CEE 260 / MIE 273 Probability & Statistics Name: Final Exam, version D — 100 points (120 minutes) PLEASE READ QUESTIONS CAREFULLY and SHOW YOUR WORK! CALCULATORS PERMITTED – ABSOLUTELY NO REFERENCES! 1. Suppose the waiting time (in minutes) for your 911 SC Targa to reach operating temperature in the morning is uniformly distributed on [0,10], while the waiting time in the evening is uniformly distributed on [0,5] independent of morning waiting time. a. (5%) If you drive your Targa each morning and evening for a week (5 morning and 5 evening rides), what is the variance of your total waiting time? b. (5%) What is the expected value of the difference between morning and evening waiting time on a given day? 2. (10%) Find the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of ϴ when Xi ~ Exponential(ϴ) and you have observed X1, X2, X3, …, Xn. 2 3. The waiting time for delivery of a new Porsche 911 Carrera at the local dealership is distributed exponentially with a population mean of 3.55 months and population standard deviation of 1.1 months. Recently, in an effort to reduce the waiting time, the dealership has experimented with an online ordering system. A sample of 100 customers during a recent sales promotion generated a mean waiting time of 3.18 months using the new system. Assume that the population standard deviation of the waiting time has not changed from 1.1 months. (hint: the source distribution is irrelevant, but its parameters are relevant) a. (15%) What is the probability that the average wait time is between 3.2 and 6.4 months? (hint: draw a sketch for full credit) b. (10%) At the 0.05 level of significance, using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? c. (10%) At the 0.01 level of significance, using the p-value approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? 3 4. Porsche AG is a leading manufacturer of performance automobiles. The 911 Carrera model, Porsche’s premier sports car, reaches a top track speed of 180 miles per hour. Engineers claim the new advanced technology 911 GT2 automatically adjusts its top speed depending on the weather conditions. Suppose that in an effort to test this claim, Porsche selects a few 911 GT2 models to test drive on the company track in Stuttgart, Germany. The average top speed for the sample of 25 test drives is 182.36 mph, with a standard deviation of 7.24 mph. a. (5%) Without using complete sentences, what might be some problems with the sampling conducted above? Identify and explain at least 2. b. (15%) Using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing and a 0.10 level of significance, is there evidence that the mean top track speed is different for the 911 GT2? (hint: state the null and alternative hypotheses, draw a sketch, and show your work for full credit) c. (10%) Set up a 95% confidence interval estimate of the population mean top speed of the 911 GT2. d. (5%) Compare the results of (b) and (c). What conclusions do you reach about the top speed of the new 911 GT2? 4 5. (10%) Porsche USA believes that sales of the venerable 911 Carrera are a function of annual income (in thousands of dollars) and a risk tolerance index of the potential buyer. Determine the regression equation and provide a succinct analysis of Porsche’s conjecture using the following Excel results. SUMMARY OUTPUT Regression Stat istics Multiple R 0.805073 R Square 0.648142 Adjusted R Square 0.606747 Standard Error 7.76312 Observations 20 ANOVA df SS MS F Significance F Regression 2 1887.227445 943.6137225 15.65747206 0.000139355 Residual 17 1024.522555 60.26603265 Total 19 2911.75 Coefficients Standard Error t Stat P-value Lower 95% Upper 95% Intercept 23.50557 6.845545641 3.433702952 0.003167982 9.062731576 37.94840898 Income 0.613408 0.125421229 4.890786567 0.000137795 0.348792801 0.878024121 Risk Index -0.00126 0.004519817 -0.278357691 0.784095184 -0.010794106 0.008277854 BONUS (5 points) What is the probability that 2 or more students in our class of 22 have the same birthday?

CEE 260 / MIE 273 Probability & Statistics Name: Final Exam, version D — 100 points (120 minutes) PLEASE READ QUESTIONS CAREFULLY and SHOW YOUR WORK! CALCULATORS PERMITTED – ABSOLUTELY NO REFERENCES! 1. Suppose the waiting time (in minutes) for your 911 SC Targa to reach operating temperature in the morning is uniformly distributed on [0,10], while the waiting time in the evening is uniformly distributed on [0,5] independent of morning waiting time. a. (5%) If you drive your Targa each morning and evening for a week (5 morning and 5 evening rides), what is the variance of your total waiting time? b. (5%) What is the expected value of the difference between morning and evening waiting time on a given day? 2. (10%) Find the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) of ϴ when Xi ~ Exponential(ϴ) and you have observed X1, X2, X3, …, Xn. 2 3. The waiting time for delivery of a new Porsche 911 Carrera at the local dealership is distributed exponentially with a population mean of 3.55 months and population standard deviation of 1.1 months. Recently, in an effort to reduce the waiting time, the dealership has experimented with an online ordering system. A sample of 100 customers during a recent sales promotion generated a mean waiting time of 3.18 months using the new system. Assume that the population standard deviation of the waiting time has not changed from 1.1 months. (hint: the source distribution is irrelevant, but its parameters are relevant) a. (15%) What is the probability that the average wait time is between 3.2 and 6.4 months? (hint: draw a sketch for full credit) b. (10%) At the 0.05 level of significance, using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? c. (10%) At the 0.01 level of significance, using the p-value approach to hypothesis testing, is there evidence that the population mean waiting time to accept delivery is less than 3.55 months? 3 4. Porsche AG is a leading manufacturer of performance automobiles. The 911 Carrera model, Porsche’s premier sports car, reaches a top track speed of 180 miles per hour. Engineers claim the new advanced technology 911 GT2 automatically adjusts its top speed depending on the weather conditions. Suppose that in an effort to test this claim, Porsche selects a few 911 GT2 models to test drive on the company track in Stuttgart, Germany. The average top speed for the sample of 25 test drives is 182.36 mph, with a standard deviation of 7.24 mph. a. (5%) Without using complete sentences, what might be some problems with the sampling conducted above? Identify and explain at least 2. b. (15%) Using the critical values approach to hypothesis testing and a 0.10 level of significance, is there evidence that the mean top track speed is different for the 911 GT2? (hint: state the null and alternative hypotheses, draw a sketch, and show your work for full credit) c. (10%) Set up a 95% confidence interval estimate of the population mean top speed of the 911 GT2. d. (5%) Compare the results of (b) and (c). What conclusions do you reach about the top speed of the new 911 GT2? 4 5. (10%) Porsche USA believes that sales of the venerable 911 Carrera are a function of annual income (in thousands of dollars) and a risk tolerance index of the potential buyer. Determine the regression equation and provide a succinct analysis of Porsche’s conjecture using the following Excel results. SUMMARY OUTPUT Regression Stat istics Multiple R 0.805073 R Square 0.648142 Adjusted R Square 0.606747 Standard Error 7.76312 Observations 20 ANOVA df SS MS F Significance F Regression 2 1887.227445 943.6137225 15.65747206 0.000139355 Residual 17 1024.522555 60.26603265 Total 19 2911.75 Coefficients Standard Error t Stat P-value Lower 95% Upper 95% Intercept 23.50557 6.845545641 3.433702952 0.003167982 9.062731576 37.94840898 Income 0.613408 0.125421229 4.890786567 0.000137795 0.348792801 0.878024121 Risk Index -0.00126 0.004519817 -0.278357691 0.784095184 -0.010794106 0.008277854 BONUS (5 points) What is the probability that 2 or more students in our class of 22 have the same birthday?

info@checkyourstudy.com CEE 260 / MIE 273 Probability & Statistics Name: … Read More...
Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Essay – Athlete’s high salaries. Should they be paid that amount or not?

