Lab Assignment 2 CECS 201, Instructor: Brian Lojeck Date Assigned: 9/11/2015 Date Due: 1. Lab report: 9/25/2015 at the start of lecture, UPLOADED TO BEACHBOARD 2. Demonstration on-board to be done in lab after lecture on 9/25/2015 File Needed: LabAssignment2.ucf is available on the beachboard. Download the correct version for your board (Nexys3, Nexys2_500K, or Nexys2_1200K) Task: Using the lab lectures and the examples in the lab lecture documents use the Xylinx ISE software to design a circuit with 4 inputs (named SW0, SW1, SW2, SW3) and one output (named LED0). The inputs are the first 4 switches on the Digilent board, the output is the first LED light on the board. Note that the input and output names must match EXACTLY as shown above. The circuit will be a “voting” circuit. The output will be high (the led will turn on) whenever more outputs have a value of 1 then a value of 0. The output will be low (the led will turn off) whenever more outputs have a value of 0 then 1. If equal numbers of 1 and 0 are entered, the light should turn off. Design a truth table for the circuit using the description above. Use Karnaugh Maps to find the simplified SOP equation based on the truth table. Implement the equation in a schematic file. Test the schematic using a Verilog testbench. Download the project to your Digilent board to make sure it works properly. Note that you will need to download the code to your board in lab to demonstrate the project and receive full credit for the lab. Hand In For Your Lab Report, as a PDF file, or as a series of screenshots in a word document 1. A cover sheet for the report 2. The truth table for the circuit 3. The K-maps you used to simplify the equations (scans or decent cell-phone photos of the page are acceptable) 4. A printout of your schematic file (printed in landscape mode) 5. A printout of your testbench file (printed in portrait mode) 6. A printout of the results of your simulation (the timing diagram). Remember to print in landscape mode, and to use the printing menu to ensure the printout is readable (not zoomed out too far) and that all data is shown (not zoomed in too far)

Lab Assignment 2 CECS 201, Instructor: Brian Lojeck Date Assigned: 9/11/2015 Date Due: 1. Lab report: 9/25/2015 at the start of lecture, UPLOADED TO BEACHBOARD 2. Demonstration on-board to be done in lab after lecture on 9/25/2015 File Needed: LabAssignment2.ucf is available on the beachboard. Download the correct version for your board (Nexys3, Nexys2_500K, or Nexys2_1200K) Task: Using the lab lectures and the examples in the lab lecture documents use the Xylinx ISE software to design a circuit with 4 inputs (named SW0, SW1, SW2, SW3) and one output (named LED0). The inputs are the first 4 switches on the Digilent board, the output is the first LED light on the board. Note that the input and output names must match EXACTLY as shown above. The circuit will be a “voting” circuit. The output will be high (the led will turn on) whenever more outputs have a value of 1 then a value of 0. The output will be low (the led will turn off) whenever more outputs have a value of 0 then 1. If equal numbers of 1 and 0 are entered, the light should turn off. Design a truth table for the circuit using the description above. Use Karnaugh Maps to find the simplified SOP equation based on the truth table. Implement the equation in a schematic file. Test the schematic using a Verilog testbench. Download the project to your Digilent board to make sure it works properly. Note that you will need to download the code to your board in lab to demonstrate the project and receive full credit for the lab. Hand In For Your Lab Report, as a PDF file, or as a series of screenshots in a word document 1. A cover sheet for the report 2. The truth table for the circuit 3. The K-maps you used to simplify the equations (scans or decent cell-phone photos of the page are acceptable) 4. A printout of your schematic file (printed in landscape mode) 5. A printout of your testbench file (printed in portrait mode) 6. A printout of the results of your simulation (the timing diagram). Remember to print in landscape mode, and to use the printing menu to ensure the printout is readable (not zoomed out too far) and that all data is shown (not zoomed in too far)

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Kevin’ regular rate of pay is $4 per hour. When he works overtime,he earns 1/1/2 times as much per hour. How much will Kevin earn for 5 1/2 hour of overtime work?

Kevin’ regular rate of pay is $4 per hour. When he works overtime,he earns 1/1/2 times as much per hour. How much will Kevin earn for 5 1/2 hour of overtime work?

