulation.  5. Draw the standing wave in the box below, labeling the AMPLITUDE, WAVELENGTH and NODES of a standing wave. Use these settings: Amplitude=20, Frequency=50, Damping=0, Oscillate, No End. Reset the clock. You can also measure the wave frequency. To do this, you should pair up with another student if possible. Watch the piston go up and down to make the wave. One up and down motion represents one wave. Use the clock to measure the time required for 10 complete cycles or waves. You will also need to PAUSE the wave to measure the wavelength of the wave in centimeters (cm). The frequency of the wave is calculated in the following way: Frequency = 10 waves/# seconds for 10 cycles For example, 10 waves/5 seconds = 2 cycles per second, or 2 Hertz. Make several waves by changing the wave frequency—use numbers over 30 on the scale. For each wave, measure the wavelength using the ruler. Now, calculate the frequency. See the example in the first row of Table 2. Record the wavelength and frequency of three waves with different wavelengths. Wavelength (cm) Frequency (cycles/second or Hertz) Speed (cm/s) = Wavelength x frequency 33 cm 10 waves/5.45 sec = 1.8 Hertz 33 cm x 1.8 Hertz = 59.4 cm/second Based on the equation used to calculate the speed of a wave, answer questions 6 and 7.  6. If you increase the wavelength of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________  7. If you increase the frequency of a wave, how does the speed change? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Part II: Objectives: • Interpret a 2D top view picture of a wave • Identify areas of constructive and destructive interference in 2D • Predict the behavior of water, sound, or light when you have two sources o What will happen in constructive areas o What will happen in destructive areas 1) Open the “Wave Interference” simulation from the PhET website (in Sound & Waves) 2) On the water simulation, what does the crest (peak) of the wave look like in the top view? What does the trough look like? 3) When you add two drips, what changes about the waves’ patterns? 4) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves constructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 5) What does the wave look like in the area that the two waves destructively interfere? Describe both the top view and what the side view would look like. a. TOP: b. SIDE: 6) Switch to the sound simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two speakers next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two speakers together) and tell me what happened. 7) Now switch to the light simulation. a. What do you think will happen when you put two light sources next to each other? b. Why do you think this will happen? c. Try it (putting two light sources together) and tell me what happened. d. What happens when you use one light source and two slits? 8) What is similar about all three of these simulations (i.e. water, sound & light)? 9) How do I know that these things are waves and not particles? (Think about what would happen in the two slit experiment if they were particles).

In case the body have to stay in lower temperature for extended time period (more than 1 hour), how does the body regulate its response?

In case the body have to stay in lower temperature for extended time period (more than 1 hour), how does the body regulate its response?

Arterioles transporting blood to external capillaries beneath the surface of … Read More...
Question 6 1 / 1 point The hydrologic cycle describes local variations in evaporation and precipitation describes how water transitions from a liquid to a solid (frozen) state. describes how ocean currents circulate water between ocean basins describes how water moves from one reservoir to another, when averaged globally

Question 6 1 / 1 point The hydrologic cycle describes local variations in evaporation and precipitation describes how water transitions from a liquid to a solid (frozen) state. describes how ocean currents circulate water between ocean basins describes how water moves from one reservoir to another, when averaged globally