Athlete’s high salaries: Should they be paid that amount or … Read More...
Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Read this article and answer this question in 2 pages : Answers should be from the below article only. What is the difference between “standards-based” and “standards-embedded” curriculum? what are the curricular implications of this difference? Article: In 2007, at the dawn of 21st century in education, it is impossible to talk about teaching, curriculum, schools, or education without discussing standards . standards-based v. standards-embedded curriculum We are in an age of accountability where our success as educators is determined by individual and group mastery of specific standards dem- onstrated by standardized test per- formance. Even before No Child Left Behind (NCLB), standards and measures were used to determine if schools and students were success- ful (McClure, 2005). But, NCLB has increased the pace, intensity, and high stakes of this trend. Gifted and talented students and their teach- ers are significantly impacted by these local or state proficiency stan- dards and grade-level assessments (VanTassel-Baska & Stambaugh, 2006). This article explores how to use these standards in the develop- ment of high-quality curriculum for gifted students. NCLB, High-Stakes State Testing, and Standards- Based Instruction There are a few potentially positive outcomes of this evolution to public accountability. All stakeholders have had to ask themselves, “Are students learning? If so, what are they learning and how do we know?” In cases where we have been allowed to thoughtfully evaluate curriculum and instruction, we have also asked, “What’s worth learning?” “When’s the best time to learn it?” and “Who needs to learn it?” Even though state achievement tests are only a single measure, citizens are now offered a yardstick, albeit a nar- row one, for comparing communities, schools, and in some cases, teachers. Some testing reports allow teachers to identify for parents what their chil- dren can do and what they can not do. Testing also has focused attention on the not-so-new observations that pov- erty, discrimination and prejudices, and language proficiency impacts learning. With enough ceiling (e.g., above-grade-level assessments), even gifted students’ actual achievement and readiness levels can be identi- fied and provide a starting point for appropriately differentiated instruc- tion (Tomlinson, 2001). Unfortunately, as a veteran teacher for more than three decades and as a teacher-educator, my recent observa- tions of and conversations with class- room and gifted teachers have usually revealed negative outcomes. For gifted children, their actual achievement level is often unrecognized by teachers because both the tests and the reporting of the results rarely reach above the student’s grade-level placement. Assessments also focus on a huge number of state stan- dards for a given school year that cre- ate “overload” (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006) and have a devastating impact on the development and implementation of rich and relevant curriculum and instruction. In too many scenarios, I see teachers teach- ing directly to the test. And, in the worst cases, some teachers actually teach The Test. In those cases, The Test itself becomes the curriculum. Consistently I hear, “Oh, I used to teach a great unit on ________ but I can’t do it any- more because I have to teach the standards.” Or, “I have to teach my favorite units in April and May after testing.” If the outcomes can’t be boiled down to simple “I can . . .” state- ments that can be posted on a school’s walls, then teachers seem to omit poten- tially meaningful learning opportunities from the school year. In many cases, real education and learning are being trivial- ized. We seem to have lost sight of the more significant purpose of teaching and learning: individual growth and develop- ment. We also have surrendered much of the joy of learning, as the incidentals, the tangents, the “bird walks” are cut short or elimi- nated because teachers hear the con- stant ticking clock of the countdown to the state test and feel the pressure of the way-too-many standards that have to be covered in a mere 180 school days. The accountability movement has pushed us away from seeing the whole child: “Students are not machines, as the standards movement suggests; they are volatile, complicated, and paradoxical” (Cookson, 2001, p. 42). How does this impact gifted chil- dren? In many heterogeneous class- rooms, teachers have retreated to traditional subject delineations and traditional instruction in an effort to ensure direct standards-based instruc- tion even though “no solid basis exists in the research literature for the ways we currently develop, place, and align educational standards in school cur- ricula” (Zenger & Zenger, 2002, p. 212). Grade-level standards are often particularly inappropriate for the gifted and talented whose pace of learning, achievement levels, and depth of knowledge are significantly beyond their chronological peers. A broad-based, thematically rich, and challenging curriculum is the heart of education for the gifted. Virgil Ward, one of the earliest voices for a differen- tial education for the gifted, said, “It is insufficient to consider the curriculum for the gifted in terms of traditional subjects and instructional processes” (Ward, 1980, p. 5). VanTassel-Baska Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum gifted child today 45 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum and Stambaugh (2006) described three dimensions of successful curriculum for gifted students: content mastery, pro- cess and product, and epistemological concept, “understanding and appre- ciating systems of knowledge rather than individual elements of those systems” (p. 9). Overemphasis on testing and grade-level standards limits all three and therefore limits learning for gifted students. Hirsch (2001) concluded that “broad gen- eral knowledge is the best entrée to deep knowledge” (p. 23) and that it is highly correlated with general ability to learn. He continued, “the best way to learn a subject is to learn its gen- eral principles and to study an ample number of diverse examples that illustrate those principles” (Hirsch, 2001, p. 23). Principle-based learn- ing applies to both gifted and general education children. In order to meet the needs of gifted and general education students, cur- riculum should be differentiated in ways that are relevant and engaging. Curriculum content, processes, and products should provide challenge, depth, and complexity, offering multiple opportunities for problem solving, creativity, and exploration. In specific content areas, the cur- riculum should reflect the elegance and sophistication unique to the discipline. Even with this expanded view of curriculum in mind, we still must find ways to address the current reality of state standards and assess- ments. Standards-Embedded Curriculum How can educators address this chal- lenge? As in most things, a change of perspective can be helpful. Standards- based curriculum as described above should be replaced with standards- embedded curriculum. Standards- embedded curriculum begins with broad questions and topics, either discipline specific or interdisciplinary. Once teachers have given thoughtful consideration to relevant, engaging, and important content and the con- nections that support meaning-making (Jensen, 1998), they next select stan- dards that are relevant to this content and to summative assessments. This process is supported by the backward planning advocated in Understanding by Design by Wiggins and McTighe (2005) and its predecessors, as well as current thinkers in other fields, such as Covey (Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). It is a critical component of differenti- ating instruction for advanced learners (Tomlinson, 2001) and a significant factor in the Core Parallel in the Parallel Curriculum Model (Tomlinson et al., 2002). Teachers choose from standards in multiple disciplines at both above and below grade level depending on the needs of the students and the classroom or program structure. Preassessment data and the results of prior instruc- tion also inform this process of embed- ding appropriate standards. For gifted students, this formative assessment will result in “more advanced curricula available at younger ages, ensuring that all levels of the standards are traversed in the process” (VanTassel-Baska & Little, 2003, p. 3). Once the essential questions, key content, and relevant standards are selected and sequenced, they are embedded into a coherent unit design and instructional decisions (grouping, pacing, instructional methodology) can be made. For gifted students, this includes the identification of appropri- ate resources, often including advanced texts, mentors, and independent research, as appropriate to the child’s developmental level and interest. Applying Standards- Embedded Curriculum What does this look like in practice? In reading the possible class- room applications below, consider these three Ohio Academic Content Standards for third grade: 1. Math: “Read thermometers in both Fahrenheit and Celsius scales” (“Academic Content Standards: K–12 Mathematics,” n.d., p. 71). 2. Social Studies: “Compare some of the cultural practices and products of various groups of people who have lived in the local community including artistic expression, religion, language, and food. Compare the cultural practices and products of the local community with those of other communities in Ohio, the United States, and countries of the world” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Social Studies, n.d., p. 122). 3. Life Science: “Observe and explore how fossils provide evidence about animals that lived long ago and the nature of the environment at that time” (Academic Content Standards: K–12 Science, n.d., p. 57). When students are fortunate to have a teacher who is dedicated to helping all of them make good use of their time, the gifted may have a preassessment opportunity where they can demonstrate their familiarity with the content and potential mastery of a standard at their grade level. Students who pass may get to read by them- selves for the brief period while the rest of the class works on the single outcome. Sometimes more experienced teachers will create opportunities for gifted and advanced students Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum to work on a standard in the same domain or strand at the next higher grade level (i.e., accelerate through the standards). For example, a stu- dent might be able to work on a Life Science standard for fourth grade that progresses to other communities such as ecosystems. These above-grade-level standards can provide rich material for differentiation, advanced problem solving, and more in-depth curriculum integration. In another classroom scenario, a teacher may focus on the math stan- dard above, identifying the standard number on his lesson plan. He creates or collects paper thermometers, some showing measurement in Celsius and some in Fahrenheit. He also has some real thermometers. He demonstrates thermometer use with boiling water and with freezing water and reads the different temperatures. Students complete a worksheet that has them read thermometers in Celsius and Fahrenheit. The more advanced students may learn how to convert between the two scales. Students then practice with several questions on the topic that are similar in structure and content to those that have been on past proficiency tests. They are coached in how to answer them so that the stan- dard, instruction, formative assess- ment, and summative assessment are all aligned. Then, each student writes a statement that says, “I can read a thermometer using either Celsius or Fahrenheit scales.” Both of these examples describe a standards-based environment, where the starting point is the standard. Direct instruction to that standard is followed by an observable student behavior that demonstrates specific mastery of that single standard. The standard becomes both the start- ing point and the ending point of the curriculum. Education, rather than opening up a student’s mind, becomes a series of closed links in a chain. Whereas the above lessons may be differentiated to some extent, they have no context; they may relate only to the next standard on the list, such as, “Telling time to the nearest minute and finding elapsed time using a cal- endar or a clock.” How would a “standards-embed- ded” model of curriculum design be different? It would begin with the development of an essential ques- tion such as, “Who or what lived here before me? How were they different from me? How were they the same? How do we know?” These questions might be more relevant to our con- temporary highly mobile students. It would involve place and time. Using this intriguing line of inquiry, students might work on the social studies stan- dard as part of the study of their home- town, their school, or even their house or apartment. Because where people live and what they do is influenced by the weather, students could look into weather patterns of their area and learn how to measure temperature using a Fahrenheit scale so they could see if it is similar now to what it was a century ago. Skipping ahead to consideration of the social studies standard, students could then choose another country, preferably one that uses Celsius, and do the same investigation of fossils, communities, and the like. Students could complete a weather comparison, looking at the temperature in Celsius as people in other parts of the world, such as those in Canada, do. Thus, learning is contextualized and connected, dem- onstrating both depth and complexity. This approach takes a lot more work and time. It is a sophisticated integrated view of curriculum devel- opment and involves in-depth knowl- edge of the content areas, as well as an understanding of the scope and sequence of the standards in each dis- cipline. Teachers who develop vital single-discipline units, as well as inter- disciplinary teaching units, begin with a central topic surrounded by subtopics and connections to other areas. Then they connect important terms, facts, or concepts to the subtopics. Next, the skilled teacher/curriculum devel- oper embeds relevant, multileveled standards and objectives appropriate to a given student or group of stu- dents into the unit. Finally, teachers select the instructional strategies and develop student assessments. These assessments include, but are not lim- ited to, the types of questions asked on standardized and state assessments. Comparing Standards- Based and Standards- Embedded Curriculum Design Following is an articulation of the differences between standards-based and standards-embedded curriculum design. (See Figure 1.) 1. The starting point. Standards- based curriculum begins with the grade-level standard and the underlying assumption that every student needs to master that stan- dard at that moment in time. In standards-embedded curriculum, the multifaceted essential ques- tion and students’ needs are the starting points. 2. Preassessment. In standards- based curriculum and teaching, if a preassessment is provided, it cov- ers a single standard or two. In a standards-embedded curriculum, preassessment includes a broader range of grade-level and advanced standards, as well as students’ knowledge of surrounding content such as background experiences with the subject, relevant skills (such as reading and writing), and continued on page ?? even learning style or interests. gifted child today 47 Standards-Based v. Standards-Embedded Curriculum Standards Based Standards Embedded Starting Points The grade-level standard. Whole class’ general skill level Essential questions and content relevant to individual students and groups. Preassessment Targeted to a single grade-level standard. Short-cycle assessments. Background knowledge. Multiple grade-level standards from multiple areas connected by the theme of the unit. Includes annual learning style and interest inventories. Acceleration/ Enrichment To next grade-level standard in the same strand. To above-grade-level standards, as well as into broader thematically connected content. Language Arts Divided into individual skills. Reading and writing skills often separated from real-world relevant contexts. The language arts are embedded in all units and themes and connected to differentiated processes and products across all content areas. Instruction Lesson planning begins with the standard as the objective. Sequential direct instruction progresses through the standards in each content area separately. Strategies are selected to introduce, practice, and demonstrate mastery of all grade-level standards in all content areas in one school year. Lesson planning begins with essential questions, topics, and significant themes. Integrated instruction is designed around connections among content areas and embeds all relevant standards. Assessment Format modeled after the state test. Variety of assessments including questions similar to the state test format. Teacher Role Monitor of standards mastery. Time manager. Facilitator of instructional design and student engagement with learning, as well as assessor of achievement. Student Self- Esteem “I can . . .” statements. Star Charts. Passing “the test.” Completed projects/products. Making personal connections to learning and the theme/topic. Figure 1. Standards based v. standards-embedded instruction and gifted students. and the potential political outcry of “stepping on the toes” of the next grade’s teacher. Few classroom teachers have been provided with the in-depth professional develop- ment and understanding of curric- ulum compacting that would allow them to implement this effectively. In standards-embedded curricu- lum, enrichment and extensions of learning are more possible and more interesting because ideas, top- ics, and questions lend themselves more easily to depth and complex- ity than isolated skills. 4. Language arts. In standards- based classrooms, the language arts have been redivided into sepa- rate skills, with reading separated from writing, and writing sepa- rated from grammar. To many concrete thinkers, whole-language approaches seem antithetical to teaching “to the standards.” In a standards-embedded classroom, integrated language arts skills (reading, writing, listening, speak- ing, presenting, and even pho- nics) are embedded into the study of every unit. Especially for the gifted, the communication and language arts are essential, regard- less of domain-specific talents (Ward, 1980) and should be com- ponents of all curriculum because they are the underpinnings of scholarship in all areas. 5. Instruction. A standards-based classroom lends itself to direct instruction and sequential pro- gression from one standard to the next. A standards-embedded class- room requires a variety of more open-ended instructional strate- gies and materials that extend and diversify learning rather than focus it narrowly. Creativity and differ- entiation in instruction and stu- dent performance are supported more effectively in a standards- embedded approach. 6. Assessment. A standards-based classroom uses targeted assess- ments focused on the structure and content of questions on the externally imposed standardized test (i.e., proficiency tests). A stan- dards-embedded classroom lends itself to greater use of authentic assessment and differentiated 3. Acceleration/Enrichment. In a standards-based curriculum, the narrow definition of the learning outcome (a test item) often makes acceleration or curriculum compact- ing the only path for differentiating instruction for gifted, talented, and/ or advanced learners. This rarely happens, however, because of lack of materials, knowledge, o