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Project Part 1 Objective Our objective, in this Part 1 of our Project, is to practise solving a problem by composing and testing a Python program using all that we have learnt so far and discovering new things, such as lists of lists, on the way. Project – Hunting worms in our garden! No more turtles! In this project, we shall move on to worms. Indeed, our project is a game in which the player hunts for worms in our garden. Once our garden has been displayed, the player tries to guess where the worms are located by entering the coordinates of a cell in our garden. When the player has located all the worms, the game is over! Of course there are ways of making this game more exciting (hence complicated), but considering that we have 2 weeks for Part 1 and 2 weeks for Part 2, keeping it simple will be our goal. We will implement our game in two parts. In Part 1, we write code that constructs and tests our data structures i.e., our variables. In Part 2, we write code that allows the player to play a complete “worm hunting” game! ? Project – Part 1 – Description Data Structures (variables): As stated above, in Part 1, we write code that constructs our data structures i.e., our variables. In our game program, we will need data structures (variables) to represent: 1. Our garden that is displayed to the player (suggestion: list of lists), 2. The garden that contains all the worms (suggestion: another list of lists), Garden: Our garden in Part 1 of our Project will have a width and a height of 10. Warning: The width and the height of our garden may change in Part 2 of our Project. So, it may be a good idea to create 2 variables and assign the width and the height of our garden to these 2 variables. 3. Our worms and their information. For each worm, we may want to keep the following information: a. worm number, b. the location of the worm, for example, either the coordinates of the cells containing the worm OR the coordinate of the first cell containing the worm, its length and whether the worm is laying horizontally or vertically. Worms: We will create 6 worms of length 3. 4. And other variables as needed. Testing our data structures: ? Suggestion: as we create a data structure (the “displayed” garden, the garden containing the worms, each worm, etc…), print it with a “debug print statement”. Once we are certain the data structure is well constructed, comment out the “debug print statement”. Code: In Part 1, the code we write must include functions and it must include the main section of our program. In other words, in Part 1, the code we write must be a complete program. In terms of functions, here is a list of suggestions. We may have functions that … ? creates a garden (i.e., a garden data structure), ? creates the worms (i.e., the worm data structure), ? places a worm in the garden that is to hold the worms (i.e., another garden data structure), ? displays the garden on the screen for the player to see, ? displays a worm in the displayed garden, ? etc… ? Finally, in Part 1, the code we write must implement the following algorithm: Algorithm: Here is the algorithm for the main section of our game program: ? Welcome the player ? Create an empty “displayed” garden, (“displayed” because this is the garden we display to the player) ? Create the worms (worms’ information) ? Create an empty “hidden” garden Note 1: “hidden” because one can keep track of the worms in this “hidden” garden, which we do not show to the player. This is why it is called “hidden”. Note 2: One can keep track of worm’s locations using a different mechanism or data structure. It does not have to be a list of lists representing a “hidden” garden. We are free to choose how we want to keep track of where our worms are located in our garden. ? Place each worm in the “hidden” garden (or whatever mechanism or data structure we decide to use) ? Display the “displayed” garden on the screen for the player to see ? While the player wants to play, ask the player for a worm number (1 to 6), read this worm number and display this worm on the “displayed” garden. This is not the game. Remember, we shall implement the game itself in Part 2. Here, in this step, we make sure our code works properly, i.e., it can retrieve worm information and display worms properly. Displaying worms properly: Note that when we create worms and display them, it may be the case that worms overlap with other worms and that worms wrap around the garden. These 2 situations are illustrated in the 3 Sample Runs discussed below. At this point, we are ready for Part 2 of our Project. Sample Runs: In order to illustrate the explanations given above of what we are to do in this Part 1 of our Project, 3 sample runs have been posted below the description of this Part 1 of our Project on our course web site. Have a look at these 3 sample runs. The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs. Of course, the position of our worms will be different but everything else should be the same. What we see in each of these 3 sample runs is 1 execution of the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project. Note about Sample Run 1: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 2 wraps around: it starts at (row 7, column B), (row 7, column A) then wraps around to (row 7, column J). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column E), (row 1, column E) then wraps around to (row 10, column E). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 5 and 6 overlap at (row 1, column E). Note about Sample Run 2: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column B) then wraps around to (row 10, column B) and (row 9, column B). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column D) then wraps around to (row 10, column D) and (row 9, column D). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 2 and 4 overlap at (row 3, column H), worms 1 and 2 overlap at (row 3, column G) and worms 2 and 5 overlap at (row 3, column E). Note about Sample Run 3: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers in the following sequence: 3, 2, 6, 4, 5, 1, 7, 8. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column C), (row 1, column C) then wraps around to (row 10, column C). Worm 1 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column B), (row 2, column A) then wraps around to (row 2, column J). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 6 and 3 overlap at (row 1, column C) and (row 2, column C). Other Requirements: Here are a few more requirements the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project must satisfy. 1. The location of each worm in the garden must be determined randomly. 2. Whether a worm is lying horizontally or vertically must also be determined randomly. 3. It is acceptable in Part 1 of our Project if worms overlap each other (see Sample Runs) 4. When placing a worm in a garden, the worm must “wrap around” the garden. See Sample Runs for examples of what “wrapping around” signifies. How will we implement this wrapping around? Hint: wrapping around can be achieved using an arithmetic operator we have already seen. 5. We must make use of docstring when we implement our functions (have a look at our textbook for an explanation and an example). 6. Every time we encounter the word must in this description of Part 1 of our Project, we shall look upon that sentence as another requirement. For example, the sentence “The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs.”, even though it is not listed below the Other Requirements heading, is also a requirement because of its must.