Standard based Curriculum In standard based curriculum, the initial point … Read More...
Chapter 03 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A Isotopes of an element differ from each other by the _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 2 Part A Which one of the following statements about pH is correct? ANSWER: Correct Lemon juice is an acid. Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 17 Part A In which form are water molecules most closely bonded to each other? ANSWER: number of electrons number of neutrons types of electrons number of protons Stomach acid has more OH- ions than H+ ions. Baking soda has more H+ ions than OH- ions. Lemon juice has more H+ ions than OH- ions. Seawater is slightly acidic. Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A Which one of the following is a molecule but NOT a compound? ANSWER: Correct Oxygen is a molecule made up of just one element. Therefore, it is not a compound. Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 3 Part A Which one of the following is a carbohydrate and one of Earth’s most abundant organic molecule? ANSWER: Correct equally closely bonded in water vapor and ice solid ice forming part of an Antarctic sheet liquid water a few degrees above the freezing point water vapor above a boiling pot of water CH4 O2 CO2 H2O oil protein cellulose DNA Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A Which one of the following is a protein that functions as a catalyst? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A The process of translation involves the use of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 5 Part A The cooling effect of sweating best represents _____. ANSWER: glucose cellulose enzyme RNA proteins to make lipids lipids to make carbohydrates carbohydrates to make proteins nucleic acids to make proteins latent heat transfer conduction radiation convection Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 6 Part A When plants use sunlight in photosynthesis, the plants are using a form of _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A Which of the following converts mass to energy? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A When a windmill turns to generate electricity, the amount of kinetic energy input _____. ANSWER: chemical energy in sunlight nuclear fission electromagnetic radiation conduction conduction the breaking of chemical bonds nuclear fission photosynthesis Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A Which of the following best represents kinetic energy? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 21 Part A Which of the following processes reduces entropy? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 9 is unrelated to the amount of electrical energy produced is more than the amount of electrical energy produced equals the amount of electrical energy produced is less than the amount of electrical energy produced a charged battery gunpowder in a bullet the energy in the wax molecules of a candle a hot burner on a stove burning gasoline in an automobile engine photosynthesis in a leaf a person walking up a flight of stairs cell respiration in a leaf Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Part A Which one of the following planets is a gas giant? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A What is the main driving force that causes Earth’s tectonic plates to drift? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 23 Part A In which of the following locations would you expect to find large quantities of young rocks? ANSWER: Venus Jupiter Mars Mercury Heat from Earth’s core causes the mantle rock to circulate. The weight of the tectonic plates causes them to sink and melt. Currents of magma from the core of Earth circulate just beneath the tectonic plates. Electromagnetic radiation from the sun heats the tectonic plates, causing them to expand. the Appalachian Mountains the Himalayas deep in the central parts of India the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A The oxygen-rich atmosphere of Earth is mainly the result of _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A A scientist working on the chemical reactions in the ozone layer is studying the _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A The total amount of moisture in the air is highest when relative humidity is _____. ANSWER: volcanic activity chemical reactions between the early Earth atmosphere and iron photosynthetic organisms erosion of rocks into soil troposphere thermosphere stratosphere mesosphere Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A You are enjoying a spring day but expect a storm to arrive soon . As the storm arrives and the rain begins to fall, you notice that the temperature drops dramatically. Most likely, you have just experienced the arrival of a _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 25 Part A Every day tremendous amounts of the sun’s energy strikes Earth. Why doesn’t Earth overheat? ANSWER: Correct Earth’s energy budget is balanced. Over the course of a year, the energy input is equal to the energy output. Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 7 low and temperatures are low high and temperatures are high high and temperatures are low low and temperatures are high cold front Hadley cell intertropical convergence stratospheric event The energy is ultimately radiated back to space. Much of the heat melts rocks, forming lava deep inside of Earth. Most of the energy is used in photosynthesis to help plants grow and survive. The energy mostly is absorbed in various weather systems. Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Part A How many calories are required to heat up 1,000 grams of liquid water (about 1 liter) from 20 °C to 70 °C? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Hadley cells near the Equator consist of _____. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 85.5%. You received 19.67 out of a possible total of 23 points. 100 1,000 5,000 50,000 rising dry air associated with deserts and falling moist air that produces precipitation and rainforests rising moist air that produces precipitation and rainforests, and falling dry air associated with deserts warm, moist air rising up the sides of mountains and cool, dry air descending on the leeward sides cool, dry air rising up the sides of mountains and warm, moist air descending on the leeward sides Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM

Chapter 03 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A Isotopes of an element differ from each other by the _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 2 Part A Which one of the following statements about pH is correct? ANSWER: Correct Lemon juice is an acid. Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 17 Part A In which form are water molecules most closely bonded to each other? ANSWER: number of electrons number of neutrons types of electrons number of protons Stomach acid has more OH- ions than H+ ions. Baking soda has more H+ ions than OH- ions. Lemon juice has more H+ ions than OH- ions. Seawater is slightly acidic. Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A Which one of the following is a molecule but NOT a compound? ANSWER: Correct Oxygen is a molecule made up of just one element. Therefore, it is not a compound. Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 3 Part A Which one of the following is a carbohydrate and one of Earth’s most abundant organic molecule? ANSWER: Correct equally closely bonded in water vapor and ice solid ice forming part of an Antarctic sheet liquid water a few degrees above the freezing point water vapor above a boiling pot of water CH4 O2 CO2 H2O oil protein cellulose DNA Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A Which one of the following is a protein that functions as a catalyst? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A The process of translation involves the use of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 5 Part A The cooling effect of sweating best represents _____. ANSWER: glucose cellulose enzyme RNA proteins to make lipids lipids to make carbohydrates carbohydrates to make proteins nucleic acids to make proteins latent heat transfer conduction radiation convection Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 6 Part A When plants use sunlight in photosynthesis, the plants are using a form of _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A Which of the following converts mass to energy? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A When a windmill turns to generate electricity, the amount of kinetic energy input _____. ANSWER: chemical energy in sunlight nuclear fission electromagnetic radiation conduction conduction the breaking of chemical bonds nuclear fission photosynthesis Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A Which of the following best represents kinetic energy? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 21 Part A Which of the following processes reduces entropy? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 9 is unrelated to the amount of electrical energy produced is more than the amount of electrical energy produced equals the amount of electrical energy produced is less than the amount of electrical energy produced a charged battery gunpowder in a bullet the energy in the wax molecules of a candle a hot burner on a stove burning gasoline in an automobile engine photosynthesis in a leaf a person walking up a flight of stairs cell respiration in a leaf Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Part A Which one of the following planets is a gas giant? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A What is the main driving force that causes Earth’s tectonic plates to drift? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 23 Part A In which of the following locations would you expect to find large quantities of young rocks? ANSWER: Venus Jupiter Mars Mercury Heat from Earth’s core causes the mantle rock to circulate. The weight of the tectonic plates causes them to sink and melt. Currents of magma from the core of Earth circulate just beneath the tectonic plates. Electromagnetic radiation from the sun heats the tectonic plates, causing them to expand. the Appalachian Mountains the Himalayas deep in the central parts of India the Mid-Atlantic Ridge Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A The oxygen-rich atmosphere of Earth is mainly the result of _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A A scientist working on the chemical reactions in the ozone layer is studying the _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A The total amount of moisture in the air is highest when relative humidity is _____. ANSWER: volcanic activity chemical reactions between the early Earth atmosphere and iron photosynthetic organisms erosion of rocks into soil troposphere thermosphere stratosphere mesosphere Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A You are enjoying a spring day but expect a storm to arrive soon . As the storm arrives and the rain begins to fall, you notice that the temperature drops dramatically. Most likely, you have just experienced the arrival of a _____. ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 25 Part A Every day tremendous amounts of the sun’s energy strikes Earth. Why doesn’t Earth overheat? ANSWER: Correct Earth’s energy budget is balanced. Over the course of a year, the energy input is equal to the energy output. Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 7 low and temperatures are low high and temperatures are high high and temperatures are low low and temperatures are high cold front Hadley cell intertropical convergence stratospheric event The energy is ultimately radiated back to space. Much of the heat melts rocks, forming lava deep inside of Earth. Most of the energy is used in photosynthesis to help plants grow and survive. The energy mostly is absorbed in various weather systems. Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM Part A How many calories are required to heat up 1,000 grams of liquid water (about 1 liter) from 20 °C to 70 °C? ANSWER: Correct Chapter 3 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Hadley cells near the Equator consist of _____. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 85.5%. You received 19.67 out of a possible total of 23 points. 100 1,000 5,000 50,000 rising dry air associated with deserts and falling moist air that produces precipitation and rainforests rising moist air that produces precipitation and rainforests, and falling dry air associated with deserts warm, moist air rising up the sides of mountains and cool, dry air descending on the leeward sides cool, dry air rising up the sides of mountains and warm, moist air descending on the leeward sides Chapter 03 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 9 5/21/2014 7:58 PM

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IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