Project Part 1 Objective Our objective, in this Part 1 of our Project, is to practise solving a problem by composing and testing a Python program using all that we have learnt so far and discovering new things, such as lists of lists, on the way. Project – Hunting worms in our garden! No more turtles! In this project, we shall move on to worms. Indeed, our project is a game in which the player hunts for worms in our garden. Once our garden has been displayed, the player tries to guess where the worms are located by entering the coordinates of a cell in our garden. When the player has located all the worms, the game is over! Of course there are ways of making this game more exciting (hence complicated), but considering that we have 2 weeks for Part 1 and 2 weeks for Part 2, keeping it simple will be our goal. We will implement our game in two parts. In Part 1, we write code that constructs and tests our data structures i.e., our variables. In Part 2, we write code that allows the player to play a complete “worm hunting” game! ? Project – Part 1 – Description Data Structures (variables): As stated above, in Part 1, we write code that constructs our data structures i.e., our variables. In our game program, we will need data structures (variables) to represent: 1. Our garden that is displayed to the player (suggestion: list of lists), 2. The garden that contains all the worms (suggestion: another list of lists), Garden: Our garden in Part 1 of our Project will have a width and a height of 10. Warning: The width and the height of our garden may change in Part 2 of our Project. So, it may be a good idea to create 2 variables and assign the width and the height of our garden to these 2 variables. 3. Our worms and their information. For each worm, we may want to keep the following information: a. worm number, b. the location of the worm, for example, either the coordinates of the cells containing the worm OR the coordinate of the first cell containing the worm, its length and whether the worm is laying horizontally or vertically. Worms: We will create 6 worms of length 3. 4. And other variables as needed. Testing our data structures: ? Suggestion: as we create a data structure (the “displayed” garden, the garden containing the worms, each worm, etc…), print it with a “debug print statement”. Once we are certain the data structure is well constructed, comment out the “debug print statement”. Code: In Part 1, the code we write must include functions and it must include the main section of our program. In other words, in Part 1, the code we write must be a complete program. In terms of functions, here is a list of suggestions. We may have functions that … ? creates a garden (i.e., a garden data structure), ? creates the worms (i.e., the worm data structure), ? places a worm in the garden that is to hold the worms (i.e., another garden data structure), ? displays the garden on the screen for the player to see, ? displays a worm in the displayed garden, ? etc… ? Finally, in Part 1, the code we write must implement the following algorithm: Algorithm: Here is the algorithm for the main section of our game program: ? Welcome the player ? Create an empty “displayed” garden, (“displayed” because this is the garden we display to the player) ? Create the worms (worms’ information) ? Create an empty “hidden” garden Note 1: “hidden” because one can keep track of the worms in this “hidden” garden, which we do not show to the player. This is why it is called “hidden”. Note 2: One can keep track of worm’s locations using a different mechanism or data structure. It does not have to be a list of lists representing a “hidden” garden. We are free to choose how we want to keep track of where our worms are located in our garden. ? Place each worm in the “hidden” garden (or whatever mechanism or data structure we decide to use) ? Display the “displayed” garden on the screen for the player to see ? While the player wants to play, ask the player for a worm number (1 to 6), read this worm number and display this worm on the “displayed” garden. This is not the game. Remember, we shall implement the game itself in Part 2. Here, in this step, we make sure our code works properly, i.e., it can retrieve worm information and display worms properly. Displaying worms properly: Note that when we create worms and display them, it may be the case that worms overlap with other worms and that worms wrap around the garden. These 2 situations are illustrated in the 3 Sample Runs discussed below. At this point, we are ready for Part 2 of our Project. Sample Runs: In order to illustrate the explanations given above of what we are to do in this Part 1 of our Project, 3 sample runs have been posted below the description of this Part 1 of our Project on our course web site. Have a look at these 3 sample runs. The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs. Of course, the position of our worms will be different but everything else should be the same. What we see in each of these 3 sample runs is 1 execution of the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project. Note about Sample Run 1: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 2 wraps around: it starts at (row 7, column B), (row 7, column A) then wraps around to (row 7, column J). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column E), (row 1, column E) then wraps around to (row 10, column E). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 5 and 6 overlap at (row 1, column E). Note about Sample Run 2: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers 1 to 8 sequentially. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column B) then wraps around to (row 10, column B) and (row 9, column B). Worm 6 also wraps around: it starts at (row 1, column D) then wraps around to (row 10, column D) and (row 9, column D). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 2 and 4 overlap at (row 3, column H), worms 1 and 2 overlap at (row 3, column G) and worms 2 and 5 overlap at (row 3, column E). Note about Sample Run 3: In this Sample Run, the player enters the numbers in the following sequence: 3, 2, 6, 4, 5, 1, 7, 8. Wrap around: Worm 3 wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column C), (row 1, column C) then wraps around to (row 10, column C). Worm 1 also wraps around: it starts at (row 2, column B), (row 2, column A) then wraps around to (row 2, column J). Overlap: There are some overlapping worms: worms 6 and 3 overlap at (row 1, column C) and (row 2, column C). Other Requirements: Here are a few more requirements the code we are to create for this Part 1 of our Project must satisfy. 1. The location of each worm in the garden must be determined randomly. 2. Whether a worm is lying horizontally or vertically must also be determined randomly. 3. It is acceptable in Part 1 of our Project if worms overlap each other (see Sample Runs) 4. When placing a worm in a garden, the worm must “wrap around” the garden. See Sample Runs for examples of what “wrapping around” signifies. How will we implement this wrapping around? Hint: wrapping around can be achieved using an arithmetic operator we have already seen. 5. We must make use of docstring when we implement our functions (have a look at our textbook for an explanation and an example). 6. Every time we encounter the word must in this description of Part 1 of our Project, we shall look upon that sentence as another requirement. For example, the sentence “The code we create for this Part 1 of our Project must produce exactly the same output as the one shown in these 3 sample runs.”, even though it is not listed below the Other Requirements heading, is also a requirement because of its must.

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1 ACTIVITY PURPOSE The purpose of this activity is to give you practice preparing a four-week work schedule. PROCESS Follow the steps listed below to prepare a schedule. 1. Read the Information Sheet: Scheduling Employees. 2. The pay week for this medical record service runs Sunday – Saturday. The pay period is two pay weeks. Each full-time employee cannot work more than 40 hours per pay week, or 80 hours per pay period. Each part-time employee works 20 hours per pay week – 40 hours per pay period. 3. The first Friday of the four – week period is a holiday. 4. The medical record service has 24 hour coverage, seven days a week. All full-time employees work a five day pay week, eight hours per day, with rotating weekend coverage. Part-time employees work four hours Monday – Friday, except for their rotation weekend. On those days they work an eight hour shift. Remember to adjust their time accordingly. 5. The Assistant Director and all supervisors, except the Tumor Registry Supervisor, should be scheduled for rotating weekend coverage. 2 6. All employees, except the Tumor Registry employees, should be scheduled on a rotating basis for weekend coverage. 7. For weekend and holiday coverage, there needs to be at least two clerks and one transcriptionist on days and evenings, one clerk and one transcriptionist at night. 8. The Department Director has scheduled a two – week vacation for the first two full weeks of the four – week schedule. 9. Employees who work holidays must take the holiday time within the pay period in which the holiday occurs. 