IT 7358 – Human interface Technology Assignment 3 – Observation Exercise The purpose of this exercise is for you to begin learning how to make and record observations of people involved in an activity of some kind. To do this project you will need a pad of paper, a notebook or something else to write on, and a pen or pencil. To begin this exercise, you will be making an observation in a public space. Specifically, you will be observing a cafeteria setting, such as found in the basement of the IU main library, dorm cafeteria, Union cafeteria etc. Choose a time during which there is a good amount of activity. Be aware that too little activity will not give you enough data to work with, and might make people feel like they’re being watched. Once you have chosen the position from which you will make your observations, go through the following steps: • Record the date, day of week, time of day, weather, and other factors you think may have some bearing on what you are observing. • Describe the setting. Note features of the physical environment that seem to be significant. Write a brief and general description of what’s going on. This is mainly for background and context. • Also record your reactions and thoughts about what is going on, but you should keep these reactions distinct from description – perhaps in the margins, or on the back of the page. • Describe in detail the activity you are observing. At this point, you should strive for your description to be concrete, specific, and chronological. For example, it is better to record, “Six people standing single file in line, holding trays horizontal at waist height, advancing several steps in cascading fashion when the cashier says ‘next.’ On each tray is…” instead of “people waiting in line to pay for their food.” Your guiding question right now is ‘What’s going on here?’ Your notes for this part of the exercise should be event-by-event narrative, not generalizations. • Separately (again, in the margins or somewhere else) record the perceptions, motives, and values of the people you are watching. As you observe, begin to focus on something that seems interesting to you, such as a pattern that emerges or a particular aspect of what you are observing. Stop when you’ve done roughly 20 minutes of detailed go back over your notes and fill in any important but missing details from memory, adding questions that came up for you as you were observing, and ideas you could investigate in the future if you were going to do further study. You can also begin adding any of your own interpretations of what you observed.

Place: Cafeteria Date: 27/05/2013 Day of week: Monday Time of … Read More...
Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER: Correct Part B At which lettered point or points is the object moving to the negative direction? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 2.7 The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Part A Is the object moving the fastest? ANSWER: A B C D E Correct Part B Is the object speeding up? ANSWER: Correct Part C Is the object moving to the left and turning around? ANSWER: A B C D E F A B C D E F Correct Kinematic Vocabulary One of the difficulties in studying mechanics is that many common words are used with highly specific technical meanings, among them velocity, acceleration, position, speed, and displacement. The series of questions in this problem is designed to get you to try to think of these quantities like a physicist. Answer the questions in this problem using words from the following list: A. position B. direction C. displacement D. coordinates E. velocity F. acceleration G. distance H. magnitude I. vector J. scalar K. components Part A Velocity differs from speed in that velocity indicates a particle’s __________ of motion. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part B Unlike speed, velocity is a __________ quantity. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part C A vector has, by definition, both __________ and direction. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part D Once you have selected a coordinate system, you can express a two-dimensional vector using a pair of quantities known collectively as __________. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part E Speed differs from velocity in the same way that __________ differs from displacement. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. Hint 1. Definition of displacement Displacement is the vector that indicates the difference of two positions (e.g., the final position from the initial position). Being a vector, it is independent of the coordinate system used to describe it (although its vector components depend on the coordinate system). ANSWER: Correct Part F Consider a physical situation in which a particle moves from point A to point B. This process is described from two coordinate systems that are identical except that they have different origins. The __________ of the particle at point A differ(s) as expressed in one coordinate system compared to the other, but the __________ from A to B is/are the same as expressed in both coordinate systems. Type the letters from the list given in the problem introduction that best complete the sentence. Separate the letters with commas. There is more than one correct answer, but you should only enter one pair of comma-separated letters. For example, if the words “vector” and “scalar” fit best in the blanks, enter I,J. ANSWER: Correct The coordinates of a point will depend on the coordinate system that is chosen, but there are several other quantities that are independent of the choice of origin for a coordinate system: in particular, distance, displacement, direction, and velocity. In working physics problems, unless you are interested in the position of an object or event relative to a specific origin, you can usually choose the coordinate system origin to be wherever is most convenient or intuitive. Note that the vector indicating a displacement from A to B is usually represented as . Part G Identify the following physical quantities as scalars or vectors. ANSWER: rB A = rB − rA Correct Problem 2.4 The figure is the position-versus-time graph of a jogger. Part A What is the jogger’s velocity at = 10 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What is the jogger’s velocity at = 25 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the jogger’s velocity at = 35 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t s v = 1.3 ms t s v = 0 ms t s v = -5.0 ms Correct Analyzing Position versus Time Graphs: Conceptual Question Two cars travel on the parallel lanes of a two-lane road. The cars’ motions are represented by the position versus time graph shown in the figure. Answer the questions using the times from the graph indicated by letters. Part A At which of the times do the two cars pass each other? Hint 1. Two cars passing Two objects can pass each other only if they have the same position at the same time. ANSWER: Correct Part B Are the two cars traveling in the same direction when they pass each other? ANSWER: Correct Part C At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #1 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E None Cannot be determined yes no Correct Part D At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #2 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E none cannot be determined A B C D E none cannot be determined Correct Part E At which of the lettered times are the cars moving with nearly identical velocity? Hint 1. Determining Velocity from a Position versus Time Graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.6 A particle starts from 10 at = 0 and moves with the velocity graph shown in the figure. A B C D E None Cannot be determined m t0 Part A Does this particle have a turning point? ANSWER: Correct Part B If so, at what time? Express your answer using two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the object’s position at = 2, 3, 4 ? Yes No t = 1.0 s t s Express your answers using two significant figures separated by commas. ANSWER: Correct Overcoming a Head Start Cars A and B are racing each other along the same straight road in the following manner: Car A has a head start and is a distance beyond the starting line at . The starting line is at . Car A travels at a constant speed . Car B starts at the starting line but has a better engine than Car A, and thus Car B travels at a constant speed , which is greater than . Part A How long after Car B started the race will Car B catch up with Car A? Express the time in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. Consider the kinematics relation Write an expression for the displacement of Car A from the starting line at a time after Car B starts. (Note that we are taking this time to be .) Answer in terms of , , , and for time, and take at the starting line. Hint 1. What is the acceleration of Car A? The acceleration of Car A is zero, so the general formula has at least one term equal to zero. ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the relation between the positions of the two cars? x2 , x3 , x4 = 10,16,26 m DA t = 0 x = 0 vA vB vA t t = 0 vA vB DA t x = 0 x(t) = x0 + v0t + (1/2)at2 xA(t) = DA + vAt The positions of the two cars are equal at time . Hint 3. Consider Car B’s position as a function of time Write down an expression for the position of Car B at time after starting. Give your answer in terms of any variables needed (use for time). ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How far from Car B’s starting line will the cars be when Car B passes Car A? Express your answer in terms of known quantities. (You may use as well.) Hint 1. Which expression should you use? Just use your expression for the position of either car after time , and substitute in the correct value for (found in the previous part). ANSWER: Correct tcatch t t xB(t) = vBt tcatch = DA vB−vA tcatch t = 0 tcatch dpass = vBDA vB−vA Problem 2.11 The figure shows the velocity graph of a particle moving along the x-axis. Its initial position is at . At = 2 , what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? Part A Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x0 = 2 m t0 = 0 t s x = 6.0 m vx = 4.0 ms Correct Part C Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.13 A jet plane is cruising at 300 when suddenly the pilot turns the engines up to full throttle. After traveling 3.9 , the jet is moving with a speed of 400 . Part A What is the jet’s acceleration, assuming it to be a constant acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.20 A rock is tossed straight up with a velocity of 22 When it returns, it falls into a hole deep. You may want to review ( pages 51 – 54) . ax = 2.0 m s2 m/s km m/s a = 9.0 m s2 m/s 10 m For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations For general problem-solving tips and strategies for this topic, you may want to view a Video Tutor Solution of Time in the air for a tossed ball. Part A What is the rock’s velocity as it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the rock, including its launch point, initial direction, and end point in the hole. Choose a coordinate system, and indicate it on your picture. Where is ? What is the positive direction? What is the position of the launch point and the bottom of the hole? In this coordinate system, what is the sign of the initial velocity and the sign of the acceleration? Calling the launch time , what is the equation for as a function of time? What is the position at the bottom of the hole? This will lead to a quadratic equation for the time when the rock hits the bottom of the hole. The quadratic equation has two solutions for the time. Not all mathematical solutions make sense physically. Which solution makes sense physically in terms of the picture that you drew at the beginning? Keeping the same coordinate system, what is the velocity in the direction as a function of time? What is the velocity when the rock hits the bottom of the hole? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rock in the air, from the instant it is released until it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. y = 0 m y t = 0 y y t y y v = -26.1 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the time the rock was in the air related to the time at which the rock hit the ground in Part A? ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.23 A particle moving along the x-axis has its position described by the function 2.00 5.00 5.00 , where is in s. At = 4.00, what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? You may want to review ( pages 38 – 42) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Polynomial Functions t = 4.90 s x = ( t3 − t + ) m t t Part A Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Evaluate the position at time = 4.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the velocity as a function of time, , from the position, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer with the appropriate units. t s 113 m v(t) x(t) v(t) v 91.0 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the acceleration as a function of time, , from the velocity, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine the acceleration at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.26 A particle’s position on the x-axis is given by the function 6.00 6.00 , where is in s. Part A Where is the particle when = 4.00 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.30 A particle’s velocity is described by the function = , where is in . a(t) v(t) a(t) 48.0 m s2 x = (t2 − t + ) m t vx m/s 1.00 m vx t2 − 7t + 7 m/s t s Part A How many turning points does the particle reach. Express your answer as an integer. ANSWER: Correct Part B At what times does the particle reach its turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s acceleration at each of the turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct 2 t1 , t2 = 5.8,1.2 s a1 , a2 = 4.6,-4.6 m/s2 Problem 2.49 A 200 weather rocket is loaded with 100 of fuel and fired straight up. It accelerates upward at 35 for 30 , then runs out of fuel. Ignore any air resistance effects. Part A What is the rocket’s maximum altitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rocket in the air? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Problem 2.52 A hotel elevator ascends with maximum speed of . Its acceleration and deceleration both have a magnitude of . Part A How far does the elevator move while accelerating to full speed from rest? kg kg m/s2 s h = 72 km t = 260 s 200 m 5 m/s 1.0 m/s2 Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take to make the complete trip from bottom to top? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from -5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. 12.5 m 45.0 s A D Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to derive the component A component of a vector is its length (but with appropriate sign) along a particular coordinate axis, the axes being specfied in advance. You are asked for the component of that lies along the x axis, which is horizontal in this problem. Imagine two lines perpendicular to the x axis running from the head (end with the arrow) and tail of down to the x axis. The length of the x axis between the points where these lines intersect is the x component of . In this problem, the x component is the x coordinate at which the perpendicular from the head of the vector hits the origin (because the tail of the vector is at the origin). ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct A A A A Ax = 2.5 A Ay = 3 Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Consider the direction Don’t forget the sign. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. How to find the start and end points of the vector components A vector is defined only by its magnitude and direction. The starting point of the vector is of no consequence to its definition. Therefore, you need to somehow eliminate the starting point from your answer. You can run two perpendiculars to the x axis, one from the head (end with the arrow) of , and another to the tail, with the x component being the difference between x coordinates of head and tail (negative if the tail is to the right of the head). Another way is to imagine bringing the tail of to the origin, and then using the same procedure you used before to find the components of and . This is equivalent to the previous method, but it might be easier to visualize. ANSWER: B By = -3 x C C C A B Cx = -2 Correct The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. A B Bx, By = 2,-3 D Dx, Dy = 2,-3 B D ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.6 Find x- and y-components of the following vectors. Part A Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. = (r 430m, 60& below positive x − axis) rx, ry = 210,-370 m v = (610m/s, 23& above positive x − axis) Correct Part C Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.10 Part A Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: vx, vy = 560,240 m/s a = (7.3m/s2 , negative y − direction) ax, ay = 0,-7.3 m/s2 B = −4 + 4 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct B B = 5.7 Part C Find the direction of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: B = 45 above the B negative x-axis & = (−2.0 − 1.0 ) cm r ı ^  ^ Correct Part E Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct r r = 2.2 cm Part F Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part G Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: r = 26.6 below the r negative x-axis & = (−10 − 100 ) m/s v ı ^  ^ Correct Part H Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using four significant figures. ANSWER: Correct v v = 100.5 m/s Part I Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part J Draw . Draw the vector with it’s tail at the origin. ANSWER: v = 84.3 below the v negative x-axis & = (20 + 10 ) m/ a ı ^  ^ s2 Correct Part K Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part L a a = 22.4 m/s2 Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.14 Let , , and . Part A What is the component form of vector ? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of vector ? ANSWER: a = 26.6 above the a positive x-axis & A = 5 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −2 + 6 ı ^  ^ D = A − B D D = 7 − 8 ı ^  ^ D = −7 − 5 ı ^  ^ D = 7 + 8 ı ^  ^ D = 4 + 5 ı ^  ^ D Correct Part C What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.15 Let , , and . Part A Write vector in component form. ANSWER: D = 10.6 D  = 49 & below positive x-axis A = 4 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −3 + 5 ı ^  ^ E = 4A + 2B E E = 10 + 2 ı ^  ^ E = + 10 ı ^  ^ E = −10 ^ E = 10 − 2 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Draw vectors , , and . Draw the vectors with their tails at the origin. ANSWER: Correct Part C A B E What is the magnitude of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.24 Part A What is the angle between vectors and in the figure? Express your answer with the appropriate units. E E = 10.0 E  = 11 & counterclockwise from positive direction of x-axis  E F ANSWER: Correct Part B Use components to determine the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part C Use components to determine the direction of . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 91.3%.  = 71.6 & G = E + F  G = 3.00 G = E + F   = 90.0 & You received 129.62 out of a possible total of 142 points.

Assignment 2 Due: 11:59pm on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Conceptual Question 2.6 Part A The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Is the object moving the slowest? Is the object moving the fastest? Is the object at rest? Drag the appropriate items to their respective bins. ANSWER: Correct Part B At which lettered point or points is the object moving to the negative direction? ANSWER: Correct Conceptual Question 2.7 The figure shows the position-versus-time graph for a moving object. At which lettered point or points: Part A Is the object moving the fastest? ANSWER: A B C D E Correct Part B Is the object speeding up? ANSWER: Correct Part C Is the object moving to the left and turning around? ANSWER: A B C D E F A B C D E F Correct Kinematic Vocabulary One of the difficulties in studying mechanics is that many common words are used with highly specific technical meanings, among them velocity, acceleration, position, speed, and displacement. The series of questions in this problem is designed to get you to try to think of these quantities like a physicist. Answer the questions in this problem using words from the following list: A. position B. direction C. displacement D. coordinates E. velocity F. acceleration G. distance H. magnitude I. vector J. scalar K. components Part A Velocity differs from speed in that velocity indicates a particle’s __________ of motion. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part B Unlike speed, velocity is a __________ quantity. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part C A vector has, by definition, both __________ and direction. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part D Once you have selected a coordinate system, you can express a two-dimensional vector using a pair of quantities known collectively as __________. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. ANSWER: Correct Part E Speed differs from velocity in the same way that __________ differs from displacement. Enter the letter from the list given in the problem introduction that best completes the sentence. Hint 1. Definition of displacement Displacement is the vector that indicates the difference of two positions (e.g., the final position from the initial position). Being a vector, it is independent of the coordinate system used to describe it (although its vector components depend on the coordinate system). ANSWER: Correct Part F Consider a physical situation in which a particle moves from point A to point B. This process is described from two coordinate systems that are identical except that they have different origins. The __________ of the particle at point A differ(s) as expressed in one coordinate system compared to the other, but the __________ from A to B is/are the same as expressed in both coordinate systems. Type the letters from the list given in the problem introduction that best complete the sentence. Separate the letters with commas. There is more than one correct answer, but you should only enter one pair of comma-separated letters. For example, if the words “vector” and “scalar” fit best in the blanks, enter I,J. ANSWER: Correct The coordinates of a point will depend on the coordinate system that is chosen, but there are several other quantities that are independent of the choice of origin for a coordinate system: in particular, distance, displacement, direction, and velocity. In working physics problems, unless you are interested in the position of an object or event relative to a specific origin, you can usually choose the coordinate system origin to be wherever is most convenient or intuitive. Note that the vector indicating a displacement from A to B is usually represented as . Part G Identify the following physical quantities as scalars or vectors. ANSWER: rB A = rB − rA Correct Problem 2.4 The figure is the position-versus-time graph of a jogger. Part A What is the jogger’s velocity at = 10 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Part B What is the jogger’s velocity at = 25 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the jogger’s velocity at = 35 ? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: t s v = 1.3 ms t s v = 0 ms t s v = -5.0 ms Correct Analyzing Position versus Time Graphs: Conceptual Question Two cars travel on the parallel lanes of a two-lane road. The cars’ motions are represented by the position versus time graph shown in the figure. Answer the questions using the times from the graph indicated by letters. Part A At which of the times do the two cars pass each other? Hint 1. Two cars passing Two objects can pass each other only if they have the same position at the same time. ANSWER: Correct Part B Are the two cars traveling in the same direction when they pass each other? ANSWER: Correct Part C At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #1 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E None Cannot be determined yes no Correct Part D At which of the lettered times, if any, does car #2 momentarily stop? Hint 1. Determining velocity from a position versus time graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: A B C D E none cannot be determined A B C D E none cannot be determined Correct Part E At which of the lettered times are the cars moving with nearly identical velocity? Hint 1. Determining Velocity from a Position versus Time Graph The slope on a position versus time graph is the “rise” (change in position) over the “run” (change in time). In physics, the ratio of change in position over change in time is defined as the velocity. Thus, the slope on a position versus time graph is the velocity of the object being graphed. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.6 A particle starts from 10 at = 0 and moves with the velocity graph shown in the figure. A B C D E None Cannot be determined m t0 Part A Does this particle have a turning point? ANSWER: Correct Part B If so, at what time? Express your answer using two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the object’s position at = 2, 3, 4 ? Yes No t = 1.0 s t s Express your answers using two significant figures separated by commas. ANSWER: Correct Overcoming a Head Start Cars A and B are racing each other along the same straight road in the following manner: Car A has a head start and is a distance beyond the starting line at . The starting line is at . Car A travels at a constant speed . Car B starts at the starting line but has a better engine than Car A, and thus Car B travels at a constant speed , which is greater than . Part A How long after Car B started the race will Car B catch up with Car A? Express the time in terms of given quantities. Hint 1. Consider the kinematics relation Write an expression for the displacement of Car A from the starting line at a time after Car B starts. (Note that we are taking this time to be .) Answer in terms of , , , and for time, and take at the starting line. Hint 1. What is the acceleration of Car A? The acceleration of Car A is zero, so the general formula has at least one term equal to zero. ANSWER: Hint 2. What is the relation between the positions of the two cars? x2 , x3 , x4 = 10,16,26 m DA t = 0 x = 0 vA vB vA t t = 0 vA vB DA t x = 0 x(t) = x0 + v0t + (1/2)at2 xA(t) = DA + vAt The positions of the two cars are equal at time . Hint 3. Consider Car B’s position as a function of time Write down an expression for the position of Car B at time after starting. Give your answer in terms of any variables needed (use for time). ANSWER: ANSWER: Correct Part B How far from Car B’s starting line will the cars be when Car B passes Car A? Express your answer in terms of known quantities. (You may use as well.) Hint 1. Which expression should you use? Just use your expression for the position of either car after time , and substitute in the correct value for (found in the previous part). ANSWER: Correct tcatch t t xB(t) = vBt tcatch = DA vB−vA tcatch t = 0 tcatch dpass = vBDA vB−vA Problem 2.11 The figure shows the velocity graph of a particle moving along the x-axis. Its initial position is at . At = 2 , what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? Part A Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: x0 = 2 m t0 = 0 t s x = 6.0 m vx = 4.0 ms Correct Part C Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.13 A jet plane is cruising at 300 when suddenly the pilot turns the engines up to full throttle. After traveling 3.9 , the jet is moving with a speed of 400 . Part A What is the jet’s acceleration, assuming it to be a constant acceleration? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.20 A rock is tossed straight up with a velocity of 22 When it returns, it falls into a hole deep. You may want to review ( pages 51 – 54) . ax = 2.0 m s2 m/s km m/s a = 9.0 m s2 m/s 10 m For help with math skills, you may want to review: Quadratic Equations For general problem-solving tips and strategies for this topic, you may want to view a Video Tutor Solution of Time in the air for a tossed ball. Part A What is the rock’s velocity as it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Start by drawing a picture of the path of the rock, including its launch point, initial direction, and end point in the hole. Choose a coordinate system, and indicate it on your picture. Where is ? What is the positive direction? What is the position of the launch point and the bottom of the hole? In this coordinate system, what is the sign of the initial velocity and the sign of the acceleration? Calling the launch time , what is the equation for as a function of time? What is the position at the bottom of the hole? This will lead to a quadratic equation for the time when the rock hits the bottom of the hole. The quadratic equation has two solutions for the time. Not all mathematical solutions make sense physically. Which solution makes sense physically in terms of the picture that you drew at the beginning? Keeping the same coordinate system, what is the velocity in the direction as a function of time? What is the velocity when the rock hits the bottom of the hole? ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rock in the air, from the instant it is released until it hits the bottom of the hole? Express your answer with the appropriate units. y = 0 m y t = 0 y y t y y v = -26.1 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How is the time the rock was in the air related to the time at which the rock hit the ground in Part A? ANSWER: Correct Enhanced EOC: Problem 2.23 A particle moving along the x-axis has its position described by the function 2.00 5.00 5.00 , where is in s. At = 4.00, what are the particle’s (a) position, (b) velocity, and (c) acceleration? You may want to review ( pages 38 – 42) . For help with math skills, you may want to review: Differentiation of Polynomial Functions t = 4.90 s x = ( t3 − t + ) m t t Part A Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem Evaluate the position at time = 4.00 . ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answer with the appropriate units. Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the velocity as a function of time, , from the position, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Part C Express your answer with the appropriate units. t s 113 m v(t) x(t) v(t) v 91.0 ms Hint 1. How to approach the problem How do you determine the acceleration as a function of time, , from the velocity, ? What calculus operation do you have to perform? Once you have , how do you determine the acceleration at a particular time? ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.26 A particle’s position on the x-axis is given by the function 6.00 6.00 , where is in s. Part A Where is the particle when = 4.00 ? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Problem 2.30 A particle’s velocity is described by the function = , where is in . a(t) v(t) a(t) 48.0 m s2 x = (t2 − t + ) m t vx m/s 1.00 m vx t2 − 7t + 7 m/s t s Part A How many turning points does the particle reach. Express your answer as an integer. ANSWER: Correct Part B At what times does the particle reach its turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part C What is the particle’s acceleration at each of the turning points? Express your answers using two significant figures separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct 2 t1 , t2 = 5.8,1.2 s a1 , a2 = 4.6,-4.6 m/s2 Problem 2.49 A 200 weather rocket is loaded with 100 of fuel and fired straight up. It accelerates upward at 35 for 30 , then runs out of fuel. Ignore any air resistance effects. Part A What is the rocket’s maximum altitude? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long is the rocket in the air? Express your answer to two significant figures and include the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Problem 2.52 A hotel elevator ascends with maximum speed of . Its acceleration and deceleration both have a magnitude of . Part A How far does the elevator move while accelerating to full speed from rest? kg kg m/s2 s h = 72 km t = 260 s 200 m 5 m/s 1.0 m/s2 Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Part B How long does it take to make the complete trip from bottom to top? Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Answer Requested Components of Vectors Shown is a 10 by 10 grid, with coordinate axes x and y . The grid runs from -5 to 5 on both axes. Drawn on this grid are four vectors, labeled through . This problem will ask you various questions about these vectors. All answers should be in decimal notation, unless otherwise specified. 12.5 m 45.0 s A D Part A What is the x component of ? Express your answer to two significant figures. Hint 1. How to derive the component A component of a vector is its length (but with appropriate sign) along a particular coordinate axis, the axes being specfied in advance. You are asked for the component of that lies along the x axis, which is horizontal in this problem. Imagine two lines perpendicular to the x axis running from the head (end with the arrow) and tail of down to the x axis. The length of the x axis between the points where these lines intersect is the x component of . In this problem, the x component is the x coordinate at which the perpendicular from the head of the vector hits the origin (because the tail of the vector is at the origin). ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct A A A A Ax = 2.5 A Ay = 3 Part C What is the y component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. Consider the direction Don’t forget the sign. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the component of ? Express your answer to the nearest integer. Hint 1. How to find the start and end points of the vector components A vector is defined only by its magnitude and direction. The starting point of the vector is of no consequence to its definition. Therefore, you need to somehow eliminate the starting point from your answer. You can run two perpendiculars to the x axis, one from the head (end with the arrow) of , and another to the tail, with the x component being the difference between x coordinates of head and tail (negative if the tail is to the right of the head). Another way is to imagine bringing the tail of to the origin, and then using the same procedure you used before to find the components of and . This is equivalent to the previous method, but it might be easier to visualize. ANSWER: B By = -3 x C C C A B Cx = -2 Correct The following questions will ask you to give both components of vectors using the ordered pairs method. In this method, the x component is written first, followed by a comma, and then the y component. For example, the components of would be written 2.5,3 in ordered pair notation. The answers below are all integers, so estimate the components to the nearest whole number. Part E In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part F In ordered pair notation, write down the components of vector . Express your answers to the nearest integer. ANSWER: Correct Part G What is true about and ? Choose from the pulldown list below. A B Bx, By = 2,-3 D Dx, Dy = 2,-3 B D ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.6 Find x- and y-components of the following vectors. Part A Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Part B Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: They have different components and are not the same vectors. They have the same components but are not the same vectors. They are the same vectors. = (r 430m, 60& below positive x − axis) rx, ry = 210,-370 m v = (610m/s, 23& above positive x − axis) Correct Part C Express your answers using two significant figures. Enter your answers numerically separated by a comma. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.10 Part A Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: vx, vy = 560,240 m/s a = (7.3m/s2 , negative y − direction) ax, ay = 0,-7.3 m/s2 B = −4 + 4 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct B B = 5.7 Part C Find the direction of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: B = 45 above the B negative x-axis & = (−2.0 − 1.0 ) cm r ı ^  ^ Correct Part E Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct r r = 2.2 cm Part F Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part G Draw . Draw the vector with its tail at the origin. ANSWER: r = 26.6 below the r negative x-axis & = (−10 − 100 ) m/s v ı ^  ^ Correct Part H Find the magnitude of . Express your answer using four significant figures. ANSWER: Correct v v = 100.5 m/s Part I Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Part J Draw . Draw the vector with it’s tail at the origin. ANSWER: v = 84.3 below the v negative x-axis & = (20 + 10 ) m/ a ı ^  ^ s2 Correct Part K Find the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part L a a = 22.4 m/s2 Find the direction of . ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.14 Let , , and . Part A What is the component form of vector ? ANSWER: Correct Part B What is the magnitude of vector ? ANSWER: a = 26.6 above the a positive x-axis & A = 5 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −2 + 6 ı ^  ^ D = A − B D D = 7 − 8 ı ^  ^ D = −7 − 5 ı ^  ^ D = 7 + 8 ı ^  ^ D = 4 + 5 ı ^  ^ D Correct Part C What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.15 Let , , and . Part A Write vector in component form. ANSWER: D = 10.6 D  = 49 & below positive x-axis A = 4 − 2 ı ^  ^ B = −3 + 5 ı ^  ^ E = 4A + 2B E E = 10 + 2 ı ^  ^ E = + 10 ı ^  ^ E = −10 ^ E = 10 − 2 ı ^  ^ Correct Part B Draw vectors , , and . Draw the vectors with their tails at the origin. ANSWER: Correct Part C A B E What is the magnitude of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Part D What is the direction of vector ? Express your answer using two significant figures. ANSWER: Correct Problem 3.24 Part A What is the angle between vectors and in the figure? Express your answer with the appropriate units. E E = 10.0 E  = 11 & counterclockwise from positive direction of x-axis  E F ANSWER: Correct Part B Use components to determine the magnitude of . ANSWER: Correct Part C Use components to determine the direction of . Express your answer with the appropriate units. ANSWER: Correct Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 91.3%.  = 71.6 & G = E + F  G = 3.00 G = E + F   = 90.0 & You received 129.62 out of a possible total of 142 points.