10.Use the following marks on the schedule: X – work eight hours V – vacation H – holiday D – day off 4 – hours for part-time employees 3 PERSONNEL OF HUFFMAN MEMORIAL MEDICAL RECORD DEPARTMENT DAYS (7:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M.) Director Diane Lucas Assistant Director JoAnn DeWitt Coding 1 Supervisor – Nina Long 3 Coding/PAS Clerks – Cheryl Newman Pam Rogers Janet Bennett Transcription 1 Supervisor – 6 Transcribers – Jessica DuBois Eileen Andrews Iris Williams Diane Henderson Vivian Thomas Lois Fisher Emma Daily Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 4 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Bill James Darlene Cook Janice Stivers Larry Patterson Don Williamson Susan Evanston Tumor Registry 1 Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Part-time Clerk – Mabel Smith Pauline Erskine Suzanne Chapman EVENING (3:00 P.M. – 11:00 P.M.) Transcription 1 Part-time – Beth Richman Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 2 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Daniel Johnson Harry Skinner Matthew Scott Anne Madison NIGHTS (11:00 P.M. – 7:00 A.M.) Transcription 3 Transcribers – Louise Wilson Jane Matters Nancy Lipman Filing/Retrieval 2 Clerks – Lily Jamison Helen Benson 4 INFORMATION SHEET SCHEDULING EMPLOYEES In addition to the planning, organizing and controlling of a medical record service, managers must accurately plan the work pattern for employees. This plan must insure that all duties are adequately covered, all shifts have sufficient numbers of people to perform duties, and employees are given appropriate days off. Scheduling encompasses both short term and long term plans. Short term scheduling involves planning work on a daily and/or weekly basis. Long term scheduling generally covers a four – to six – week time period, as well as yearly planning for holidays. In larger health care facilities with the medical record service providing 24 hour service, seven days a week, advanced planning is a requisite to a smooth operation. In smaller facilities with shorter hours of service, the schedule is less complex. The number of employees needed for weekend work for those facilities open on weekends is totally dependent upon the weekend workload. A volume of seventy (70) to ninety (90) discharges per day generally requires two (2) medical record clerks to process those discharges, as well as to perform the other daily responsibilities of the medical record service. It is also advisable to schedule a supervisor during the weekend in the event that any problems arise which a clerk might not be able to handle (i.e. medico-legal questions, irate patients or physicians). If you work in a department that has an active work 5 measurement program, valuable scheduling information can be obtained from the data reported. In planning for holidays, it is important to remember to: 1. obtain employee preferences for which holidays they might choose to work; 2. keep track of who has worked which holidays; 3. if a holiday occurs on a Friday or a Monday and the employee must work on the holiday, try to give them a Friday or Monday off to compensate. It is important for you to be fair in terms of assigning employees weekend work and scheduling Holidays. Everyone should share the responsibility equally. If you have all supervisors work one weekend per month, then that schedule should be followed. If you have clerks working every other weekend, then that pattern should be followed consistently. When preparing a schedule it is best to put in all the “givens” first. For example, if you have vacations scheduled for the four weeks you’re preparing, then those should be marked in first. Also included in this category would be employees who do not work weekends (i.e. personnel in the Tumor Registry). Once all work times have been scheduled, you must be certain that an employee receives two (2) days off for every seven (7) days. If an employee works more than forty (40) hours in one (1) week, the facility must pat time-an-a-half for all hours over forty. Some facilities are experimenting with a variety of scheduling techniques: flex time and the four-day work week. Both techniques have been 6 heavily debated. The final questions regarding these nontraditional alternatives end up being: 1. Are your employees willing to try it? 2. Are you ready to handle the extra planning these alternatives may warrant? 3. Do you have the necessary resources, including equipment, to accommodate a nontraditional scheduling alternative? 4. Will administrator of the facility support your proposal? Once you have established answers to those questions you are ready to embark on a new technique of scheduling. Scheduling employees can be one of the most challenging tasks that a manager faces. Whether you elect to try one of the nontraditional alternatives or use the five-day work week, the manager must: 1. be fair; 2. apply all guidelines to every employee consistently 3. utilize all available data to arrive at appropriate numbers for weekend and holiday staffing requirements; and 4. maximize the utilization of equipment and resources.