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Chapter 04 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Activity: Investigating Survivorship Curves Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Which of these species typically has a mortality rate that remains fairly constant over an individual’s life span? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of robins remains relatively constant throughout their life span. Part B Oyster populations are primarily, if not exclusively, composed of _____. ANSWER: Correct Young oysters have a very high mortality rate; older oysters have a much lower mortality rate. Thus, most oyster populations consist primarily of older individuals. Part C Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of oysters? ANSWER: grasses oysters elephants robins humans juveniles adults prereproductive oysters larval and juvenile oysters larvae Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Grasses, like oysters, have a relatively high mortality rate early in their life span, after which the mortality rate decreases. Part D Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of humans? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of elephants, like that of humans, remains relatively low for much of their life span and then dramatically increases for older individuals. BioFlix Quiz: Population Ecology Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. cats robins elephants grasses humans cats oysters grasses robins elephants Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part A An ideal habitat with unlimited resources is associated with Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Populations grow exponentially with unlimited resources. Part B The maximum population a habitat can support is its Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part C Logistic growth involves Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Both exponential growth and logistic growth. Population crashes. Exponential growth. Logistic growth. Neither exponential growth nor logistic growth. Logistic growth. Death rate. Birth rate. Carrying capacity. Exponential growth. A population crash. Population growth continuing forever. Population growth reaching carrying capacity and then speeding up. Population size decreasing to zero. Population growth slowing down as the population approaches carrying capacity. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Part D In exponential growth Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the following would NOT cause population size to decrease? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct An increased birth rate would cause population size to increase. BioFlix Activity: Photosynthesis — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the photosynthesis equation? To review photosynthesis, watch this BioFlix animation: Photosynthesis. Part A – Photosynthesis equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis. ANSWER: Population size grows more and more slowly as the population gets bigger. Population size grows faster and faster as the population gets bigger. Population size stays constant. Population growth slows as the population gets close to its carrying capacity. None of these are correct. Increased death rate A exponentially growing population outgrowing its food supply and crashing Poor weather, resulting in less food being available Increase in the number of predators Increased birth rate Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Energy Flow Can you identify how energy flows through an ecosystem? To review energy flow in cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Energy flow through an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how energy flows through an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Chemical Cycling Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem? To review the chemical inputs and outputs of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Chemical cycling in an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the cellular respiration equation? To review cellular respiration, watch this BioFlix animation: Cellular Respiration. Part A – Cellular respiration equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Population Ecology — Types of Population Growth Can you identify the different ways in which populations grow? To review types of population growth, watch this BioFlix animation: Population Ecology. Part A – Types of population growth Drag the correct label under each graph to identify the type of population growth shown. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Doubling Time Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you calculate doubling times and growth rates for exponentially growing populations? Remember that the doubling time (in years) for an exponentially growing population is estimated by dividing 70 by the growth rate of the population (as a percentage): Doubling time (in years) = 70 / annual growth rate (%) Part A Drag the values on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences. Not all values will be used. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Population Growth Rates Populations grow larger from births and immigration and grow smaller from deaths and emigration. The growth rate for a population is determined by adding the birth rate and the immigration rate, and then subtracting the death rate and the emigration rate (all rates expressed as the number per 1,000 individuals per year): (birth rate + immigration rate) (death rate + emigration rate) = growth rate Positive population growth rates lead to population increases, and negative population growth rates lead to population declines. Part A Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 14 per 1,000/year Death rate = 6 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 5 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 1 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part B Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: 4 per 1,000/year 12 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 26 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Birth rate = 11 per 1,000/year Death rate = 10 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 4 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part C Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 10 per 1,000/year Death rate = 12 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 2 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Concept Review: Levels of Ecological Organization Can you identify the example that corresponds to each level of ecological organization? Part A Drag the labels to the appropriate targets in the table. ANSWER: 0 per 1,000/year 2 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 28 per 1,000/year 3 per 1,000/year 1 per 1,000/year 17 per 1,000/year 27 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Mechanisms of Evolution — Natural Selection: Pesticides Can you identify the process by which natural selection acts on an insect population exposed to pesticides? To review the process of natural selection, watch this BioFlix animation: Mechanisms of Evolution: Natural Selection. Part A – Natural selection: Pesticides Drag the labels onto the flowchart to place them in the correct sequence. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 10 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ABC News Video: Protecting the Galapagos Islands Watch the ABC News video (2:07 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A Where are the Galapagos Islands located? ANSWER: Part B Which of the following sets of animals are likely to be found on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: near the tip of South Africa northeast of Australia along the Great Barrier Reef 600 miles west of Ecuador, near the equator in the Mediterranean Sea, as part of the Greek Islands frogs, lungfish, mountain goats tortoises, finches, blue-footed boobies ostriches, cougars, porcupines beaver, snakes, armadillos Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 11 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part C Which species is threatening the natural wildlife on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: Part D The Galapagos Islands were the first place on Earth to _____. ANSWER: Part E Tourism on the Galapagos Islands is being restricted by requiring tourists to _____. ANSWER: Current Events: A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (New York Times, 2/28/2012) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (2/28/2012) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part B What predator currently feeds on deer in Rock Creek Park? humans zebra mussels Asian carp mountain lions suffer the complete extinction of all native species be declared off-limits to all humans be declared a world heritage site be invaded by human-introduced species visit each island in groups of only ten individuals at a time view the islands only from the water be escorted by trained guides at all times stay at least 100 feet away from all animals on the islands Deer have always been a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not native to Rock Creek Park, and have been a problem since they were introduced in 1952. Deer were once absent from Rock Creek Park, and have only become a problem in the last 20 years. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 12 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ANSWER: Part C Why isn’t the deer population controlled by hunting in Rock Creek Park? ANSWER: Part D It is hoped that the deer herd can be reduced by how much? ANSWER: Part E Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part F Because the park is changing in response to the increasing deer population, this is an example of ______________. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 21.2%. You received 9.1 out of a possible total of 43 points. There are no predators of deer in Rock Creek Park. mountain lion coyote wolf Hunting has been attempted in the park, but the trees are too thick. Hunting is prohibited in the park. There is no public interest in hunting in the park. Deer are a protected species. one-quarter one-half three-quarters the entire herd Animals cannot be killed on federally managed public lands. Only Congress can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. The federal agency in charge of management of the land in question decides if animals should be killed. Only the National Park Service can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. succession artificial selection recession progression Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 13 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM

Chapter 04 Homework Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Activity: Investigating Survivorship Curves Click here to complete this activity. Then answer the questions. Part A Which of these species typically has a mortality rate that remains fairly constant over an individual’s life span? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of robins remains relatively constant throughout their life span. Part B Oyster populations are primarily, if not exclusively, composed of _____. ANSWER: Correct Young oysters have a very high mortality rate; older oysters have a much lower mortality rate. Thus, most oyster populations consist primarily of older individuals. Part C Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of oysters? ANSWER: grasses oysters elephants robins humans juveniles adults prereproductive oysters larval and juvenile oysters larvae Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Grasses, like oysters, have a relatively high mortality rate early in their life span, after which the mortality rate decreases. Part D Which of these organisms has a survivorship curve similar to that of humans? ANSWER: Correct The mortality rate of elephants, like that of humans, remains relatively low for much of their life span and then dramatically increases for older individuals. BioFlix Quiz: Population Ecology Watch the animation at left before answering the questions below. cats robins elephants grasses humans cats oysters grasses robins elephants Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part A An ideal habitat with unlimited resources is associated with Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Populations grow exponentially with unlimited resources. Part B The maximum population a habitat can support is its Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part C Logistic growth involves Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Both exponential growth and logistic growth. Population crashes. Exponential growth. Logistic growth. Neither exponential growth nor logistic growth. Logistic growth. Death rate. Birth rate. Carrying capacity. Exponential growth. A population crash. Population growth continuing forever. Population growth reaching carrying capacity and then speeding up. Population size decreasing to zero. Population growth slowing down as the population approaches carrying capacity. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Correct Part D In exponential growth Hint 1. Review the animation or your Study Sheet for Population Ecology ANSWER: Correct Part E Which of the following would NOT cause population size to decrease? Hint 1. Review the animation. ANSWER: Correct An increased birth rate would cause population size to increase. BioFlix Activity: Photosynthesis — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the photosynthesis equation? To review photosynthesis, watch this BioFlix animation: Photosynthesis. Part A – Photosynthesis equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of photosynthesis. ANSWER: Population size grows more and more slowly as the population gets bigger. Population size grows faster and faster as the population gets bigger. Population size stays constant. Population growth slows as the population gets close to its carrying capacity. None of these are correct. Increased death rate A exponentially growing population outgrowing its food supply and crashing Poor weather, resulting in less food being available Increase in the number of predators Increased birth rate Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Energy Flow Can you identify how energy flows through an ecosystem? To review energy flow in cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Energy flow through an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how energy flows through an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis — Chemical Cycling Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem? To review the chemical inputs and outputs of cellular respiration and photosynthesis, watch these BioFlix animations: Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis. Part A – Chemical cycling in an ecosystem Drag the labels onto the diagram to identify how chemicals cycle in an ecosystem. ANSWER: BioFlix Activity: Cellular Respiration — Inputs and Outputs Can you fill in the cellular respiration equation? To review cellular respiration, watch this BioFlix animation: Cellular Respiration. Part A – Cellular respiration equation Drag the labels onto the equation to identify the inputs and outputs of cellular respiration. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Population Ecology — Types of Population Growth Can you identify the different ways in which populations grow? To review types of population growth, watch this BioFlix animation: Population Ecology. Part A – Types of population growth Drag the correct label under each graph to identify the type of population growth shown. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Doubling Time Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 7 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Can you calculate doubling times and growth rates for exponentially growing populations? Remember that the doubling time (in years) for an exponentially growing population is estimated by dividing 70 by the growth rate of the population (as a percentage): Doubling time (in years) = 70 / annual growth rate (%) Part A Drag the values on the left to the appropriate blanks on the right to complete the sentences. Not all values will be used. ANSWER: Concept Review: Calculating Population Growth Rates Populations grow larger from births and immigration and grow smaller from deaths and emigration. The growth rate for a population is determined by adding the birth rate and the immigration rate, and then subtracting the death rate and the emigration rate (all rates expressed as the number per 1,000 individuals per year): (birth rate + immigration rate) (death rate + emigration rate) = growth rate Positive population growth rates lead to population increases, and negative population growth rates lead to population declines. Part A Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 14 per 1,000/year Death rate = 6 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 5 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 1 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part B Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: 4 per 1,000/year 12 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 26 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 8 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Birth rate = 11 per 1,000/year Death rate = 10 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 4 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part C Suppose you are studying a population with the following characteristics: Birth rate = 10 per 1,000/year Death rate = 12 per 1,000/year Immigration rate = 2 per 1,000/year Emigration rate = 3 per 1,000/year What is the growth rate for this population? ANSWER: Part D This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part E This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Part F This question will be shown after you complete previous question(s). Concept Review: Levels of Ecological Organization Can you identify the example that corresponds to each level of ecological organization? Part A Drag the labels to the appropriate targets in the table. ANSWER: 0 per 1,000/year 2 per 1,000/year 14 per 1,000/year 28 per 1,000/year 3 per 1,000/year 1 per 1,000/year 17 per 1,000/year 27 per 1,000/year Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 9 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM BioFlix Activity: Mechanisms of Evolution — Natural Selection: Pesticides Can you identify the process by which natural selection acts on an insect population exposed to pesticides? To review the process of natural selection, watch this BioFlix animation: Mechanisms of Evolution: Natural Selection. Part A – Natural selection: Pesticides Drag the labels onto the flowchart to place them in the correct sequence. ANSWER: Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 10 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ABC News Video: Protecting the Galapagos Islands Watch the ABC News video (2:07 minutes). Then answer the questions below. Part A Where are the Galapagos Islands located? ANSWER: Part B Which of the following sets of animals are likely to be found on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: near the tip of South Africa northeast of Australia along the Great Barrier Reef 600 miles west of Ecuador, near the equator in the Mediterranean Sea, as part of the Greek Islands frogs, lungfish, mountain goats tortoises, finches, blue-footed boobies ostriches, cougars, porcupines beaver, snakes, armadillos Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 11 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM Part C Which species is threatening the natural wildlife on the Galapagos Islands? ANSWER: Part D The Galapagos Islands were the first place on Earth to _____. ANSWER: Part E Tourism on the Galapagos Islands is being restricted by requiring tourists to _____. ANSWER: Current Events: A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (New York Times, 2/28/2012) Read this New York Times article and then answer the questions. A Surplus Washington Could Do Without: A Capital Park’s Rapacious Deer (2/28/2012) Registration with The New York Times provides instant access to breaking news on NYTimes.com. To register, go to http://www.nytimes.com/register. Visit http://www.nytimes.com/content/help/rights/terms/terms-of-service.html to review the current NYT Terms of Service. Part A Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part B What predator currently feeds on deer in Rock Creek Park? humans zebra mussels Asian carp mountain lions suffer the complete extinction of all native species be declared off-limits to all humans be declared a world heritage site be invaded by human-introduced species visit each island in groups of only ten individuals at a time view the islands only from the water be escorted by trained guides at all times stay at least 100 feet away from all animals on the islands Deer have always been a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not a problem in Rock Creek Park. Deer are not native to Rock Creek Park, and have been a problem since they were introduced in 1952. Deer were once absent from Rock Creek Park, and have only become a problem in the last 20 years. Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 12 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM ANSWER: Part C Why isn’t the deer population controlled by hunting in Rock Creek Park? ANSWER: Part D It is hoped that the deer herd can be reduced by how much? ANSWER: Part E Which of the following is true? ANSWER: Part F Because the park is changing in response to the increasing deer population, this is an example of ______________. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 21.2%. You received 9.1 out of a possible total of 43 points. There are no predators of deer in Rock Creek Park. mountain lion coyote wolf Hunting has been attempted in the park, but the trees are too thick. Hunting is prohibited in the park. There is no public interest in hunting in the park. Deer are a protected species. one-quarter one-half three-quarters the entire herd Animals cannot be killed on federally managed public lands. Only Congress can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. The federal agency in charge of management of the land in question decides if animals should be killed. Only the National Park Service can decide to have animals killed on federally managed public lands. succession artificial selection recession progression Chapter 04 Homework http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 13 of 13 5/21/2014 7:59 PM