1 ACTIVITY PURPOSE The purpose of this activity is to give you practice preparing a four-week work schedule. PROCESS Follow the steps listed below to prepare a schedule. 1. Read the Information Sheet: Scheduling Employees. 2. The pay week for this medical record service runs Sunday – Saturday. The pay period is two pay weeks. Each full-time employee cannot work more than 40 hours per pay week, or 80 hours per pay period. Each part-time employee works 20 hours per pay week – 40 hours per pay period. 3. The first Friday of the four – week period is a holiday. 4. The medical record service has 24 hour coverage, seven days a week. All full-time employees work a five day pay week, eight hours per day, with rotating weekend coverage. Part-time employees work four hours Monday – Friday, except for their rotation weekend. On those days they work an eight hour shift. Remember to adjust their time accordingly. 5. The Assistant Director and all supervisors, except the Tumor Registry Supervisor, should be scheduled for rotating weekend coverage. 2 6. All employees, except the Tumor Registry employees, should be scheduled on a rotating basis for weekend coverage. 7. For weekend and holiday coverage, there needs to be at least two clerks and one transcriptionist on days and evenings, one clerk and one transcriptionist at night. 8. The Department Director has scheduled a two – week vacation for the first two full weeks of the four – week schedule. 9. Employees who work holidays must take the holiday time within the pay period in which the holiday occurs. 10.Use the following marks on the schedule: X – work eight hours V – vacation H – holiday D – day off 4 – hours for part-time employees 3 PERSONNEL OF HUFFMAN MEMORIAL MEDICAL RECORD DEPARTMENT DAYS (7:00 A.M. – 3:30 P.M.) Director Diane Lucas Assistant Director JoAnn DeWitt Coding 1 Supervisor – Nina Long 3 Coding/PAS Clerks – Cheryl Newman Pam Rogers Janet Bennett Transcription 1 Supervisor – 6 Transcribers – Jessica DuBois Eileen Andrews Iris Williams Diane Henderson Vivian Thomas Lois Fisher Emma Daily Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 4 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Bill James Darlene Cook Janice Stivers Larry Patterson Don Williamson Susan Evanston Tumor Registry 1 Supervisor – 1 Clerk – 1 Part-time Clerk – Mabel Smith Pauline Erskine Suzanne Chapman EVENING (3:00 P.M. – 11:00 P.M.) Transcription 1 Part-time – Beth Richman Filing/Retrieval 1 Supervisor – 2 Clerks – 1 Part-time Clerk – Daniel Johnson Harry Skinner Matthew Scott Anne Madison NIGHTS (11:00 P.M. – 7:00 A.M.) Transcription 3 Transcribers – Louise Wilson Jane Matters Nancy Lipman Filing/Retrieval 2 Clerks – Lily Jamison Helen Benson 4 INFORMATION SHEET SCHEDULING EMPLOYEES In addition to the planning, organizing and controlling of a medical record service, managers must accurately plan the work pattern for employees. This plan must insure that all duties are adequately covered, all shifts have sufficient numbers of people to perform duties, and employees are given appropriate days off. Scheduling encompasses both short term and long term plans. Short term scheduling involves planning work on a daily and/or weekly basis. Long term scheduling generally covers a four – to six – week time period, as well as yearly planning for holidays. In larger health care facilities with the medical record service providing 24 hour service, seven days a week, advanced planning is a requisite to a smooth operation. In smaller facilities with shorter hours of service, the schedule is less complex. The number of employees needed for weekend work for those facilities open on weekends is totally dependent upon the weekend workload. A volume of seventy (70) to ninety (90) discharges per day generally requires two (2) medical record clerks to process those discharges, as well as to perform the other daily responsibilities of the medical record service. It is also advisable to schedule a supervisor during the weekend in the event that any problems arise which a clerk might not be able to handle (i.e. medico-legal questions, irate patients or physicians). If you work in a department that has an active work 5 measurement program, valuable scheduling information can be obtained from the data reported. In planning for holidays, it is important to remember to: 1. obtain employee preferences for which holidays they might choose to work; 2. keep track of who has worked which holidays; 3. if a holiday occurs on a Friday or a Monday and the employee must work on the holiday, try to give them a Friday or Monday off to compensate. It is important for you to be fair in terms of assigning employees weekend work and scheduling Holidays. Everyone should share the responsibility equally. If you have all supervisors work one weekend per month, then that schedule should be followed. If you have clerks working every other weekend, then that pattern should be followed consistently. When preparing a schedule it is best to put in all the “givens” first. For example, if you have vacations scheduled for the four weeks you’re preparing, then those should be marked in first. Also included in this category would be employees who do not work weekends (i.e. personnel in the Tumor Registry). Once all work times have been scheduled, you must be certain that an employee receives two (2) days off for every seven (7) days. If an employee works more than forty (40) hours in one (1) week, the facility must pat time-an-a-half for all hours over forty. Some facilities are experimenting with a variety of scheduling techniques: flex time and the four-day work week. Both techniques have been 6 heavily debated. The final questions regarding these nontraditional alternatives end up being: 1. Are your employees willing to try it? 2. Are you ready to handle the extra planning these alternatives may warrant? 3. Do you have the necessary resources, including equipment, to accommodate a nontraditional scheduling alternative? 4. Will administrator of the facility support your proposal? Once you have established answers to those questions you are ready to embark on a new technique of scheduling. Scheduling employees can be one of the most challenging tasks that a manager faces. Whether you elect to try one of the nontraditional alternatives or use the five-day work week, the manager must: 1. be fair; 2. apply all guidelines to every employee consistently 3. utilize all available data to arrive at appropriate numbers for weekend and holiday staffing requirements; and 4. maximize the utilization of equipment and resources.