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Chapter 05 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A In the second stage of the demographic transition, called the mortality transition, the death rate _____ while the birth rate _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 2 Part A About a century ago, the population in Latin America moved from an agricultural to an urban-industrial base. During this period birth rates _____, death rates _____, and the overall population _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A Over the course of human history, the greatest increases in human populations have been due to_____. ANSWER: increases, decreases decreases, decreases decreases, remains high or increases increases, remains high or increases stayed about the same, decreased, and the population grew even faster increased greatly, increased, declined decreased dramatically, decreased, declined stayed about the same, increased, increased Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A Compared to women in the United States, women in poor countries such as Ethiopia typically have _____ children at _____ age. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A Women in two developed countries have similar total fertility rates of 3.5. However, women in country A typically have their children about 2 years earlier than women in country B. How will the populations of the two countries compare? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A Overall population growth rates are most likely to be highest when the median age of a population is _____ and a country is in stage _____ of the demographic transition. ANSWER: improved medicine improved water supplies discovery of new land increased food production fewer, an older more, a younger more, an older fewer, a younger The population of country B will increase faster than country A. The population of country A will increase but the population of country B will decline. The population of country A will increase faster than country B. The populations of both countries will be stable, with similar totals and little increase or decrease. Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A An age-structure diagram of a poor country in stage 1 of the demographic transition will be closest to the shape of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A Predictions about global growth rates have been difficult because of changes in human values and behavior largely based upon _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 9 Part A Because human suffering _____ as the human population approaches its carrying capacity, sustainability of the global human population must be _____ the carrying capacity of the Earth. ANSWER: older, 1 younger, 4 older, 3 younger, 2 the letter O, widest in the middle a pyramid, with a broad base and narrow top the letter V, widest at the top column, with even width from top to bottom shifting weather patterns increasing abilities to travel between countries the spread of infectious disease economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A The IPAT formula is used to estimate the _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A If everyone in the world had the ecological footprint of people currently living in the United States and Canada, the world would _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 22 Part A If the population of the United States continues to grow and consumption levels also increase, we expect that the _____. ANSWER: increases, below decreases, above increases, above decreases, below birth rate of a population shift from one stage to another in the demographic transition age structure of a population ecological footprint of a society have just enough biocapacity without any additional population growth exceed its biocapacity by 40% still have enough biocapacity for 20% more humans exceed its biocapacity by five times over Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A Given the increasing global population and increased rates of consumption in developing countries, the most likely avenue to sustainability is _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A Which one of the following typically contributes to population growth? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Members of the neo-Malthusian movement advocated for _____. ANSWER: ecological footprint will eventually exceed the biocapacity of the environment biocapacity will eventually exceed the ecological footprint of the environment United States will eventually become an ecological debtor ecological debt of the United States will continue to increase more efficient use of natural resources the discovery of ways to dramatically increase the global biocapacity to have developed countries use more natural resources from developing countries increase our reliance upon fossil fuels better education empowerment of women high infant mortality economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A China, Mexico, and India have all made progress in reducing the population growth rates in their countries by adopting policies that encourage _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 7 Part A Malthus found that populations in the American colonies were increasing _____ than populations on the European continent due to _____. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 17 points. increasing population size to support greater economic development birth control to limit population growth greater use of natural resources to increase the biocapacity of Earth to support a growing human population greater conservation of natural resources to limit the environmental impact of a growing human population limits on family size women to work only inside of their homes women to start having children at a younger age couples to marry earlier faster, no political conflicts or wars faster, greater resources were available in the American colonies slower, fewer resources were available in the American colonies slower, greater disease in the American colonies Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM

Chapter 05 Reading Questions Due: 11:59pm on Friday, May 23, 2014 You will receive no credit for items you complete after the assignment is due. Grading Policy Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 1 Part A In the second stage of the demographic transition, called the mortality transition, the death rate _____ while the birth rate _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 2 Part A About a century ago, the population in Latin America moved from an agricultural to an urban-industrial base. During this period birth rates _____, death rates _____, and the overall population _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 16 Part A Over the course of human history, the greatest increases in human populations have been due to_____. ANSWER: increases, decreases decreases, decreases decreases, remains high or increases increases, remains high or increases stayed about the same, decreased, and the population grew even faster increased greatly, increased, declined decreased dramatically, decreased, declined stayed about the same, increased, increased Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 1 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 4 Part A Compared to women in the United States, women in poor countries such as Ethiopia typically have _____ children at _____ age. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 18 Part A Women in two developed countries have similar total fertility rates of 3.5. However, women in country A typically have their children about 2 years earlier than women in country B. How will the populations of the two countries compare? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 19 Part A Overall population growth rates are most likely to be highest when the median age of a population is _____ and a country is in stage _____ of the demographic transition. ANSWER: improved medicine improved water supplies discovery of new land increased food production fewer, an older more, a younger more, an older fewer, a younger The population of country B will increase faster than country A. The population of country A will increase but the population of country B will decline. The population of country A will increase faster than country B. The populations of both countries will be stable, with similar totals and little increase or decrease. Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 2 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 20 Part A An age-structure diagram of a poor country in stage 1 of the demographic transition will be closest to the shape of _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 8 Part A Predictions about global growth rates have been difficult because of changes in human values and behavior largely based upon _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 9 Part A Because human suffering _____ as the human population approaches its carrying capacity, sustainability of the global human population must be _____ the carrying capacity of the Earth. ANSWER: older, 1 younger, 4 older, 3 younger, 2 the letter O, widest in the middle a pyramid, with a broad base and narrow top the letter V, widest at the top column, with even width from top to bottom shifting weather patterns increasing abilities to travel between countries the spread of infectious disease economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 3 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 10 Part A The IPAT formula is used to estimate the _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 12 Part A If everyone in the world had the ecological footprint of people currently living in the United States and Canada, the world would _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 22 Part A If the population of the United States continues to grow and consumption levels also increase, we expect that the _____. ANSWER: increases, below decreases, above increases, above decreases, below birth rate of a population shift from one stage to another in the demographic transition age structure of a population ecological footprint of a society have just enough biocapacity without any additional population growth exceed its biocapacity by 40% still have enough biocapacity for 20% more humans exceed its biocapacity by five times over Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 4 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 24 Part A Given the increasing global population and increased rates of consumption in developing countries, the most likely avenue to sustainability is _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 13 Part A Which one of the following typically contributes to population growth? ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 14 Part A Members of the neo-Malthusian movement advocated for _____. ANSWER: ecological footprint will eventually exceed the biocapacity of the environment biocapacity will eventually exceed the ecological footprint of the environment United States will eventually become an ecological debtor ecological debt of the United States will continue to increase more efficient use of natural resources the discovery of ways to dramatically increase the global biocapacity to have developed countries use more natural resources from developing countries increase our reliance upon fossil fuels better education empowerment of women high infant mortality economic development Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 5 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 15 Part A China, Mexico, and India have all made progress in reducing the population growth rates in their countries by adopting policies that encourage _____. ANSWER: Chapter 5 Reading Quiz Question 7 Part A Malthus found that populations in the American colonies were increasing _____ than populations on the European continent due to _____. ANSWER: Score Summary: Your score on this assignment is 0.0%. You received 0 out of a possible total of 17 points. increasing population size to support greater economic development birth control to limit population growth greater use of natural resources to increase the biocapacity of Earth to support a growing human population greater conservation of natural resources to limit the environmental impact of a growing human population limits on family size women to work only inside of their homes women to start having children at a younger age couples to marry earlier faster, no political conflicts or wars faster, greater resources were available in the American colonies slower, fewer resources were available in the American colonies slower, greater disease in the American colonies Chapter 05 Reading Questions http://session.masteringenvironmentalscience.com/myct/assignmentPrintV… 6 of 6 5/21/2014 8:00 PM

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11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices

11-Wendy works as a weather announcer for a TV station under the character name Weather Wendy. Wendy can register her character’s name as: a certification mark. a trade name. a service mark. none of the choices

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the late 1960s and early 1970s were years of turmoil in the U.S. Psychologists thought that rioting was related to temperature, with hotter weather making people more aggressive. Two investigators, however, argued that “the frequency of riots should increase in temperature beyond this level.” To support their theory, they collected data on 102 riots over the period 1967-71, including the temperature in the city where the riot took place. They plotted a histogram for the distribution of riots by temperature. There is a definite peak around 85 degrees. True or false and explain: the histogram shows that higher temperatures prevent riots

the late 1960s and early 1970s were years of turmoil in the U.S. Psychologists thought that rioting was related to temperature, with hotter weather making people more aggressive. Two investigators, however, argued that “the frequency of riots should increase in temperature beyond this level.” To support their theory, they collected data on 102 riots over the period 1967-71, including the temperature in the city where the riot took place. They plotted a histogram for the distribution of riots by temperature. There is a definite peak around 85 degrees. True or false and explain: the histogram shows that higher temperatures prevent riots

No expert has answered this question yet. You can browse … Read More...