Essential Statistics for Public Managers and Policy Analysts / Edition 3 by Evan M Berman, Xiaohu Wang 1-Use the public perception dataset. Is the relationship between watching Orange TV (watch), the county’s cable television station, and trusting the government to do what is right most of the time (trust) statistically significant? Do you consider this a causal relationship or an association? Does the analysis satisfy the assumptions of the Chi-square test? If not, how might you address this problem? 2-Use the public perception dataset. Examine the relationship between residents who trust the county government to do what is right most of the time (trust) and their belief that county government works efficiently (works). What is the practical significant of this relationship? 3-Use the public perception dataset. In Chapter 10 of this workbook, you used Chi-square to examine the relationship between residents who trust the county government to do what is right most of the time (trust) and their belief that county government works efficiently (works). Reexamine this relationship using measures of gamma, Somer’s d, Kendall’s tau-c. What do you conclude? 4-Table W 12.1 is the printout of a t-test (independent samples). The continuous variable is an index variable of environmental concern. The dichotomous variable is a measure of education (college versus no college). Interpret and write up the results. What other information would you like to have about this relationship? 5-Table W 12.2 is the printout of a period-samples t-test. The data are before-and-after measurements of a public safety program. Interpret and write up the results. What other information would you like to have about this relationship? 6-Use the Public Perception dataset. An analyst wants to know whether incomes vary by age group. Treat the income variable as a continuous variable, and treat the age variable as an ordinal variable. Calculate the means for each of these groups, and then use ANOVA to determine whether any of these differences are statistically significant. For which group is the relationship linear?

Essential Statistics for Public Managers and Policy Analysts / Edition 3 by Evan M Berman, Xiaohu Wang 1-Use the public perception dataset. Is the relationship between watching Orange TV (watch), the county’s cable television station, and trusting the government to do what is right most of the time (trust) statistically significant? Do you consider this a causal relationship or an association? Does the analysis satisfy the assumptions of the Chi-square test? If not, how might you address this problem? 2-Use the public perception dataset. Examine the relationship between residents who trust the county government to do what is right most of the time (trust) and their belief that county government works efficiently (works). What is the practical significant of this relationship? 3-Use the public perception dataset. In Chapter 10 of this workbook, you used Chi-square to examine the relationship between residents who trust the county government to do what is right most of the time (trust) and their belief that county government works efficiently (works). Reexamine this relationship using measures of gamma, Somer’s d, Kendall’s tau-c. What do you conclude? 4-Table W 12.1 is the printout of a t-test (independent samples). The continuous variable is an index variable of environmental concern. The dichotomous variable is a measure of education (college versus no college). Interpret and write up the results. What other information would you like to have about this relationship? 5-Table W 12.2 is the printout of a period-samples t-test. The data are before-and-after measurements of a public safety program. Interpret and write up the results. What other information would you like to have about this relationship? 6-Use the Public Perception dataset. An analyst wants to know whether incomes vary by age group. Treat the income variable as a continuous variable, and treat the age variable as an ordinal variable. Calculate the means for each of these groups, and then use ANOVA to determine whether any of these differences are statistically significant. For which group is the relationship linear?

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ENGL 122-Geist Drew Writing Assignment #3 Your first draft is due Monday, Oct. 26 with 3 copies. Conference days: Oct.30th and Nov. 2nd Your revised draft is due Wednesday, Nov. 4th Your Assignment: Type a 4 page essay about a quote you think should be added to the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall. This can be a quote from a human right’s activist, a well-known person from your country, or someone else in the world. The quote must be related to human rights! Make sure that the quote is not already on the AFHRMQW. Tell us about the person who said the quote, and when and why they said what they said. Help your reader understand what the person meant by what he/she said, and why it is important for other’s to remember. Finally, help your reader understand why this particular quote would be a good quote to include on the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall for people to read. If you include information from outside sources, make sure that you give full credit following the correct MLA format for in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Remember that Knight Cite might be a helpful tool. Here are some things to consider while you are brainstorming ideas for this assignment: Why is this person and what he/she said important to the whole world and not just his/her country? What is the significance of what this person said (did) to the rest of the world? How does this person serve as an example to others? What can we learn from this person? Do this person’s ideas/words transcend place and time? That means, is this person’s words and ideas still true TODAY and will they continue to be true in the FUTURE? How has this person and their words influenced or impacted you or your way of thinking? How are this person’s words related to human rights? Requirements: 1. Your essay must be 4-pages, typed, double-spaced and have 1-inch margins. 2. Use essay format: Name, Date, Assignment Name, Title, Essay 3. Your essay should be written in paragraph form with each paragraph indented. 4. Your essay should have an interesting title that catches the attention of the reader. 5. Think about your intended audience. Consider your writer’s voice based on your audience. Criteria for evaluating this essay: 1. You must choose a quote that you think should be added to the AFHRMQW. 2. You must have a clear main idea that includes your chosen quote and why it should be added to the AFH RMQW. 3. Your essay should include details, description and support from your experience and others. 4. Include your opinions about how this person and what they said/did has had an impact on you and your life. 5. Make sure that you have followed the correct MLA format for documenting in-text citations for summaries, quotes and other references. 6. Include a Works Cited page if you use sources other than your own ideas. REMEMBER THAT REVSION IS THE KEY! Please come and see me if you have any questions. Make Writing Center appointments early. This is a busy time!

ENGL 122-Geist Drew Writing Assignment #3 Your first draft is due Monday, Oct. 26 with 3 copies. Conference days: Oct.30th and Nov. 2nd Your revised draft is due Wednesday, Nov. 4th Your Assignment: Type a 4 page essay about a quote you think should be added to the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall. This can be a quote from a human right’s activist, a well-known person from your country, or someone else in the world. The quote must be related to human rights! Make sure that the quote is not already on the AFHRMQW. Tell us about the person who said the quote, and when and why they said what they said. Help your reader understand what the person meant by what he/she said, and why it is important for other’s to remember. Finally, help your reader understand why this particular quote would be a good quote to include on the Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial Quote Wall for people to read. If you include information from outside sources, make sure that you give full credit following the correct MLA format for in-text citations and the Works Cited page. Remember that Knight Cite might be a helpful tool. Here are some things to consider while you are brainstorming ideas for this assignment: Why is this person and what he/she said important to the whole world and not just his/her country? What is the significance of what this person said (did) to the rest of the world? How does this person serve as an example to others? What can we learn from this person? Do this person’s ideas/words transcend place and time? That means, is this person’s words and ideas still true TODAY and will they continue to be true in the FUTURE? How has this person and their words influenced or impacted you or your way of thinking? How are this person’s words related to human rights? Requirements: 1. Your essay must be 4-pages, typed, double-spaced and have 1-inch margins. 2. Use essay format: Name, Date, Assignment Name, Title, Essay 3. Your essay should be written in paragraph form with each paragraph indented. 4. Your essay should have an interesting title that catches the attention of the reader. 5. Think about your intended audience. Consider your writer’s voice based on your audience. Criteria for evaluating this essay: 1. You must choose a quote that you think should be added to the AFHRMQW. 2. You must have a clear main idea that includes your chosen quote and why it should be added to the AFH RMQW. 3. Your essay should include details, description and support from your experience and others. 4. Include your opinions about how this person and what they said/did has had an impact on you and your life. 5. Make sure that you have followed the correct MLA format for documenting in-text citations for summaries, quotes and other references. 6. Include a Works Cited page if you use sources other than your own ideas. REMEMBER THAT REVSION IS THE KEY! Please come and see me if you have any questions. Make Writing Center appointments early. This is a busy time!

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Please read the following case scenario and describe how you would handle it using one of the following ethical theories: Utilitarianism, Deontological, Contractarian, Virtue or Feminist. Case: You are taking a math class at the University of Hartford. It is a very difficult class. You must take and pass the class in order to graduate. You have worked very hard to just barely scrape by with a low C going into the final. You are talking to one of your classmates before the last class and she tells you that her roommate has a copy of the test that will be given. Her roommate works nights as part of the cleaning crew and “found a copy in her files”. You could really use the advance copy to help study. What do you do? Use the first paragraph to describe what you would do and why. In the second paragraph describe how you came to that solution using one of the Ethical Theories that are listed.

Please read the following case scenario and describe how you would handle it using one of the following ethical theories: Utilitarianism, Deontological, Contractarian, Virtue or Feminist. Case: You are taking a math class at the University of Hartford. It is a very difficult class. You must take and pass the class in order to graduate. You have worked very hard to just barely scrape by with a low C going into the final. You are talking to one of your classmates before the last class and she tells you that her roommate has a copy of the test that will be given. Her roommate works nights as part of the cleaning crew and “found a copy in her files”. You could really use the advance copy to help study. What do you do? Use the first paragraph to describe what you would do and why. In the second paragraph describe how you came to that solution using one of the Ethical Theories that are listed.

Virtue Ethics (Aristotle): “Strive for happiness, to be as fully … Read More...